Toothpaste Is Never Just Toothpaste, A Dress Essay

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Toothpaste is never just toothpaste, a dress is never just a dress, a car is never just a car in those economies where consumers have demand for a variety of options and the ability to consume a selection of products and services. There are several economic principles at play including demand, customer satisfaction, consumer choices and the income effect. Products in countries where the average consumer has minimal disposable income such as in 3rd world or emerging countries have demand curves with a small range of elasticity. Meaning the range in price a consumer is willing and able to pay for a particular product is relatively small. There simply is no incentive to provide products that consumers aren't wailing and able to pay for. In developed countries where consumers have a higher disposable income the demand for a variety of products and...

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The elasticity of the demand curve for a product such as toothpaste is much wider; people are willing and able to pay for options even at a higher cost. Therefore, companies provide products in demand by consumers and the price of the products are determined by the intersection of the supply and demand curves.
Consumers aim to reach the highest possible point on the indifference curve to maximize total satisfaction. The greater the income the higher the indifference curve. Budget constraints are very minimal at this point, meaning that consumers can afford wider selection of products than those consumers with tighter budget constraints. This is why we see some very wealthy individuals with custom cars or very high-priced items not available to or affordable by most of the population. While its true a car that…

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references and income allows her the ability to choose amongst a variety of options to maximize her total utility.

Would it be more efficient if there was just one choice and one price? Not necessarily. In economies where consumers have the willingness and ability to pay for variety such as the U.S., Great Britain and other strong economies where residents have disposable incomes; variety is king. While producing just one type of toothpaste or just one type of any consumer product would allow a manufacturer to achieve great economies of scale, efficiency is not the end goal. Serving society by providing them the variety of options that consumer demands is a goal that capitalist societies aspire to achieve. In countries where disposable incomes are higher enables the provision of greater choices at higher price points.


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