Women in Medieval Society During Term Paper

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This gave her husband the right to sell any of her property and she was not in a position to object in any way. Religious women with their vows of obedience and poverty really had no reason to get involved in legal matters and were untouched in any way by the legal structure.

Widows were the only women who held in legal position in the society. "She (a widow) regained her legal personality, was entitled to a certain share of her husband's holdings and, for the first time in her life, could make independent decisions." Legally, this was the best position for women. It was not without problems especially for wealthy women. These women were frequently intimidated into a second marriage or into relinquishing parts of their holdings. They had no legal recourse against this kind of intimidation in the same way that married women could not object to domestic abuse.

In conclusion, women's positions in early Medieval Society were so limited that there was essentially no opportunity to become something greater. They were tied to a societal framework, either marriage or the church, that essentially stripped them of their rights and pigeon-holed them into a specific kind of existence. At times, these women could assume a managerial role, but it was always under the auspices of some form of authority. Due to the limitations of the time period, women were unable to advance in the society.

Labarge xii.

Time-Life 114-5.

Delort 110.

Labarge 27.

Delort 112.

Time-Life 107.

Delort 110.

Otto-William.

Karras 154.

Karras 155.

Time-Life 118.

Labarge 75.

Time-Life 124.

Labarge 145.

Gies and Gies 145.

Time-Life 118.

Conway.

Labarge 98.

Conway.

Warren 12.

Warren 13.

Barber 144.

Labarge 114-5.

Labarge 34.

Palmer.

Labarge 28.

Labarge 27.

Labarge 28.

Works Cited

Barber, Richard. The Penguin Guide to Medieval Europe. New York: Penguin

Books, 1984.

Conway, Stephen. "Silent Voices: Women in the Middle Ages." 1991. http://www.subverbis.com/essays/medievalwomen.rtf.

Delort, Robert. Life in the Middle Ages. Trans. Robert Allen. New York:

Greenwich House, 1972.

Gies, Frances and Joseph Gies. Life in a Medieval Village. New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1990.

Karras, Ruth Mazo. "Women's Labors: Reproduction and Sex Work in Medieval

Europe." Indiana University Press 15.4 (2004): 153-158.

Labarge, Margaret Wade. A Small Sound of the Trumpet: Women in Medieval

Life. Boston: Beacon Press, 1986.

Otto-William, Count of Macon. "A Husband's Endowment Of His Future Wife

On Their Betrothal - Southern Burgundy, 994." Trans. Paul Hyams. http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/endow1.html

Palmer, Robert. "Women and the Law: A study of Glanvill on law as it applies to Women in England 1188." Women's History Source Book. 2001. www" www.fordham.edu/halsall/women/womensbook.html#Medieval%20Europ

Time-Life Books. What Life was Like in the Age of Chivalry: Medieval Europe

800-1500. Richmond, VA: Time-Life Books, 1997.

Warren, Ann…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Barber, Richard. The Penguin Guide to Medieval Europe. New York: Penguin

Books, 1984.

Conway, Stephen. "Silent Voices: Women in the Middle Ages." 1991. http://www.subverbis.com/essays/medievalwomen.rtf.

Delort, Robert. Life in the Middle Ages. Trans. Robert Allen. New York:

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