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Aboriginal Perspective and the Secret River

Words: 1434 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80868013

Secret River

The two part series The Secret River, is based on Kate Grenvilles book of the same name. The series is about the colonisation of Australia through the story of Will and Sal Thornhill, who 'takes up land' on the Hawkesbury River. Will is a convict, his character may be seen as akin to many poor Dickensian characters. Once freed in Australia he has an opportunity to start a new life, which he wants to do on a point of land along the Hawksbury River. It is here the main issue of the book manifests; the cultural differences between the white settlers and the Aboriginal people, who have very different perspectives on the issue of land ownership. The story is of the bloody and brutal settlement of the area, with characters such as Smasher Sullivan, Saggity Birtles, and Ned's perceiving the Aboriginal people as nothing but uncivilised savages, who…… [Read More]

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Eradicating Suicide Canadian Aboriginal Youth

Words: 3080 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28505221

CANADA'S ABOIGINAL PEOPLE

Suicide amongst Canada's Aboriginal People

Suicide amongst Canada's Aboriginal People

The aboriginal people of Canada have faced injustices perpetrated through colonization, cultural prejudice, and forced assimilation among many other social injustices. The perpetrators, who include the Canadian dominant population, did this without considering the aboriginal people's well-being. Therefore, in an attempt to reduce the social problems they faced, the aboriginal people taken part in habits such as alcoholism, violence, and suicide. The aboriginal youth remain the most affected, mainly because of the development of suicidal thoughts, which have driven them to commit suicide (Kirmayer, & Valaskakis, 2009). To make it worse, the aboriginal people are denied access to healthcare services, which has contributed to lack of identification of suicidal youths.

The social problems they face result to depression, and some of the people opt to take part in some life-threatening habits, for example, suicide (Lavelle & Poole,…… [Read More]

References

Baskin, C. (2011). Strong Helpers' Teachings: The Value of Indigenous Knowledge in the Helping Professions. Toronto, ON: Canadian Scholar's Press.

Blackstock, C. (2009). The Occasional Evil of Angels: Learning from the Experiences of Aboriginal Peoples and Social Work. First Peoples Child and Family Review, 4(1), 28-37.

Hart, M., Sinclair, R., & Bruyere, G. (2009). Wi-cihitowin: Aboriginal social work in Canada.

Halifax: Fernwood Pub.
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Disparities Original Medicine Chest Clause Aboriginal Treaties

Words: 2533 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27607330

disparities original "medicine chest" clause Aboriginal Treaties Canada, failure Canadian government meet health care Aboriginal people today

Policy Change for Improvement

The aboriginals of Canada comprise of the indigenous people who are within North America, but dwell in the boundaries of Canada. Nevertheless, people have continuously view them discriminatively. This is what has led to the formulation of numerous policies, which will favor the aboriginals and make them feel part of the Canadian society. Although this is the case, the policies, some of which are applicable, have not yielded much success. Owing to this, there is a need for policy improvement in an effort to attain some of the essential needs such as healthcare (Walkerman and Humphreys, 2002).

In so doing, the aboriginals will access healthcare, and subsequently feel as part of the society. Notably, aboriginals are present in many other parts of the Western world, and the treatment is…… [Read More]

References

Government of Ontario (1994). Aboriginal health policy -- Executive summary. Toronto, ON:

Aboriginal Healing & Wellness Strategy. Retrieved 17 December, 2013 from  http://www.ahwsontario.ca/about/healthpolicy.html 

Kinsley, C. (2002). Rural health in rural hands: Strategic decisions, remote, northern and aboriginal communities. Retrieved from  http://www.srpc.ca/PDF/rural_hands.pdf 

Lavoie, J.G., Forget, E., Prakash, T., Dahl, M., Martens, P., & O'Neil, J.D. (2010). Have
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Sociology- Social Work Aboriginal Social Work Why

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76217792

Sociology- Social Work

Aboriginal Social Work

Why does Judge Murray Sinclair note that the legal concept of innocence/guilt is not granted by Aboriginal societies as it is in the Canadian Justice System?

In Aboriginal communities, guilt is typically secondary to the main issue: the main concern is that something is erroneous and it has to be corrected. Since the main purpose is the reinstatement of accord rather than the imposition of reprimand, the accused is more likely to confess bad behavior. Judge Sinclair proposes that possibly this explicates why so many Aboriginal people plead guilty when in court. The Canadian criminal justice system is founded on Euro-Canadian principles and, as a consequence, frequently clashes with Aboriginal values. High levels of imprisonment, augmented focus from law enforcement, language hurdles, conflicting values and theoretical frameworks concerning crime and punishment, as well as certain issues faced by youth, all add to the breakdown…… [Read More]

References

Family Violence. (1996). Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, vol. 3,

Gathering Strength. Minister of Supply and Services, Canada.ISBN: 0-660-16415 -- 9.

Stolen Sisters: A Human Rights Response to Discrimination and Violence Against Indegenous

Women. (2004). Retrieved from  http://www.amnesty.ca/stolensisters/amr2000304.pdf
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pacific island and aboriginal art 1980

Words: 1599 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93822255

Art, ritual, and religion are inseparable in the aboriginal societies of Oceania. Aboriginal myths of creation and the Dreamtime are rendered in art and permeate the various types of art found throughout indigenous Australia from bark and rock paintings to the modern renditions on canvas. Similarly, the art of Pacific Islands before 1980 is inseparable from their cultural contexts. The concept of art is different in the Pacific Islands than it is for the Europeans who colonized the region. Therefore, it is important to understand both aboriginal and Pacific Island art within their own historical, cultural, and social worldview. Art was functional, symbolic, and sacred, and was tacitly decorative.

The aboriginal Australians have populated their lands for 50,000 years, and during that time developed highly sophisticated cosmologies comprising "what anthropologists say is the world's longest enduring religion," (Kiger, n.d.). Although there is a considerable amount of diversity in the exact…… [Read More]

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Cultural care of an Aboriginal patient in an Australian hospital

Words: 1901 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53146497

Australia, indigenous people recognize themselves as belonging to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or by descent, and also identified as the same by the society. A resistance has been observed in them to access hospitals for healthcare. Therefore, healthcare professionals need to plan, implement and maintain appropriate policies for their treatment. Also, cross-cultural awareness training should be given to paediatric hospital staff. (Munns & Shields, 2013, p. 22)

How would you support ianna and her family in this situation?

The poor health status of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is well documented, and has been the subject of official policy and program attention for many years. The mainstream health system has responded to increased funding and clear portfolio responsibility, with increasing attention to the burden of illness that Aboriginal people experience and the need for effective health care (Dwyer et al., 2014). I would thus make arrangement for proper…… [Read More]

References

Ansuya. (2012). Transcultural Nursing: Cultural Competence in Nurses. International Journal of Nursing Education, Volume 4(1), pp. 5-7.

Durey, A, Wynaden, D, Thompson, SC, Davidson, PM, Bessarab, D & Katzenellenbogen, JM. (2012). Owning Solutions: A Collaborative Model to Improve Quality in Hospital Care for Aboriginal Australians. Nursing Inquiry, Volume 19(2), pp. 144-152.

Dwyer, J, Willis, E & Kelly, J. (2014). Hospitals Caring for Rural Aboriginal Patients: Holding Response and Denial. Australian Health Review, Volume 38(5), pp. 546-551.

Kelly, J & Willis, E. (2014). Travelling to the City for Hospital Care: Access Factors in Country Aboriginal Patient Journeys. Australian Journal of Rural Health, Volume 22(3), pp. 109-113.
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Aboriginals and Social Work This Course Provided

Words: 1203 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78651290

Aboriginals and Social Work

This course provided a very broad perspective of the impact Western and European cultures have an aboriginal culture. It showed how devastating these influences have been to native aboriginal cultures, generally serving to suppress them and change the shape of aboriginal culture, in some cases smothering aboriginal cultures completely. The overall impact this course had on me was allowing me to comprehend this impact on aboriginal societies and see that the Western or European way is not always the best way. This course helped provide a general framework for understanding the difficulties and challenges faced by aboriginal youths and adults. It also showed that social work must be adapted significantly to take into consideration one's cultural background because this can dramatically shape the framework of social work. If one uses a Western or European model on aboriginals, they may find themselves misaligning the model for support…… [Read More]

References:

Absolon, K. (2011). Kaandossiwin: How we come to know. Fernwood Publishing.

Chisholm, R. (1985), 'Destined children: Aboriginal child welfare in Australia: directions of change in law and policy', Aboriginal Law Bulletin, Vol.14

Ross, MG. (1986). Australian Aboriginal oral traditions. Oral Tradition, 1(2): 231-71.

Sinclair, R. (2007). Identity lost and found: Lessons from the sixties scoop. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 3(1): pp.65-82.
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Ethical or Social Justice

Words: 3148 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8427475

Aboriginal people are the Indians who live in Canada. Over the years, they have been characterized by poor living conditions, low social status, poverty, discrimination, and social injustices. Government organizations should be on the front ensuring proper treatment and social justice for the Aboriginal people. ed Cross is an example of non-profit organization, which seeks to improve the status of the Aboriginal people, regardless of their social status and with equal treatment to all, as discussed in the paper.

Non-profit organization aims at providing services to the public, while profit organizations aim at profit maximization. Public interest comes first, for the non-profit organization, rather than their interests. The ed Cross is recognized as the non-profit organization, and it is chartered by the U.S. congress. It provides services worldwide, and the general population during times of disaster and the workforce is predominantly volunteers.

ed Cross society

Nonprofit organizations have to be…… [Read More]

References

Journal of Education Controversy:. (1997). The Give Away Spirit.

Australia, N.L. (1992). Australian Public Affairs Information Service. Australia: National Library of Australia.

Ciconte, B.J. (2011). Fundraising Basics: A Complete Guide. Atlanta: Jonnes and Bartlett Learning.

Crooks, C.T. (2007). Engaging and Empowering Aboriginal Youth. Chicago: Trafford Publishing.
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Sociology Aboriginal Social Work Why Are Outcomes

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91223247

Sociology

Aboriginal Social Work

Why are outcomes for Aboriginal children who are transracially adopted described as poor?

The outcomes for Aboriginal children who are transracially adopted are often not good due to a number of different factors. One factor is that transracial children frequently find it hard to adjust to the new culture in which they find themselves and thus have a hard time figuring out their identity. Another factor is that they are often victims of racism which makes it very difficult for them to have successful experiences in their new homes. These kids never feel like they really fit into the new place that they are and they do not have a good support system to help them adjust thus their outcomes do not turnout to be good.

After reading Sinclair's research on transracial adoptions, how does this information challenge, change or confirm your views on Aboriginal children…… [Read More]

References

Sinclair, Raven. (2007). Identity lost and found: Lessons from the sixties scoop. First Peoples

Child & Family Review, 3(1), pp. 65-82.

Sterling-Collins, Rona. (2007). A Holistic Approach to Supporting Children with Special Needs.

In Bruyere, Gord, Hart, Michael Anthony & Sinclair, Raven (Eds.), Wicihitowin.
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Chippewa's Aboriginal Homeland

Words: 1579 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 96366973

Chippewas of ama First Nation

Chippewas

Author's note with contact information and more details on collegiate affiliation, etc.

This paper will study the Chippewa people of ama First Nation. The paper will provide a larger context within North American history and Chippewa history to reflect upon this tribe's cultural traditions and heritage. The paper will focus upon several key aspects to the culture such as the interaction with Europeans, reputation within the aboriginal tribes of Canada, and the rich oral history/tradition of the Chippewas of ama First Nation. The paper serves to be informative and comprehensives.

A Brief Examination of the Chippewas of ama First Nation

The Chippewas of ama First Nation are one of numerous tribes that compose the First Nations. The First Nations is a collective term that refers to the aboriginal tribes of Canada, not including those who are Inuit and/or Metis. North American aboriginal tribes have…… [Read More]

References:

"Chippewas of Rama First Nation." 2012 January 2012

"Mnjikaning History." 2012 January 16

"M'njikaning First Nation." 2012 January 16

"Ojibway People." 2012 January 16 <  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Nations >
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Childhood Obesity and Its Impact on Health in Canada's Aboriginal Population

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10797238

obesity is a growing problem that negatively strikes the health of many children in Canada. From a statistical analysis of childhood obesity in Canada in 1996, reports show that 23% to 36% of Canadian children with age ranging from 7 to 13 are considered overweight and obese (Willms, 2004). This rate of obesity continuously increases every year, thus, resulting to the widespread concern of Canada's national healthcare system to solve the problem of obesity.

This study finds the prevalence of obesity, particularly in the childhood years of Canada's children, a major health dilemma. Obesity is a major disease because it is not only a problem of being unhealthfully overweight, but also a health crisis that leads to other serious health ailments such as heart disease and diabetes. With the alarming increase in rate of obese Canadians, this study finds it important to provide the public with sufficient information about obesity.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnston, J.M. (2004). Eating Disorders and Childhood Obesity: Who are the real gluttons?

Canadian Medical Association Journal, 171, (12).

Willms, J.D. (2004). Early Childhood Obesity: A Call for Early Surveillance and Preventive Measures. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 171, (3).

Tremblay, M.S., Willms, J.D. Is the Canadian Childhood Obesity Epidemic Related to Physical Inactivity? International Journal of Obesity, 27, 1100-1105.
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Cultural Schema Hypothesis on Aboriginals

Words: 2231 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 20294139

Aborigines are Australia's original inhabitants and until the late 1700's -1800's the aborigine had little contact with Western civilization. Local dialects and the territorial nature of bands provided the different social groups their distinctive identity. The Mardudjara (Mardu) aborigines are part of the Western Desert cultural block in Australia (Tonkinson, 1978). The Mardu culture, societal system, etc. has never been recorded in its pristine state as anthropologic researchers did not study the group until well after alien influences had occurred. Nonetheless, the nomadic lifestyle of the Mardu was dictated by the harsh climate in which they live and they are an extremely interesting group. Nomadic groups like the Mardu often have a perception of gender or a cultural gender schema that fits in functionally with their lifestyle and is based on a division of labor and status that allows the group to maintain an identify, clearly defined roles, and survive…… [Read More]

References

Bird, R. (1999). Cooperation and conflict: The behavioral ecology of the sexual division of labor. Evolutionary Anthropology, 8 (2), 65-75.

Holmes, L.D., & Holmes, E.R. (1992) Samoan Village (2nd ed.). New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Tonkinson, R. (1978). The Mardudjara aborigines: Living the dream in Australia's desert. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Gender
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Arts and Tanzania People

Words: 4640 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 9619567

Art to Tanzania people

Art and Culture of Tanzania

Every country has its special features and certain interesting facts about its history and legacy. This paper discusses the unique country of Tanzania in the continent of Africa and describes its culture and history. Certain doctrine point out that the mainland of Tanzania was named by a ritish civil servant in the year 1920 and its name was derived from the words in Swahili language, tanga, meaning sail and nyika, meaning bright and plain. This place had a very intriguing and unique culture of people, who had a long history of existence and had preserved their identity. This place came to be known as a Tanganyika Territory, which was formerly a German East African area. Later in 1964, Tanganyika was joined with Zanzibar, which was an archipelago of islands off the coast of eastern Africa1.

This was a very interesting development…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Countries and their culture. n.d.  http://www.everyculture.com/Sa-Th/Tanzania.html  (accessed January 17, 2015).

2. Jahn, Reuster Uta, and Gabriel Hacke. The Bongo Flava industry in Tanzania and artists' strategies for success. Germany: Johannes Gutenberg University, 2011. Retrieved from:  http://www.ifeas.uni-mainz.de/Dateien/AP127.pdf 

3. Caves, Richard E., Creative Industries. Contracts between Art and Commerce. Cambridge, Mass.:Harvard University Press, 2000.

4. Vavrus, F. (2004). The referential web: Externalization beyond education in Tanzania. In G. Steiner-Khamsi (Ed.), The Global Politics of Educational Borrowing and Lending, New York: Teachers College Press
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K C Adams' Aboriginal Photography In

Words: 591 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 76541791

Furthermore, the defiant and different poses of each model allows for uniqueness of each model, showing their individual personalities and dispositions. In "Cyborg Hybrids" the montage structure is different than that in "Useless Beauty." hile "Useless Beauty" combined a series of photos of both material images and models in an upside down "L" shape, Cyborg Hybrids" is a single horizontal line of models wearing the same necklace and white T-shirt. In this photo, models look directly at viewers, daring them to make assumptions. The uniformity of uniform makes a sarcastic statement about the belief that persons of one ethnicity and race are all the same. Despite their similarity in pose and dress, the models are each very noticeably different.

Though his photographs are certainly unique and socially important, K.C. Adams's photographs can be characterized by both positive and negative traits. Positive traits of K.C. Adams's work include the socially responsible…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adams, K.C. "Cyborg Hybrids." nd. KC Adams.net. 12 October 2008. JC Adams.net.  http://www.kcadams.net/art/arttotal.html 

Fields, Tom. "Gallery I." 2008. Native Fields. 12 October 2008. Native Fields.  http://www.nativefields.com/tom/gallery1/fields2.htm 

Matus, Bernard T. "Digital Photography." 2008. Matus Arts. 12 October 2008. Matus

Arts. http://www.matusarts.com/index.php.
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Torres Strait Islanders Torres Island

Words: 2927 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45682052

However, it is not culturally sensitive and says nothing about the desire to work with in cultural norms and traditions.

This article does not attempt to portray the aboriginal people in any particular way. It attempts to remain neutral in its portrayal of the Torres Strait Islanders. This article recognizes that Islanders in rural areas have different needs than those living in urban areas. The government will provide funding for implementing this plan. It is an excellent plan, but could be made better by the inclusion of cultural sensitivity within the programs that it outlines. The plan promises to give aboriginals better access to public programs. This suggests that access is inadequate at the current time.

4. Culture

acisimnoway (2008). Australian Communities: Torres Strait Islander People. etrieved February 28, 2008 at http://www.racismnoway.com.au/classroom/factsheets/53.html.

This article explains the language and cultural traits of the Islander, both on and off the island. It…… [Read More]

References

Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2006). The 2004-05 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS). Retrieved February 27, 2008 at  http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS//PrimaryMainFeatures/4715.0?OpenDocument .

Ban, P., Mam, S., Elu, M., Trevallion, I. & Reid, a. (1993). Torres Strait Islander family life. Family Matters. No.35 August 1993, pp.16-21. Retrieved February 28, 2008 at  http://www.aifs.gov.au/institute/pubs/fm1/fm35pb.html .

Batrouney, T. & Soriano, G. (2001). Parenting Torres. Family Matters. No. 21. Winter 2001.

Commonwealth of Australia (2007). National Strategic Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2003-2013. Department of Health and Aging. Publication Number: P3-2106., Retrieved February 27, 2008 at  http://www.health.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/Content/6CA5DC4BF04D8F6ACA25735300807403/$File/nsfatsihimp2.pdf .
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Aborigines Society As Every Human Society Has

Words: 2082 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6439936

Aborigines Society:

As every human society has ways of governing itself, Australian government started thousands of years ago following the settlement of the Aboriginal people in the continent. Unlike the other European settlers, Aboriginal people had very different ways of organizing and governing themselves. Despite of the various Aboriginal cultures in the throughout Australia, there are similar features shared among most Aboriginal cultures. Some of the common features of the Aboriginal societies revolve around family organization, trade, travel, home, art, and education. The Aboriginal people have occupied Australia for approximately 40,000 years even though very little is known regarding them for this duration of time. However, the Aboriginal people have experienced major changes in their culture, identity, and society since 1788 due to various factors.

History and Culture of the Aboriginal People:

Aboriginal people, identity, culture, and society has been characterized by two different aspects i.e. one showing great continuities…… [Read More]

References:

Albrecht, P.G.E. (2012, February 3). Who is An Aborigine? Retrieved August 3, 2012, from  http://www.quadrant.org.au/blogs/bennelong-papers/2012/02/who-is-an-aborigine/page:printable 

"Aboriginal Society." (n.d.). Skwirk.com.au -- Interactive Schooling. Retrieved August 3, 2012,

from  http://www.skwirk.com/p-c_s-1_u-97_t-236_c-792/aboriginal-society/nsw/aboriginal-society/australian-democracy/australia-before-1788 

"Aboriginal Societies: The Experience of Contact." (n.d.). Australian Law Reform Commission.
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Ritual Knowledge Is Transmitted in

Words: 1973 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44293621

Furthermore, under most circumstances, these variations in Muslim belief do not have a negative impact on how Muslims interact; instead, they manage to live peacefully side-by-side in most settings. This may have to do with the idea that all Muslims believe that the Quran (Qur'an, Koran) is the holy text for Muslims. They believe that the Quran reflects the word of God. "For Muslims, the text of the Koran is entirely the work and word of God. It is possible for a Muslim to hold that the Koran uses symbolic language and is describing the essence of things, not their technical form, but it is difficult to hold that the Koran reflects the views of our more distant ancestors" (Sedgewick 2006, p. 40).

Mohammed plays a central role in Islam. He is the most important prophet and many facets of modern day Islam are based, not simply on the Quran,…… [Read More]

References

Hassan, R 2008, Exploring Islamic consciousness, Inside Muslim minds, Melbourne University

Press, Carlton, Vic, pp. 24-61.

Jupp, J 2009, Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders in the Encyclopedia of religion in Australia, Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, pp.69-118.

McBrien, R 1982, the nature and use of power in the church, Proceedings of the annual convention, 37, CTSA Editorial Offices, Yonkers, NY, pp.38-49.
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Ideal Psychotherapy for Childhood Abuse in Adults

Words: 2724 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79564366

Social Work Practice Within Aboriginal

Building attached case study Lisa, describe discuss social work practice approach aboriginal innovative practice modalities a cultural context. This assignment refining approach practice integrating theories practices learned required readings.

ABOIGINAL AND INNOVATIVE SOCIAL WOK PACTICE APPOACH

Concepts in Social Work Practice within Aboriginal and Cultural Framework

In trying to attend to a client's challenges in psychology, it is imperative to provide an environment that is sufficiently safe where a client can talk and explore their problems (Brave Heart, 2004). This measure is adequate for many clients but not sufficient for all especially so when it comes to cases involving aboriginal persons. For the aboriginal clients, an understanding of adaptation difficulties and the inter-generation aspects is necessary to provide a wholesome resolution to the challenges at hand. This paper presents a discussion on the ideal approach in social work for the case of Lisa, who had…… [Read More]

References

Brave Heart, M.Y.H. (2004). The historical trauma response among Natives and its relationship to substance abuse: A Lakota illustration. In E. Nebelkopf, & M. Phillips (Eds.), Healing and mental health for Native Americans: Speaking in red. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press.

Briere, J. (2002). Treating adult survivors of severe childhood abuse and neglect: Further development of an integrative model. In J.E.B. Myers, L. Berliner, J. Briere, C.T. Hendrix, T. Reid, & C. Jenny (Eds.). The APSAC handbook on child maltreatment, 2nd Edition. . Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

Burns, D. (1999). The feeling good handbook. United Kingdom: Penguin Group.

Burton, L., Westen, D., & Kowalski, R.M. (2012). Psychology. Milton, Qld. Australia: John Wiley and Sons.
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American Democracy Contact Between Europeans

Words: 553 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77214073



Given the very nature of colonialism and imperialism, it is doubtful that the Europeans would have wanted to give any credit to the Native Americans for their contributions to the development of democracy in the United States. As Johansen points out, the settlers in the Northeast must have gleaned some information about how Enlightenment principles can be put into practice. However, the indigenous peoples of North America were incredibly diverse, as were the settlers and their settlement patterns. Influences of Native Americans on Europeans varied, and in many cases the interactions were totally unlike the ones described by Johansen.

Although Johansen overestimates the influence of the Iroquois Confederacy government and social structure on the development of democracy in the United States, the role of Native Americans in the development of the United States should not be discounted. The very fact that Europeans encountered diverse indigenous peoples became a major factor…… [Read More]

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Edition of the Globe and

Words: 2861 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 54692015

We have seen in the past how such agreements are put aside by governments, especially in the United States, in those instances where the natural resources become the focus of business.

However, the agreement does return to the aboriginals the hope that they might create for themselves an economy that sustain them and it provides an opportunity for them to recreate themselves in a modern world, but to practice life in a way that is compatible with their own traditions. The challenges they face socially and economically are large and only time will tell if they are as overwhelming for a people who have lost much of what their ancestors had as they are large.

The article does not say whether or not the financial package is one that is lump sum or disbursed over a period of years, and that would make a difference as to what might be…… [Read More]

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Abo Fem Towards Hearing and

Words: 1420 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77718654



It is in this way that fiction from female aboriginal Canadian writers both empowers the authors and their people and brings to light better understandings of what native Canadians have faced and must continue to face. One native scholar on the subject has been quoted as saying, "our task…is two fold. To examine the past and culturally affirm toward a new future" (Armstrong, in Acoose 227). It is not simply a rumination on past injuries that this literature provides, but a way of analyzing the past that allows for forward movement.

It is also impossible to consider the literature produced by members of this community as pure fictions, but rather some historical knowledge is necessary to fully appreciate the intricacies and events of stories like in Search of April Raintree. The largely negative nature of the events of the novel and the rapidity with which they take place is easily…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Acoose, J. "The Problem of 'Searching' for April Raintree." In Search of April Raintree. Winnipeg: Penguis Publishers, 1999.

Groening, Laura Smyth. Listening to Old Women Speak: Natives and alterNatives in Canadian Literature. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2004.

Mosionier, Beatrice Culleton. In Search of April Raintree. Winnipeg: Penguis Publishers, 1999.

Perreault, Jeanne. "In Search of Cheryl Raintree, and Her Mother." In Search of April Raintree. Winnipeg: Penguis Publishers, 1999.
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Pearl Gibbs Pearl Mary Gambanyi Gibbs 1901-1983

Words: 2326 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 84332682

Pearl Gibbs

Pearl Mary (Gambanyi) Gibbs (1901-1983) was one of the major political activists supporting Aboriginal rights in Australia from the 1920s all the way to the 1970s. The highlights of her work include organizing the key -- pickers strike in 1933, being involved in organizing the Day of Mourning in 1938, speaking for the Committee for Aboriginal Citizen ights, calling for Aboriginal representation on the New South Wales board, being the organizing secretary for the new Melbourne-based Council for Aboriginal ights, establishing the Australian Aboriginal Fellowship in 1956, being the first and only female member of the NSW Aboriginal Welfare Board in 1954, and establishing the Australian Aboriginal Fellowship in 1956 (Gilbert, 1983; Goodall, 1983; Goodall, 1988; Horner, 1983). This list of accomplishments is just a scratch on the surface of the life of this amazing political activist and leader. Her activism for the rights of Indigenous peoples was…… [Read More]

References

Attwood, B. (2003). Rights for Aborigines. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Attwood, B. & Magowan, F. (2001).Telling stories: Indigenous history and memory in Australia and New Zealand. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Celermajer, D. (April 22, 2005). The stolen generation: Aboriginal children In Australia human rights dialogue: "Cultural rights." In Carnegie Council for Ethics and International Affairs. Retrieved November 3, 2012, from http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/publications/archive/dialogue/2_12/section_1/514

Commonwealth of Australia (2012). Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution: Report of the Expert Panel. Retrieved November 3, 2012 from http://www.youmeunity.org.au/uploads/assets/html-report/index.html.
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Indigenous Studies Colonization Can Negatively

Words: 1334 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18600663

In addition the Europeans that colonized Australia believed that their culture was superior and the aboriginal culture would somehow disappear in a short period of time. hen this did not occur drastic steps were taken to assimilate indigenous people. These steps included taking aboriginal children away from their families to be raised in white society.

Certainly this type of violent and reckless interaction led to great fear and panic because a way of life that had existed for thousands of years began to vanish. Such stressors were passed down from generation to generation. Stress is a dangerous emotion because it can cripple to immune system and also cause people not to have the will to properly take care of their health.

Government policy and exclusion

According to McCalman et al. (2005) the types of government policies adapted as a result o colonialism has also contributed to poor health amongst indigenous…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aboriginal health issues.  http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/aboriginal_health_issues-open 

Anderson, I.,&Whyte, D. (2006). Australian Federalism and Aboriginal Health. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2, 5-16.

McCalman, J., Morley, R., & Mishra, G. (2008). A health transition: Birth weights, households and survival in an Australian working class population sample born 1857 -- 1900. Social Science & Medicine, 66, 1070-1083.

McCalman J., Smith L., Anderson I., Morley R., Mishra G. (2009) Colonialism and the health transition: Aboriginal Australians and poor whites compared, Victoria, 1850 -- 1985. History of the Family 14-253 -- 265
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Communication Diversity This Is the

Words: 1935 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 83120658



17. Johann calls you and says that Billy smells and he needs a shower. If you don't move Billy to another ward, Johann will sign himself out. Explain in details what you would do to resolve this cross cultural situation.

I would tell Johann that we are doing all we can to ensure Billy's hygiene and that if his body odor continued to bother Johann that we can move him to another room or ward in the hospital.

18. There seems to be a language and cultural barrier that's blocking effective communication occurring between these two gentlemen. Considering they are both your clients, what strategies would you put in place to improve this situation?

The best way to remedy the situation would be to introduce the two patients to each other. A handshake, some eye contact, and small personal interactions can go a long way toward eliminating prejudices and stereotypes…… [Read More]

References

Australian Indigenous HealthInfo.net (2008). Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at  http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/ 

Department of Education and Training (2005). "Racism No Way." Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at  http://www.racismnoway.com.au/library/cultural/ 

Indigenous Peoples of Australia: Health." Retrieved Feb 29, 2008 at  http://www.ldb.org/oz_h.htm
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Loss of Family Is a

Words: 2386 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42955800

This stream-of-consciousness writing is in a secret journal, for the writer will get into trouble if what she writes is found by Sister Theo, who "checks our letters home. e're not allowed to say anything about the school" (Sterling 12). If the journal is discovered, the girl may suffer abuse at the hands of the teachers. riting is an act of defiance that the girl sees to be worth the risk.

The time of the story was a disturbing part of Canada's history. The use of Residential Schools actually predates Canada's existence as a country (meaning before Confederation in 1867, and the system served as a means of containment and control if the Indian population. As the Europeans acted out the myth of the New orld as an undiscovered and undeveloped land, the existence of the Aboriginal peoples complicated the myth and challenged the government that was instituted. Policies were…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ricci, Nino. The Lives of the Saints. Toronto: Cormorant Books, 2003.

Sterling, Shirley. My Name Is Seepeetza. Vancouver: Douglas and McIntyre, 1992.
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Qustions to Answer on Human

Words: 1648 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37476910



5. The United Nations International Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is essential for the protection of human rights. However, despite the fact that Australia is considered to be one of the most democratic countries in the world, it fails to take full account of the need to offer maximum protection of human rights especially concerning the aboriginal population. This is why the UN has hard criticized the government for its actions.

Critics have been focused on the administrative aspects of the human rights protection system in Australia in particular on the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission which the Australian government has committed itself to reform (United Nations, 2006). Also, the United Nations raised questions concerning the possibility of the Aboriginal people to benefit from the power of representativeness. However, the government is determined to take these matters under consideration and reconsider the situation through the establishment of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Forsythe, David. Human rights in international relations. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. London: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Nye, Joseph. Understanding international conflicts: an introduction to theory and history. New York: Pearson, 2005.

United Nations. Comments by the Government of Australia on the Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. (reports Submitted by States Parties under Article 9 of the Convention. International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination). 2006.
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Inuktitut Inuit's Language in Modern Inuit Communities in Northern Canada

Words: 3303 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41276203

Inuktitut in Modern Inuit Communities in Northern Canada

The role of language in identity construction of the Inuit in Nunavik (Quebec, Canada), which nourishes the evolution of their ethno-territorial movement in the eastern Canadian Arctic, had been around since the 1970s. This paper is an analysis of the legal-political context of the Quebec State then enables the detachment of the cornerstones of its policy speech in general, and finally those with respect to the indigenous population, in particular to the Inuit language.

There are eight major Inuit communities: those of the LABADO, the UNGAVA, and the BAFFIN, of Iglulik, the CAIBOU, of Netsilik and Copper as well as the Inuit of the Western Arctic (which replaced MACKENZIE INUIT). There are five main dialects Inuit in Canada Inuvialuktun, Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut and inuttut grouped under a single language, Inuktitut or Inuktitut. (McGrath 2007) At the last census, 70% of Inuit said they…… [Read More]

References

Alia, Valerie (2009). Names and Nunavut: Culture and Identity in Arctic Canada. Berghahn Books. ISBN 9781845451653

Billson, Janet Mancini; Kyra Mancini (2007). Inuit women: their powerful spirit in a century of change. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 9780742535961

Crandall, Richard C (2000). Inuit art: a history. McFarland. ISBN 0786407115

De Poncins, Gontran. Kabloona. St. Paul, MN: Graywolf Press, 1996 (originally 1941). ISBN 1-55597-249-7
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Canadian Canada Is One of the Largest

Words: 1775 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 56377051

Canadian

Canada is one of the largest countries in Northern America, covering more than 9 million square metres. It has a population of over 31 million people. Even though the country is ethnically diverse, two main languages the people use are English and French. The Canadians use these two official languages. This makes it a bilingual country. People whose ancestry is British make the largest percentage of the people who live in Canada. Economically, Canada is one of the largest economies in the world, with an average per capita income of over twenty thousand dollars (Kalman & Bobbie, p. 4).

Values that the Canadians uphold

The Canadians uphold several values. These values include coexisting peacefully, equality and freedom, respecting the cultural differences that exist between them and keeping the law among other values. Keeping peace is one of the metiers that the Canadians cherish. Canada has been very active in…… [Read More]

Works cited

Conrad, John D. Scarce Heard Amid the Guns: An Inside Look at Canadian Peacekeeping.

Toronto: Dundurn Press, 2011. Internet resource.

De, la T.M. Heritage Values in Site Management: Four Case Studies. Los Angeles: Getty

Conservation Institute, 2005. Print.
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Cree's Opposition to the James

Words: 2991 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82822455

In fact, environmentalists were often dismissed during that time period. Moreover, environmental regulation was seen as an area of concern for each individual country, so that other countries would rarely, if ever, provide international pressure for environmental issues. However, the growing body of scientific literature about the environment changed the game between the 1970s and the 1980s/1990s. For example, when the James Bay Project was first conceived, it was considered a very green source of electricity because it lacked emissions and other hallmarks of pollution. The reality, however, is that the project resulted in incredible environmental damage:

It has been shown that environmental impacts of the first phase include: methyl mercury contamination of water in reservoirs and downstream rivers and mercury accumulation in fish; reversal of the natural seasonal flow pattern of rivers; conversion of La Grande estuary from a saltwater environment to a freshwater one because of regulated peak…… [Read More]

References

Bethune, D.N. (1997). Environmental Damage and Aboriginal Health. Retrieved February 21,

2010 from NIICHRO

Website: http://www.niichro.com/Environ/Enviro4.html#anchor378148

Coffee, H. (1992). James Bay Hydroelectric Project Hits a Dam. Retrieved February 21, 2010
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Margaret Preston Aim to Modernise

Words: 1907 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88134910

He expeimentation with new techniques and the fact that she was unafaid to ty new things with he at helped he populaity immensely. Peston's elationships to famous atists and the pomotion of he wok in aea magazines wee also unique and offeed a lage vieweship audience.

Not eveyone enjoys looking at Peston's wok, but she had definitely held a stong pesence in Austalian society thoughout he lifetime, as well as since he death. Peston definitely new exactly what she wanted to do thoughout he life and wasn't afaid to implement unusual and new techniques into he wok. He studies of both Aboiginal at and Japanese at seems to have influenced much of the at she poduced.

He use of publicity sets Peston apat fom othe atists duing that time peiod. As a woman atist who was making he way independently finally, Peston appealed to women thoughout Austalia by poducing he…… [Read More]

references to Aboriginal art . Australia: Art Library.

McPhee, J.A. (1982). Australian decorative arts in the Australian National Gallery . Australia: Australian National Gallery.

Nice, R. The Australian scarf / Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales. New South Wales: Greenway Gallery.

Butel, E.R. (1986). Margaret Preston: the art of constant rearrangement . New South Wales: in association with the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

The art of Margaret Preston, Margaret, 1875-1963 . (1980). Adelaide: Art Gallery Board of South Australia.
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Video Crossing the Line the

Words: 1599 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96395088

In some countries, bed numbers began to drop before the introduction of the drugs. In others, bed numbers actually increased despite this introduction. The drugs also have been used on a variety of populations that were not deemed to be mentally ill (such as people with learning difficulties and older people). The drugs were only relevant in giving psychiatric staff more confidence in dealing with community-based patients; they do not explain the policy of deinstitutionalization. At the end of the twentieth century deinstitutionalization has become a dominant mental health policy goal in most Western democracies (Sax, 1984).

Conclusion

However, this formal goal has become clouded by evidence that the gradual reduction of large institutions has been replaced by a scattering of smaller ones 'in the community' (Roe, 1976). Also, most countries still have legal statutes to coercively remove madness from community set- tings. The extent of this continued coercive control…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gale, F. 2007 A changing Aboriginal population. In F. Gale and G. Lawton (eds), Settlement and Encounter: Geographical studies presented to Sir Grenfell Price, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 65-88.

Smith, L. 2006 The Aboriginal Population, The Australian National University Press, Canberra.

CDHHS 2004, The National Aboriginal Health Strategy: an evaluation, Commonwealth Department of Health and Human Services, Canberra.

Roe, M 1976, 'The establishment of the Australian Department of Health: its background and significance', Australian Historical Studies 17(67):176-92.
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Canadian Labour in The Honest

Words: 1489 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72652970

For the aboriginal population of British Columbia, industrialization and capitalism threatened and later undermined traditional ways of life. Trading was soon replaced by wage labour systems. Shifting from barter to a labour market unraveled the essential social institutions of traditional aboriginal society. Potlatches once served as a "bulwark which enabled the aboriginal people to resist acculturation," (p. 252). Lutz, unlike Kealey or DeLottinville, examines the effects of colonialism on industrialization. Colonial power structures legitimized the social hierarchies that form the backbone of capitalist infrastructure.

The ways capitalism transformed traditional aboriginal society from being barter-based to being wage labour-based closely resemble the ways capitalism transformed traditional European skilled labour culture. As Kealey points out, the European artisan model of labour persisted until the Industrial evolution. Skilled labourers like coopers and smiths once apprenticed their work, entering into careers that offered a high degree of control over the means of production and…… [Read More]

References

DeLottinville, P. "Joe Beef of Montreal: Working-Class Culture and the Tavern, 1869-1889." In Canadian Working Class History: Selected Readings, pp. 190-214.

Kealey, G.S. "The Honest Workingman and Workers' Control: The experience of Toronto Skilled Workers, 1860-1892." In Canadian Working Class History: Selected Readings, pp. 112-142.

Lutz, J. "After the Fur Trade: The Aboriginal Labouring Class of British Columbia 1849-1890" in Canadian Working Class History: Selected Readings, pp. 235-259.
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Educational Equality in Canada Canada's

Words: 2862 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64920592

436-437). In other words, official commitment to multiculturalism is just a smoke screen for many Canadian officials who believe that the Euro-Canadian way of doing things is the norm.

The limits of multiculturalism in practice are also visible in the treatment of Canadian citizens and immigrants who have dark skin color. According to Kelly (1998), African Canadians are routinely "racialized" and "othered" (that is, they are put outside of the dominant group). The manner in which African Canadians are unable to become fully-fledged Canadians even if they are born in Canada was succinctly explained by Marlene Nourbese Philip, an African Canadian essayist: "Being born elsewhere, having been fashioned in a different culture, some of us may always feel 'othered,' but then there are those -- our children, nephews, nieces, grandchildren -- born here, who are as Canadian as snow and ice, and yet, merely because of their darker skins, are…… [Read More]

References

Fieras. A & Elliot. J (2010a) Chapter 10, Multiculturalism in Canada: "Living together with differences." In Unequal relations: An introduction to race, ethnic, and Aboriginal dynamics in Canada (6th ed) (p283-308).

Fieras. A & Elliot. J (2010b) Chapter 11, "Institutional Inclusiveness: Putting Multiculturalism to work." In Unequal relations: An introduction to race, ethnic, and Aboriginal dynamics in Canada (6th ed) (p309-343; 362-374).

Kelly, J. (1998) Under the Gaze: Learning to be Black in White Society. Fernwood publishing, Blackpoint Nova Scotia.

Millar. J. (1996a) Chapter 13, "Our greatest need today is proper education": Winding down the system. In Shingwauk's vision: A history of Native residential schools (p377-405; 526-535) Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
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Native Societies and Disease Numerous Reports From

Words: 2339 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7428035

Native Societies and Disease

Numerous reports from European traders, missionaries, soldiers and explorers in the 16th and 17th Centuries reveal the same information about the devastating effect smallpox and other epidemic diseases had on the aboriginal populations of the Americas. Europeans were colonizing Africa and Asia at the same time, but "on no other continent in historic times has a combined disease and Construct phenomenon led to the collapse of an entire indigenous population."[footnoteRef:1] In 1492, Native Americans were one-fifth to one-sixth of the global population, but their numbers never came close to equaling that again after all the great epidemics that struck them in waves. Unlike China and India, where smallpox, plague, typhus, measles and influenza already existed, and therefore the local populations had more immunity and greatly outnumbered the European colonizers, aboriginal American societies routinely suffered mortality rates of 80 or 90%. Some forms of smallpox, such as…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hackett, Paul. "A Very Remarkable Sickness": Epidemics in the Petit Nord, 1670 to 1846. (University of Manitoba Press, 2002).

Trigger, Bruce G. Natives and Newcomers: Canada's "Heroic Age" Revisited (McGill-Queen's University Press, 1985).

Warrick, Garry A., "European Infections, Disease and Depopulation of the Wendat-Tionotate (Huron-Petun)" in Jordan F. Kerber (ed) Archaeology of the Iroquois: Selected Readings and Research Sources (Syracuse University Press, 2007), pp. 269-86.

Watts, Sheldon. Epidemics and History: Disease, Power and Imperialism (Yale University Press, 1997).
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Native Canadians in the Prison

Words: 625 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69588443



The oyal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (CAP) was established in 1991 to investigate the issues faced by the Canadian First Nations in terms of both their social lives and justice issues. This entity also found that the Canadian First Nations have been disproportionally represented, and concluded that the justice system has "failed" these people (Office of the Correctional Investigator, 2010). CAP also found a particular overrepresentation of Aboriginal women in the criminal justice system, while the general federally incarcerated population in the country declined by 12.5% from 1996 to 2004. For the same period, First Nations representatives in the system increased by 21.7%.

Factors that influence this population include not only discrimination and racial or cultural prejudice, but also economic and social deprivation that tend to lead to substance abuse and violence across generations, as mentioned above.

Demographic information shows Aboriginal offenders to be among the younger age groups, who…… [Read More]

References

The History of Canada Online. (n.d.). First Nations and the Justice System. Northern Blue Publishing. Retrieved from: http://canadachannel.ca/HCO/index.php/6._First_Nations_and_the_Justice_System

Office of the Correctional Investigator. (2010). Backgrounder: Aboriginal Inmates. Retrieved from:  http://www.oci-bec.gc.ca/rpt/annrpt/annrpt20052006info-eng.aspx
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Republicanism in British America the

Words: 1963 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58969004

Therefore, the next stage in the evolution of the island can be characterized as a need for overcoming the annexation attempts from China and afterwards Japan. The situation however became an issue of international politics as Europeans became involved through the Unequal Treaties which "which opened designated ports in China to foreign trade. In addition, as a result of the treaties' terms, European powers were granted extraterritorial jurisdictions in the treaty ports themselves, so that Europeans were obligated to abide by their own legal system and would only be tried by their own consular officials" (McDevitt-Parks, 2007).

The island was in itself at the disposal of the several influences which exercised their authority particularly because the aboriginal people did not have the capacity to defend themselves, nor were they able to stand against the desires for supremacy of China, Japan, and other European countries such as the French. Therefore, the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Andrade, Tonio. "The Rise and Fall of Dutch Taiwan, 1624-1662: Cooperative Colonization and the Statist Model of European Expansion." Journal of World History. Emory University. 2006.

McDevitt-Parks, Dominic. "19th-century Anglo-American representations of Formosan peoples." Freeman Summer Grant. 2007. 30 April 2008  http://www.reed.edu/academic/studentgrants/downloads/freeman-mcdevitt-parks-report.pdf 

New Taiwan. Taiwan's 400 years of history. 2007. 30 April 2008.  http://www.taiwandc.org/hst-1624.htm 

Taipei Economic and Cultural Office. Taiwan's Culture and Art. N.d. 30 April 2008  http://www.asianinfo.org/asianinfo/taiwan/pro-art.htm
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Drinking Down Under

Words: 862 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21320777

Aborigine Alcoholism

Any substance or behavior that is not done in some sort of balance or harmonic alliance with nature is sure to cause problems within any group or groups of people. The introduction of alcohol into the Australian indigenous populations has caused many health problems and issues that warrant further discussion. The purpose of this essay is to discuss alcoholism as it relates to the aboriginal people of Australia. This essay will examine the disease process and its symptoms and outcomes. The essay will then look at how the contributing factors of this disease are affecting this group of people. The essay will conclude with ideas on the implications of alcoholism on that community and the healthcare providers that work with this group.

Disease Process

Alcohol is a staple in the culture and social practices of many humans around the world. The inebriation rituals that were prominent during the…… [Read More]

References

Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council (nd). Alcohol and health in Australis. Viewed 10 Oct 2014. Retrieved from https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/your-health/alcohol-guidelines/alcohol-and-health-australia

Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (2014). Review of the harmful use of alcohol amongst Indigenous Australians. Retrieved from  http://www.aodknowledgecentre.net.au/aodkc/alcohol/plain-language/alcohol-plain-language-review 

Brady M (1986) A social analysis of drinking and its aftermath in a remote Aboriginal community. In: Bush RA, ed. Exploring the Alcohol and Drug Crime link: society's response. Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology:

Woods, I. (2011). Battle To Curb Aborigines' Drink Problem. Sky News 19 June 2011. Retrieved from  http://news.sky.com/story/862854/battle-to-curb-aborigines-drink-problem
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Myths Myth of Marriage and Children Joseph

Words: 1995 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64860892

Myths

Myth of Marriage and Children

Joseph Campbell's The Power of Myth is a book that can potentially transform the reader's consciousness. Beyond being informative, Campbell's analysis of cultural myths is profound; it provokes genuine introspection. The author refers to the spiritual in whatever he speaks about, and yet he never lapses into religious diatribe or dogma. Subjects like marriage are elevated beyond the social to the psycho-spiritual. For example, he calls marriage "primarily a spiritual exercise, and the society is supposed to help us have the realization. Man should not be in service to society, society should be in the service of man," (8).

In light of modern society, Campbell's words hold new meaning. In America, we have few true rituals because we have turned our attention outward instead of inward. The wisdom of life is being denigrated through a preoccupation with technology and material goods. There is little…… [Read More]

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colonialism in higher education indigenous

Words: 1562 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49996447

Public Intellectual Essay

The introduction of critical race theory and other anti-colonial approaches to academic discourse has obscured the fact that higher education itself remains embedded in colonial institutions and structures. Higher education is a vestige of colonial means of psychological and social control. The political implications of colonialism in higher education include the perpetuation of hegemony, the suppression and subordination of alternative epistemologies, the ongoing political dominion over what constitutes knowledge, and the use of higher education to promote structures and institutions that serve the dominant culture. Although often an unconscious process, the ways colonial mentalities and processes remain entrenched in higher education are directly harmful to individual students and to society as a whole. Colonialism in higher education promotes a monolithic worldview that inhibits critical inquiry and creative solutions to global problems. By controlling how knowledge is defined, institutes of colonialist higher learning prevent alternative views and inhibit…… [Read More]

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Unlike the Way the 'Race for the

Words: 1068 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26257884

unlike the way the 'race for the moon' became the driving force of American scientific exploration during the 1950's and 1960's, the race to control the trade routes to the far reaches of the globe and to expand its technological knowledge of navigation became the driving force of Spanish foreign and domestic policy during the period of world history from the 15th to the 17th centuries. This period is also commonly called "The Age of Discovery" by European historians. The economic impact of Spain's forays into the New orld or worlds ultimately changed the face of European knowledge of the world and the economic structure of Europe. Both the residents of Spain and Europe as a whole, however, experienced both positive and negative effects of this exploration. However, the effects upon Europe were on the whole largely beneficial, because of the increased exposure to new goods and the expansion of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Age of Discovery. http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Flats/3795/port2.htm. Website Accessed June 20, 2002.

American Spice Trade Organization -- The Age of Discovery.  http://www.astaspice.org/history/history_04.htm . Web site Accessed June 20, 2002.

Learning Network: Exploration -- The European 'Age of Discovery'

 http://ad.doubleclick.net/adi/ln.infoplease/;!category=xmain;ch=world;site=www.infoplease.com;test=no;pos=pop;slot=1;sz=1x1;tile=1;ord=1024585600 . Website Accessed June 20, 2002.
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Sustainable Marine Tourism in Similan

Words: 5220 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Methodology Chapter Paper #: 50833690



Another case study, this one by Cole (2011) examines the cultural and community impacts of tourism, both sustainable and unsustainable, on specific cultures in Indonesia. Cole concludes as well that in order to help keep the cultural and community influences and positive attitudes intact, it is important to consider the local community as a major stakeholder in the sustainability of a tourist destination. Cole states in her article, "ourism has the potential to empower communities and the sustainable tourism agenda needs to focus on how to bring this about. As the case study illustrates, understanding tourists and tourism processes is the first stage to empowering the local community to make informed and appropriate decisions about their tourism development. Considerable investments are required in communication and trust building between the actors in tourism. his paper examines how action research, focus groups and the creation of a tourism forum can be concrete,…… [Read More]

These are the questions which are very difficult to answer, but in order to have a maintained tourism system they plays an important role.

Moreover, the use of term "itself" is confusing for a sustainable tourism. Alternative tourism, 'soft' tourism, ecotourism, and 'green' tourism are the types of tourism which can be used with sustainable tourism which is a high class branch of tourism. The story behind tourism in 1919, about 664 million tourists were present, and those who were known as mass tourism were approximately 80%. Development of sustainable tourism is affected by the differences in between mass tourism and sustainable tourism (Berno and Bricker, 2001).

If one can make a difference between 'good' tourism (best known as the alternative forms of tourism) and 'bad' tourism (particularly mass tourism) then sustainable tourism can appear as disruptive force in the society (Swarbrooke, 1999). To confuse ecotourism with sustainable tourism can give a bad result because all sustainable tourism does not take place at natural area and not all types of ecotourism are sustainable. According to Wall (1997), as the mass tourists might not prefer to visit threatened remote areas, their demand may be lesser than that of
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Employee Safety in the Workplace

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67644531

Organizational Behavior

"World of work"

Drawing from chapter 9 of the class reading, there is no equality in work, and it will never be. Male have dominated top leadership positions while women are left to do care taking jobs in the society, such as taking care of the elderly. These are mere wage jobs that need less time. This chapter also presents the issue of interest as many young women have not realized that being in a career such as engineering, can also be a "helping" occupation. As such, the society has not only lost talented women from the world of work. It has also lost talented men in the domestic world. Men have the potential to be excellent caregivers as studies indicate the significance of fathering four children (O'Brien, 2007).

Based on the equal right to employment code, the right to "equal treatment pertaining employment" defends women in all…… [Read More]

Reference

O'Brien, G. (2007, fall). Understanding Ourselves: Gender Differences in the Brain. Retrieved from The Columbia Consultancy: http://www.columbiaconsult.com/pubs/v52_fall07.html
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Wretched of the Earth When Nations of

Words: 1643 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63833823

retched of the Earth

hen nations of Europe set out on boats, they determined to find lands and claim them for the empirical country, regardless of any objections coming from the people actually living on those lands. In the colonized land, the native population were marginalized, oppressed, and limited in their civil rights. Many were turned into slaves on large farms run by the emissaries from the motherland. The natives were sometimes outnumbered but the number of the enemy seldom mattered because the colonial soldiers usually were in possession of more sophisticated weaponry with which they could subjugate the aboriginal peoples. Sometimes these colonies existed for centuries and lines of ethnically determined social status kept the descendants of colonists in the upper echelons of society while those descended from the natives were kept subservient to their European oppressors. Understandably this did not go well with the natives or their descendents…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fanon, F. (2004). The Wretched of the Earth. Grove: New York, NY.
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Indigenous Culture in Australia Has

Words: 2038 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49992763

" [Parliament of Australia]

The Future

Australia's aboriginal population is currently estimated around 4,60,000 roughly constituting 2.3% of the national population. [Australian Government] However, the sad fact is that aborigines have higher rates of alcohol and drug abuse and unemployment. Prime minister Rudd declared a state of emergency in the northern territory following high reports of alcoholism and child sexual abuse among the aboriginal communities. Efforts were also taken to restrict the use of welfare money only in stipulated shops so as to ensure that money is not spent on alcohol. Such intervention measures have created controversies but the government persists with these emergency measures citing the acute needs of the aboriginal communities. Prime minister Rudd envisions a future "where this Parliament resolves that the injustices of the past must never, never happen again. A future where we harness the determination of all Australians, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to close the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Dr. Michael Halloran, 'Cultural Maintenance and Trauma in Indigenous Australia: Paper presented at the 23rd Annual Australia and New Zealand Law and History Society Conference, Perth, Western Australia (2-4th July, 2004), retrieved Aug 24th 2010, from,  http://www.latrobe.edu.au/psy/aw/Halloran-Murdoch_law_journal.pdf 

2) Reconcili Action Network, (Jul 2007) 'Stolen generations', retrieved Aug 24th 2010, from, http://reconciliaction.org.au/nsw/education-kit/stolen-generations/

3) UNPO, (2008), 'Aboriginals of Australia', retrieved Aug 24th 2010, from,  http://www.unpo.org/members/7855 

4) HREOC, (Apr 1997) 'Bringing Them Home: Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission Report', retrieved Aug 24th 2010, from, ' http://www.hreoc.gov.au/social_justice/bth_report/report/ch2_part2.html
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Northern Territory Nt Intervention in This Essay

Words: 2426 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2340144

Northern Territory (NT) Intervention

In this essay, the author will examine how the Australian Federal Government can pass legislation (as was done with the Northern Territory (NT) intervention) which is not subject to the operation of acial Discrimination Act (Clth) and, in turn, any State/Territories acial Discrimination Acts. The author will raise the question of whether or not the Federal Government has such power. If this is so, the author will then examine under what circumstances such power should be exercised. Further, in the essay the author will raise the question of whether the federal government exercised this power correctly with regards to the NT intervention. Finally, the essay will examine if the Federal Government should not have such power, then how human rights can be protected in Australia.

It is the author's opinion that the Australian government far overstepped its mandate. While technically legal, the intervention was only barely…… [Read More]

Reference List

Ashby-Cliffe, J. (2008) 'Reaching the End,' Army (1202), 4.

ABC News. (2007). Pearson Fears for Indigenous Parents' Freedom. Available:  http://www.abc.net.au/news/2007-06-22/pearson-fears-for-indigenous-parents-freedom/78106 . Last accessed 6 September 2011.

Australian Human Rights Commission. (2007). Submission of the Human Rights

and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC) to the Senate Legal and Constitutional Committee on the Northern Territory National Emergency
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Religion of Australian Aborigines a

Words: 1910 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65077696

Many claim Islam increases their sense of worth. Islam particularly appeals to disaffected young men. Solomon, 23-years-old, participated in a television interview. "It's not a part of our religion to stand there and get stepped on," Solomon said. "That's why Islam is so good for the Aboriginal people." (Australian Aborigines...)

Europeans prefer the name "Koori" for Aborigine, even though they named the native Australians "Aborigine." Aborigine, however, means "from the beginning." Aborigines "taught their children dances, songs, and stories for both sacred and non-sacred rituals that taught them traditions and history of the past, present and future." (Australian Aborigines...) Along with plants, animals, other natural objects, man categorized himself with his totem. Aborigines focused on and blamed the supernatural for every scenario. Some individuals believed a victim of a spell would usually sicken and die, because they believed it would happen. At one time in the Aborigines' religion, the "medicine…… [Read More]

References

AIPR Fact sheet: Psychic and Mystical Experiences of the Aborigines. (2002). 07 December 2006. http://www.aiprinc.org/aborig.asp.

Australian Aborigines Dreamers. (2002). 7 December 2006. http://www.religionportal.com/ReligionFinder/religions/australiaaborigines.htm.

Australian Aboriginal Religion." (2006). 7 December 2006. http://philtar.ucsm.ac.uk/encyclopedia/westoc/abor.html.

OZ CITY AUSTRALIA - Australian Aborigines. (2001). 07 December 2006.  http://ozcity.faithweb.com/aborigines.html .
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Mackenzie Valley Region

Words: 4029 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 23682792

Mackenzie Valley egion

The iver Mackenzie measures up to around one thousand, one hundred and twenty miles that is equivalent to almost eighteen hundred kilometers of length. It originates from Canada, more specifically the Great Slave Lake in Northwest Territories. It passes through a delta, which is at the northwest of the Arctic Ocean. It is called the Slave iver when it glows between the Lake Athabasca and the Great Slave Lake (Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 2010).

The river system known as the Final Peace along with the Lake Athabasca connects with the Mackenzie. The "Finlay Peace Mackenzie system" which is the second biggest uninterrupted flow of river in North America measures up to four thousand and two hundred kilometers long. The biggest tributary directly meeting the Mackenzie is the Liard iver. Navigation is possible all the way from the Great Slave Lake to the Arctic Ocean only between the months…… [Read More]

References

Berger, Thomas R. (1977a). Northern Frontier Northern Homeland: The Report of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry, vol. 1. Ottawa: Minister of Supply and Services Canada.

Berger, Thomas R. (1977b). Northern Frontier Northern Homeland: The Report of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry, vol. 2. Ottawa: Minister of Supply and Services Canada.

Blake, Phillip. (1977). Statement to the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry, 9 July 1075. In Dene Nation: The Colony Within, ed. Mel Watkins, pp. 5-9. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Canadian Dimension. (2005). People, Petroleum, and Pipelines in the Mackenzie Valley: a Chronology. Vol. 39, Issue 2.
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Sociology in Indigenous Populations Specifically it Will

Words: 1953 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46381443

sociology in indigenous populations. Specifically it will discuss what the terms ethnicity and racism mean, and critically examine how these terms apply to Indigenous Australians? Ethnicity and racism apply to Indigenous Australians (Aborigines) throughout their history, sad but true. Since the English first settled Australian in the 1700s, the Indigenous population has suffered greatly, and it is one of Australia's greatest shames that it went on so long.

The Indigenous people of Australia (Aborigines and Torres Straight Islanders) are one of the oldest cultures on Earth. Archaeologists believe their lineage goes back at least 50,000 years, and some believe it could go as far back as 65,000 years ago. They were the original occupants of Australia, and have a deep and abiding respect for the land and its many different environments. An Aboriginal Web site notes, "For Indigenous Australians, the land is the core of all spirituality and this relationship…… [Read More]

References

Adams, M. (2006). Raising the profile of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men's health: An Indigenous man's perspective. Australian Aboriginal Studies, 2006(2), 68+.

Author not Available. (2006). Indigenous Australians. [Online] Available at:  http://www.aihw.gov.au/indigenous/index.cfm .

Clarke, F.G. (2002). The history of Australia. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Editors. (2008). Australian Indigenous cultural heritage. [Online]. Available at: http://www.cultureandrecreation.gov.au/articles/indigenous / [Accessed 17 June 2009].
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Interaction Between the Indigenous and

Words: 2421 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 32873646

In 1992 there was a problem with the courts and the land disputes that were occurring between the two cultures.

In the case of Mabo and Others vs. The State of Queensland and the Commonwealth of Australia, decided in 1992, the Australian High Court ruled that the land tenure rights of the indigenous inhabitants of the Murray Islands in the Torres Strait did not extend seaward beyond the high water mark (Sharp, 1997). This decision reflected a Eurocentric bias and ignored the islanders' traditional claims to exclusive use of the reefs and seas surrounding their land territories (Sharp, 1997). Factfinders for the court applied the European conception of sea rights to the case, under which the seas and reefs were considered state property (Sharp, 1997)."

The result of this and other court mandates has been an attitude of Eurocentricism. This attitude has harmed the integration of the two cultures that…… [Read More]

References

Citizenship, history and indigenous status in Australia: back to the future, or toward treaty? Journal of Australian Studies; 1/1/2004; Bradfield, Stuart

Australia: The Complete Guide to Aboriginal Australia; To experience 'real life' down under, try exploring an Indigenous community. CHARLOTTE HINDLE looks at one of the most remarkable cultures in the world.(Features)

The Independent (London, England); 9/21/2002; Hindle, Charlotte

Finding common ground: Indigenous and Asian Diasporic cultural production in Australia. Hecate; 10/1/2001; Stephenson, Peta
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Indigenous Australian Patients Evidence-Based Discussion

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14666361

In order to assess Yvonne and her symptoms, the nurse practitioner must show patience and understanding. In the treatment of the symptoms, whether to relieve the fevers or perform scans and tests to find the source of the abdominal pain, the nurse practitioner must give Yvonne and her relatives significant input into the management of the illness. Optimal outcomes can be achieved by providing information to the patient that decreases fear, timely involvement of the doctor in the administration of pain medications and emotional support (McGrath, P. 2006).

eflective practices can have considerable effectiveness in the care of Yvonne. In a paper discussing the benefits of reflective care, Ben Hannigan (2001) argues that reliance on practical knowledge alone is insufficient to solving medical problems as they are rarely abstract in nature. eflection by the nurse practitioner embeds the medical problem into the social context and allows the practitioner to engage…… [Read More]

References:

1. Mununggirritj, D. Yolngu Healer's Medicine: Plants used by the women healers of North-East Arnhem Land. [Online] Available at:  http://www.atec.net.au/djapirri_muunggirritj_atec_h_w_presentation.pdf  [Accessed 3 September 2011].

2. McGrath P., 2006. 'The biggest worry..': research findings on pain management for Aboriginal peoples in Northern Territory, Australia. Rural Remote Health 6(3), p.549

3. Aboriginal Resource and Development Services (ARDS) [Online] Available at:  http://www.ards.com.au/default.html . [Accessed 3 September 2011].

4. Cass A, Lowell A, Christie M, Snelling PL, Flack M, Marmganyin B, Brown I., 2002. Sharing the true stories: improving communication between Aboriginal patients and healthcare workers. Mad J. Aust 176(10), pp.466-70
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Canoes Racism and Film An

Words: 1605 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14736385



It was filmed in Aboriginal languages, with all of the characters speaking a variety of languages that were native to the people of Australia before the Europeans came. This helps connect aboriginal people from today with the past that they are trying not to lose. There are always the subtitles, to allow everyone to understand the dialogue of the characters in the story. Yet, it is filmed in aboriginal languages in order to revitalize an ethnic community that has been plagued by racism seen under a colonial structure. The Europeans took away the everyday use of such unique languages, and the film helps try to reconnect modern aboriginals with the past that could be fading away faster than anyone ever want. This essentially brings a new life to a culture that would otherwise be fading away. It is a modern movement to reach back before the time of colonialism and…… [Read More]

References

Stam, Robert & Spence, Louise. "Colonialism, Racism, and Representation: An Introduction."
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Right Embodies the Notion That One Has

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13737904

right" embodies the notion that one has the sovereignty to act without obtaining the permission of others (Lea, 2004). This concept carries an implicit unstated postscript with it in that one may exercise one's rights as long as one does not violate the individual rights of others. Individual rights pertain to the rights that are deemed universal to all people regardless of any group affiliations they may have. For example freedom of speech is considered a universal individual right in many societies. Governments are formed to protect the individual rights of all, but at the same time restrict some rights to ensure equality.

Collective rights refer to the rights that groups have, or to the rights held only by those individuals within a specified group (Lea, 2004). For instance, a certain group of indigenous people may lay claim to certain rights such as the right to live on native lands…… [Read More]

References

Lea, D. (2004). Individual autonomy: Group self-determination and the assimilation of indigenous cultures. North Australian Research Unit. Discussion Paper No. 18, 1-17.

Tsey, K. & Every, A. (2000). Evaluating Aboriginal empowerment programs: the case of family well-being. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 24(5), 509-514.
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Postoperative Nursing Management

Words: 1885 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23228923

Mrs. Margaret Foley's Culturally Congruent, Personalized Nursing Care Plan
Case Scenario Overview

Mrs. Margaret Foley (Maggie) is a 46-year-old Aboriginal female has had an emergency open cholecystectomy. Although the case does not specifically indicate why the laparoscopic surgery was changed to an open procedure, this is common whenever the surgeon has trouble accessing the gallbladder for any reason such as a patient's smaller frame. Furthermore, this has several implications for the length of her stay and her care plan. There are also factors that indicate that Maggie will benefit from a nursing care plan that is attunded to her cultural needs due to the fact that multiple previous misunderstandings were mentioned in her case history. For instance, the case indicates that Maggie "felt uncomfortable" with the medical jargon used which was essentially incomprehensible to her and likely led her to not follow the care plan that was recommended for her.…… [Read More]

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Resocialization Total Institution

Words: 2195 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 38614237

esocialization and Total Institutions

esocialization Total Institutions

ecycling: esocialization and Total Institutions

esocialization and Total Institutions

esocialization is a process in which the identity and personality of the individual is radically changed by placing that individual in an environment or institution, which is controlled and monitored strictly. Total institutions are such institutions that utilize resocialization process in order to bring significant changes in the personality of individuals living there. The goal of these institutions is to eradicate personal identity of the individual and then, create a new identity through reward and punishment system.

esocialization and Total Institutions

Introduction

esocialization is a process in which the identity and personality of the individual is radically changed by placing that individual in an environment or institution, which is controlled and monitored strictly. Total institutions are such institutions that utilize resocialization process in order to bring significant changes in the personality of individuals living…… [Read More]

References

John J. Macionis and Linda M. Gerber (2011).Sociology Seventh Canadian Edition. Pearson Education, Inc.

Llewellyn, Jennifer J. (2002). "Dealing with the Legacy of Native Residential School Abuse in Canada: Litigation, ADR, and Restorative Justice."University of Toronto Law Journal. 52.3 (2002): 253-300. Print.

Patrick Donnelly. (2013). Scapegoating the Indian Residential Schools. Ottawa Cover Story.
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Historians Are in the Business of Telling

Words: 1570 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62878978

Historians are in the business of telling a storied past based on the collection of information revealed through the search for knowledge. Now knowledge is not truth, and the application of science is to search for the truth as can be best explained testing and understanding within bounded constraints. Therefore, the forms of evidence used by historians are not based on, or not always based on, scientific merit. One must remember the job of a historian is to recount a story and not scientific fact.

Historians engage explaining events by using primary and secondary evidence to describe the chronology of events. The primary historical sources include the word of mouth, either from the actual witness to the event, the active participant in the event, or as is passed on down via oral tradition to a chosen societal member whom then is responsible for the history. Should this individual then write…… [Read More]

References

Davison, G. (1988) 'The Use and Abuse of Australian History' in Susan Janson and Stuart Mcintyre (eds) Making the Bicentenary. Special Issue of: Australian Historical Studies, Vol. 23, No. 91, October. Parkville: University of Melbourne. Pp. 55-76.

Desai J. (2003) "Bombay Boys and Girls: The Gender and Sexual Politics of Transnationality in the New Indian Cinema in English" South Asian Popular Culture Vol. 1 (1) 45-61 (ISSN 1474-6689 print/1474-6697 online) copyright 2003 Taylor & Francis Ltd.

Identifying Primary and Secondary Sources. A Preliminary Guide. Indiana University Bloomington Libraries.  http://www.libraries.iub.edu/index.php?pageId=1483 

Lecture 7 Hong Kong Cinema as Travelling Cinema
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Strategic Tourism Management Plan Today

Words: 3375 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66371071



These initiatives are especially important now because unemployment remains high in the Northern Territory today (Mohatt, 1994), and a lack of educational and employment opportunities has resulted in a paucity of a skilled workforce by mainstream social standards that has contributed to an increased incidence in criminal activity throughout the region (Smith, 2001). According to one authority, "The notion of economic barriers such as job ceilings does not necessarily create disincentives toward schooling or create folk theories which make for ambivalence. Where subsistence living and mixed cash economies form a central part of people's lives, then these so-called economic barriers to school success are much less a factor in school failure in places such as the Northern Territories of Australia" (Mohatt, 1994 p. 183). Nevertheless, the Northern Territory has much to offer domestic and foreign visitors alike today, providing them with a unique glimpse into what is essentially another world…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baker, R. (1999). Land Is Life: From Bush to Town the Story of the Yanyuwa People. St. Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Chatelard, G. (2003). Conflicts of interest over the Wadi Rum Reserve: Were they avoidable? A socio-political critique. Nomadic Peoples, 7(1), 138.

Cowlishaw, G. (1999). Rednecks, eggheads, and blackfellas: A study of racial power and intimacy in Australia. St. Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Hall, D., & Richards, G. (2000). Tourism and sustainable community development. London: Routledge.
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Canadian Constitution

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Seminar Paper Paper #: 93882623

Canadian Constitution

Freedoms:

Freedom of conscience and religion

Freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression iii. Freedom of peaceful assembly

Freedom of association

The freedoms guaranteed by the Canadian Constitution are similar to those of the United States and other democratic nations. The basic principles of these freedoms are the privileges of the individual to believe, speak, and meet peacefully without fear of governmental repression.

Right to vote in an election of the House of Commons

Right to enter, remain in, and leave Canada iii. The right to live and work in any Canadian province

Right to life, liberty, and the security of the person and the right not to be deprived

Right to be secure against unlawful search and seizure

Right not to be arbitrarily imprisoned vii. Right upon arrest or detention to be informed of the reasons, retain and instruct counsel, have the validity of detention be determined…… [Read More]

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Human Rights on the Australian

Words: 687 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 5373052

rights of Aborigines in Australia

The country I chose to deconstruct for this particular assignment is Australia. The two chief cultures that inhabit Australia are the Anglo-Led Westernized one, and that of the indigenous Aboriginal people who occupied the land before the former -- despite the fact that the former had no compunction about displacing the latter from it. In terms of human rights, such rights should ideally apply to each of these cultures equally. However, the cultural differences between these two groups have resulted in a situation in which the ethical norms and codes of conducts of the Westerners (Anglos) are much more aligned with the principles of the Universal code of Human rights. In fact, it was not until relatively recently (near the turn of the 20th century, if not after that) that Westerners formally acknowledged the Aboriginal natives in Australia as people. Thus, the human rights which…… [Read More]

References

Nickel, J. (2012). Human rights. In E.N. Zalta (Ed.), The Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy (Summer 2013 ed.). Retrieved from  http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2013/entries/rights-human/ 

United Nations. (n.d-b). The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Retrieved November 19, 2013, from  http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/