A Clockwork Orange Essays (Examples)

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Film Directors Everywhere Have a

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15762580



An American Alex would be against classical music, with anarchists normally being associated with hard rock music. Moreover, he would find it perfectly normal to use drugs instead of drinking milk in a club that has dummies for tables. The reason for which a Hollywood producer would not have his psychotic character drinking milk is that he or she would unquestionably find such a scene to be sick, and, thus, not to be presented to a general public.

Most American movies presenting young people fighting for anarchy want to teach a lesson. They want people to understand that society is good and that it is not worth fighting it, since you only harm yourself in the process. In contrast, Kubrick shows that the system is bad and obsessed with maintaining control over people. After Alex is freed from prison, he can no longer be free, as his mind continues to…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. A Clockwork Orange. Dir. Stanley Kubrick. Warner Bros, 1972.
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Horror Dimitri Is a Fifteen-Year-Old

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76151189

She said, "What is the point? I don't want to make myself feel that way. I would rather watch something that makes me feel good." Having no need for meditated horror, Fan simply said, "Oh you mean like Nightmare on Elm Street or something?" when asked about films.

Local legends and urban legends were of more interest for Fan because they pointed to the real world and genuine human need to understand crime and victimhood. As a victim of a crime, Fan said that she felt no matter how good a person is, bad things can still happen to them. It is philosophically difficult to understand, and the most important thing is to not be depressed and get on with life.

Interview 3

Daymien is an African-American gay male. He is 30 years old and the boyfriend of one of my brother's friends. I interviewed Daymien because he is a…… [Read More]

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Stanley Kubrick the Madness of

Words: 4124 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16699303

Strangelove, put him over the top" (p. 61). The learning curve was clearly sharp for Kubrick, and he took what he had learned in these earlier efforts and put this to good use during a period in American history when everyone was already ready to "duck and cover": "The film's icy, documentary-style aspect served not only to give the movie its realistic edge that juxtaposed nicely with its broad satire, the style introduced the essential Kubrick setting" (Sharrett, 1999, p. 61).

According to Mcdouglas (2003), Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and a Clockwork Orange were all later listed by the American Film Institute as being among the top one hundred American films of cinema's first century. In addition, "Each of these films provoked heated debate and each was a box-office success" (Mcdouglas, 2003, p. 2). The popular response to Kubrick's movie, 2001, in particular, was the result of an…… [Read More]

References

Badley, L. (1995). Film, horror and the body fantastic. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Booker, M.K. (1999). Film and the American left: A research guide. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Cook, D.A. (1996). A history of narrative film. New York W.W. Norton.

Falsetto, M. (2001). Stanley Kubrick: A narrative and stylistic analysis. Westport, CT: Praeger.
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Dangers of Society as Depicted

Words: 1696 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77155526

He could not be tamed not did he want to be. His was a wild spirit and one that held no regard for human life or morality. hat we learn from both authors is that there must be a balance in our lives. Josephine and Constantia were too dependent and therefore did not make any decisions on their own. This is fine until they have no one to make decisions for them. Then all things become difficult and dramatic. Alex was defective in that he did not depend on anyone's opinion at all. He was left to his own devices and, considering the fact that he was a wild young teenager, which is not such a good thing. Both stories illustrate how man is a social creature and depends upon human interaction to a certain point.

hile the stories seem to take place in different worlds, we must remember what…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1962.

Mansfield, Katherine. "The Daughters of the Late Colonel." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol. II W.W. Norton and Company. New York: 1986.
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Golden Rule of Cross-Cultural Communications

Words: 1659 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85513855



Finally, it should be noted that anxiety and language can hamper communication between people of the identical culture if the context is not mutually understood. Anecdotally, this author once requested a copy of a Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess from an elderly man behind a counter in a small-town used bookstore who appeared to be the husband of the full-time owner, who was away. The kindly man squirmed a bit, stared blankly into space and repeated the words one at a time: "A" -- "clockwork" -- "orange?" he asked. It was clear he understood the mother tongue and the meanings of the individual words, but taken together, he did not understand them in their context as being a reference to a book and motion picture by the same name, highlighting the universal need for context in day-to-day communications with anyone from any culture.

Conclusion

As the globalization process continues to…… [Read More]

References

Chu, Y., Strong, W., Ma, J. & Greene, W.E. (2005). Silent messages in negotiations: The role of nonverbal communication in cross-cultural business negotiations. Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict, 9(2), 97-98.

Henderson, G.. (1999). Cultural diversity in the workplace: Issues and strategies. Westport, CT:

Praeger Publishers.

Pederson, P.B. & Ivey, a. (1999). Culture-centered counseling and interviewing skills. Westport,
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Early Films of Stanley Kubrick

Words: 2668 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53356511

Kubrick

An Analysis of the Evolution of Kubrick's Technique in His Early Films

In contrast to his later films (A Clockwork Orange, Full Metal Jacket, Eyes ide Shut), the films of Stanley Kubrick's early career may be seen as far more conventional in terms of plot, camera work, and realism. hile such pictures as "Day of the Fight" and Fear and Desire are by no means reflections of the director's early innocence or naivety, they did appeal to contemporary conservatism, whether as informational pieces or as a melodramatic war stories. Nonetheless, Kubrick's early work reveals the director's creativity, originality, and willingness to explore complex and controversial themes. From "Flying Padre" to Paths of Glory and Lolita, the first part of Kubrick's oeuvre captures a time and place in American history that is at once as stylish and straightforward as it is melodramatic and contentious. This paper will show how Kubrick's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ciment, Michel. Kubrick: The Definitive Edition. UK: Faber and Faber, 1999. Print.

Ebert, Roger. "Paths of Glory." Chicago Sun-Times. 2005. Web. 16 Oct 2012.

Ferrara, Serena. Steadicam: Techniques and Aesthetics. UK: Focal Press, 2000. Print.

"Fracturing the Pawn: Destruction of the Reader in Nabokov's Lolita." Web. 16 Oct
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Killing Stanley Kubrick Was One

Words: 626 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21838206



Another pattern of the film noir is the urban setting which has dark and/or wet streets. Take for example the scene when Mike leaves for the bus station, for the flower box, the street outside his apartment is wet.

What might be rather bothering is the narration, the voice is not the most pleasant one, and some may find the information in it too much. But we can not ignore that it is an important to the film's structure, the description sounds like the narrator's a reporter looking back on the past events with objectivity.

Definitely ingenious because it relies heavily on flashbacks, and is telling things out of order depending on which character is involved with the heist; in spite of these nonlinear sequences it is very straightforward, very unique for its time.

Kubrick is the master in creating tension in his plots, playing with time, he takes each…… [Read More]

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Admired Those That Have Done

Words: 627 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82390172

Instead, he proved that art can be achieved through more than one means and that his movies would ultimately achieve great results in the film industry.

The main reason for why Kubrick has drawn many critiques for his movies is that he chose to satirize society through a series of cliches.

Similar to Kubrick, Park Chan-Wook, the South-Korean filmmaker, has intended to make movies that would bring together both comedy and drama into films that have a touch of satire of the society.

Park's films are generally recognized for the direct way that he uses to make his audience better accustomed with his work. Both Park and Kubrick have abused extreme violence and S.F. In their movies, but this only added to the dramatic feeling that one gets when viewing one of their creations. Kubrick and Park stand out from the rest of the film directors for the reason that…… [Read More]

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Philosophy of Film Philosophy in

Words: 1565 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63162942

His floating away at the end of the movie seems to suggest that he is indeed dead, and that the film has been the final moments of his brain creating illusory perceptions. The fact that this is not explicitly decided reveals the film's perspective that this doesn't really mater -- perception is the method we use to interact with "reality;" the realizations that Wiley comes to and the knowledge he receives is not mad any less valid or important by the fact that none of the encounters he experiences might actually have happened.

The fact that we have such strong intellectual and emotional responses to fictive films is an indicator that perception, to a large degree, creates reality. The nature of truth is also explored in the documentary Standard Operating Procedure. The main philosophical issue in this film is how the framing of an event can affect truth, or at…… [Read More]

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Popular Culture vs High Culture

Words: 1538 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70524590

Pop Art on Society

During the fifties, America experienced tremendous growth in many aspects of society. As a result, technological advancements led to sophisticated aspects of American life. Media and advertising became mass media and the invention of the television paved the way to a new generation of communication. This was also an era of exploration among generations. Traditional forms of art began to experience growth and "culture" expanded into many sub-cultures.

Some of the trends that surfaced were New York City turning into an "international center for painting and architecture" (Davidson 1147), mass circulation of paperback books, network television suddenly becoming the world's most powerful form of mass communication, and rock and roll becoming the language of youth (Davidson 1147).

The explosion of such artistic expression was greeted with optimism, but mostly with pessimism, "warning against moral decadence and spiritual decline" (1147). On one had, the "highbrow intellectuals" argued…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davidson, Gienapp, Heyman, Lytle, and Stoff. Nation of Nations. New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, 1990. 17 December 2002.

Metrailler, Edouard. High in Saccharine, Low in (Moral) Fiber. The Harvard Salient. 7 October 1996. http://www.digitas.harvard.edu/~salient/issues/961007/mediocrity.html17 December 2002.

Morse, Margaret. Pop Art. Biddingtons. 17 December 2002. http://www.biddingtons.com/content/pedigreepop.html17 December 2002.

Myers, Ken. What Distinguishes "popular" Cultures From Other Varieties of Culture? Modern Reformation. http://www.modernreformation.org/mr97/janteb/mr9/01distinguishes.html17 December 2002.
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Rur and AI More Human

Words: 1955 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69929903

Kubrick himself suggested the baton be passed onto Spielberg due to that director's unique abilities.

The play was originally-based Brian Aldiss's short story "Supertoys Last All Summer Long," on which a.I. is based, in 1983 (Corliss 1-3). In the Kubrick formulation, the world is a lot darker and Gigolo Joe is much more aggressive. According to Corliss in the "Joe was much more aggressive, more twisted." Here he is, in Spielberg's word, David's "scoutmaster." Spielberg did this to solve many of the problems Spielberg had with the text, Joe being one of the biggest problems. By softening things and making them more human and less dark, he provided solution to the problem (Ibid 1). The Flesh Fair and Rouge City are vintage Kubric and remained a part of the body of the work. Garish scenery completes this menagerie Spielberg identifies himself with the abandoned child (ibid 2).

It is the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Corliss, Richard. Time 17 June 2001: 1-3. Web. 3 Nov 2010.


Horakova, Jana. "The (Short) Robot Chronicle. On the 20th Century Cultural History of Robots.." Proceedings (2006): pp. 241-248. Web. 3 Nov 2010. .

Capek, Karel. R.U.R . Gloucestershire, Great Britain: Echo Books, 2009.
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Stanley Kubrick

Words: 1239 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91962462

Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick: An Analysis of His Life and Work

Biography

Stanley Kubrick, who many would describe as one of the greatest filmmakers every, was born in 1928 in the Bronx, New York. Believe it or not many would say that Kubrick was not a born writer or filmmaker, but rather one that was made. This is the result of some less than spectacular early attempts at writing and filmmaking. Though Kubrick did believe that college might be beneficial at some point in his life, he was actually not able to get into college due to his tremendously bad grades in high school (SK-TMF 1). His passions while young included "jazz drumming, chess and photography" (SK-TMF 1). Considered a "non-brilliant student," it took some time for Kubrick to begin pursing his real dream ... filmmaking (SK-TMF 1).

Kubrick made his first film at the age of 23 in 1951 (Gerrhig…… [Read More]

References:

Anderegg, M. "Inventing Vietnam: The war in film and television." Philadelphia, Temple

University Press: 1991.

Canby, V. "Full Metal Jacket Review." The New York Times, 1987, New York Times. 24,

April, 2005:  http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/movie.html?v_id=18878
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Modernism and Postmodernism Question 2

Words: 2654 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54684999

93)."

That the post modernists rejected the psychotherapy of the modernist era is by no means suggestive that the artists of the era have escaped psychological analysis. Because of the extreme nature of the pop culture, it has presented a psychological windfall for study in excessiveness. It is represented by an excess of economic affluence, drugs, sex, and expressions of behavior. The excessiveness is found not just in the music industry, but also in literature, film, and paintings and photography. It is all encompassing of all art expressions.

One important definition of the post-modern, as a radically sceptical and questioning attitude of mind, is that provided by the philosopher Jean-Francois Lyotard (1984), who wrote of it in terms of 'the death of grand narratives', with Marxism and Freudianism particularly in mind. Lyotard would see as futile attempts to consider the modern and post-modern in terms of historical periodisation. For him,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=76905168

Buchanan, Iain, Michael Dunn, Elizabeth Eastmond, and Frances Hodgkins. Frances Hodgkins: Paintings and Drawings. Auckland, N.Z.: Auckland University Press, 1994. Book online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=76905182.Internet. Accessed 24 August 2008. http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=21033116

Cantor, Norman F. Modernism to Deconstruction. New York: Peter Lang, 1988. Book online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=21033116.Internet. Accessed 24 August 2008.

Del Loewenthal, and Robert Snell. Post-Modernism for Psychotherapists: A Critical Reader. Hove, England: Brunner-Routledge, 2003. Book online. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=107976699.Internet. Accessed 24 August 2008. http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99670131
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Kubrick Impacts

Words: 814 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72884297

Full Metal Kubrick

In the years following the Vietnam War, from 1979 -1989, many movies were created to depict this event from an American point-of-View. The genre of war movies, became inundated with new films based on this violent conflict. The purpose of this essay is to explore Stanley Kubrick's movie Full Metal Jacket as it relates to film media and how it represents this particular era in both history and art. This essay will discuss how this film played an impact on American culture and film in general.

Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick is often noted as one of the best film makers who has ever picked up a camera. His legend is based upon his intellectual capacity and his daring and innovative styles of film that never seem to become outdated and remain fresh and current despite them being decades old. Kubrick had great success as film maker in the…… [Read More]

References

Cocks, G., Diedrick, J., & Perusek, G. (Eds.). (2006). Depth of field: Stanley Kubrick, film, and the uses of history. Univ of Wisconsin Press.

White, S. (1988). Male bonding, Hollywood orientalism, and the repression of the feminine in Kubrick's Full metal jacket. Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory, 44(3), 120-144.

Sperb, J. (2006). The Kubrick Facade: Faces and Voices in the Films of Stanley Kubrick. Rowman & Littlefield.
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Literally Means Acquaintance With Letters

Words: 1198 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32836285

Then I ferret for poetry on the specific subject that boosts me. Generally, I love Tennyson and Emily Dickinson; perhaps I go, as I do in literature, for the relevant and inspiring.

Poems that have had the greatest impact on me include Joaquin Miller's Columbus: particularly the stanza:

What shall I say, brave Admiral, say,

If we sight naught but seas at dawn?"

"Why, you shall say at break of day, 'ail on! sail on! sail on! And on!'"(Derek, 2002, p.134)

Philosophers of literature argue regarding the impact literature may or may not have on the ethical psyche. Tolstoy's 'What is Art?" For instance, maintains that literature has a strong impact and, therefore, one should choose one's readings carefully. Plato asseverated, likewise, recommending literature as part of the diet of the Philosopher king. Ruskin, too, maintained that literature should be employed for the betterment of society, whilst in Confucian thought,…… [Read More]

Sources

Cory, B. (1999). Literature: a crash course. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications

Derek, W. (2002). Selected poems. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Kessler, J.M. (2003). Ashcroft v. free Speech Coalition. Appalachian J, 61-72.
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Social Control as Displayed in the Handmaid's Tale By Margaret Atwood

Words: 1174 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30543666

Margaret Atwood set out to depict a society in the future, one that in her eyes had characteristics that needed to be solved from the present. This novel is dystopian in nature which presents a dysfunctional society in the future as seen in the eyes of the author. It is however instrumental to note that most of the works of fiction that are set in the future, are actually meant to help correct the current vices or giving a precautionary note to the society. Here, the republic of Gilead, fictitiously described represents the regions where women suffer under male dominance like Africa, Iran, India, Guatemala and Germany (Danita Dodson). This novel is set in Gilead which is an imaginary society of the future with a woman called Offred being the protagonist in the novel. It narrates a dystopia in which the freedom of women is restricted by men dominated society…… [Read More]

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Violence in Film to Some

Words: 1551 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92354315

After all, when Marcellus is raped, the audience has witnessed the murder of two college students by Marcellus' hit men, and knows that Marcellus had a former ally thrown off of a roof for an unknown reason. In addition, it is because of Marcellus' orders that Vincent, whom the audience has grown to like, is killed at Butch's house. Marcellus is clearly not a good man, and yet, nothing in the movie suggests that he deserves to be raped by Zed and Maynard. It was significant that Tarantino chose Marcellus, the most criminal person in the movie, as the rape victim. It was even more significant that Tarantino chose Butch, the person with the most motive to see Marcellus injured, as Marcellus' rescuer. ather than dehumanizing people, the violence in the movie humanizes the monstrous Marcellus, both by depicting him as a victim and by showing him getting revenge. By…… [Read More]

Referenced

Scorsese, Martin. Taxi Driver. Los Angeles: Bill/Phillips, 1976.

Scott, Ridley. Thelma & Louise. Los Angeles: Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer, 1991.

Tarantino, Quentin. Pulp Fiction. Los Angeles: A Band Apart, 1994.

Winner, Michael. Deathwish. Universal City, CA: Dino De Laurentiis Company, 1974.
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Raiders of the Lost Ark

Words: 1249 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63801771

The shots in the scene reuniting Indy and Marian are impersonal, long shots and medium shots.

The scene introducing the relationship between Indy and Marian quickly cuts in to the Nazi whose expertise is one of torture. He has come for the same thing Indy has, and the close ups are Marian's facial expression of fear as she's about to lose her eye to a red hot poker. Indy comes to the rescue and the final Nepal scene is a montage of dynamic action where Indy and Marian make their escape.

The film cuts to the Middle East, where Indy and Marian have traveled, as have the Nazis, in search of the ark. The first part of this Act II, so to speak, introduces Indy's good friend and his Middle Eastern contact. The scenes in the Act II employ a series of medium and long shots as Indy and Marion…… [Read More]