Alcoholism Essays (Examples)

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Psychological Theory

Words: 2096 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11794677

Alcoholism and Upbringing

Psychological theory

James' father is responsible for James' involvement in crime and burglary. Origin of the problem. Alcoholic parents are the reason for the moral decay of juveniles

Another reason for James' feelings of inadequacy

Effect of alcoholism in the upbringing of a child

The effect of taking James out of his mother's home as a juvenile

eaction formation

An examination of James' denial of his responsibility over his problem

Personality theory

Sociological theory

Personality and sociological theory

An explanation of James' behaviors, and his father using the two frameworks

Thorburn (2005) suggests that a misapprehension that numerous alcoholics seem to have is that their behavior does not affect other people. They deny ever hurting other people but themselves. A great deal of research and huge anecdotal proof suggest otherwise. The behavior of alcoholics can affect those around them, including family members, friends, coworkers and employers. Children…… [Read More]

References

Plant, M.A., Peck, D.F., Samuel, E., & Stuart, R. (2000). Alcohol, drugs, and school-leavers.

London: Tavistock Publications.

Thorburn, D. (2005). Alcoholism myths and realities: Removing the stigma of society's most destructive disease. Northridge, Calif: Galt Pub.

Floyd, M.R., & Seale, J.P. (2002). Substance abuse: A patient-centered approach. Abingdon,
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Teenage Drinking Too Much Alcohol

Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20377798

Alcoholism

There has been an ever increasing trend of young people getting to the habit of too much drinking. This is rampant at the point where these youth become of legal age and to majority, that acts as the go ahead to binge drinking and absolute abuse of alcohol. There are various issues that are related to excessive drinking especially among the youth. These risks are emanated as one moves from one category to another as of these categories formed by the HNS (2010);

Lower-risk drinkers -- who are the teenagers drinking between 2-3 units and are at a lower risk of causing themselves health risks in the future. However they may be exposed to injury if operating machinery, dangerous driving, risk or drowning if planning to go swimming alone without peers, babies may be affected in the womb for teenagers who get pregnant these among other minor risks.

Increasing-risk…… [Read More]

References

HNS (2010). The risks of drinking too much. Retrieved February 22, 2012 from  http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/alcohol/Pages/Effectsofalcohol.aspx 

Men's health (2012). 4 Strange Reasons You Drink Too Much. Retrieved February 22, 2012 from http://news.menshealth.com/reasons-for-binge-drinking/2012/01/21/

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, (2012). Underage Drinking: Why Do Adolescents Drink, What Are the Risks, and How Can Underage Drinking Be Prevented? Retrieved February 22, 2012 from  http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AA67/AA67.htm
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Psycho-Social Dynamics of Alcoholic Addiction Family

Words: 1931 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86530127

Psyco-Social Dynamics of Alcoholic Addiction Family

Alcoholism is a disease.

It affects the entire family and creates an environment of dysfunction and disorganization.

ithin the family, the social and psychological ramifications of alcoholism affect the alcoholic, his or her spouse, and the children.

Children Supporting Paragraph

Children must cope with the effects of an alcoholic on the family (disorganization).

There are five roles which serve as coping mechanisms.

The mascot, placater, acting out child, lost child, responsible child.

Child Roles Supporting Paragraph

Roles either make things better or worse.

The responsible child excels

The mascot and placater child intermediate.

The former does so from foolery, the second from caring.

The lost child disassociates.

The acting out child gets in trouble.

Spouse Supporting Paragraph

A. Spouses are more of a determinant of an alcoholic's behavior than children.

B. Spouses have three perspectives on actions of the alcoholic.

1. They like alcoholism…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Devine, Cindy and Valerie Braithwaite. "The Survival Roles of Children and Alcoholics: Their Measurement and Validity." Addiction 88.1: 69-78. 1993. Print.

Glover, Geraldine. "The Hero Child in the Alcoholic Home: Recommendations for Counselors." School Counselor 41: 185-191. 1994. Print.

Janzen, Curtis. "Family Treatment for Alcoholism: A Review." Social Work 23.2: 135-144. 1978. Print.

Johnson, Patrick. "Dimensions of Functioning in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Families." Journal of Mental Counseling 23 (2001): 127-136
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History of the Problem Psychological

Words: 1722 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98126040

Scientists need to do much more research in the area of female alcohol abuse, and sounder methods of treating this debilitating disease need to be developed. Society treats women alcoholics differently from men - there is still a stigma that alcoholic women are weak, unfit for work or family, and even more sexually active. Until this stigma is removed, many women will not seek out treatment, and who knows how many will die as a result. Women alcoholics still need research, but they also need understanding and support to treat and conquer their disease.

eferences

Carter, C.S. (1997). Ladies don't: A historical perspective on attitudes toward alcoholic women. Affilia; 12; 471-485.

Editors. (1995). Diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism No. 30 PH 359.

Grant, B.F.; Dawson, D.A.; Stinson, F.S.; Chou, S.P.; Dufour, M.C.; and Pickering, .P. (2004). The 12-month prevalence and trends…… [Read More]

References

Carter, C.S. (1997). Ladies don't: A historical perspective on attitudes toward alcoholic women. Affilia; 12; 471-485.

Editors. (1995). Diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism No. 30 PH 359.

Grant, B.F.; Dawson, D.A.; Stinson, F.S.; Chou, S.P.; Dufour, M.C.; and Pickering, R.P. (2004). The 12-month prevalence and trends in DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence: United States, 1991-1992 and 2001-2002. Drug Alcohol Depend, 74(3):223-34.

Hanson, D.J. (2007). Puritans to prohibition. Retrieved from the State University of New York Web site: http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/FunFacts/PuritansToProhibition.html16 June 2007.
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Physiological and Biological Effects of

Words: 1302 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12337112

Alcoholic effects are more pronounced in adolescents and prenatal alcohol intake may create serious cognitive problems for the unborn child.

Other effects of Alcohol upon the Body.

It is noted that Alcoholics generally suffer from malnutrition since the changes in metabolism brought about by alcohol consumption, prevent proper digestion and absorption of food. Thus alcoholics are often found deficient in proteins and vitamins, particularly vitamin A, accounting to susceptibility for liver disease and other serious alcohol-related disorders in the body. Alcohol breakdown in the liver generates toxins such as acetaldehyde and some highly reactive molecules containing oxygen that can cause serious damages to the liver. These toxins interfere with the metabolism of lipids resulting in the damage of liver cells. Moreover Alcohol interferes with the formation and activity of lysosomes that contain specific enzymes which break down proteins and thus may contribute to protein accumulation in the liver, which can…… [Read More]

Reference:

Kathryn Magruder-Habib, A. Mark Durand and Keith A. Frey, April 1991, Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in primary healthcare settings, Journal of family practice.

Nutrition Health Review, Winter 2003.

Dean F. Wong, Atul Maini, Olivier G. Rousset, James Robert Brasic, Spring 2003 Positron emission tomography: a tool for identifying the effects of alcohol dependence on the brain, Alcohol Research and Health.

Charles S. Leiber, Fall 2003, Relationship between nutrition, alcohol use, and liver disease, Alcohol Research and Health.
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Drinking Down Under

Words: 862 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21320777

Aborigine Alcoholism

Any substance or behavior that is not done in some sort of balance or harmonic alliance with nature is sure to cause problems within any group or groups of people. The introduction of alcohol into the Australian indigenous populations has caused many health problems and issues that warrant further discussion. The purpose of this essay is to discuss alcoholism as it relates to the aboriginal people of Australia. This essay will examine the disease process and its symptoms and outcomes. The essay will then look at how the contributing factors of this disease are affecting this group of people. The essay will conclude with ideas on the implications of alcoholism on that community and the healthcare providers that work with this group.

Disease Process

Alcohol is a staple in the culture and social practices of many humans around the world. The inebriation rituals that were prominent during the…… [Read More]

References

Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council (nd). Alcohol and health in Australis. Viewed 10 Oct 2014. Retrieved from https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/your-health/alcohol-guidelines/alcohol-and-health-australia

Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (2014). Review of the harmful use of alcohol amongst Indigenous Australians. Retrieved from  http://www.aodknowledgecentre.net.au/aodkc/alcohol/plain-language/alcohol-plain-language-review 

Brady M (1986) A social analysis of drinking and its aftermath in a remote Aboriginal community. In: Bush RA, ed. Exploring the Alcohol and Drug Crime link: society's response. Canberra: Australian Institute of Criminology:

Woods, I. (2011). Battle To Curb Aborigines' Drink Problem. Sky News 19 June 2011. Retrieved from http://news.sky.com/story/862854/battle-to-curb-aborigines-drink-problem
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Knowledge Concerning Ethical Issues Involved

Words: 4963 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86009486

100). Much of the focus of personnel selection using psychological testing was on new troops enlisting in the military during two world wars and the explosive growth of the private sector thereafter (Scroggins et al., 2008). Psychological testing for personnel selection purposes, though, faded into disfavor during the 1960s, but it continues to be used by human resource practitioners today. In this regard, Scroggins and his colleagues advise, "Many H practitioners, however, have continued to use personality testing with an optimistic and enduring faith in its ability to discriminate between good and poor job candidates" (p. 101).

In cases where cheating is suspected (such as in the case of an teen applicant possibly using a smartphone or consulting crib notes during testing by visiting the restroom), psychologists have a professional responsibility to conform to relevant privacy laws with respect to the results of such tests, including following the decision-making model…… [Read More]

References

Barnes, F.P. & Murdin, L. (2001). Values and ethics in the practice of psychotherapy and counseling. Philadelphia: Open University Press.

Bersoff, D.N. (2008). Ethical conflicts in psychology. American Psychological Association.

Bonventre, V.M. (2005, Spring). Editor's foreword. Albany Law Review, 68(2), vii-ix.

Charman, D. (2004). Core processes in brief psychodynamic psychotherapy: Advancing effective practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Development of Alcohol Abuse

Words: 1544 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32895120

Alcohol abuse was once considered a problem of willpower. Now, it is widely recognized as a medical problem with three primary roots causes: biological factors, psychological factors, and socio-cultural factors. This paper examines the three root causes, beginning with the foundation that genetic predisposition plays a tremendous role in substance abuse and alcoholism. If examines the biological factors impacting alcohol abuse, but goes beyond genetics to discuss brain changes that are the result of alcohol abuse. Next, it considers the psychological factors that relate to alcohol abuse, considering both psychological stressors and underlying character traits linked to alcoholism. Finally, it looks a socio-cultural factors linked to alcohol abuse.

Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol abuse is a complex, multi-faceted problem with many factors impacting the onset and expression of the disorder. Furthermore, alcohol abuse, while part of the disease of alcoholism, is not limited to alcoholism. "It's possible to have a problem with…… [Read More]

References

Horvath, A.T., Misra, K., Epner, A.K., Morgan Cooper, G.l, & Zupanick, C.E. (2014). The biological causes of alcoholism. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from AMHC website:  http://www.amhc.org/1410-alcoholism/article/49099-the-biological-causes-of-alcoholism 

Horvath, A.T., Misra, K., Epner, A.K., Morgan Cooper, G.l, & Zupanick, C.E. (2014). The psychological causes of alcoholism. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from AMHC website:  http://www.amhc.org/1410-alcoholism/article/49100-the-psychological-causes-of-alcoholism 

Horvath, A.T., Misra, K., Epner, A.K., Morgan Cooper, G.l, & Zupanick, C.E. (2014). Socio-

cultural forces that lead to alcoholism. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from AMHC website:  http://www.amhc.org/1410-alcoholism/article/49102-socio-cultural-forces-that-lead-to-alcoholism
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Should Alcohol Abuse the Categorised as a Disease

Words: 957 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92731774

Alcoholism a Disease?

There is little doubt that alcoholism is a chronic condition, which in 1956 was classified by the American medical Association as an illness, elevating the status to disease in 1966 (Baldwin esearch Institute, 2015). However, despite this announcement, there still appears to be a significant level of dispute within the medical community, where the concept of alcoholism as a disease has remained unproven (Hanson, 2013), however many of the characteristics of the condition appear to be aligned with a disease diagnosis (Borelli, 1989). The aim of this paper is to consider the concept of alcoholism as a disease, considering the evidence for and against this hypothesis.

The Association of alcohol disease began during the 1800s, proposed by Dr. Benjamin ush, who argues those who drank too much alcohol were diseased, and utilised this argument to promote his revisionist ideas (Baldwin esearch Institute, 2015). However, simply calling it…… [Read More]

References

Baldwin Research Institute, (2015), Alcoholism Is Not a Disease, retrieved 12 December 2015 from http://www.baldwinresearch.com/alcoholism.cfm

Borelli, N, (1989), Is Alcoholism Disease, The Journal of the American Medical Association, 262 (1), 343

Fingarette, H, (1990), "Why We Should Reject the Disease Concept of Alcoholism," in Endings, or (Ed), Controversies in the Addictions Field, Dubque, Kendall-Hunt

Hansen, D, (2013), Is Alcoholism a Disease? Retrieved 12 December 2015 from https://archive.is/Vj5lu
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Drinking Alcohol Together With Tobacco

Words: 2119 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8875256

hile each of these studies has reported a cardioprotective effect of alcohol, they differ over which type of alcoholic beverage provides the greatest benefit" (634).

Overlooked in many of these studies, though, is the fact that some people who categorize themselves as being one type of drinker compared to another may engage in other activities that are unhealthy from the outset (for instance, beer drinkers may be more likely to also be tobacco users) while others may engage in a wide range of healthy behaviors (for example, wine drinkers may not be smokers and may job or exercise regularly). As McGregor and his colleagues emphasize, "One inherent difficulty within these studies is that in the general population, drinkers distinguished as primarily wine, beer or spirits drinkers tend to differ in other important aspects. If, for example, wine drinkers are found to be healthier, it may be the result of a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Alcohol." 2009, Partnership for a Drug-Free America. [Online]. Available: http://www.drug free.org/Portal/drug_guide/Alcohol.

Booth, Brenda M., Joann, Kirchner, John Fortney, Robin Ross and Kathryn Rost, 2000, "Rural

At-Risk Drinkers: Correlates and One-Year Use of Alcoholism Treatment Services."

Journal of Studies on Alcohol 61(2): 267.
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Al-Anon the Open Discussion Group

Words: 1223 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44783406

"All I needed was someone to tell say, 'Yeah, I've been there, too,'" Susan said, "and that's what I found here." This attitude was typical of many of the older members present at the meeting; he almost total experience of isolation, difference and strangeness, and total helplessness could jus as well have come from a depression support group. Though these people had a specific real-world reason for their mental distress, their symptoms were no less chronic or clinically viable than those suffering from depression in more commonly recognized situations.

Doug, too, is an example of depression at work in the family of alcoholics. The real-world manipulation that his ex-wife practiced with the couple's children and money would be enough to drive most people to the brink of sever depression, if not right into it. This was not seemed to get Doug down the most, however. With some encouragement, he shared…… [Read More]

References

Al-Anon Official Website. (2006). Accessed 6 March 2009. http://www.al-anon.alateen.org/english.html

Janssen Pharmaceuticals. (2007). "Alcohol related disorders." Accessed 6 March 2009. http://www.psychiatry24x7.com/bgdisplay.jhtml?itemname=substance_alcohol

RightHealth. (2008). "Depression guide." Accessed 6 March 2009. http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Depression/overview/adam20?fdid=adam_b593fc53774e94d72ec3432ed3972154&section=Summary
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Cognitive Social Learning and Related

Words: 927 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71709233

These include observable characteristics (Nathan, 1985, p.169) such as specific effects of drinking, quantities and lengths of time people drink, and environmental factors.

The article also emphasizes the degree in which this particular theory considers the very root cause of alcoholism. It discusses historical reasons attributed to the etiology of alcoholism, such as a stress reducer, and details some of the positive projections people associate alcohol consumption with. One of the most important points considered is the diagnosis of alcoholism, in which the author advocates a transactional diagnosis.

The article written by Kathryn Coronges et al., "Social network influences of alcohol and marijuana cognitive associations" discusses a research study designed to discern the influence of socialization on the consumption of mind altering substances. The study involved presenting a number of continuation high school students surveys to fill out during and upon the completion of a drug education program. The research…… [Read More]

References

Coronges, K., Stacy, a.W., Valente, T.W. (2011). "Social network influences of alcohol and marijuana cognitive associations." Addictive Behaviors. 36: 1305-1308.

Nathan, P.E. (1985). "Alcoholism: a cognitive social learning approach." Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 2: 169-173.

Niaura, R. (2000). "Cognitive social learning and related perspectives on drug craving." Addiction. 95: S155-S163.
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Speech Outline

Words: 791 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90700398

Speech on Alcoholism and Addiction

Main Points: I. Alcoholism is an addiction, not a character flaw.

Treating alcoholism requires modern rehabilitation methods.

The "Twelve-Step" program advocated by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

represents an extremely effective route to recovery.

Central Idea: For centuries, society has viewed addiction to alcohol and other substances as a defect in one's moral fiber, rather than a medical affliction. Modern scientific exploration into the subject of addiction has revealed that alcoholism is actually the result of neurotransmitters in the brain becoming activated, chemical responses throughout the body, genetic influences, and even environmental factors. By revising the widespread belief that addiction to alcohol is one's own "fault," and recognizing the litany of variables which determine whether somebody will be prone to addictive tendencies, the stigma placed on alcoholism may eventually be lifted.

Introduction

A. For as long as mankind been aware that the actions of an individual are…… [Read More]

References

Dodes, L. (2002). The heart of addiction: A new approach to understanding and managing alcoholism and other addictive behaviors. New York, NY: Harper-Collins

Narcotics Anonymous Fellowship. (1991). An introductory guide to narcotics anonymous, revised. Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.na.org/admin/include/spaw2/uploads/pdf/litfiles/us_english/Booklet/Intro Guide to NA.pdf
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Etiology of Theories on Addiction

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48595172

Etiology of Theories on Addiction

There are different sorts of addictions and substance abuse methods that plague the world today. However, in order to cure an addiction, one needs to go down to its root cause, and eliminate it, after which the damages caused can be mitigated and prevented. There are several theories and approaches to tackle an addiction problem. Most trained professionals use these theories in their treatment plan to get a better understanding of when and how the addiction came into being. After which, along with therapy, counseling and medication, the road to recovery can begin.

Medical etiology is the study of causes of an illness or any psychological condition. When a diseases is uncovered which the doctors are unable to explain and understand, an etiologist is responsible for determining the reason for its origin and being (Alcoholism, 2005). In this manner, the etiologist and the doctors are…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alcoholism, N.I. (2005). Module 2: Etiology and Natural History of Alcoholism. National Institute of on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

O' Farrell, T., & Fals-Stewart, W. (1999). Treatment models and methods: Family models. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sheehan, T., & Owen, P. (1999). Addictions: A comprehensive guidebook. New York: Oxford University Press.
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Alcohol the Search for Pleasure

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7643887

Alcohol is classified as a depressant because it slows down the release of neurochemicals that inhibit certain behaviors. The subjective feelings associated with alcohol intoxication are due to its effects on the brain and central nervous system but that system also controls our behaviors. The depression of certain neurotransmitters often reduces reflex time and reduces general inhibitions.

The digestive system is also strongly affected by alcohol consumption. Alcohol is absorbed almost entirely by the small intestine, from where the alcohol seeps into the blood. The liver is strongly affected by the absorption of alcohol and is in fact the main organ responsible for metabolizing alcohol. hen too much alcohol is consumed, the liver becomes overtaxed and cannot filter the toxins from the body as fast as it normally can. Over the long-term, the liver can become permanently damaged from too much alcohol consumption.

The heart and circulatory system are also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alcohol Absorption, Distribution, and Elimination." California DUI Help. Retrieved Feb 23, 2008 at http://www.californiaduihelp.com/dui_investigation/alcohol.asp

Boggan, Bill. "Alcohol Chemistry and You." Kennesaw State University, 2003.
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Addictive Paradigm a Paradigm Is a Conceptual

Words: 1959 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91359822

Addictive Paradigm

A paradigm is a conceptual model. It puts a frame around ideas and assumptions in order to give a sense of direction for understanding and action. In the field of alcoholism and addiction, the frames of reference most commonly used until recently have encased pictures in the frames of the personal: struggles, challenges, control and acceptance that come with looking alcohol and what it does to one as an individual. It is the "me" who is powerless against this mysterious (though possibly biochemical) force of compulsion, and thus it is "I" who must come to terms with the reality it imposes. The step programs that most people know reflect this understanding and take the initiative to bring together people who are framed by a similar life.

A different picture gets framed when one looks at the issues of drugs and addiction from a social constructs perspective; a conceptualization…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Adams, J. (2008). Fragmented Intimacy: Addiction in a social world. Springer Science. Auckland, NZ.

Wikipedia (2011). Framing (Social Sciences). Viewable at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Framing_(social_sciences).
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Observation of Various Life Stages

Words: 1442 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51229077

group meets downstairs in a church. There are "tables" where the members sit and discuss their issues. In this group there are two tables, nearly filled with about 20 people at each table. There are mostly middle-aged to older adults here (40 years old and up), but a few that are under 30 years of age. There is a pretty even distribution of males and females at the two tables. The general interaction between the members is causal and quite friendly. After sitting at one table I wait for the meeting to get started. Once it is started there are a lot of formalities: an introduction by the leader (I am later told that this person is referred to as the chairperson and this position is a volunteer that changes weekly), the reading the stipulations of the group, a prayer, asking if there are any first time attendees (I remained…… [Read More]

References

Kelly, J.F., Magill, M., & Stout, R.L. (2009). How do people recover from alcohol dependence? A systematic review of the research on mechanisms of behavior change in Alcoholics Anonymous. Addiction Research and Theory, 17, 236-259.

Rosenberg, H. (1993). Prediction of controlled drinking by alcoholics and problem drinkers.

Psychological Bulletin, 113, 129-139.

Vaillant, G.E. (2005). Alcoholics Anonymous: Cult or cure? Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 39(6), 431-436.
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College Students and Alcohol Use

Words: 5292 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74738903

Psychosocial factors, such as depression, anxiety and social support, also induce drinking. This study confirmed that social cognitive factors drove college students to report on their own drinking. Psychosocial motives drove them to do so only at 1%. Social support was the only significant psychosocial predictor. The awareness of both the positive and negative consequences of drinking was quite likely behind the willingness of college students to report on their own drinking. This implied that drinking was a deliberate and conscious decision on their part. Heavy drinkers viewed their drinking as something negative in that they perceived themselves as having reduced control over it. Peer norms were also found to be an important predictor of drinking as a perceived norm and behavior, which supports drinking. Parental drinking norms also surfaced, although not as strong as the preceding predictors (Kuther & Temoshin).

Environmental Policies

Many new studies attempted to determine if…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Barnett, N. et al. (2008). Profiles of college students mandated to alcohol intervention.

Journal of Studies on Alcohol: Alcohol Research Documentation, Inc. Retrieved on May 20, 2009 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6378/is_5_69/ai_n29473218/?tag=content;col1

Black, J.M.; Ausherman, J.A.; Kandaka, T.L.; Lam, E.T. C; and Jurjevic, S. C (2004).

Urban university students' knowledge of alcohol and drinking. American Journal of Health Studies: University of Alabama Department of Health Services. Retrieved on May 20, 2009 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOCTG/is_2_19/ai_n6361765/?tag=content;col1
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Long Day's Journey Into Night by Eugene O'Neill

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11947391

Journey into Night

It is an irony of Eugene O'Neill's career that his large-scale expressionist dramas of the 1920s and 1930s -- which earned Pulitzers for works like Strange Interlude and ultimately the Nobel Prize in Literature for O'Neill himself -- seem to have fallen entirely out of the repertory, and O'Neill is remembered chiefly for his least characteristic plays: Long Day's Journey Into Night and The Iceman Cometh. O'Neill's biographers Arthur and Barbara Gelb note that not only do these plays share an obsessive central concern with alcohol, O'Neill also "set both in 1912" and to some extent Long Day's Journey "can be regarded as its sequel" (Gelb and Gelb 506). The posthumous publication and staging of this autobiographical domestic drama Eugene O'Neill's classic American domestic drama Long Day's Journey Into Night has raised the question of why O'Neill apparently withheld the play during his lifetime. To some extent…… [Read More]

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Proposal for Unmet Community Need

Words: 1853 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32883355

Geagua County, OH

Planning -- The most effective strategy within a community for any public health issue is two-fold: education and focus. To accomplish this at the community level, there needs to be a broad level of focus and support from all levels of the government: local, State and Federal, in order for there to be a consistent and proactive message. Education should begin at the elementary school level, with teaching talking about substances, abuse and alternatives; and move through the school system as appropriate for the cognitive abilities of various age groups. In this way, the community can collaborate with schools to provide initiatives and programs that address the problem prior to it becoming as endemic, and offer proposed solutions in a way that almost everyone involved knows they can receive help if necessary. The educational process must also be pervasive and accessible -- people need a number to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bangeret-Drowns, R. (1988). The Effects of School-Based Substance Abuse Education. Journal of Drug Education, 18(3), 243-64.

Berkowitz, M., et al. (1991). Sociomoral Development and Drug and Alcohol Abuse. In W. Kurtines (Ed.), Handbook of Moral Behavior and Development (Vol. 3). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum.

Blondell, R. (2005). Ambulatory detoxification of patients with alchohol dependence. American Family Physician, 71(3), 495-502.

Cook, P., & Moore, M. (2002). The Economics of Alchohol Abuse. Health Affairs, 21(2), 120-33.
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Peace Keepers of the Northeast

Words: 2241 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92147282

This dance was very powerful as it did scare the European people. They did not fully understand the reason behind the dance and the religion, but they were very clear as to what the apocalypse was and they wondered if the Indians were somehow summoning the end of the world. Not soon after this Ghost dance caused such a commotion, an Indian by the name of Handsome Lake who was a leader for the Seneca tribe brought a new message to the Iroquois people. His message was to end the drinking. The Iroquois people had began to drink a lot of alcohol that was often offered to them from the European people during the fur trade. Handsome Lake believed that many of the problems that the Iroquois people faced was related to the alcohol. Many of the Indian people were drunk when they were trying to handle problems of poverty…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Kehoe, Alice Beck. North American Indian Tribes, Chapter 5. 1992 Prentice Hall.

Biolsi, Thomas and Zimmerman, Larry. Indians and Anthropologists, Chapter 9. 1997 Prentice Hall.

Iroquois Website. Retrieved December 19, 2009 from http://www.iroquois.net/.