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Ancient Kingdoms- Expansion and Empire Building Ancient

Words: 1649 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27599323

Ancient Kingdoms- Expansion and Empire Building

Ancient kingdoms and their expansion strategies were uniform throughout the ancient world. Persia, Rome, Athens and Sparta had expanded their kingdoms by means of conquests, wars and consolidation. The enlargement of kingdoms had but one purpose i.e. security as Thomas Hobbes notes: "If there is no power erected, or not great enough for our security, every man will and may lawfully rely on his own strength for caution against all other men" (99). Greece, Russia and all other major empires of the ancient world had their focus on just one thing, security which they sought through either conquests or consolidation with weaker nations.

It is strange but true that all major empires especially Sparta, Athens and Persia have histories that were interconnected. It was always believed both by the rulers and the ruled that mightier forces had the right to rule and for this…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

History of the Peloponessian War, Thucydides

Herodotus, Translations of the Histories, by A. de Selincourt

Hobbes, Thomas. "Of Commonwealth." Leviathan. Ed. Nelle Fuller. New York:

Everyman's Library, 1973.
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Ancient Societies and Their Philosophies

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 10485778

This was true for example in the northern countries of Europe where Protestantism had firmly embedded itself an thrown off Church teaching. ars were the result as the Holy Roman Empire attempted to put down the Protestant Rebellions -- but the Peace of estphalia in 1648 finally and politically gave the Protestant countries in the north of Europe the right to exercise their new religions. Humanism, indeed, was spreading as a result of the Renaissance and many societies were willing to adopt it.

orks Cited

Bennett, Judith. Queens, hores and Maidens: omen in Chaucer's England.

University of London. 5 March 2002. Royal Halloway, Hayes Robinson Lecture Series No. 6. eb. 23 March 2011.

Haaren, John. Famous Men of Greece. NY: American Book Company, 1904.

Johnson, Paul. Art: A New History. NY: HarperCollins, 2003.

Jusserand, J.J. English ayfaring Life in the Middle Ages. Chatham, UK: &J Mackay & Co. Ltd., 1950.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennett, Judith. Queens, Whores and Maidens: Women in Chaucer's England.

University of London. 5 March 2002. Royal Halloway, Hayes Robinson Lecture Series No. 6. Web. 23 March 2011.

Haaren, John. Famous Men of Greece. NY: American Book Company, 1904.

Johnson, Paul. Art: A New History. NY: HarperCollins, 2003.
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World During First Century CE

Words: 1350 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82327653

political, social and economical processes of the first century AD, it's important to distinguish main superpower, which dictated its values and spread its influence on other nations and ethnic groups. If to look on the problem from these perspective the problems that arose from such interaction will become obvious and clear. That's why we have to describe the processes that took place in the oman Empire, the only super state on the world's map of that epoch.

At the beginning of the first century the power of oman empire had expended over the territories of Mediterranean region: omans had conquered Britain, Spain in the West and reached eastern borders of their possessions on the territories of modern Armenia, Northern Mesopotamia in the East, omania in the North and Sarah in the South. oman emperors starting from Julius Caesar expanded and empowered oman Empire, its territories, increased army and turned into…… [Read More]

Reference:

Craig, Albert M. Heritage of World Civilizations, Combined Volume (6th Edition) Prentice Hall; 6th edition 2002
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world history

Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35178739

Jerry H. Bentley, the word "world history" has different meanings for different societies. While some may define it as a broad analysis of the whole world's history, others believe it implies foreign history. But, this word doesn't actually correspond to either definition. It denotes historical learning which undertakes an overt comparison of experiences beyond individual societal boundaries or studies interactions among individuals hailing from diverse communities or studies broad historical processes and trends which extend beyond discrete communities. Besides highlighting cross-cultural dealings in a historical context, one chief concern of the major part of modern world history deals with constructing alternative approaches to the established Eurocentric perspectives of history.[footnoteRef:1] [1:. Jerry H. Bentley, A Companion to Western Historical Thought, ed. Lloyd Kramer and Sarah Maza (Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishers, 2002), 393.]

Ever since historical events began to be documented, the element of world history was apparent. The ancient world lacked access…… [Read More]

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Ancient Art Sarcophagi

Words: 2774 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 54746192

Roman Sarcophagi sculptures, one sarcophagus of portraying Roman deity as portrayed on the Sarcophagus with the Indian Triumph of Dionysus' triumphal return from India, contrasted with the other the Sarcophagus Depicting a Battle between Soldiers and Amazon made for a military leader.

During the second and 3rd centuries, inhumation became more and more used than cremation, and this created a push for a greater need for sarcophagi, as the departed were placed inside these vessels. "Sarcophagi are of eminent importance for the study of Roman art, for they provide the largest single body of sculptural material in which we may study both the style and subject matter of the art of the tumultuous years of the later Roman empire, when there are few other monuments with pictorial relief to which we can turn… through sarcophagus reliefs we can trace and re-experience the profound shift in pagan religious thought, away from…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Awan, H.T.. "Roman Sarcophagi." metmuseum.org. The Metropolitan Museum, n.d.

Web. 1 Apr 2014.

Koortbojian, Michael Myth, Meaning, and Memory on Roman Sarcophagi. Berkeley:

University of California Press, 1995.
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Ancient Roman History the Objective

Words: 717 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1078821

" (New Standard Encyclopedia, 1986) There were two classes of people in ancient Rome, specifically those who were the patricians, or landowners and the plebeians who were poor farmers and those who worked in the city as well as those who had gained citizenship.

III. BEST RESENTATIVE of the GOOD SIDE of ROME

The emperor Marcus Aurelius who is remembered for his excellent form of a working government is stated to have passed away during the year of 180 a.D. during a war with the tribes of the Danube River, who were viscous tribes. The government was broke and the countrymen of Rome were sick from the plagues that had been infecting the land. The son of Marcus Aurelius, Commodus was spoiled and loved pleasure. Under the rule of Commodus, the government was poorly run and the result is that Rome is stated to have fallen into decay.

IV. RULE…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Charlemagne (2006) Lucid Cafe Website. Online available at http://www.lucidcafe.com/library/96apr/charlemagne.html.

Rome (1986) New Standard Encyclopedia. Standard Educational Corporation Chicago, Illinois.

Durrant, Will (nd) a Story of Civilization. Online available at http://www.chronique.com/Library/MedHistory/charlemagne.htm

Ancient Roman History
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Ancient Accomplishments and Later Appearances

Words: 357 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87655464



The Sumerians of Mesopotamia were also the first to use iron, They recovered the metal from meteorites and used it for spear tips and ornaments. Later smelting techniques developed in the area to purify the iron, and these spread to Europe via trade routes. By the Middle Ages, large foundries existed for smelting and forging iron into the many things it was used for. Basic trade rules and organization also passed from the Sumerians to Europe; methods of keeping accounts and even early guilds and merchant groups were part of Sumer, and passed est with trade (Airmet).

orks Cited

Airmet. "The History of Iron orking." Accessed 26 July 2009. http://www.airmetmetalworks.com/iron-working-history.html

Hooker, Richard. "Ancient China: The Shang." Accessed 26 July 2009. http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/ANCCHINA/SHANG.htm

O'Connor, J.J. And E.F. Robertson. "Egyptian Numerals." Accessed 26 July 2009. http://www.gap-system.org/~history/HistTopics/Egyptian_numerals.html… [Read More]

Works Cited

Airmet. "The History of Iron Working." Accessed 26 July 2009.  http://www.airmetmetalworks.com/iron-working-history.html 

Hooker, Richard. "Ancient China: The Shang." Accessed 26 July 2009.  http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/ANCCHINA/SHANG.htm 

O'Connor, J.J. And E.F. Robertson. "Egyptian Numerals." Accessed 26 July 2009.  http://www.gap-system.org/~history/HistTopics/Egyptian_numerals.html
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Ancient India the Bhavagad-Gita in the Beginning

Words: 1835 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 53161579

Ancient India

The havagad-Gita

In the beginning of "The hagavad-Gita," two groups of opponents prepare for battle. On one side, the one hundred sons of Dhritarashtra stand and on the other side, and the Pandava brothers stand. These soldiers are in the middle of a family feud over the right to govern the land of Kurukshetra.

A soldier named Arjuna, who is the leader of the Pandava armies, prepares to battle as Lord Krishna heads toward the opposition. Just before the battle, Arjuna asks Lord Krishna for advice.

Arjuna is ridden with hesitation and guilt as he faces his family and knows he will have to kill many loved ones to win the battle. Arjuna has set down his weapon and is ready to sacrifice his life. Arjuna approaches Krishna to tell him about his emotions regarding the battle. "Krishna, I seek no victory, or kingship or pleasures" (Miller, 25).…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Miller, Barbara Stoler, translator. The Bhagavad-Gita: Krishna's Counsel in Time of War. New York NY, Bantam Books, 1986.
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Ancient Lit Gilgamesh Questions Why

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88044406



3. What are some of the themes you notice in the "Love Songs"?

The Egyptian love songs use the terms "brother" and "sister" as generic references to male and female lovers and suggest intimacy as well as the taboo of incest. Brother-sister unions were already written into Egyptian mythology by the time the love songs were penned. Also, the love songs reveal an emerging theme of romantic love, which almost seems out of place in ancient literature.

4. Did the erotic or explicit nature of some of the love songs surprise you? Explain.

The eroticism in the love songs is not wholly surprising, given that many ancient cultures addressed human sexuality frankly and even using graphic depictions. The Egyptians also employed some sexual imagery into their art, as did the ancient Indians and Chinese.

Old Testament

1. In what ways is the Hebrew view of God different from the Sumerian…… [Read More]

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Ancient Iraq the Land Where

Words: 880 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55232532

Since they did not have stone, the Sumerians made do with brick, building a myriad of famous constructions during this period according to their needs.

As kings of rival city-states ruled Sumer during this period, they would often go to battle. For this reason, the Sumerians also engineered many important forms of warfare technology. These include the wheeled chariot and the discovery of bronze (via the melding of copper and tin.)

The second major stage of Sumerian development was marked by the invasion of Sargon the Great, who would come to rule all of Mesopotamia. Sargon would conquer the first known empire, which extended all the way across Syrian into southeastern Turkey. Among Sargon's many accomplishments, he standardized weights and measurements in the disparate lands that he came to rule over. This made trading possible in his kingdom. Sargon was also the first Sumerian king who managed to maintain a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hourani, Albert. A History of the Arab Peoples. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press,

Roux, Georges. Ancient Iraq. New York: Penguin USA, 1993.

Tripp, Charles. History of Iraq. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
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Ancient China the Xia Dynasty

Words: 829 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29243765

The cultures shifted from a primarily agrarian economic base to one that used metal as a means to craft practical and ritual objects. In addition to the ritual cauldrons that were emblematic of the Xia dynasty, other uses of advanced metallurgical techniques include the manufacturing of "jue," vessels used to hold a grain alcohol beverage commonly translated as "wine," (Class unit: 12). In fact, bronze objects were cast en masse during the Xia and Shang dynasties (Class unit: 12). Warfare over metals, especially tin and copper, transformed the balance of power in the region (Class unit: 12). Commoners were frequently conscripted for military service during the Shang dynasty ("The Evolution of Complex Societies in China,": 446). Bronze casting allowed Shang rulers to have access to advanced weaponry. Their bronze weapons, their centralized leadership, and their control over a large number of peasant soldiers enabled the Shang to become the first…… [Read More]

References

Class Unit.

The Evolution of Complex Societies in China,"
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Ancient Civis an Examination of

Words: 1418 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25047016

Ancient Greek urban planning dates its glory to Pericles. Temple architecture sourced in a precedent civilization, the Minoan of Crete, is actually reflective of palace architecture from that society's maritime city-state, Knossos (de la Croix, H. And Tansey).

The Greek civis was largely informed by astronomy; influencing everything from temple design to the order of the public City-State. 'Archaeoastronomical' patterns beginning with the Geometric through the final Hellenistic period in Greece reveal sophistication in calculation synonymous to solar alignment. This perspective fits with what is known about the star gazing cult practices found in the archaeological record (Belmonte). Sacred objects further this theory, and there remain a significant number of votive statuary stored at temple sites. Votive offerings were left by devotees of that particular cult, including weapons, helmets, and even statues. The interior of the temple, known as the cella, was often decorated with columns and most used for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Belmonte, Juan Antonio. From the Atlas to the Caucasus: The Other Side of the Mediterranean Before Islam. Archaeoastronomy 15.(2000): 78.

de la Croix, H. And Tansey, R.G. Gardner's: Art Through the Ages. New York, NY: Harcourt and Brace, 1980.

Dimock, Wai Chee. The Egyptian Pronoun: Lyric, Novel, the Book of the Dead. New Literary History 39.3 (2008): 619-643.

Maddison, Angus. The Contours of World Development. The World Economy, OECD, 2010.. Web.
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Ancient Literary Sources How Reliable

Words: 1920 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70146739

For example, in the United States, the Civil War occurred less than 150 years ago, and yet different historians provide conflicting perspectives about the causes of the war, why it was lost, and the consequences of the war for America's history. Moreover, it was only after the Civil War and the end of slavery that one began to see widespread, reliable publication about various slave rebellions that had occurred in the antebellum South. This is interesting, because it makes one wonder if that information would be available or suppressed had the war ended differently. Moreover, the vast majority of Americans are unaware that some northern states were slaveholding states. Furthermore, when one looks at the number of Holocaust deniers, despite the overwhelming physical evidence and documentation regarding the Holocaust, one can see how intentional misrepresentation can play a role in history; there are entire countries that believe it is a…… [Read More]

References

Cornell, T.J. 2005. "The Value of the Literary Tradition Concerning Archaic Rome," in K.A. Raaflaub (ed) Social Struggles in Archaic Rome. New Perspectives on the Conflict of the Orders, 47-74. 2nd ed, Malden, MA.

Forsythe, G. 2005. A Critical History of Early Rome. From Prehistory to the First Punic War. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London. 1-5; 59-77.

Livy, Books 1-10 (trans. de Selincourt, a. 1960. Livy. The Early History of Rome. London and New York). [Scott reserve DG 207 L5 D35 1960 or online at  http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/txt/ah/Livy/ ]

Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Roman Antiquities (trans. Cary, E. 1937-50. The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus. 7 vols. Cambridge, MA. [Scott PA 3611 L63 D562 or online at  http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Dionysius_of_Halicarnassus/home.html ]
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Ancient Culture Development

Words: 916 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9617420

Ancient Culture Development (AC)

Ancient Culture Development

As ancient man developed, they were faced with various challenges that were as well confronted in particular ways, in order to survive in the environment that was full of challenges. There was the use of stones shaped like chisels, flaked at the tip to provide a sharp edge to cut meat. This is one of the earliest documented tools that are estimated back to around 2.5 million years ago (Anne Pyburn, 2003). These were tools that were discovered in East Africa at Olduvai Gorge as one of the ancient man's abode.

There was division of labor apparently, and men who were faster were commissioned to hunting while women did the gathering of plant products and caring for children. This was a simple governance structure that had to do mainly with domestic labor structure. This was during the lower Paleolithic.

During the upper Paleolithic…… [Read More]

References

Anne Pyburn, (2003). The First People and Culture. Retrieved January 24, 2012 from  http://www.indiana.edu/~arch/saa/matrix/ia/ia03_mod_10.html 

Anne Pyburn, (2004). Middle and Upper Paleolithic Hunter-Gatherers The Emergence of Modern Humans, The Mesolithic. Retrieved January 24, 2012 from  http://www.indiana.edu/~arch/saa/matrix/ia/ia03_mod_11.html 

The Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, (2010a). The 'Neolitic Revolution'. Retrieved January 24, 2012 from  http://teachmiddleeast.lib.uchicago.edu/foundations/origins-of-civilization/essay/essay-02.html 

The Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, (2010b). Life in Mesopotamia: Law and Governance. Retrieved January 24, 2012 from  http://mesopotamia.lib.uchicago.edu/mesopotamialife/article.php?theme=Law%20and%20Government
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World War II in Europe

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23478242



By attacking from the North, Hitler effectively bypassed France's only real defense against invasion. Within two weeks, Paris was under Nazi control, and still seething from the harsh terms of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I, Hitler demanded that the surrender terms be signed in the very same spot as the armistice that ended that war, and in the very same railroad car, which he had brought out from its museum display for that purpose3. Belgium had surrendered to Germany without firing a shot, effectively dooming France to Nazi occupation, and nearly sealing the fate of more than a quarter million British troops sent to support Britain's ally, France. Only a last-

3. Hayes & Faissler p.444 minute scramble saved the British from capture, at the port city of Dunkirk, where the British used thousands of ships, boats, and dinghies to rescue them all and ferry…… [Read More]

References

Commager, H.S., Miller, D.L. The Story of World War II: Revised, Expanded & Updated from the Original Text by Henry Steele Commager (2002)

Hayes, C., Faissler, M. Modern Times: The French Revolution to the Present (1966)

Kowalick, T.M. The Western Tradition Transcripts (1989)

Lukacs, J. The Last European War (1976)
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Ancient Near Eastern Values in

Words: 2893 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90605352

The use of physical suffering as a symbol for emotional and spiritual suffering is also well-known in the estern tradition. Centuries later, men and women would disappear into the desert in search of God. They would live apart from all human companionship, and deprive themselves of all physical comfort. Gilgamesh does the same. Gilgamesh is also like the lover who pines away for his beloved and wastes away in body, as well as in heart. The message is that the eternal truths of the universe are not easily discovered, and again that these truths are largely hidden from humankind. Humanity's lot is to suffer even in the face of our greatest happiness. Unlike the gods, we cannot know joy eternally. Enkidu was a dear friend, but he could not be by Gilgamesh' side forever. The joy and love that the hero had known were foreordained to be short. Even if…… [Read More]

Works Cited

 http://www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o&d=5000947937" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Ancient Cultures the Purpose of

Words: 1299 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55561573

Greek and Roman civilizations were not primitive. Their life style was organized and constructed in an structured pattern of rules that set the base for what we know today as modern existence.

Life was seen differently in Greece than in Rome. In the Greek conception, humans and gods were almost equal characters and they portrayed both parts in the same dimension. Humans were given divine attributes, while gods were represented as humans. This was a form of magic suggestion to compare humans with gods and create the feeling of power and balance that characterized life in the Classic Period. It was this conviction of their similitude to the divine entities that gave society the strength and balance to grow and flourish for many centuries, recreating a feeling of prosperity and harmony. The godly world they reflected in their mythology and poetry was as full of conflict as the human world,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Burckhardt, J. (2002). History of Greek Culture. New York: Dover publications.

Hingley, R. (2005). Globalizing Roman Culture: Unity, Diversity and Empire. London: Routledge

Hurwit, JM. (1987). The Art and Culture of Early Greece, 1100-480 B.C. New York: Cornell University press.

Burckhardt, J. (2002). History of Greek Culture. New York: Dover publications
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Ancient Greek & Ancient Roman

Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89566570

Violence of some sort was often depicted. Sculptures of the Roman period, not surprisingly, were very similar. Again, it is difficult to tell the difference between Greek Hellenistic sculptures and Roman originals. And what better influence of classic Greek sculpture and its ideal art form on Roman artists than Michelangelo's David. The Baroque period is exemplified by Bernini's work at the Vatican. However, in his fine work, one cannot mistake the influence of Greco-Roman myth such as his own version of "Apollo and Daphne."

Examples of some of the differences between Roman art and Greek art would be Roman art tends to be more naturalistic then Greek art. Greeks were more interested in idealism. For example it's when a painter would manage to create an ideal beauty even more perfect than any of the flawed original models he was using. Romans were more interested in realism.… [Read More]

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Ancient Art Is Filled With Fabulous Examples

Words: 699 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39875996

Ancient art is filled with fabulous examples of various media and unique depictions of historical and cultural events. Much ancient art is symbolic, and much is literal. Some ancient art serves both a literal and a symbolic function. This is true for much in the Egyptian art canon. It is impossible to generalize about Egyptian art because of the great span of time the various empires straddled. However, there are many similarities in Egyptian style, media, and content. In New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art alone, there are several examples of two works of Egyptian art that are directly comparable. For example, "Yuny and His Wife enenutet" is a 19th Dynasty New Kingdom sculpture. It depicts the titular figures seated together on their throne. It is made of limestone, and the dimensions are about 33 inches high and 21 inches wide. The Metropolitan Museum of Art also has a New…… [Read More]

References

"Isis and Wepwawet, god of Asyut," (ca. 1279 -- 1213 B.C.E). Retrieved online:  http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/100001091 

"Yuny and His Wife Renenutet," (1294 -- 1279 B.C.E.). Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved online:  http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/100001089?high=on&rpp=15&pg=1&rndkey=20120919&ft= *&pos=6
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Worlds of Phaedo and the

Words: 4337 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48423269

It is only through occult understanding that the forms and the archetypal images and symbols can be interpreted.

Here we see that the term unconsciousness is very similar to the Platonic ideals and forms. Another aspect that will form part of the theoretical perspective of this study is the concept of transformation. In order to understand the occult and its relationship to the forms, a process of transformation has to take place. In Platonic terms this transformation is a radical change in life, morality and ethics; while for Jung it is transformation in terms of the deeper understanding of the relation of the unconscious to the conscious mind.

Transformation also has related occult meaning and symbols such as fire. Fire is an age-old indication of change of perception and consciousness. This also refers to Jungian concepts such as the shadow. There are many other points of reference and similarity between…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Archetypes as Defined by Carl Jung) October 9, 2004. http://www.acs.appstate.edu/~davisct/nt/jung.html#shadow

Arnzen. M. "The Return of the Uncanny." 1977. University of Oregon. March 17, 2004.  http://paradoxa.com/excerpts/3-3intro.htm 

Boeree, G. Carl Jung. October 11, 2004.  http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/jung.html 

Christian Churches of God) Mysticism Chapter 1 Spreading the Babylonian Mysteries (No. B7_1). October 9, 2004. http://www.holocaustrevealed.org/english/s/B7_1.html
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Ancient Computers Was the Vendor

Words: 543 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53373578



arket research revealed several factors contributing to price inelasticity. ost importantly, Ancient's competitors were far larger competitors that raised financial viability concerns for Ancient in sales deals. Further, competitors offered bundles of software products that were far large than Ancient's database and data integration line. Some of Ancient's prospects had expressed that they were fearful that a lower price meant that the product was inferior to more expensive offerings even though Ancient did not believe that there were major differences in functionally between its data integration product and those of the competition.

Given its initial poor market reception, Ancient is now repositioning the SnapTogether solution for small and medium sized enterprises (SEs). This time it believes it will have more luck. Ancient believes that smaller companies will be more price sensitive and unable to afford the huge price tag of competitive offerings. Unlike the crowded enterprise market, Ancient's competitors avoid…… [Read More]

Market research revealed several factors contributing to price inelasticity. Most importantly, Ancient's competitors were far larger competitors that raised financial viability concerns for Ancient in sales deals. Further, competitors offered bundles of software products that were far large than Ancient's database and data integration line. Some of Ancient's prospects had expressed that they were fearful that a lower price meant that the product was inferior to more expensive offerings even though Ancient did not believe that there were major differences in functionally between its data integration product and those of the competition.

Given its initial poor market reception, Ancient is now repositioning the SnapTogether solution for small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). This time it believes it will have more luck. Ancient believes that smaller companies will be more price sensitive and unable to afford the huge price tag of competitive offerings. Unlike the crowded enterprise market, Ancient's competitors avoid selling to smaller companies, leaving Ancient one of the few players in a relatively untapped market. Although the integration needs of smaller companies aren't as great as those of larger enterprises, Ancient believes that it can price its product in such a way that will still make it attractive for SMEs to purchase a product rather than to build the capabilities themselves. And, Ancient has developed a channel strategy to replace its direct sales force, an approach that should increase profit margins.

In the world of product introduction nothing is ever certain. But, this time around Ancient is optimistic that it has uncovered a good market opportunity. Launch of the new market strategy is slated for March, 2005. Stay tuned
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Ancient Buddhism Buddhist Religion and

Words: 474 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 25105635

(Kumar, 2004)

Colors were essential as a means of expression in art as well.

Explanation of laughter

Laughter is rarely allowed in public, a cordial smile being always preferable. This limitation is yet again a proof of the influence Buddhism had on the aesthetic values of the world. (Clasquin, 2001)

Conclusion

Buddhist religion, as one of the oldest in the world, represents the expression of the constant quest for the meaning of life and the overcoming of suffering.

The philosophical system it set in place, the artistic standards it established, along with the moral percepts it promoted, Buddhism is an important influence on the aesthetic values of modern civilizations.

eferences

Clasquin, M. (2001) eal Buddhas don't laugh: attitudes towards humor and laughter in ancient India and China. [electronic version] Social Identities, vol. 7, no. 1. University of South Africa. etrieved, March 28, 2007, at http://www.thezensite.com/ZenEssays/Philosophical/Buddhas_Dont_Laugh.pdf

Indianchild. (2000) Buddhism in India,…… [Read More]

References

Clasquin, M. (2001) Real Buddhas don't laugh: attitudes towards humor and laughter in ancient India and China. [electronic version] Social Identities, vol. 7, no. 1. University of South Africa. Retrieved, March 28, 2007, at  http://www.thezensite.com/ZenEssays/Philosophical/Buddhas_Dont_Laugh.pdf 

Indianchild. (2000) Buddhism in India, ancient Buddhism in India, India and Buddhism. Retrieved March 28, 2007, at  http://www.indianchild.com/buddhism_in_india.htm 

Kumar, N. (2004) Love and Passion in Tantric Buddhist Art. Retrieved, March 28, 2007, at http://www.kheper.net/topics/Buddhism/tantra.html

Lefebure, L. (2001) Ultimate journey: retracing the path of an ancient buddhist munk who crossed asia in search of Enlightment- book review. Retrieved, March 28, 2007, at  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1058/is_17_118/ai_75496693
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Ancient Philosophy

Words: 1638 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72548684

Ancient Philosophy

Though it is acknowledged that the words and ideas of Socrates have been filtered though the thoughts of those that followed him, namely Plato, as Socrates wrote nothing himself, it is also clear that the interpretation garnered by the ancients has been profoundly felt throughout western culture. It is also clear that the body of work that survives in fragmentation recorded as prior to the Socratic philosophical revolution is a strong basis for that which followed, it can also be described as simpler or at least less complex. The main difference according to the writings of the post Socratic philosophers between Socratic ethics and pre-Socratic ethics are twofold. On the one hand the idea that philosophical questions are not and cannot be seen as finite and on the other the establishment of Socrates as the supreme model of the philosophical life and all its trappings. The impact that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Plato. The Apology of Socrates

Wheelright, Philip ed. The Presocratics. New York: Odyssey Press, Inc. 1966.
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Ancient Athens Was a Democracy

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 83065849



Q2. Plato believed that, just as skilled craftsman should confine themselves to making shoes and warriors should confine themselves to fighting, only 'the best' should rule. Individuals with great aptitudes to be philosophers should be selected and taught to lead the people, and leadership by the majority was dangerous. The Platonic 'Guardians' would be taken away from their family at birth and given special training by other philosophers, so they would know how to govern. This reflects Socrates' notion of philosophy and leadership as specialized skills rather than something that can be practiced by all individuals equally effectively, as the concept of Athenian democracy would suggest. For Socrates, justice is not based in the concept of giving each citizen equal opportunities; justice means creating a perfect society. Making sure that the 'perfect' cobblers make shoes, the perfect warriors defend the city, and the best minds rule on earth makes society…… [Read More]

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Ancient Art Flora Goddess Mother

Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44473440



According to the Roman historian Pliny, in his Natural History, in 238 BC, at the direction of an oracle in the sibylline books, a temple was built to honor Flora, an ancient goddess of flowers and blossoming plants. (Pliny, XVIII.286) the temple was dedicated on April 28 and the Floralia instituted to solicit her protection for the city.

Although the Floralia originated as a "moving festival," after a period with bad crops when according to Ovid, "the blossoms again that year suffered from winds, hail, and rain" (Ovid, Fasti, V.329ff), the festival Ludi Florales started to be held every year, the first in 173 BCE. "It was later fixed on April 27th. After Caesar's reform of the calendar, it was April 28th. The purpose of the festival was to ensure the crops blossomed well." ("Flora," Roman Religion and Mythology: Lexicon, 1999)

Flora thus is fertile, like a mother, for she…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Flora," Roman Religion and Mythology: Lexicon. Originally created 1999. Last updated 2005. Retrieved 26 Feb 2005.  http://sights.seindal.dk/sight/1080_Flora.html 

Flora and Pomona." Ancient Roman Mythology. Retrieved 26 Feb 2005.  http://www.crystalinks.com/romemythology.html 

Ovid. Fasti. Translated by a.J. Boyle and R.D. Woodard. New York: Penguin Classics, 2000.

Pliny. Natural History. Translated by H. Rackham. Cambridge: Loeb Classical Library, 1938.
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Ancient Child -- Scott Momaday

Words: 1718 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 96955006

In this excerpt, her mature medicine woman attitude shows clearly that she has grown up. That doesn't mean that she isn't attracted sexually to Set, but there is a reverence now and an appreciation for his needs that perhaps readers didn't see previously. And on page 297 the desire that Set feels for Grey is a sweeter, more casual lead-in to sexual foreplay. "Their hands slipped over their bodies, describing desire, but yet discreetly." They both have grown by now.

As for the characters' achievement of modern American Indian identity, the way it interfaces the history of the Old est (to wit, Billy the Kid) with modern tends to bring the fictional aspect of the book into a brighter spotlight than Native American cultural reality. Grey's character, in particular, reveals some truth about medicine and how Indians understand that medicine comes to them. And as Karen allace writes in her…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coltelli, Laura. Winged Words: American Indian Writers Speak. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1990.

Momaday, Scott N. The Ancient Child. New York: Doubleday, 1989.

Wallace, Karen L, and Schmitt, Deborah A. "Liminality and Myth in Native American

Fiction: Ceremony and The Ancient Child." Contemporary Literary Criticism. Vol.
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Ancient Text With Modern Text

Words: 1400 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47599362

Ancient Text ith Modern Text

Because written literature is capable of being transmitted from the person who wrote it across generations, it acquires the status of communal wisdom simply by being recorded. Yet there are limitations to the applicability of such stories, and to a certain degree wisdom consists in knowing that there are limitations to the theoretical knowledge one can acquire in this way, or human error can misinterpret the text. I would like to look at the way in which three texts -- one ancient (by Rumi) and two modern (by Siije and Soyinka) -- offer wisdom at the same time that they suggest limits to our own knowledge, and limits to the applicability of any such wisdom.

The poems of Rumi, by virtue of their age, seem almost to define the way by which wisdom can be transmitted in literature, but also can acknowledge its own limits.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Rumi, Jalal al-Din. The Essential Rumi: New Expanded Edition. Translated by Coleman Barks. New York: Harper-Collins, 2004.

Siije, Dai. Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress. New York: Anchor Books, 2001.

Soyinka, Wole. Death and the King's Horseman. New York: Norton, 2002.
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Formation of Ancient Societies the

Words: 2084 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91389503

Both Spartan men and women exercised together in the nude, and both were "encouraged to improve their intellectual skills" ("omen in Ancient Greece"). Being a woman in Sparta certainly ensured a greater sense of gender equality -- but that does not necessarily mean Sparta was the preferred residence of women in Greece. After all, Sparta did without a lot of the creature comforts that other city-states like Athens took for granted as essential to civilization. There is a reason the phrase "Spartan living" has come to be synonymous with the bare necessities.

As for variance in the social structure of the various states, democracy prevailed in Athens for a time (but so did tyranny and corruption as well). Thebes also had its monarchy and later on its heroic warrior citizens. Sparta had two kings who ruled simultaneously. But its social structure was also more slave-based than anywhere else. In fact,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Haaren, John. Famous Men of Rome. NY: American Book Company, 1904.

Johnston, Sarah. Religions of the Ancient World. Harvard University Press, 2004.

Kyziridis, Theocharis. "Notes on the History of Schizophrenia." German Journal of Psychiatry, vol 8, 42-48, 2005.

Sikora, Jack. Religions of India. Lincoln, NE: Writer's Club Press, 2002.
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History of Economic of the 4 Periods in Ancient Civilization

Words: 5166 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 16341967

Economics in Ancient Civilization

It is said that "Rome was not built in a day." Indeed, the Roman Empire was the last of a series of civilizations to emerge in the Mediterranean by the First Millennium, B.C. Precursors to the culture most identified as the seat of estern political economy, the Ancient Egyptians, Etruscans, Greeks, Syrians, Carthaginians and Phoenicians all had contact with the Romans, and eventually were incorporated through territorial expansion of the Empire in Asia Minor, Cyrenaica, Europe, and North Africa. Prior to the Roman period, Europe was primarily occupied by Barbarian tribes; societies where no written language, legal system or alternative mechanism of governance was in place. hen we discuss the advancement of Ancient civilizations, then, it is through the transmission of law, literacy and polity that we find source to retrospect on early economic forms. In Feinman and Nicholas (2004), Perspectives on Political Economies, the difficulties…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Buck-Norss, S. The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1991.

Benjamin, W.(1927). Das Passagen Werken. Notebooks.

Bitros, George C., and Anastassios D. Karayiannis. "Morality, institutions and the wealth of nations: Some lessons from ancient Greece." European Journal of Political Economy 26.1 (2010): 68-81.

Boyazoglu, J., I. Hatziminaoglou, and P. Morand-Fehr. "The role of the goat in society: Past, present and perspectives for the future." Small Ruminant Research 60.1/2 (2005): 13-23.
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Fire in Ancient Warfare Greece

Words: 986 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40493590

104).

In Ancient Israel, the use of fire is also part of the tradition of warfare. For example, we are not sure whether the prophet Elijah is stating that the fire hurled against the Moabites is divine, or simply falls down upon the enemy from Israelite war machines: "If I am a man of God," Elijah replied, "may fired come down from heaven and consume you and your fifty men!" Then the fire of God fell from heaven and consumed him and his fifty men (2 Kings 1:12, New International Version).

Similarly, since most ancient gates were nothing but fortified wood, when the armies of Israel set out to use siege warfare, the rules for such are outlined in Deuteronomy 20: 10-20; however, use of flaming arrows, lit pots of oil shot from frames arranged on the outsides of walls -- more like a slingshot than a catapult, in fact,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bradford, a. (2000). With Arrow, Sword, and Spear: A History of Warfare in the Ancient World. Praeger.

Crosby, a. (2002). Throwing Fire: Projectile Technology Through History. Cambridge De Vaux, R. (1997). Ancient Israel: Its Life and Institutions. Erdmans.

Partington, J. (1998). A History of Greek Fire and Gunpowder. Johns Hopkins University

Press.
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Religion Comparison Religions in Ancient

Words: 2389 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75013626

According to Bass, "Hinduism is the only major religion lacking an adequate explanation as to its origin," as no definitive Hindu text exist that that date before 1000 B.C. Indeed, because Hinduism is one of the religions that views time as cyclical rather than linear, what information is available about Hinduism does not give a very accurate picture of its history (Bass 5). hat can be gleaned from this history is the fact that Hinduism is one of the oldest religions with one of the oldest societies in the world. Just as their origins are difficult to define, the beliefs of Hinduism are varied depending on one's personal interpretation of the religion. However, one of the more important aspects of Hinduism is its social caste system. This belief states that there are four casts, and each "has its rules and obligation for living." The three castes are Brahman, priests, hatriyas,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"A Concise History of Islam and the Arabs." Mid East Web. n.d. 11 June 2009.



Abdullah, Mohd Habibullah Bin. "The Story of Creation in the Quar'an and Old

Testament." Bismika Allahuma. 15 October 2005. 11 June 2009.
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Food From Ancient to Modern

Words: 1386 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25663218

Therefore, it is true that the aspect of trade of wine and quality, as well as publication of the paintings, used the grapes and wine themes for the marketing brand associated and the underlying culture within the painter's lives.

Why the artists from Classical Antiquity to Modernism have been using particularly this theme?

From the Classical Antiquity to the modernism era, people developed an attitude that keeps certain groups of painters making a name through the themes they apply in their paintings. Therefore, the grapes and wine theme is already in deep roots within the basis of sales possible. Every painting that applies the use of the grapes and wines theme receives significant support and acceptance within the society; hence, the reason it has such wide application by the classical antique and modernism-painting activists.

Why the modern artists have been continuing to use themes particularly from Classical antiquity and from…… [Read More]

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universal religions and the history of the world

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 18053830

Universal religions have grandiose political and social schemes. Unlike smaller-scale spiritual faiths, universal religions are those that seek to expand their locus of power and control over larger areas, such as through proselytizing or linking with political rulers. Universal religions also extended deeper into more areas of individual, family and community lives. For example, universal religions propagated specific social norms, morals, and ethics, and became one of the fundamental means of establishing laws. Universal religions also became linked with culture and ethnicity, providing a means by which people forged collective and individual identities. Yet unlike ancient religions, universal religions did not limit their scope to specific geo-political terrain. Believers would spread universal religions far beyond the place where they originated. Universal religions were believed to possess transcendent truths, which could be communicated to and received by people from various cultures, ethnicities, backgrounds, and belief systems. Unlike the localized faiths, universal…… [Read More]

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Religion in Ancient Greece

Words: 1001 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32766343

The Greeks were one of the most religious societies in the ancient world. With roots in Minoan culture, West Asian beliefs, and Central Asian gods, religion permeated virtually every aspect of Greeks' life -- from politics and culture to family, morals, agriculture, festivals, games, as well as beliefs about nature and the origin of life (Carr). The Greeks strongly believed that there were invisible, all-powerful gods and goddesses that controlled every occurrence. As a society, therefore, it was important to maintain a good relationship with the gods through prayer, sacrifice, and leading a good (morally upright) life. The prayers and sacrifices were made in sacred sites and temples where the gods were erected in their personified forms (Cartwright). Gods were also believed to reside in mountains.

Religion in ancient Greece was strongly tied to natural phenomena like rain, storms, plagues, earthquakes, and volcanoes (Carr). There were gods for each of…… [Read More]

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Arab Transnationalism the Arab World

Words: 2182 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38757364

This is largely what Ibn Battuta did by providing individuals that he encountered with his opinion concerning particular matters. He was strict with regard to his beliefs, but was relatively unhesitant about observing other cultures and individuals respecting them. He basically appreciated the fact that he could learn important information from other people, regardless of their status and background.

VII. Arab transnationalism evolution

Arab transnationalism is closely connected to globalization, considering that Arab Muslims conquered a series of territories in South Asia and virtually presented people they conquered with Islamic thought. The fact that Islam itself was divided between Sunni Muslims and Shi'a Muslims played an important role in influencing many Muslims to get actively involved in the transnationalism process. In addition to conquering territories in South and South-East Asia, numerous Muslims also integrated in cultures in the area and freely expressed their national identity there. Arab thinking thus pervaded…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Ahmed, Akbar S., and Sonn, Tamara, "The SAGE Handbook of Islamic Studies," (SAGE, 26.05.2010)

Grant, Clinton, "The Travels and Journals of Ibn Battuta," Retrieved November 29, 2012, from the PeopleHofstra.edu Website:  http://people.hofstra.edu/alan_j_singer/CoursePacks/TheTravelsandJournalsofIbnBattuta.pdf 

Mandaville, Peter, "Transnational Islam in Asia: Background, Typology and Conceptual Overview," Retrieved November 29, 2012, from the National Bureau of Asian Research Website:  http://www.nbr.org/publications/specialreport/pdf/Preview/PR09_TransIslam.pdf 

Nagel, Caroline R., and Staeheli, Lynn a., "Citizenship, Identity, and Transnational Migration: Arab Immigrants to the U.S.," Retrieved November 29, 2012, from the Scholar Commons Website:  http://scholarcommons.sc.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1023&context=geog_facpub
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Ruddiman's Account of Ancient Human

Words: 2518 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 69627461

Humanity might not have the same effective power over the environment when fossil fuels run out. While this assumption is certainly believable, humans will not doubt reach a point where the greenhouse gas absorbing plants and bodies will no longer be able to keep up with human activity. This will further exacerbate the problem of human-caused global climate change. On the other hand, if humans are able to develop non-fossil fuel alternatives that do not have a negative effect on the environment on a global scale, the warming trend might very well be reversed in a generation or two. Either way, Ruddiman's arguments will likely be proven to be wrong or right, on a long enough timeframe.

ection IV: Opposing Points-of-View

Anthropologists, specifically, disagree with Ruddiman. ince the author himself is not an anthropology professor and admittedly has very little experience in this field, it would only seem natural that…… [Read More]

Sources

Allen, Robert, Scott Seaman and John DeLascio. "Emerging Issues: Global Warming Claims and Coverage Issues." Defense Counsel Journal 76 (2009): 12-9. Web. 10 Apr. 2010. .

Bast, Joseph. "Eight Reasons Why 'Global Warming' is a Scam." The Heartland Institute. The Heartlander, Feb. 2003: n.pag. Web. 10 Apr. 2010.

Bert, Ray. Rev. Of Plows, Plagues, & Petroleum: How Humans Took Control of Climate, by William F. Ruddiman. Civil Engineering 78 (2008): 73.

Morgan, Sally. Global Warming. New York: Heinemann, 2009. Print.
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Culture in Ancient Sparta Men and Women

Words: 544 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57099431

Bettany Hughes, the Ancient Worlds 5 of 7 the Spartans

Points from the Film:

Unlike the Athenians, Spartans were not known for their philosophical insights or their artistic triumphs. They were known for being frugal and for being fighters. Their society was built on the idea that it could only stand so long as they were physically strong. Thus, Spartans had a strict code of discipline and self-sacrifice: everything was done to protect the State. The weak were viewed as a threat to the State's strength and weak children were killed. While this may seem like a barbaric exercise today, it was a matter of fact practice in ancient Sparta and everyone there accepted it.

Another curious point about Sparta was that male homosexuality was compulsory in Sparta. Women could also take lesbian lovers if they chose. This was because sex between a man and woman was primarily viewed as…… [Read More]

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Tao Te Ching the Ancient

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 48330971



In Lao Tzu's opinion, there is much more to Dao than just matter. In order to understand Dao people need to dispose of their previous concepts in relation to life and to their purpose on earth. Chapter fourteen gives instructions on how people should act if they actually want to see, hear, and touch Dao. According to Lao Tzu, one of the biggest mistakes made by people when they attempt to discover something is that they try to compare it to something from their daily lives.

As written in the Prehistoric Origins chapter, people constantly search for new theories to adopt and to follow for the rest of their lives. In contrast to that, Dao is not something that one could follow from a certain point in their lives, as it is something that people have always followed from the beginning of time. Unlike the sun that shines for only…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Correa, Nina. "MY DAO DE JING." Retrieved September 29, 2009, from the Dao is open Web site:  http://www.daoisopen.com/BYNina.html 

2. Lao Tzu. "Tao Te Ching."
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Ancient Near East the Story

Words: 1051 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74640015

At the same time, the presentation of his work, the lives of the community in which he lived and the way in which he succeeded in forming a family must be relevant for the actual depiction of the historical background, the environment, and the customs of the time. For instance, the fact that he was given to marry the elder daughter of the ruler of the land he had chosen as his next home, Amunenshi, represented indeed an appreciation of his qualities and virtues as an Egyptian. Therefore, it can be said that the piece of writing is also an important source of history of the Near East.

Another important perspective of the story is the historical one which offers a view on the current situation of the time in Egypt. Therefore, the story focuses on the way in which king Sesostris was involved in political actions and maneuvers that…… [Read More]

References

The Story of Sinuhe. (n.d.) Retrieved 19 May 2008, from the Ancient Egypt Online web site:  http://www.ancientegyptonline.co.uk/storysinuhe.html
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Ancient Mythology East and West Multicultural Comparison of Myths

Words: 1101 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76927417

mythology and ancient beliefs. Specifically it will compare the myths of heroism in the myth of Achilles to the modern film "Troy." The film "Troy," from 2004, is a remake of the Homer classic "The Iliad," which recounts the legend of the Greek warrior Achilles. In the film, actor Brad Pitt plays Achilles, giving him a larger than life, heroic quality. Achilles is the child of a mortal and a nymph, and his parents attempt to give him immortality by dipping him in the iver Styx, but they miss a tiny spot on his heel, and this leads to his downfall.

Both of these myths center around the idea of the hero in mythology, and in fact, they show the importance of heroes in the Greek society 3500 years ago. The translator of the Iliad writes, "Heroes are born into positions of prominence, which they also reaffirm by their public…… [Read More]

References

Homer. Iliad. Trans. Stanley Lombardo. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, 1997.

Troy. Dir. Wolfgang Petersen. Perf. Brad Pitt, Orlando Bloom, Eric Bana, Brian Cox. Warner Brothers, 2004.
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Ancient China There Once Lived

Words: 1012 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18908269

Soon after, the Banker died as well, and the entire family fortune and responsibility fell on the Son.

With the passage of her husband, Mother was now no longer the head of the household, but she was confident nothing would change, after all her son loved her. When she came back from a vacation trip after a hot summer, she went into her room only to find that all of her possessions were missing. In a panic she ran to her Son's room and found him sitting on his desk.

Where are my things my beautiful son, where did you move them to?," she cried.

Why to grandmother's room of course," he diffidently stated.

What? To that dirty little shack, you cannot expect your mother to live their?!," she screamed.

Her son looked up at her and blinked his eyes. "Why are you so angry, I am treating you no…… [Read More]

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Ancient Roman Civilization and the Gladiator Games

Words: 2517 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65998199

Introduction

In ancient Rome, the gladiator games were a popular form of entertainment—but they were also much more than this and served multiple purposes within the Roman civilization. The games were used both by Roman authorities and by the slaves of Rome (the gladiators) as a tool, wielded for a different aim respectively. The Roman religious and the politicians used the games as well for their own ends. While the combats that took place in the arenas dazzled audiences, the violence and spectacle was really but one aspect of the contests, and an examination of the underlying social, political, religious and economic subtexts of the gladiator games reveals much about the nature of ancient Roman society. This paper will identify the four main purposes of the gladiatorial games in ancient Rome—the expression of political influence, the expression of religion, a means of emphasizing the Empire’s power, and grounds for slaves…… [Read More]

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Ancient Text Explains or Demonstrates

Words: 749 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61557350

In the "Odyssey" Achilles says to Odysseus, that it is better to be a living dog than honored in Hades.

Submission to fate is ultimately what the Greeks seem to honor as a 'good' attitude. Oedipus the King finally accepts his cursed status, rather than fleeing from it, and from the beginning of her life, Antigone seems to anticipate that she will meet with an unhappy end. Although she is betrothed to marry, she does not seem to see her future as a married woman as an obligation that supersedes her obligation as a sister, and even says that because she can only have one brother, unlike a husband; obligations to the family come before everything. The play seems to suggest that this is valid, given the wrath that falls upon Creon's head. But evil also falls upon the heads of the innocent, because of the actions of the guilty,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sophocles. "Antigone." The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 2nd edition. Edited by Lawall & Mack. Vol. a.
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Ancient Islam in Today's World

Words: 318 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51203957

Alex Pulsipher notes that all but one of these pillars Involve "daily life" (Pulsipher 314), thus it is difficult to separate the religion from the very existence of the culture. In addition to the pillars, there are other requirements of those that practice Islam. Justice, truthfulness, abstention from alcohol, and pork, and "anything that seems remotely connected to idolatry" (44) are all things from which Muslims must refrain.

hen we look at the practices involved with being Muslim, we can see why these people behave the way they do. It is not because they are strange; it is because they are upholding ancient religious values through practices that help them define who they are. Understanding this helps build the bridge to understanding our differences.

orks Cited

Monk, Robert, et al. Exploring Religious Meaning. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. 1997.

Pulsipher, Alex.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Monk, Robert, et al. Exploring Religious Meaning. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. 1997.

Pulsipher, Alex. World Regional Geography. New York: Macmillan. 2007.
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Ancient Roman Religion

Words: 3936 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 33196915

Roman Religion

Although the ancient Roman religion might seem a far cry from today';s contemporary context, in reality Roman religion continues to inform and shape Western culture to this day (the celebration of Christmas being one example). While there are a number of literary sources which provide contemporary scholars with information about Roman religions, both in terms of belief and practice, this religions information is encoded into the landscape and physical space of Rome itself, from the layout of its forums to the sculptures which adorn its altars. y examining three such sources in detail, the Ara Pacis, the Forum of Augustus, and the grove of the Arval rothers, one will be able to understand how Roman religion permeated Roman social and political identity and organizations, and furthermore, how these concurrent strains of identity-formation and power relations etched themselves into the very physical objects left behind to be discovered and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ando, Clifford. The Matter of the Gods: Religion and the Roman Empire. Berkeley: University

of California Press, 2008.

Beard, Mary, John North, and Simon Price. Religions of Rome, Volume 1: A History. Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press, 1998.
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World Cultures Middle East

Words: 1748 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 77036999

Middle East comprises a diverse group of regions, countries, peoples, customs, and cultures. On the one hand, it is daunting to offer a semester-long course that treats all Middle Eastern issues with clarity and fairness. The risk of oversimplification, however, is outweighed by the risk of ignorance. This course will explore the Middle East with as much depth and breadth as possible, stimulating student thought on political, social, religious, historical, ethnographic, and economic issues related to the region. Included in the course rubric will be current events ranging from gender issues to terrorism. In between the heavier topics, lighter lessons on local customs, culture, music, and food will reveal the ordinariness of daily life in the part of the world we call the Middle East.

Islam will be covered from a multidisciplinary perspective, allowing for nuanced and rich class discussions about the unique interface between politics, religion, and social norms.…… [Read More]

Anderson, Lisa. "Demystifying the Arab Spring." PDF Available:  http://www.ssrresourcecentre.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Anderson-Demystifying-the-Arab-Spring.pdf 

Henry, Clement Moore and Springborg, Robert. Globalization and the Politics of Development in the Middle East. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Kuran, Timur. "The Islamic Commercial Crisis: Institutional Roots of Economic Underdevelopment in the Middle East." The Journal of Economic History (2003), 63(2).
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World's Oldest Largest and Deepest

Words: 2674 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 39017351

134). In addition, ussian authorities have also joined with the international community to protect the lake. In this regard, Hudgins adds that, "Increased awareness of such threats to the unique ecology of Lake Baikal has prompted a number of international organizations -- including the Sierra Club and Baikal Watch in the United States -- to join the ussians in their efforts to protect this natural wonder of the world" (1998, p. 135). According to the Sierra Club, "Lake Baikal, arguably ussia's most significant environmental treasure -- it contains a fifth of the world's unfrozen freshwater and is a UNESCO World Heritage site -- is being polluted by toxic waste from a paper mill that Vladimir Putin ordered reopened for economic reasons" (Pollutin' Putin, 2010, para. 2). In fact, the recently reopened paper mill disposes of toxic wastes directly into Lake Baikal's fragile biological system (Hoare, 2008). While the Sierra Club…… [Read More]

References

Current programs. (2010). Baikal Watch. Retrieved from  http://www.earthislandprojects.org  / project/campaignPage.cfm?pageID=7&subSiteID=1&CFID=43926225&CFTOKEN=32

975106.

Gladkochub, D.P., Donskaya, T.V., Wingate, M.T., Poller, U., Kroner, a., Fedorovsky, V.S.,

Mazukabzov, a.M., Todt, W. & Pisarevsky, S.A. (2008). Petrology, geochronology and tectonic implications of C. 500 Ma metamorphic and igneous rocks along the northern margin of the Central Asian orogen. Journal of the Geological Society, 165, 235-237.
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World Mythology

Words: 1909 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79560831

Mythology Through the Eyes of Joseph Campbell

This essay discusses a little part of world mythology as perceived through the eyes of Joseph Campbell. It also relates to his conceptualization of the myths associated with different geographical regions of the world. This uses 1 source in MLA form.

Long has existed the phenomenon of myths and religions. Mythology is defined as the study of myths, which is a strong belief that is associated with someone or ancient figures. If it is brought under proper observation its exact era from where it all started is difficult to find as even the existence of the first man on the universe has been associated with mythological happening. As there exist different explanations and myths with the existence of the world these explanations also tend to vary when concerning different geographical areas. There is a lot of text available even belonging to ancient times…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Leeming, David "Mythology: The Voyage of the Hero" 1981
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World War II Also Marked

Words: 2272 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99236996

The demonstration in Tiananmen Square showed that there were alrge semgnets of the population that wanted change, but Deng's response was to crush the movement with violence and to assert the supremacy ofm centalzied rule once more..

These actions show some of the difficulties of independence and of developing a new political structure when many adhere to older political structures and ideas. One response is to try to wipe out the old with violence, but regimes tend to become reactionary about their own ideas as well and to crush any opposition, real of perceived.

9. Arab unity has not materialized for a number of historical reasons related to the different ways in which the countries of the region have developed so that the leaders of some of the states are wary of other leaders, because of differences in economic structures in the various countries, and because of different reactions to…… [Read More]

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World Regional Geography

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29821841

Regional Geography

hy could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of African states remain poor. Be sure to include several factors relation to this region's unique physical geography, complex human geography, history.

The spectrum of environments which exist in Africa spans entire moisture and temperature gradients, from perhaps the most arid to among the well-watered places on earth, from the coolness of the Cape to the furnace that is the Sahara. This environmental diversity is mirrored in the proliferation of its fauna and flora, for Africa has seemingly every conceivable combination of climatological, geological, and pedological factors; the plant and animal communities have evolved over time to reflect this heterogeneity. Moreover, it is an ancient continent that has provided a cradle for a wide range of taxonomic groups, from among the very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Chen-Young, et al. Transnationals of tourism in the Caribbean. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. 2001.

2. Richard Wiffin, William Phettipace, Anas Todkill; Imagining Distance: Spanish Explorers in America. Early American Literature, Vol. 25, 1990.

3. Stephen Zunes; The United States and the Western Sahara Peace Process. Middle East Policy, Vol. 5, 1998.
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Ancient and Classical Stories of

Words: 1095 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77496600

While in exile, Ravana and Maricha trick Lakshmana into believing the Rama was in trouble. Since it was Lakshmana's duty to protect Rama, he goes to rescue them. While he is gone, Sita is abducted.

Interestingly, however, the evil Ravana is ultimately defeated through an act of deceit. Although the Brahma promised he could not be killed by a god, spirit or demon, they make no such promise as to humans. However, Ravana, being a god, would not even think of being defeated by a human as this is impossible. Yet, when the Brahma see Ravana destroying the earth, they become disturbed and thus create the plan of creating Rama, as a human incarnation of a god and thus powerful enough to kill Ravana without breaking their promise. In a sense, this is the greatest deceit of them all.

In summary, the story of Ramayana is an expression of what…… [Read More]

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Ancient Greeks and Chinese Philosophers

Words: 1538 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41202902



The three authors presented above and their works were considering the different ways science and the results of scientific knowledge translated in the advance of technology influence human lives. Hawthorne saw technology positively influencing the lives of those taking advantage of it and helping them get out of the darkness of unknown; Dick was imagining a much more gloomy outcome of the combination between human nature and technology, while Taylor was presenting the importance of addressing the issues of prosperity in an industrial society benefitting the advantages of technology solely from the point-of-view of science.

eferences

Dick, P.K.(1968) Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Ballantine Books.

Hawthorne, N.(1898) the House of the Seven Gables. etreived: Oct. 15, 2008. Available at http://books.google.com/books?id=wxYPsGsZOQQC&dq=the+house+of+the+seven+gables&pg=PP1&ots=tJCsK0U_GC&sig=Ez5dxVgBzgzPk9DZNOvMO4PrdY&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result

Taylor, F.W. (1911) the Principles of Scientific Management. Harper. Originally from Harvard University. etrieved: Oct. 15, 2008. Available at http://books.google.com/books?id=5ek4cYPdndYC&dq=the+principles+of+scientific+management&pg=PP1&ots=jZtS7Qkgc5&sig=_AhmBEtfZQZbjyjJwq4crGqmc0&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result… [Read More]

References

Dick, P.K.(1968) Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Ballantine Books.

Hawthorne, N.(1898) the House of the Seven Gables. Retreived: Oct. 15, 2008. Available at  http://books.google.com/books?id=wxYPsGsZOQQC&dq=the+house+of+the+seven+gables&pg=PP1&ots=tJCsK0U_GC&sig=Ez5dxVgBzgzPRk9DZNOvMO4PrdY&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result 

Taylor, F.W. (1911) the Principles of Scientific Management. Harper. Originally from Harvard University. Retrieved: Oct. 15, 2008. Available at  http://books.google.com/books?id=5ek4cYPdndYC&dq=the+principles+of+scientific+management&pg=PP1&ots=jZtS7Qkgc5&sig=_AhmBEtfZQZbjyjJwq4crGqmcR0&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=4&ct=result
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Worlds of Criminal Justice and

Words: 1422 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79090795

"(Bonnie et al.)

For many the ability of a client to participate in pleading insanity is controversial. Many contend that this ability shows that the person is rational and should be punished accordingly. While others argue that, the ability of a person to know that they are insane does not make them sane. In either case, the insanity plea remains as a controversial subject.

Within the realm of psychology, the issue of insanity has always been a topic of interest. Psychologists have long asserted that there are various mental conditions that render individuals insane. These conditions include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and even certain forms of depression. Psychologists contend that these conditions can make an individual unable to rationalize.

A book entitled Court-Ordered Insanity: Interpretive Practice and Involuntary Commitment explains that many cases involve the hospitalization or commitment of the client. In these cases, the book explains that the client mental…… [Read More]

References

 http://www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o&d=5000459756

Bonnie, R.J., Poythress, N.G., Hoge, S.K., Monahan, J., & Eisenberg, M. (1996). Decision-Making in Criminal Defense: An Empirical Study of Insanity Pleas and the Impact of Doubted Client Competence. Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 87(1), 48-62..
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World of Confucians

Words: 751 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 75460034

Confucian Filial Piety and Differences With Other Ethical Systems

"Let us consider the case of a filial son who seeks what is beneficial for his parents. Does a filial son who seeks what is beneficial for his parents want other people to care for and benefit his parents or does he want other people to dislike and steal from his parents? According to the very meaning of filial piety, he must want other people to care for and benefit his parents. Given this, how should one act in order to bring about such a state of affairs? Should one first care for and benefit the parents of another, expecting that they in turn will respond by caring for and benefitting one's own parents? Or should one first dislike and steal from other people's parents, expecting that they in turn will respond by caring for and benefitting one's own parents? Clearly…… [Read More]

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Greek on Mediterranean World Sparta

Words: 2198 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88891091

Mediterranean agriculture therefore turned out as extraordinarily market-oriented.

Slavery turned out to be a further key component of the Mediterranean world economy. Aristotle was among the Philosophers who came up with the justifications for requisite of slavery to a proper society, for exclusive of slaves it would have been challenging for aristocrats to learn what was required to maintain culture or have the time to nurture political virtue. Slaves were obtained as a consequence of wars, bizarrely common in the Mediterranean world. Athenians relied on slaves for household jobs as well as workers in their enormous silver mines, which accelerated the development of Athens's empire as well as money-making operations, even though working environment were awful. Slavery also assisted elaboration on why Greece was never particularly engrossed in technological modernism appropriate to either agriculture or manufacturing. The Greeks established significant advances in building ship as well as routing, which proved…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Baeck L (1994) the Mediterranean tradition in economic thought. Routledge, New York [Routledge history of economic thought series, vol 5, 1994]. Retrieved on April 30, 2013 from:  https://www.google.com/search?q=Bibliography+on+Political+and+social++impact+of+Greek+on+the+Mediterranean+world&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-U.S.:official&client=firefox-a .

John Boardman (1999). The Greeks Overseas: Their Early Colonies and Trade, 4th edition, Thames and Hudson. Retrieved on April 30, 2013 from: http://suite101.com/article/greek-colonization-and-its-impact-on-the-mediterranean-world

Perrotta C (2003) the legacy of the past: ancient economic thought on wealth and development. Eur J. Hist Econ Thought 10(2):177 -- 219. Retrieved on April 30, 2013 from:
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Compare and Contrast the Development of Ancient Near East and Mediterranean

Words: 969 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 33818213

civilization in the ancient Near East (3500-1000 B.C.E.) and the Mediterranean (1000 B.C.E. - 500 C.E.) shared a great number of similarities as well as numerous differences. These points of comparison covered the political, economic, and social realms, cultural and intellectual ideas, as well as values and institutions. Further, each civilization differed in their specific impact on the creation of estern civilization, and the degree of that impact.

Civilization in the ancient Mediterranean (1000 B.C.E. - 500 C.E.) arose out of a number of important causes. First, the location of the Mediterranean area between three continents, and the influence of civilizations like Mesopotamia, India and China nearby. Further, the excellent communication by sea, the mild climate, and the invention of writing were important factors in encouraging the development of civilization in the area (Poiycratis).

The history of civilization in the Mediterranean is not one of a single cultural, political, social,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ancientnewreast.com. Near eastern history, language and culture. 03 June 2004.  http://www.ancientneareast.com/ 

Carlos, Michael C. Near East. Odyssey Online. 13 June 2004.  http://carlos.emory.edu/ODYSSEY/NEAREAST/homepg.html 

Poiycratis, G.S. 1992. THE INFLUENCE OF THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CIVILIZATION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CULTURES. Annals of the MBC,5(1). 03 June 2004.  http://www.medbc.com/annals/review/vol_5/num_1/text/vol5n1p5.htm
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Roman World

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34743438

oman World

ome, whose beginning can be traced in 753 B.C., is the capital city of Italy. Initially, kings ruled the city; however, the last king, Tarquin the Proud, was overthrown. ome, then, became a republic for the next four hundred years. During this time, the republic was ruled by a Senate. The people to do different jobs in the senate were called Senators (Buckleitner, 58). However, not everyone was allowed to vote in these elections: women, slaves, and poor people were not allowed to vote. Those oman people who were not slaves were called 'citizens'.

In 55 B.C. The oman general Julius Caesar conquered France (At the time the country was called Gaul, and the omans called it Gallia). The Gauls fought hard against the omans and had been helped by Britain. Caesar was disappointed by their assistance and attempted to invade Britain, first in 55 B.C. And then…… [Read More]

References

Buckleitner, Warren. Ancient History: Lives and Times in Ancient Egypt, Greece, and the Roman Empire. School Library Journal, Vol. 50, No. 2, (2004): 58.

Dowling, Melissa Barden. A Time to Regender: The Transformation of Roman Time. KronoScope, Vol. 3, No. 2, (2003): 169-184.

Dyck, Ludwig Heinrich. CAESAR'S First Great Campaigns. Military History, Vol. 20 No. 6, (2004): 50-56.

Purcell, Nicholas. The Way We Used To Eat: Diet, Community, And History At Rome. American Journal of Philology, Vol. 124, No.3, (2003): 330-358.
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Individuals Take Over the World

Words: 1391 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66974411

The more important someone's rank in society was, the bigger the obligations became and thus, the responsibility increased.

Mesopotamia was a region between the two rivers Tigris and Euphrates where the swing of world's first civilization emerged. Various cultures occupied the region and were brought together solely by their customs and religion. Trade came in as the result of agriculture, it brought prosperity and urbanization. The rise of cities led to economic and political developments, one city being conquered by another until the establishment of the first Mesopotamian empire by Sargon that lasted about 150 years until outside powers such as the Hittites (who raided Babylon) gained control over some areas. During the Middle Bronze Age, the Assyrians conquered much of Mesopotamia and, with the rise of the Babylonian dynasty, trade was once again favoured and brought along warfare.

The Alexandrian Empire was favoured by a number of its king's…… [Read More]