Anthropology Essays (Examples)

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Anthropology: The Fundamental Social Science
Anthropology is, according the American Anthropological Association, "the study of humans, past and present" (AAA, 2011). Anthropology looks at what it means to be human; it is "a field of inquiry that studies human culture and evolutionary aspects of human biology, including cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and biological anthropology" (Jurmain, Kilgore, & Trevathan 2006: 6). It, therefore, is the fundamental social (and behavioral) science discipline that is concerned with humans. To understand Anthropology, one must understand social science, which is "a branch of science that deals with the institutions and functioning of human society and with the interpersonal relationships of individuals as members of sociality" (ebster's, 2011). hile other social sciences describe and explain aspects of humanity, anthropology looks at humanity holistically.

Anthropology

Anthropology is, at its heart, a discipline concerned with both the biological and sociocultural aspects of humanity. As such, it sets the stage for all….

Anthropology as a Career
PAGES 2 WORDS 641

Anthropology Career:
Anthropology can broadly be defined as the study of humanity based on its evolutionary origins in the past millions of years and its current global diversity. Unlike other disciplines that focus on one or another aspect of humanity, anthropology focuses on how people plan their lives and relate to each other in interacting, interconnected groups or societies with similar beliefs and practices. Anthropologists share many interests with other disciplines such as economics, sociology, political science, psychology, and biological science. However, this discipline distinguishes itself from the others based on three major characteristics i.e. A holistic view, a comparative perspective, and focus on the concept of culture (Bonvillain, p.4).

I am interested in becoming an anthropologist because of the focus of this discipline in studying humanity. A career in this field will provide me with knowledge, skills, and tools that will enable me to study the past, work with people, and….

Religion is an inherent part or element of a culture or society, and this must be viewed in the context of the society/culture in which this religion developed and thrived. It must be considered that all religions give credit to humanity's existence through a certain god / goddess (or in the case of polytheistic religions, gods/goddesses). Differences across religions lie only on the traditions observed, roles assumed by each member, and worldview and perspectives about specific issues, understood from the context of the society's/culture's religion. However, the central idea of having a creator/creators that govern all living and non-living things in the world remains constant across religions, therefore making it possible for anthropologists to consider and explain the concept of universality of religion.
10. How and why do cultures change?

Cultures change because of changes in the peoples' interactions or geographical phenomena. Changes in the social actors and their interactions with….

Although the writer explained his honest opinion, he still showed respect to the people concerned and his reasons sound fair enough for the Yanomami and other indigenous people.
The fourth letter indicated some direct criticisms to the AAA organization. The writer explained facts based from his study and in turn explained his comments and criticisms which are also based from factual information that he had researhed on. As compared to the first three letters where the writer showed deep concern for the Yanomami and other indigenous people, the writer in this letter showed concern on the credibility of the AAA organization. This is apparent in his suggestions that can prevent Yanomami from failures and from having criticisms from others.

The fifth letter sounds suggestive and yet reprimanding. In the first paragraph of the letter, the writer explained the purpose of the AAA. This is perhaps to generally indicate to the reader….


Cultural Construction -- Fundamental beliefs, definitions, behaviors, and relationships that are attributable to social learning and culture-specific expectations rather than to biology.

What is participant observation and what are the advantages of it (please use the virtual reality game (econd Life) as an example.

Participant observation is a type of anthropological, sociological, and other research-based disciplines in which the researcher can become directly and intimately involved with specific populations of research subjects. In its traditional format, researchers from one culture live with foreign societies as a method of increasing their understanding of their cultures through direct first-hand, face-to-face experiences as temporary members of those cultures.

In the context of the study of virtual-reality-game societies such as econd Life, participant observation takes the form of participating in the virtual reality game and interacting exclusively with econd Life characters within that virtual context. The advantage of this type of research is that it reduces the….

Anthropology, in the broadest sense of the term, is concerned with the whole history of mankind: man in the context of evolution. Yet this is a difficult position to take because being concerned with man as he occurs and as he has occurred means that the body and the soul must be taken into consideration together and the differences in man associated with time and location must be investigated. Still, there is a fundamental difference between the work of an anthropologist and that of an anatomist or a psychologist who deal, primarily, with the common functioning of the human mind and body. Accordingly, "Minor differences such as appear in any series of individuals are either disregarded or considered as peculiarities without particular significance for the type, although sometimes suggestive of its rise from lower forms."
To the anthropologist, on the other hand, each individual human must be seen through the lens….

Anthropology
How an Anthropologist Knows

There are many different ways anthropologists can gather information and draw conclusions about the artifacts they encounter. Even when confronted with two very similar female skeletons from the same period, a skilled anthropologist will likely be able to make certain determinations about the people that these skeletons belonged to back when they were animated and covered in softer tissues. Features of the skeletons themselves as well as other artifacts found on or near the skeletons can also provide clues as to their identity -- not their names or other highly specific information (at least, not in most cases), but possibly their occupation familial role(s), station in society, and especially their socioeconomic status. The next few paragraphs will outline several ways in which an anthropologist can come to these and other conclusions about a skeleton from a simple examination.

There are three main types of forensic anthropology that can….

Anthropology: An Analysis of Two Articles
The Gender and Labor Politics of Postmodernity" by Aihwa Ong and "Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Community" by Arjun Appadurai both offer perspectives on the impact of the changing global economy. These two articles will now be analysed in turn. This involves describing the main argument of each article, considering how each article is persuasive, considering how each article is confusing, and finally, considering how each author either agrees or disagrees with the ideas of other scholars.

In "The Gender and Labor Politics of Postmodernity" Aihwa Ong discusses the situation in the modern industrial work environment, also focusing on the role of women in this environment. Ong argues that there is a gap between what the literature says is happening and what the real experiences of workers are. In the essay, Ong attempts to show what the real situation is by looking at the….

Anthropology - Culture
According to White's "Energy and the Evolution of Culture," culture is a multifaceted dynamic which operates on a few different levels. Quite literally, the author proposes the notion that there are three primary facets of culture and its expression. These are the technological, sociological, and the ideological parts of culture. However, the writer makes a point of noting that despite the fact that these different modes of culture are interrelated and both act upon and react to the forces of one another, they do not do so equally. White believes that the technological aspect of culture is the most dominant one, and effectively asserts its influence on the other two realms the most. Consequently, the author believes that culture evolves in accordance to technology and the technological aspect of culture.

Essentially, culture evolves because of technology's effect upon it. At the core of this notion advocated by White is….

Gift giving creates a bond between the giver and the receiver. Mauss felt that to reject a gift, was to reject the social bond attached to it. Likewise, to fail to reciprocate is viewed as a dishonorable act in some cultures. Gift giving is a means to create social cohesion among the group.
What Distinctive contributions did Weber make to social theory?

Weber used his work to attempt to understand the differences between traditional cultures and modern western society. He disagrees with organic theories and placed more emphasis on the individual's contribution to the whole (Weber, in Anthropological Theory, 1922: 112-113). Weber contributed the idea that religion changes the motives of the individual. Therefore, religion played a constructive role in the development of society. Weber felt that individuals in traditional societies selected and followed leaders based on their personalities, or out of tradition. He felt that individuals in Western society follow….

Technological innovations were common as mankind learned to communicate with one another. Working in social groups early humans discovered tools, methods for controlling fire and using the wheel and eventual begin developing methods for "recording and communicating message" to one another, resulting in "the creation of larger societal units, hierarchical differentiation and specialized division of labor" (Laszlo, 2001: 654).
Language communication and development have made possible faster growth, more complexity within society and higher levels of socialization and interaction. Through increased communication and interaction humans were able to develop and work together to discover technological innovation that further changed the way humans behave. Organization within human communities and territorial expansion continued to rise and homosapiens continued on a path of socio-cultural evolution stemming from language developments (Gibson, 1987).

Current Behavioral Implications Modern Humans

Laszlo (2001) suggests we are at a "critical juncture in the history of our species" when "a mode of….


Many of the poems produced by the Bushmen are written in this manner, which does not rhyme and can seem disjointed. However, it is also possible to sense the deep communion with nature that the Bushmen have in the way they express themselves through poetry and other writings. They want to show the beauty of the land they live on, and provide others with a way to see the value in it, as well. The flowers, trees, grass, and even the animals they hunt and kill for food and other needs are all revered by them, much more so than most people do today. They also see themselves in nature, and want to express that experience of everything being connected to everything else. This is not always an easy thing to express, but it Bushmen found a way to do so.

Both Bank and Krog, in their discussions of Bleek and….

The other positive is that I will be travelling and meeting new people in my life as well as trying out new ways of life there.
How do you anticipate your field experience might change your initial plans and expectations?

The field work will definitely change my plans as well as expectations since from the American view, Turkey happens to be another society that is not fully democratized ad needs to adapt to democratic leadership. The thing no one is talking about is the type of community exists at the grassroots especially the youth and the changes they might be undergoing and only concentrates on the older generation. These are the perceptions that will be shaped about the Turkey community and the youth community in particular.

eflect on what you think distinguishes an anthropological approach and anthropological research from other types of research through your specific imagined case study.

Anthropological research has a….

Anthropology of Power and Maoism by Andrew Kipnis
China in the 20th century had been under the reformist political system of Communism, where Mao Zedong, its first leader, led to country towards Cultural Revolution. Under Mao's leadership, Chinese society has been transformed into a Socialist society, which became possible through the peasant revolution, since Socialism decrees that social changes include the rise of peasant leadership (the proletariat class) over the elite (bourgeoisie class).

Indeed, Mao's influence as the great Communist leader of one of the biggest and most powerful Communist countries in the world had permeated the lives of every Chinese of the 20th century. That is why anthropologists, seeking to understand the anthropology of power under Mao's leadership, conducted research that looked into power relations and dynamics during and after Mao's reign as leader of China. In Kipnis' study on the anthropology of power and Maoism in China, he analyzes five….

Anthropology and Total Institutions
The presence of total institutions within our overall societal structure provides a unique opportunity for anthropologic inquiry through the standardization of individual behaviors. First introduced by sociologist Erving Goffman in his 1957 essay On the Characteristics of Total Institutions, the concept of total institution is used to describe "social arrangements which regulate, under one roof and according to one rational plan, all spheres of individuals' lives -- sleeping, eating, playing and working" (Goffman, Lemert and Branaman, 1997, p. 54). While total institutions exist in multiple forms throughout society, ranging from orphanages and nursing homes to army barracks and mental hospitals, perhaps no other organizational establishment embodies Goffman's conception of a total institution better than the modern prison. The intensely structured and overtly authoritarian environment fostered inside a prison system epitomizes a total institution because its "total character is symbolized by the barrier to social intercourse with the….

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3 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Anthropology The Fundamental Social Science Anthropology Is

Words: 815
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Anthropology: The Fundamental Social Science Anthropology is, according the American Anthropological Association, "the study of humans, past and present" (AAA, 2011). Anthropology looks at what it means to be human;…

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2 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Anthropology as a Career

Words: 641
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Anthropology Career: Anthropology can broadly be defined as the study of humanity based on its evolutionary origins in the past millions of years and its current global diversity. Unlike other…

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8 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Anthropology for Me Is Synonymous

Words: 2497
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Essay

Religion is an inherent part or element of a culture or society, and this must be viewed in the context of the society/culture in which this religion developed…

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1 Pages
Term Paper

Anthropology

Anthropology Letter Evaluation the First

Words: 392
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Although the writer explained his honest opinion, he still showed respect to the people concerned and his reasons sound fair enough for the Yanomami and other indigenous people. The…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Anthropology

Anthropology -- Short and Long

Words: 752
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Cultural Construction -- Fundamental beliefs, definitions, behaviors, and relationships that are attributable to social learning and culture-specific expectations rather than to biology. What is participant observation and what are the…

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13 Pages
Term Paper

Anthropology

Anthropology in the Broadest Sense of the

Words: 4224
Length: 13 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Anthropology, in the broadest sense of the term, is concerned with the whole history of mankind: man in the context of evolution. Yet this is a difficult position to…

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2 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Anthropology How an Anthropologist Knows There Are

Words: 604
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Anthropology How an Anthropologist Knows There are many different ways anthropologists can gather information and draw conclusions about the artifacts they encounter. Even when confronted with two very similar female skeletons…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Anthropology

Anthropology An Analysis of Two Articles the

Words: 1043
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Anthropology: An Analysis of Two Articles The Gender and Labor Politics of Postmodernity" by Aihwa Ong and "Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Community" by Arjun Appadurai both offer…

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2 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Anthropology - Culture According to White's Energy

Words: 608
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Anthropology - Culture According to White's "Energy and the Evolution of Culture," culture is a multifaceted dynamic which operates on a few different levels. Quite literally, the author proposes the…

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23 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Anthropology Historical Foundations of Anthropology

Words: 7138
Length: 23 Pages
Type: Essay

Gift giving creates a bond between the giver and the receiver. Mauss felt that to reject a gift, was to reject the social bond attached to it. Likewise,…

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9 Pages
Term Paper

Anthropology

Anthropology Behavioral Implications of Developmental

Words: 2416
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Technological innovations were common as mankind learned to communicate with one another. Working in social groups early humans discovered tools, methods for controlling fire and using the wheel…

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6 Pages
Essay

Communication - Language

Anthropology Andrew Bank's Evolution and

Words: 2000
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Essay

Many of the poems produced by the Bushmen are written in this manner, which does not rhyme and can seem disjointed. However, it is also possible to sense the…

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5 Pages
Essay

Education - Computers

Anthropology in Turkey Changing Role

Words: 1765
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

The other positive is that I will be travelling and meeting new people in my life as well as trying out new ways of life there. How do you…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Government

Anthropology of Power and Maoism by Andrew

Words: 631
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Anthropology of Power and Maoism by Andrew Kipnis China in the 20th century had been under the reformist political system of Communism, where Mao Zedong, its first leader, led to…

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5 Pages
Essay

Criminal Justice

Anthropology and Total Institutions the Presence of

Words: 1444
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Anthropology and Total Institutions The presence of total institutions within our overall societal structure provides a unique opportunity for anthropologic inquiry through the standardization of individual behaviors. First introduced by…

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