Anatomy Essays (Examples)

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Greek Culture

Words: 2546 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31403257

Anatomy of an Aesthete

The Picture of Dorian Gray and the Rise of Aestheticism

Oscar ilde's the Picture of Dorian Gray is the manifesto of Late Victorian Aestheticism.

The Late Victorian Era was characterized by numerous artistic and literary movements that were reactions to the growing industrialization and homogenization of contemporary society. As trains, telephones, and factories rushed humankind headlong to an unknown future, many of the greatest lights of the Age looked back into the Past, and to a simpler, more clearly-defined time and place; a time and place with readily-recognized rules and standards. For centuries, the Classical orld of Ancient Greece and Rome had provided a model for modern Europeans. Artists, writers, philosophers, architects -- even musicians -- let themselves be guided by what they believed to be the Classical canons of behavior and taste. Until the dawn of the Industrial Age, Europe's intellectual class entertained no illusions…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aldrich, Robert. The Seduction of the Mediterranean: Writing, Art, and Homosexual Fantasy. New York: Routledge, 1993.

Beckson, Karl, ed. Oscar Wilde: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1997.

Boscagli, Maurizia. Eye on the Flesh: Fashions of Masculinity in the Early Twentieth Century. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1996.

Harris, Jose. "1 Ruskin and Social Reform." Ruskin and the Dawn of the Modern. Ed. Birch, Dinah. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. 7-33.
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Neuromuscular Issues and Parkinson's Disease

Words: 736 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94261949

Anatomy: Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease is a central nervous system disease that is degenerative. It disrupts normal functioning at the cellular level by reducing the activity of cells that secret dopamine (Davie, 109). That happens through the death of cells, as well, in a couple of different regions of the brain. The two regions most affected are both related to movement and learning. They also affect how a person reacts to something, and whether he or she feels like a particular behavior was rewarding. The pathways that connect the basal ganglia of the brain to other areas are all affected in people who have Parkinson's disease (Shulman, De Jager, & Feany, 196). The symptoms are based on the ways in which those pathways are disrupted by the disease process and the death of the cells. As these cells die, they are not able to stop the body's systems from activating…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davie, C.A. "A review of Parkinson's disease." British Medical Bulletin, 86(1): 109 -- 127. 2008. Print.

Shulman, J.M., De Jager, P.L., & Feany, M.B. "Parkinson's disease: Genetics and pathogenesis." Annual review of pathology, 6: 193 -- 222. 2011. Print.
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Faith and Science Today

Words: 2014 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28790437

Anatomy/Christianity

The Breath of Life

Throughout scripture the concept of breath represents life. Genesis 2:7

It is evident that we need to breathe to live and that without our respiratory system, we would die. But why is this? Can we know why other than to say that this is how our Creator designed us to be? Perhaps an understanding of our own respiratory system can help us to better understand our Creator? I think so.

What do we find in our nose? A kind of filter that keeps out of our lungs harmful particles and spores that would otherwise pollute them. This can be a symbol of how we should filter our minds of impure thoughts so as to keep our souls clean. It can also be a symbol of how important God's grace is in our souls -- it is to our souls as oxygen is to our bodies.…… [Read More]

South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.

Sheen, F. (1951). Three to Get Married. Princeton, NJ: Scepter Publishers.

Holy Bible, New Living Translation. (2004). IL: Tyndale House Publishers.
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Questions Concerning the Study of

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76550023


Homeostasis is the goal promoted by both positive and negative
feedback mechanisms. This is the principle which indicates that there is a
balance in autonomic life functions which the body attempts always to
maintain. This refers to such features as body temperature, heart rate,
respiration and the powering of vital organs. When stimuli create a
divergence from this status, the body will activate a set of responses
designed to regulate a return to balance.

4. In anatomical position, how many planes can be described and what
are their names?
There are three major anatomical planes, which are used to refer to
different ways of addressing the body and its systems. The anatomical
planes include the Coronal Plane, which refers to the frontal surface of
the body from head to foot. The Sagittal Plan refers to the surface which
might be viewed from a profile, indicating a lateral perspective on the…… [Read More]

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Quality of Life Among Tawau Hospital Sufering

Words: 8383 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85112392

Quality of Life Among Tawau Hospital Sufering From

Knee Osteoarthritis With Physiotherapy

Qualitative study of How Quality of Life of Tawau Hospital Staff

Suffering from Knee Osteoarthritis have been improved at Physiotherapy Unit.

To investigate how the Quality of Life among Tawau Hospital staff suffering from Osteoarthritis (knees) have been improved using Physiotherapy intervention.

The study employs qualitative techniques to collect data. The sample population is selected from people and Tawau Hospital staff visiting the physiotherapy unit. Approximately 100 sample valid questionnaires are collected and the data collected are used for the research findings. The study evaluates the extent the physiotherapy intervention has been able to improve the quality of life of participants. The physiotherapy intervention include physical exercise, and massage. The study measures the outcome of physiotherapy intervention using VAS (visual analogue scale). The reduction of pain has been used to measure the improvement of quality of life index…… [Read More]

References

Aoki, Y. Sugiura, S. Nakagawa, K et al. (2012).Evaluation of Nonspecific Low Back Pain Using a New Detailed Visual Analogue Scale for Patients in Motion, Standing, and Sitting: Characterizing Nonspecific Low Back Pain in Elderly Patients. Pain Research and Treatment.

Baba, D. Indah, D.D.D. Rasdan, I.A. (2010). Work Posture and Back Pain Evaluation in a Malaysian Food Manufacturing Company. American Journal of Applied Sciences 7 (4):, 473-479.

Breedveld, F.C. (2004). Osteoarthritis -- the Impact of a Serious Disease. Rheumatology. 43(Suppl. 1):i4 -- i8

Brigham and Women's Hospital (2009). Standard of Care: _Osteoarthritis of the Knee. Department of Rehabilitation Services.UK.
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Cardiac Arrest

Words: 3253 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91083108

Heart Disease

elationship between cardiac arrest and coronary cardiac disease

The heart is an essential organ in the human body, it keeps the individual alive. Understanding how the heart operates and functions is essential to help protect your heart from heart disease. Cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease are significant heart related illness that has a high mortality rate. It is important for individuals with pre-existing heart disease to understand the symptoms of cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease, since these are both leading causes of fatality in the United States. Understanding how the heart works, the individuals risk for heart disease, and how to prevent or delay heart disease is essential. In this paper I will address the relationship between cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease. I will also explain how the heart functions and discuss some ways of preventing cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease.

Cardiac Arrest

Cardiac…… [Read More]

References

Antonini-Canterin et. al. (2009). Association between carotid and coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve stenosis: an angiographic study. Angiology 60 (5) 596-600

CDC. (2010). Heart disease. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/ 

Dewey et. al. (2004). Coronary artery disease: new insights and their implications for radiology. European Radiology. 14 (6) 1048-1054

Escolar et. al. (2006). New imaging techniques for diagnosing coronary artery disease. Canadian Medical Association Journal. 174 (4) 487-495
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Healthy Heart vs Coronary Disease

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61031010

hen an heart needs more oxygen, such in times of exercise, stress or pharmacological stimuli, blood flow is increased to fulfill this demand. However, the physiological narrowing of arteries due to plaque build up found in coronary disease restricts blood flow to the heart, especially in times of when an increase in myocardial oxygen is needed. These restrictions mean a lessened CFR for the individual, which can lead to coronary ischemia, cardiac infarction, and several other dangerous effects. This physiological change in the coronary system, through the build up of plaque, occurs for several reasons. Lack of physical activity and poor nutrition, with the consumption of certain fats and cholesterols, can facilitate plaque build up. High blood pressure, obesity, depression, and anxiety are also contributing factors (Pazoki, Nabiour, Seyednezami, and Imami).

There are different treatment options for coronary artery disease. Two treatment clinical options include lifestyle modification and revascularization. Lifestyle…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kern, Morton, Amir Lerman, Jan-Willen Bech, Bernard De Bruyne, Eric Eeckhout, William Fearon, Stuart Higano, Michael Lim, and Martjin Meuwissen. "Physiological Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory ." American Heart Association Journal 114 (2006): 1321-1341. American Heart Association. Web. 16 Nov. 2010.

Pazoki, Raha, Iraj Nabipour, Nasrin Seyednezami, and Seyed Reza Imami. "Effects of a community-based healthy heart program on increasing healthy women's physical activity: a randomized controlled trial guided by Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR)." BMC Public Health 7 (2007): 216-220. Print.

Rub, M., Cremer, J., Krian, a., Meinertz, T., Werdan, K., & Zerkowski, H. "Different Treatment Options in Chronic Coronary Artery Disease." Deutschs Arzteblatt International 106.15 (10 Apr 2009): 253-261.

Shirato, Susan, and Beth Ann Swan. "Women and Cardiovascular Disease: An Evidentiary Review." MedSurg Nursing 19.5 (2010): 282-306. Print.
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Renaissance the Trend in Medicine

Words: 2914 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48408487



It is of extreme importance in medicine to know accurately the anatomical changes that take place in a certain disease for diagnosis and treatment. The man who created this science was Morgagni who taught us to think anatomically in our approach of a disease. Morgagni studied at Bologna under Valsalva and Albertini, who are notable persons themselves in the history of medicine. Morgagni did this in the form of letters to an unknown friend who inquired about Morgagni's thoughts and observations in the diseases he had seen. These included affections of the pericardium, diseases of the valves, ulceration, rupture, dilation and hypertrophy of the aorta which were detailedly described clinically and anatomically. Of all his entires, the section on aneurysm of the aorta is one of the best he had written. A good example of his letter was about angina pectoris.

The aorta was considerably dilated at its curvature; and,…… [Read More]

References

1. Evolution of Medicine.Online. Available from Internet, http:://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/tech/medicine/theEvolutionofmodernmedicin/legalese.html, Accessed May 12, 2007.

History of Anatomy. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.wikipedia.com Accessed May 12, 3007

Mayeaux, E.J. Jr. 1989. A History of Western Medicine and Surgery. Online. Available from Internet,  http://www.lsumc.edu.com , Accessed May 12, 2007

Medieval Medicine. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.wikipedia.com Accessed May 12, 3007
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Lungs What Are the Lungs

Words: 3387 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31909477

However, it was 1953 that the formation of serotonin was from the lungs was substantiated. It is also observed that detoxification of the blood takes place in the lungs. Later, it was observed that one of the important activities of the lung is to provide chemical filtration by shielding the regular circulation of blood from the attack of vasoactive mixtures and other exogenous compounds present in the arteries. The physiology of the lungs and its location makes the lung exclusively suitable to perform these activities. (Wet; Moss, 1998)

The total output from the cardiac system is obtained by the lungs whereas other organs acquire only a very small quantity of output. The blood that circulates the lungs is subject to the vast capillary endothelial plane of the body which is of seventy square meters. This aspect of output and circulation enable the lung to perform the efficient function of biochemical…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, Taylor. B. (1996) "Essentials for Animal Research: A Primer for Research Personnel"

Diane Publishing.

De Reuck, a.V. S; O'Connor, Maeve. (1962) "CIBA Foundation Symposium on Pulmonary

Structure and Function" a. Churchill Ltd.: London.
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Burned on Stove Biology Scenario

Words: 1137 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82618830

Or pressure. Or temperature (hot and cold, separately). Or vibration (both high- and low-frequency)." (Hancock, 1995) All over the surface f the skin are receptors that report warmth and there are others that report cold. Several types of nerves exist that have the ability to sense "cold, warmth pressure, pain, and more. The nerves that sense and transmit pain are called nociceptors. Nociceptors transmit electrical signals to your spinal column. In the spinal cord, electrical pain signals causes a release of chemicals which are called neurotransmitters, which activate other nerve cells that process and transmit the information to the brain. Important decisions occur in the spinal column: Acute pain like that from touching a hot surface raises a red flag and is routed to the brain immediately.. "The larger fibers convey electrical impulses very rapidly to the brain, and are thought to cause sharp pricking pain, while the very fine…… [Read More]

Bibliography

DeSanti, Leslie (2005) Pathophysiology and Current Management of Burn Injury Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 18(6), July/August 2005, pp 323-332

Hancock, Elise (1995) The Handy Guide to Touch - April 1995. Online available at http://www.jhu.edu/~jhumag/495web/touch.html.

Kane, Daniel (2004) Feb 19 How Your Brain Handles Love and Pain MSNBC Online available at http://www.sciam.com/search/index.cfm?QT=Q&SCC=Q&Q=burns%3A+skin+receptors.

Britt, Robert Roy (2006) The Pain Truth: How and Why We Hurt - Health Sci-Tech 31 January 2006 Live Science Online available at http://aolsearch.aol.com/aol/search?query=signals+to+brain+from+burn&page=4&nt=SG1_S I0&userid=-7493026336042476887&invocationType=topsearchbox.search&c lickstreamid=-7493026336042476889
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Tissue Maturation Body System Effects

Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40406059

e. hypertrophy). In the elderly, this process is reverse. Hence, the functional reserve capacities of the skeletal muscles decline with age, largely due to diminished levels of physical activity. As a result daily tasks once taken for granted become progressively more difficult, and eventually impossible, to perform. In illustration, a great deal of muscle force is required to simply stand up or to climb stairs. Therefore, skeletal system is relying upon the reserve capacity of the heart to provide the endurance needed to perform such activities. If an elderly person does not engage in some sort of endurance-based activities, he or she will not have the cardiac reserve capacity needed for daily tasks. More importantly, diminished capacity may not counteract illnesses or diseases. Although strength-based activities help the cardiac reserve, it may not benefit the skeletal system. "While resistance exercise promotes fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscles, the explosive power of…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, R. (2011). Muscle tissue. About.com Guide. Retrieved from http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/aa022808a.htm

Carpi, A. (1999). Basic anatomy - tissues & organs. Retrieved from http://web.jjay.cuny.edu/~acarpi/NSC/14-anatomy.htm

Lakatta, E.G. (1994). Cardiovascular reserve capacity in healthy older humans. Laboratory of Cardiovascular Science, Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, 6(4): 213-23.

Courtesy of Musculartory System BlogSpot
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Vestibular and Olfactory Sensory Systems Static and

Words: 1064 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88782789

Vestibular and Olfactory Sensory Systems

Static and Dynamic Equilibrium

Mechanisms of Vestibular-Mediated Equilibrium

There are two types of equilibrium that the vestibular system helps to maintain: static and dynamic (Virtual Medical Centre, 2010, para. 31). Static equilibrium provides feedback concerning head position or head movement when the body is stationary. In contrast, dynamic equilibrium involves sensing motion or acceleration/deceleration of the head. Acceleration can be further divided into sensing a change in linear velocity, either horizontally or vertically, and angular velocity associated with rotation of the head.

The vestibular system's contribution to maintaining equilibrium critically depends on inner ear structures. The saccule and utricle together provide sensory information concerning static equilibrium and linear acceleration, while the semicircular canals contribute information about angular acceleration (Virtual Medical Centre, 2010, para. 31-32). Both the saccule and utricle contain a small patch of hair cells and supporting cells, which are known as maculae. The…… [Read More]

References

Hain, T. And Helminski, J. (2001). Anatomy and physiology of the normal vestibular system. In S. Herdman (Ed.) Vestibular Rehabilitation, 3rd Edition (pp. 2-18). Philadelphia F.A. Davis Company.

Lledo, Peirre-Marie, Gheusi, Gilles, and Vincent, Jean-Didier. (2005). Information processing in the mammalian olfactory system. Physiological Reviews, 85, 281-317.

Virtual Medical Centre. (2010). Ear. VirtualMedicalCentre.com. Retrieved 12 Dec. 2011 from http://www.virtualmedicalcentre.com/anatomy/ear/29
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Plasma & Rbc Plasma Constitutes the Majority

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94076051

Plasma & BC

Plasma constitutes the majority of whole blood volume, about 46-63% (Martini, Nath, & Bartholomew, 2011). Plasma is the matrix of blood, contributing to blood's unique composition. Plasma has three main components: plasma proteins, water, and other solutes (Patton & Thibodeau, 2009). Plasma proteins are too large in size to get across capillary walls; therefore after the majority of these proteins are synthesized by the liver, they go into the bloodstream and remain there (Martini, Nath, & Bartholomew, 2011). The majority of plasma proteins are albumins. Albumin's role is to contribute to the osmotic pressure of plasma; they also serve as carrier proteins, transporting various hormones and fatty acids (Tortora & Derrickson, 2011). Globulin is another plasma protein whose role is to transport ions, thyroid and steroid hormones, and lipids; they also contain our antibodies that help our immune system (Martini, Nath, & Bartholomew, 2011). Fibrinogin is an…… [Read More]

References:

Martini, F., Nath, J., & Bartholomew, E. (2011).Fundamentals of anatomy and physiology.. (9th ed.). San Francisco: Pearson/Benjamin Cummings.

Patton, K.T., & Thibodeau, G.A. (2009). Anatomy & physiology. (7th ed.). Missouri: Mosby.

Tortora, G.J., & Derrickson, B.H. (2011). Principles of anatomy and physiology. (13th ed., Vol. 22). Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley.
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Computed Tomography

Words: 2585 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21707412

Computed tomography, more commonly know as a CT or CT scan, is an X-ray technique that is used to produce very detailed images of internal organs located in various parts of the body, such as the head, chest, and abdomen. Doctors use the images produced through this procedure to help diagnose and treat diseases. Other terms for the technique are also called computerized tomography or computerized axial tomography (CAT). While conventional X-ray exams produce two-dimensional images, CT scans uses an X-ray-sensing unit that rotates around your body and a large computer to create cross-sectional images of the inside of your body. This paper will address vital educational information including a brief history, uses for computed tomography, and the effects that it may have on the patient.

Computed Tomography

Brief History

British engineer, Godfrey Hounsfield of EMI Laboratories, England and Allan Cormack of Tufts University in Massachusetts invented computed tomography. Their…… [Read More]

References

Imaginis.com. Computerized Tomography Imaging. Accessed April 1, 2004, at http://www.imaginis.com/ct-scan/how_ct.asp.

International Medical News Group. (2001). CT scan radiation. Family Practice News, 31 (6) 35.

Frush, D. (2003, Nov. 1). In planning CT dese reduction, one size does not fit all - Body size, imaging indication, and scanner engineering create complex formula for success. Dianostic Imaging, p. NA.

MayoClinic.com. (1998-2004). "Mayo Clinic Health Information." Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.
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Stepping Up One Step and

Words: 1008 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39410551



So far, we have accomplished stepping up one step, but this is only half of the process necessary for reaching something on a high shelf. The second step, of course, is reaching up with the arm to grasp the desired object. The beginning of the process is pretty much the same -- a nerve impulse originates in the brain (possibly in the motor cortex for this more complex and less-often performed task), and then travels along the spinal cord and periphery nerves to the proper muscles (pbs.org). Again, the neuromuscular junction is the site of chemical/electrical messaging between he nerve and the muscle fiber, and the same process activates the muscle tissue.

It is worthwhile to examine exactly what process takes place in the muscle tissue once activated that actually enables movement. muscles work by contracting; at the cellular level, the muscle fibers actually cling together and shorten when activated,…… [Read More]

References

Cluett, J. (2009). "Information About Anatomy: Orthopedics." Accessed 17 May 2009. http://orthopedics.about.com/od/anatomy/Information_About_Anatomy.htm

Freudenrich, C. (2009). "How Muscles Work." Accessed 17 May 2009. http://health.howstuffworks.com/muscle1.htm

Pbs.org. "The Secret Life of the Brain." Accessed 17 May 2009.  http://www.pbs.org/wnet/brain/3d/
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Human Body Cavity the Internal

Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16317327

The large intestine begins near the lower coils of the small intestines but then ascends up the right side and bend back over the top of the highest loop of the small intestine. Several layers of muscle and sinewy tissue wrap around the area housing the internal organs (Iazzetti & igutti, 2007).

The other organs located in the major body cavity include the bladder, gall bladder, and pancreas. In addition, the female body cavity also contains a uterus.

Besides the major internal organs, there are major blood vessels that run down the body cavity directly from the heart and branch off to smaller arteries and veins that carry blood throughout the rest of the body (Iazzetti & igutti, 2007).

eferences

Iazzetti, G, igutti, E.…… [Read More]

References

Iazzetti, G, Rigutti, E. (2007). Atlas of Anatomy. London: TAJ Books.
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Vitruvian Man the Concept of

Words: 1302 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71789780

However, starting from this, Leonardo was able to use this conclusion in his mathematics work and "rationalize irrational geometry of square root of 2."

The rationalization mentioned in the previous paragraph is not only related to the proportions that exist between the different body parts, but also to the easiness with which the square and circle can be constructed and how these two perfect geometric shapes are correlated. As such, the drawing initially starts with the square. If rotated by 45 degrees, the square will result in a vertical geometric projection of itself. The difference between the extremity of the projected square and the side of the initial square will form the diameter of the circle. Calculated in palms, the area of the circle is 660 palms, while the area of the square is 576 palms. This makes for the differences between the two areas 84 palms, important because of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Vitruvius. Ten Books on Architecture. Translated by a committee, edited by Ingrid D. Rowland and Thomas Noble Howe; Cambridge University Press, 1999

2. Place, Robert. Leonardo's Vitruvian Man. 2000. On the Internet at http://thealchemicalegg.com/VitruviusN.html.Last retrieved on December 7, 2008

3. Turbeville, Joseph. An Angular Perspective of Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man. From "A Glimmer of Light from the Eye of a Giant: Tabular Evidence of a Monument in Harmony with the Universe.

4. Bowman, David. Vitruvian Man. 2008. On the Internet at http://www.aiwaz.net/a6.Last retrieved on December 7, 2008
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Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Systems Integrated

Words: 2173 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56960433

Integration of Cardiovascular/Gastrointestinal Systems

Integration of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems within the human body

The integration of the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems allow for nutrients to be introduced, broken down, and absorbed by body to maintain and promote healthy bodily functions. Independently, these systems serve separate functions, but when working in conjunction, help to transport necessary nutrients throughout the body, while maintaining and promoting homeostasis within the systems. Any imbalance within these systems will greatly affect the body, as a whole, and can lead to potentially fatal results.

Integration of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems within the human body

The gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems of the human body help to breakdown and transport items that are ingested, such as food and medication, to the necessary parts of the body, expelling wastes that are not needed. Separately, the gastrointestinal and cardiac systems have different functions, but when the systems work in conjunction…… [Read More]

References:

Bowen, R 2002, Salivary glands and saliva, Colorado State University, viewed 14 September 2011,  http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/pregastric/salivary.html 

Cleveland Clinic 2005, The structure and function of the digestive system, viewed 29 September 2011, http://www.cchs.net/health/health-info/docs/1600/1699.asp?index=7041

Cotterill, S 2000, The cardiovascular system (heart and blood): medical terminology for cancer, Department of Child Health, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, viewed 14 September 2011,  http://www.cancerindex.org/medterm/medtm8.htm 

Gregory, M n.d., The circulatory system, Clinton Community College, State University of New York, viewed 15 September 2011, http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu/faculty/michael.gregory/files/Bio%20100/Bio%20100%20Lectures/Organ%20Systems/Circulatory%20System/Circulatory%20System.htm
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Judge N L 2007 Assessing and

Words: 843 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84039065

While less than a full page is devoted to actual diseases and conditions and specific mention of diagnostic methods and treatments of these conditions, over three pages are given over to a general discussion of assessment and treatment (Judge 2007). Though there are conditions that might not present in ways conducive to these general methods, Judge notes that the bulk of musculoskeletal conditions often have similar complaints, especially with range of motion and pain (Judge 2007). The consistent symptom presentation and other related factors makes this approach most efficient.

The similarities can also make the correct diagnoses of a specific musculoskeletal condition in contrast to another somewhat difficult. Judge lays out a careful yet efficient assessment procedure that quickly determines the underlying cause of the most commonly presented musculoskeletal symptoms, giving the working nurse an excellent and handy practical guide in providing the most help to patients. One of the…… [Read More]

References

Judge, N.L. (2007). "Assessing and managing patients with musculoskeletal conditions,"

Nursing standard, 22(1), pp. 51-7
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Functions of the Skeletal System

Words: 1025 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70872691



Any brain injury is serious and Julie should not have continued the climb. Seeking immediate medical attention as soon as the injury occurred may have saved Julie's life. The severe headache and ringing in her ears is another sign that the bump on the head was not so light, but still consistent with a Grade 1 concussion. Although Julie did not lose consciousness, she still had the key signs of a concussion.

The treatment of a concussion includes rest and inactivity. Aspirin should be avoided, as it may contribute to continued internal bleeding. Continuing the hike may have caused Julie's blood pressure to remain high, contributing to the inability of her body to form clots at the injury points. The onset of severe headache was a sign that things had become critical. Julie's life may have been saved had the severity of the injury been recognized from the beginning and…… [Read More]

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Stem Cell Stems Cells Are

Words: 1836 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12906512



eferences

Condic, M.L. (2007, January). What We Know about Embryonic Stem Cells. First Things: A Monthly Journal of eligion and Public Life 25+.

Patel, K., & ushefsky, M. (2005). President Bush and Stem Cell Policy: The Politics of Policy Making. White House Studies, 5(1), 37+.

Pickrell, J. (2006, September). "Instant Expert: Stem Cells." NewScientist.com news service. etrieved on March 4, 2007 at http://www.newscientist.com/channel/sex/stem-cells/dn9982

Shapiro, .S. (2006). Bioethics and the Stem Cell esearch Debate. Social Education, 70(4), 203+.

Stem Cell Basics." (2006). Stem Cell Information from the National Institute of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. etrieved on March 4, 2007 at http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/basics/

Wagner, C.G. (2007, January/February). Values Conflicts in Stem-Cell esearch: Governments Struggle with Bioethical Issues. The Futurist, 41, 8+.

Precursor cells are also known as pluripotent cells, i.e., having the ability to replicate (to form other stem cells) and to make all other specialized cells that make…… [Read More]

References

Condic, M.L. (2007, January). What We Know about Embryonic Stem Cells. First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life 25+.

Patel, K., & Rushefsky, M. (2005). President Bush and Stem Cell Policy: The Politics of Policy Making. White House Studies, 5(1), 37+.

Pickrell, J. (2006, September). "Instant Expert: Stem Cells." NewScientist.com news service. Retrieved on March 4, 2007 at http://www.newscientist.com/channel/sex/stem-cells/dn9982

Shapiro, R.S. (2006). Bioethics and the Stem Cell Research Debate. Social Education, 70(4), 203+.
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Brain Cells Distinguish Between the

Words: 374 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12378271

They cannot carry impulses as they do not have an axon and dendrites. The oligodendrocyte cells are more numerous than the neurons and make up almost 90% of the brain cells. Thus, to differentiate between a neuron and oligodendrocyte the researcher would have to eliminate the presence of the axon and dendrite and check the density of the presence of these cells within the brain sample. [Wikipedia, 2005]

ASTOCYTE: These are another type of Glial cells that can easily be differentiated through their star shape. The astrocytes are seen to contain many secondary filaments that function just like dendrites in neurons. When examined the nuclei of the astrocytes is seen as smaller than that of the oligodendrocytes. The glial cells are non-neural and can easily be distinguished from the neurons. [Glia, 2005]

eferences

Author Not Available, the Brain, Enchanted Learning.com http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/anatomy/brain/Neuron.shtml,2005

Author Not Available, Glial Cell, Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia,…… [Read More]

References

Author Not Available, the Brain, Enchanted Learning.com http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/anatomy/brain/Neuron.shtml,2005

Author Not Available, Glial Cell, Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, 2005 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glia

Author Not Available, Glia, 2005,  http://www.mb.jhu.edu/tins/media/Neuroglia.txt
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Biology of the Mind The

Words: 1285 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34730696

This system results in stable blood concentrations of the hormones that are regulated by the pituitary gland (Reiser and Kemp, p.1).

This complex system of self-regulation means that there are multiple opportunities for the glands to stop working properly.

The hypothalamus, which is located in the brain, is, in many ways, the control center of the endocrine system. The hypothalamus secretes hormones that, in turn, either suppress or stimulate hormone release by the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland then uses the messages it receives from the hypothalamus to govern its secretion of stimulating hormones to other glands in the endocrine system. The pituitary gland sends messages to other glands in the endocrine system, as well as producing important hormones that regulate bodily functions without requiring the intervention of other glands. The hormones produced by the pituitary gland include: growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, Harriet. "For Some, Psychiatric Trouble May Start in the Thyroid." The New York

Times. N.p. 21 Nov. 2011. Web. 10 Dec. 2012.

Rieser, Marianne and Stephen Kemp. "Anatomy of the Endocrine System." Emedicine Health.

1-11. 7 Dec. 2011. Web. 9 Dec. 2012.
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Cardiac Cycle Diastole and Systole Phases and

Words: 1411 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90976222

Cardiac Cycle: Diastole and Systole Phases and Heart Disease

The objective of the research in this study is to examine the cardiac cycle from the anatomy and physiology perspective. Toward this end, literature in this area of inquiry, which for the purpose of this study is the cardiac cycle, is examined and reported.

Two Phases of the Cardiac Cycle

The work of Klabunde reports that the single cycle of cardiac activity may be divided into two primary phases stated to be those of: (1) the diastole phase; and (2) the systole phase. (Klabunde, 2012, p.1, p.1) Diastole is representative of the span of time when the "ventricles are relaxed…blood is passively flowing from the left atrium (LA) and right atrium (RA) into the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV), respectively." (Klabunde, 2012, p.1) The mitral and triscuspid or atrioventircular valves are reported to "separate the atria from the ventricles…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chute, RM (2012) Chapter 19: The Cardiovascular System: Blood Vessels. Retrieved from:  http://www.apchute.com/ap2chap/chapt19.htm 

Fukuta, H. And Little, W.C. (2008) The Cardiac Cycle and the Physiological Basis of Left Ventricular Contraction, Ejection, Relaxation, and Filling. Heart Fail Clin. 2008. Jan 4(1):1-11. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2390899/ 

Klabunde, R.E. (2012) Cardiac Cycle. Cardiovascular Physiology Concepts. Retrieved from:  http://www.cvphysiology.com/Heart%20Disease/HD002.htm 

Limacher, MC (2004) Understanding the Impact of Abnormal Cardiac Activation on Cardiac Function. J Am Cardiol 2004;43(9): 1532-1533. Retrieved from: http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleid=1135544
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Hematology and Its Practice

Words: 1018 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58136264

Hematology is the branch of medicine that deals with blood. This includes functions of blood, organs and organisms in the body that create blood, and diseases that are concerned with the blood. Each component of the blood has an equally important role and the body cannot function properly if one of these abilities is in some way hindered. Blood itself is composed of plasma, platelets, and red and white blood cells. Each of these parts work together inside the human body in order to make a fully-functioning human; if any of the components of the blood fail, the rest of the body will not be able to function properly.

Adult humans have approximately five liters of blood in their bodies at one time. The most abundant cells in human blood are red blood cells. These cells are proteins which create iron and function to allow oxygen to travel throughout the…… [Read More]

References:

"Blood Basics" (2010). American Society of Hematology.

Brass, Lawrence (2010). "Understanding and Evaluating Platelet Function." Blood. (1): 387-96.

"The Human Heart" (2011). The Franklin Institute.
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Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cell Recent Studies

Words: 3683 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55971983

Intrinsically Photosensitive etinal Ganglion Cell

ecent studies on biological anatomy of the eye discovered an additional photoreceptor within the mammalian eye. The cells discovered mediate the primary non-image visual activities with the vision system. The functioning of these cells aids in various significant processes including the regulation of the papillary reflex activity in response to light, as well as, the circadian photo entrainment. These cells, called the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells respond to more than the absolute light. The ipGCs have a unique feature of activity, as they differ from the usual photoreceptor cells of cones and rods. The rods and cones mediate on the vision of images by signaling the contrasts in light after adaptation. Interestingly, the ipGCs also do adapt to light contrast. The cells show sensitivity to flash of light, as is the case with other photoreceptors. The factor of action of the intrinsically photosensitive ganglion…… [Read More]

References

1. Bellintani-guardia, B., & Ott, M. (2002). Displaced retinal ganglion cells project to the accessory optic system in the chameleon (chamaeleo calyptratus). Experimental Brain Research, 145(1), 56-63. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-002-1091-z

2. Ben Simon, G.,J., Hovda, D.A., Harris, N.G., Gomez-Pinilla, F., & Goldberg, R.A. (2006). Traumatic brain injury induced neuroprotection of retinal ganglion cells to optic nerve crush. Journal of Neurotrauma, 23(7), 1072-82. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2006.23.1072

3. Engelund, A., Fahrenkrug, J., Harrison, A., & Hannibal, J. (2010). Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) is co-stored with PACAP in projections from the rat melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells. Cell and Tissue Research, 340(2), 243-55. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-010-0950-3

4. Henderson, D., & Miller, R.F. (2003). Evidence for low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium currents in the dendrites of tiger salamander retinal ganglion cells. Visual Neuroscience, 20(2), 141-52. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/198275379?accountid=458
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Angiography Types Categories Signs and Symptoms Treatment Imaging Modality

Words: 1082 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59741103

Angiography;, Types Categories, , Signs & Symptoms, Treatment, Imaging Modality

Angiography

An angiography involves the use of water-soluble X-ray contrast media by injecting it into blood streams in arteries or veins with the purpose of imaging blood vessels. The process is meant to observe normal or pathological conditions of the vessel organization. By seeing the lumen of blood vessels and organs, an angiography can provide information concerning conditions like luminal narrowing and aneurismal widening. Vessel access is essential and serious complications can appear if the substance is unable to pervade the veins and arteries, but this is rare and unlikely to occur. hile these are some of the conditions that are frequently detected through an angiography, it can also play an important role in analyzing sources of bleeding, tumors, and diverse malformations in veins and arteries.

The discovery of X-rays led to some of the first experiments with angiographies as…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Ford-Martin, P.A. (2002). Angiography. Retrieved November 14, 2013, from http://www.healthline.com/galecontent/angiography#1

Osborne, A.G. (1999). Diagnostic Cerebral Angiography. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Snellen, H.A., Dunning, A.J., & Arntzenius, A.C. (1981). History and perspectives of cardiology: catherization, angiography, surgery, and concepts of circular control. Leiden University Press.

Thomas, A.M.K. & Banerjee, A.K. (2013). The History of Radiology. Oxford University Press.
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Androstenedione in the Major League Baseball Season

Words: 1582 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84928160

Androstenedione

In the Major League aseball season of 1998, Mark McGwire became famous for breaking Roger Maris' home run record. Later it was found out that McGwire's power hitting came from a muscle building synthetic hormone called Androstenedione or Androstenediol. This supplement, nicknamed "Andro" became the first in a list of performance-enhancing substances called pro-hormones. The scrutiny of McGwire's performance was overshadowed by the fact that many professional athletes were using it. Also, this substance was not banned by the aseball Commission. This compound is called a pro-hormone because it is a precursor to testosterone. It metabolizes directly into testosterone.

There are some differences between the -dione and the -diol version. In the former, there are two carbonyl (-C=O) groups. These groups are replaced by alcohol (-C-OH) groups in the diol. For the purpose of this work, which involves really understanding the post-chemical positive and negative side effects, we can…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ruzicka, L., and A. Wettstein. "The Crystalline Production of the Testicle Hormone Testosterone." Helvetica Chimica Acta 18 (1935): 1264-75.

Kochakian, C.D., and J.R. Murlin. "Relationship of Synthetic Male Hormone Androstenedione to the Protein and Energy Metabolism of Castrated Dogs and the Protein Metabolism of a Normal Dog." Amer J. Physiol 117 (1936): 642-57.

Hacker, R., and C. Mattern. "Androstenedione." Arrowdeen Ltd. Germany: DE 42 14953 A1, 1995.

Stalheim-Smith, Ann, and Greg K. Fitch. Understanding Human Anatomy and Physiology. Minneapolis/St. Paul: West Pub. Co., 1993.pp. 1 v. (various pagings)
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Positron Emission Tomography

Words: 2676 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69626907

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

PET represents a new step forward in the way scientists and doctors look at the brain and how it functions. An X-ray or a CT scan shows only structural details within the brain. The PET scanner gives us a picture of the brain at work. - What is PET?

The epigraph above is reflective of the enthusiasm being generated among clinicians concerning the advent of positron emission tomography and its potential for imaging the human brain. The introduction of sophisticated neuroimaging techniques such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has shifted the emphasis of neuropsychology from lesion localization to diagnosing the etiology of diseases (Maruish & Moses, 1997).

Behavioral neurology also benefited from innovations in neuroimaging techniques. The advent of improvements in the imaging of brain anatomy through computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MI), as well as functional imaging with single photon emission…… [Read More]

References

Charney, D.S., Hoffer, P.B. & Kosten, T.R. et al. (1995). Opiate Dependence and Withdrawal: Preliminary Assessment Using Single Photo Emission Computerized Tomography. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 21(1), 47.

Imaging Parkinson's. (December 14, 2002). Science News, 162(24), 382.

Jensen, K.B. (1991). Humanistic scholarship as qualitative science: Contributions to mass communication research. In K.B. Jensen & N.W. Jankowski (eds.). A handbook of qualitative methodologies for mass communication research (17-43). New York: Routledge.

Lincoln, Y.S., & Guba, E.G. (1990). Judging the quality of case study reports. Qualitative Studies in Education, 3(1), 53-59.
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Kinesiology Human Kinetics

Words: 2279 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39999107

Kinesiology -- Human Kinetics

Dunking

Dunking, also known as slam dunk, is a basketball trick in which the player jumps in the air and dunks the ball in the basket with one or both the hands over the rim of the basketball hoop. It is a popular shot among the audience and provides an entertaining experience to the viewers. Slam dunk contests are also held separately due to the popularity of this shot.

Phases of the movement

There are four distinct phases involved in dunking. In the first phase, the player or MJ in this case, extends his body by bending his right knee and extending his left leg so that it propels him off the ground. In the second phase, he is jumping in the air and his right knee is more bent than his left knee. He also raises his right elbow and extends his left arm to…… [Read More]

References

Hoffman, Shirl. (2009). Introduction to Kinesiology: Studying Physical Activity. Illinois: Human Kinetics.

Redmond, Kevin; Foran, Andrew; Dwyer, Sean. (2009). Quality Lesson Plans for Outdoor Education. Illinois: Human Kinetics.

Milner, Clare. (2008). Functional Anatomy for Sport and Exercise. Kentucky: Taylor & Francis.

Pangrazi, Robert; Dauer, Victor. (1979). Lesson Plans for Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. Minneapolis: Burgess Publishing Company.
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Regulations of Urine Output Through Hormones

Words: 532 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41098157

Hormonal egulation of Urine

Human beings are made of 75% water. The huge percentage of water in the human body is attributed to the constant need to sustain fluid balance through drinking water. However, the quantity of ingested water needs to be balanced with the amount and concentration of urine generated so as to regulate the volume of fluid and osmolarity within an ordinary range. Urine is formed in the human body through three major processes that occur in the nephrons i.e. glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and turbular secretion (McCann et. al., 2002, p.605). The quantities of substances reabsorbed and secreted in the nephrons are varied by the kidneys, which contributes to changes in the composition of excreted urine.

Urine output or excretion is usually regulated by several hormones that also play a crucial role in regulation of urine. Vasopressin is one of the hormones that regulate urine output and…… [Read More]

References

McCann et. al. (2002). Illustrated manual of nursing practice (3rd ed.). Springhouse, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

McCann et. al. (2007). Straight A's in anatomy & physiology: a review series. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Rubin, R.H. & Pfaff, D.W. (2010). Hormone/behavior relations of clinical importance: endocrine systems interacting with brain and behavior. Burlington, MA: Elsevier Inc.
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Red Wolf and Different Aspects Related to

Words: 1943 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50828426

red wolf and different aspects related to this species. I have included information about its taxonomy, morphology & anatomy, distribution, habitat, feeding, predators, behavior, reproduction, development and economic value. Over all, I have given thorough information regarding the life and habits of the red wolf that is now an endangered animal.

Taxonomy

The red wolf is a species of wolf that is smaller in size and its color varies from reddish gray to almost black. It is commonly known as red wolf. The red wolf is considered as the most beautiful of all the wolves on the planet (Sutton, 1998). However, it has been given the scientific name of Canis rufus. It belongs to the Family Canidae and Order Carnivora (Kelly & Phillips, 2000, p. 247). As far as the status of red wolf is concerned, it has been categorized as an endangered living creature as this species of wolf…… [Read More]

References

Dahl, M. (1997). The Wolf. Minnesota: Capstone Press. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from http://books.google.com.pk/books?id=HomHpmeIyWkC&printsec=frontcover&dq=the+ wolf&hl=en&sa=X&ei=f_FNUZ2tHeqR7AbG5YHwBA&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA

Kelly, B.T., & Phillips, M.K. (2000). Red Wolf. Endangered Animals: A Reference Guide to Conflicting Issues (p. 247+). Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. Print.

Mech, L.D., & Boitani, L. (2003). Wolves: Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. Print.

Paradiso, J.L., & Nowak, R.M. (1972, November 29). Canis rufus. Mammalian Species, 22, 1-4. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from  http://www.science.smith.edu/msi/pdf/i0076-3519-022-01-0001.pdf
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Environmental Philosophy

Words: 1537 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59801288

Environmental Philosophy

The first Grays arrived in 2010, but they did not come en masse until a century later. The initial group of twenty brought with them a plethora of testing equipment from their home planet and took with them a total of two thousand samples from our environment. With the cooperation of the United Nations Council on Extraterrestrial Life (UNCEL), the Grays were permitted to take with them soil samples from hundreds of Earth locations and hundreds of botanical samples, many of which were of plants edible to humans but many of which were deemed palatable by the Grays. The Grays also took atmospheric air samples and water samples, both saline and non-saline, with them. Once the extensive surveys determined that their species could and would live on Earth comfortably, and once UNCEL approved it, about ten thousand of the Grays were permitted to come to the planet. The…… [Read More]

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Health Letter to Friend Hormone Problems Who

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92539532

Health Letter to Friend

Hormone problems. Who can't relate to those these days? People talk a lot about symptoms like high blood pressure, emotional ups and down, obesity, all of which might well be related to serious medical concerns that come with our age, or that might be caused by stress or junk food!

Which means you are right to have questions and a bit of anxiety. Some hormone conditions (minor or severe) need attention because they tell us how well the endocrine system is in balance -- and it's the endocrine system that influences how the body works and how different parts of our system function together. So the balance is important.

But hormone imbalances can vary a lot, and it takes information to figure out what's wrong. Diabetes (or being overweight), reproduction problems, infertility, thyroid conditions, high blood pressure, poor cholesterol levels and even lipids (not putting on…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

Kemp, S., Chausmer, A.B., and Talavera, F., (2011) emedicineHealth, Anatomy of the Endocrine System. Retrieved on October 15, 2011 from  http://www.emedicinehealth.com/anatomy_of_the_endocrine_system/article_em.htm .
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Gall Bladder Disorders

Words: 821 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57229200

Anatomy [...] gall bladder disorders, with background information for the first page, and then homeopathic treatments on the second page. Must be alternative treatments to surgery, drugs etc. (ex, diet)

The gall bladder is a small, pear-shaped organ nestled beneath the liver. It stores treats the bile from the liver, and then dumps the bile into the intestines. Gall bladders can suffer several disorders, such as gallstones, gall bladder sludge, infection and inflammation, and even cancer. Some symptoms of gall bladder disorders include nausea or vomiting, pain in the upper abdomen or between the shoulders, abdominal bloating, continued intolerance of fatty foods, and gas and/or indigestion (Comforth). Patients may also notice a fever, or slight jaundice (yellow skin or whites of the eyes) (Bartel). Gallstones are the most common form of gall bladder disorder, and usually are the cause of at least 80% of gall bladder disorders. Usually, there are…… [Read More]

References

Bartel, Kent R. "Gall Bladder Symptoms." New Hope Health Clinic. 2003. 3 Dec. 2004.

<  http://www.newhopehealthclinic.com/gall_bladder_symptoms.htm 

Editors. Van Nostrand's Scientific Encyclopedia. 3rd ed. Princeton, NJ: D. Van Nostrand, 1958.

Comforth, Tracee. "Symptoms of Gallbladder Disease." About.com. 2004. 3 Dec. 2004.
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History of Surgery

Words: 6608 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18946792

¶ … History of Surgery had been started from the prehistoric time with its appropriate technique and tools applicable during the age. There was no sophisticated care of hygiene and anatomic knowledge in the early days; the basic research was started using trial and error on every case and it had set a very strong basic which still makes sense and counts into modern practice.

The following summary of history of surgery is compiled from various sources based on the timeline set in dr. Schell's lecture: The History of Surgery.

The Ancient Medicine (Prehistoric Time)

People had strong magic beliefs and connection to multiple gods during the prehistoric time, so that any cases of illness were also believed as the punishments from angry gods for community's or one's moral failure. Some common cases recorded were respiratory and digestive problems, infections, and gynecologic disorders. Life expectancy low, then 28-35 years was…… [Read More]