Athlete Essays (Examples)

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Athletes and Steroids
Historical issue in sports

The use of steroids by athletes is unfair and can be very dangerous to both the body and mind

Athletes today are quite competitive, and every athlete desire is to be the winner. The audience has extremely high expectation for the athletes, and most athletes do not wish to disappoint the expectations of the spectators. The coaches put too much pressure to the athlete, which sometimes is far much beyond expectation. The athlete requires working tremendously hard to achieve the expected results. This requires the athlete to put so much time on training, diet and discipline. The use of steroids provides the athlete with a quicker and easier way of achieving the expected results without too much strain. The circumstances surrounding the athlete put him into the temptation of using steroid. In most cases, the athletes do not have enough information about the use of steroids.….

Proper ankle taping is generally understood to reduce plantarflexion and inversion of the ankle, and this has been shown to be the most common mechanism associated with ankle sprain injuries."
Nonetheless, the benefits of taping are reduced after about an hour of sporting practice. esearchers assert that taping becomes loose and cuts down the support to nearly negligible levels (around 40%). This is further decreased after a couple of hours of sporting activity. Furthermore, researchers have also criticized the cost associated with using tape in the long run. Mickel (2006) compares the cost-effectiveness of both ankle taping and bracing and concludes, "One study reported a cost of $1.75 per ankle when taping was used to prevent ankle sprains, resulting in a cost of more than $400 per athlete over 1 college football season. For these reasons, a number of ankle braces, both laced and semi-rigid with Velcro straps, have been….

Athletes as Role Models
PAGES 2 WORDS 736

Athletes as ole Models
The media's role in the portrayal of athletes as role models in history

ay it ain't so, Joe.' During the infamous 1919 Black Sox scandal, in which the team deliberately 'threw' the World Series for a bribe, the players' betrayal was depicted as being particularly hurtful to young people who idolized the SOX (Everstein 1998). Babe uth was also portrayed as a hero during this era, as he slugged out record numbers of hits, often specifically asked to do so by his adoring young fans. Even today, whenever a new scandal about an athlete erupts, from steroids to Michael Phelps smoking pot, the media seldom portrays this as bad behavior by an individual. ather it is portrayed as cultural event, and a betrayal of all the fans, particularly the young fans, of the sport. As athletics have become more and more central to everyday life -- and more….

Today's athletes do not deserve the high price tags that come with signing them to play for professional sports today. Their high incomes increase the cost of sales, the cost of products that bear their name, the cost of products that they help advertise; and they create false hope in young sports fans, and distract the attention of young adolescents who dream of one day being a big income earning athlete - an unrealistic goal.
In a Duke Law Journal article by researcher Sarah E. Gohl, the author writes about the unrealistic dreams of youngsters who have become less focused on the competition of sport, and more on the amenities associated with high incomes. She writes:

young boy sits in English class, staring out the window at the empty basketball court on the playground. He wonders why he has to learn that "ball" is a noun and that "round" is an….

Athletes in Training and Competition
According to the studies examined by Monroe-Chandler, et al. (2004), research has shown that athletes can enhance their performance and technique by setting goals. Of course, other studies indicate that research into goal setting has not examined this thoroughly enough and, therefore, has not accurately established whether the setting of goals varies between training and competition. The study analyzed here used a qualitative approach in order to investigate the kinds of goals that are set by athletes, in both training and competition situations (Monroe-Chandler, et al., 2004). Based on previous research, a framework was generated that allowed for the examination of 249 athletes who represented 18 individual sports. They were asked about the goals that they set in competition and their goals in training. The results of the study indicated that the goals were very similar whether they were set for training or for competition (Monroe-Chandler,….

Athlete's Identity
PAGES 3 WORDS 1128

Athlete's Identity
Interactionist Theory and the Female Athlete

The social role is the group of expected behaviors that a person in a certain social situation has given to him or her. Role confusion is when an individual has difficulty figuring out what the expected behaviors are in a certain situation. Role strain is when fulfilling the expectations of one social role conflicts with filling those of another social role. Social roles, as well as these two elements of the social role, are important to interactionist theory, which may also be referred to as the social action theory. The concept of the role was adapted from anthropology, and to interactionists it represents the constantly changing and adapting set of expected behaviors which are negotiated between the people in a situation. The interactionist social role is rather meaningless if looking at one individual isolated from others, as it develops only through the social interactions….

Athlete Training Programs
PAGES 5 WORDS 1570

Athlete Training egimen
In the sport of running, the distance someone goes will determine how they prepare and train. Those who run in the half and full marathons will often use various training methods to improve their endurance, strength and flexibility. These factors enable their bodies to perform more efficiently. To achieve these objectives requires establishing a training regime over years. This will be accomplished by looking at the sport / systems, pre / post tests, program design, prescribed activities and physiological factors. Together, these elements will illustrate the importance of this program for the athlete in reaching their goals. (Henderson, 2004)

Describe the sport/position, specific motions performed, musculature used and energy systems activities

Long distance running dates back to days of ancient Greece. This is when the marathon was started in 490 B.C. By a Greek soldier named Pheidippides. He ran 26.2 miles from the Battle of Marathon to Athens and….

Dying a premature death may earn him the admiration of his neighbors, but a fully lived life depends on how many lives one has touched instead of the number of medals one has accumulated or the number of victories one has won in his lifetime.
The poet's attitude towards death connotes that it seems better to die young and having lived a glorious life than to die old but see other people transcend one's victories and fame. He has a rather cynical view on death for his poem connotes that the people who died young appear to be lucky. In real life, one has to accept or acknowledge the fact that there will come a day when a person will be born who will be far better than you - smarter, faster, etc.

eferences

Cummings, Michael. "To an Athlete Dying Young: A Poem by a.E. Housman." Cummings Study Guides. 2007. Cummings Study….

Athlete-Coach Communication and Injury eporting Amongst Male and Female Athletes
Although physical activity is a necessary component of a healthy lifestyle, there is great alarm that injuries are escalating amongst athletes at every level of sporting competition. In sports such as football and hockey, there are growing concerns about head trauma; in sports such as gymnastics and track and field, there are growing concerns about overuse injuries (Lopate 2013; Caine et al. 2006). Although the physiological and psychological factors which can increase the risk of injury will vary on an individual basis from sport to sport and athlete to athlete, one possible factor that can contribute to injury is the characteristics of the communication which occurs between athlete and coach. Of course, the nature of coach-athlete communication can be positive or negative; helpful or unhelpful. eflecting this, a number of measurement scales have been developed to critically assess effective communication….

Athletes Train both Physically and Psychologically as They Prepare for and Participate in Competitive Sports, by Joe Palca. Specifically, it will summarize and react to the essay.
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SPOTS

This transcript of a live call in show on National Public adio (NP) discusses the psychology of winning in sports, and why some athletes simply win more because of their attitudes. Palca speaks with athletes Joanna Zeiger, a member of the U.S. Olympic triathlon team, and Casey Fitzandolph, a member of the U.S. speed skating team and a 1998 Winter Olympian, to discover how they prepare themselves before competitions, and with several experts to discover what they have studied about the successful psychology of winning in sports. The athletes also discuss how they deal with losing. The experts discuss the successful strategies some athletes use for mentally preparing before competitions, and find that most successful athletes use some form of….

Athlete Relationship
Critically evaluate the use of questionnaires to research the coach-athlete relationship

In this paper, we aim to present arguments for and against the use of questionnaires to conduct research on the overall relationship that exists between an athlete and his/her coach. The paper starts off by explaining some of the inconsistencies that have existed in studies using questionnaires to study the same phenomenon; the paper then moves towards explaining the basics of what a questionnaire is meant to measure and how. The paper then moves on to making 3 arguments and counter arguments for the use of questionnaires in research that is pertaining to studying the relationship between an athlete and a coach.

Past use of questionnaires

eing an expert or a novice doesn't make a difference when it comes to reading journal articles pertaining to the relationship between coach and athlete. This is so since it isn't easy deciphering what….

Paying them to play sports in college would devalue their education and encourage them to continue on a path that will never be profitable in the long-term (Hill, 2007).
Conclusion

As can be seen, there are two sides to the story. There are good reasons to avoid paying athletes, but there are also good reasons why paying them could be helpful and beneficial. Whichever is decided, it is clear that there will be a high level of disagreement from those who are opposed to the decision that is ultimately made. When people are uncertain about what to do in any given situation, it also helps to focus on what has been done in the past, or what has worked for others. With the issue of paying or not paying college athletes, that is not something that can be undertaken. In other words, because it has not been done before, there is….

College Athlete Pay
The question of payment for college athletes may seem trivial at first glance, when one considers the variety of other, seemingly more pressing issues facing universities today, but upon closer examination it becomes clear that the question of whether or not college athletes should be payed for playing actually cuts to the heart of budget crises plaguing so many American universities. For example, according to Forbes magazine, in 2011 the University of Texas Longhorns football team brought in $129 million dollars for the school, a not insubstantial amount considering that so many universities are being forced to reduce their budgets (Smith, 2011). However, this emphasis on the return has led to troubling practices, including improper benefits and exploitative contracts. Paying student athletes would likely reduce some of these back-door deals and exploitative practices, but formally turning these students into employees runs the risk of transforming sports programs from….

Case Study of Athletes
PAGES 7 WORDS 3001

athlete concerning intimidation, eligibility and elimination, technology in sports, commercial sports, ergogenic aids, violence and principles and exceptions. The explanation is going to be based on the types used, how effective they are and the consequences of them in the field of athlete. Violence is the act of using great force or doing something which one accompanies by great force. Intimidation can be described as to frighten someone to make him/her to do something sometimes by threatening her/him.
Elimination is to do away with while eligible is where one meet the qualifications required. Principles are rules that governs someone's behaviors on the other hand exception can be described as principles that are not being followed. Technology is whereby in the industry the knowledge are applied to practical task systematically and commercial can be referred to as to make money out of. Ergogenic is the use of drugs for specific reason….

Besides the fact that they are dangerous they taint the game as a whole. In the game of baseball the elusive home runs record that was chased for a very long time was a big deal, and when it was finally broken there was a lot of excitement that surrounded the game. But after hearing about all of the steroid and performance enhancing drug use that was going on during that time, it makes one question the entire validity of the record all together. If the record was not achieved without the use of drugs or steroids then it shouldn't be counted and thus not the real records that stands. It is highly unfair to those who set the record in the first place, drug free.
eferences

Court Documents Show Barry Bonds Tested Positive for 3 Types of Steroids. (2009). etrieved

June 23, 2009, from FoxNews.com Web site:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,487633,00.html

O'Keefe, Michael. (2007). Barry Bond's….

Stress in sport can refer to two distinct things.  It can refer to physical stress and is compared to recovery periods or it can refer to the emotional stressors experienced by athletes in various sports.  Because you referred to the sources of stress experienced by those involved in sport, we are proceeding under the assumption that you are referring to emotional stressors.  We are going to provide an outline to give you an idea of what we might include in the introduction, main body paragraphs, and conclusion of an essay about that topic.

Essay Outline:

I. Introduction

A.....

1. The Evolution of Adidas: A Look at the Brand's History, Successes, and Challenges
2. The Impact of Adidas on Sports and Fashion: How the Brand Has Influenced Trends and Culture
3. Adidas vs. Competitors: A Comparative Analysis of Marketing Strategies and Successes
4. Sustainable Practices in the Adidas Supply Chain: How the Brand is Leading the Way in Corporate Social Responsibility
5. The Future of Adidas: Predictions and Opportunities for Growth in the Global Market
6. Athlete Endorsements and Partnerships: How Adidas Collaborates with Sports Stars to Drive Sales and Brand Awareness
7. The Influence of Technology on Adidas Products: How Innovation is Driving the....

Essay Topics on Adidas: A Comprehensive Analysis

1. The Rise and Evolution of Adidas: A Study in Sports Marketing

Trace the origins and growth of Adidas, examining its key marketing strategies and product innovations.
Analyze the company's target audience, brand positioning, and communication channels.
Discuss the challenges and opportunities Adidas has faced in the competitive sportswear market.

2. Adidas's Social and Environmental Impact: A Critical Assessment

Evaluate Adidas's commitment to social responsibility and sustainability initiatives.
Examine the company's efforts to address issues such as labor rights, environmental protection, and diversity and inclusion.
Discuss the effectiveness of these initiatives and their impact on....

1. Should social media platforms be held responsible for monitoring and removing hate speech?
2. Is the death penalty an effective deterrent for violent crime?
3. Should college athletes be paid for their performance?
4. Are stricter gun control laws necessary to reduce gun violence?
5. Should the government provide free healthcare for all citizens?
6. Is climate change a result of human activity?
7. Should the minimum wage be increased to a livable wage?
8. Is affirmative action still necessary in today's society?
9. Should standardized testing be the primary measure of student achievement?
10. Is privacy in the digital age a fundamental human right?
11. Should the use....

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4 Pages
Essay

Anatomy

Athletes and Steroids Historical Issue in Sports

Words: 1213
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Athletes and Steroids Historical issue in sports The use of steroids by athletes is unfair and can be very dangerous to both the body and mind Athletes today are quite competitive, and…

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8 Pages
Research Paper

Sports

Athletes Review Ankle Tape or

Words: 2419
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Proper ankle taping is generally understood to reduce plantarflexion and inversion of the ankle, and this has been shown to be the most common mechanism associated with ankle…

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2 Pages
Research Proposal

Sports

Athletes as Role Models

Words: 736
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Research Proposal

Athletes as ole Models The media's role in the portrayal of athletes as role models in history ay it ain't so, Joe.' During the infamous 1919 Black Sox scandal, in which…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Sports

Athlete Salaries The Price of

Words: 1411
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Today's athletes do not deserve the high price tags that come with signing them to play for professional sports today. Their high incomes increase the cost of sales,…

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2 Pages
Essay

Sports

Athletes in Training and Competition According to

Words: 705
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Athletes in Training and Competition According to the studies examined by Monroe-Chandler, et al. (2004), research has shown that athletes can enhance their performance and technique by setting goals. Of…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Sports

Athlete's Identity

Words: 1128
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Athlete's Identity Interactionist Theory and the Female Athlete The social role is the group of expected behaviors that a person in a certain social situation has given to him or her.…

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5 Pages
Essay

Sports

Athlete Training Programs

Words: 1570
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Athlete Training egimen In the sport of running, the distance someone goes will determine how they prepare and train. Those who run in the half and full marathons will…

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1 Pages
Term Paper

Literature

Athlete Dying Young by Alfred

Words: 402
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Dying a premature death may earn him the admiration of his neighbors, but a fully lived life depends on how many lives one has touched instead of the…

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2 Pages
Research Paper

Sports

Athlete-Coach Communication and Injury Reporting Amongst Male

Words: 482
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Athlete-Coach Communication and Injury eporting Amongst Male and Female Athletes Although physical activity is a necessary component of a healthy lifestyle, there is great alarm that injuries are escalating…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Sports

Athletes Train Both Physically and Psychologically as

Words: 701
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Athletes Train both Physically and Psychologically as They Prepare for and Participate in Competitive Sports, by Joe Palca. Specifically, it will summarize and react to the essay. THE PSYCHOLOGY…

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3 Pages
Essay

Sports

Athlete Relationship Critically Evaluate the Use of

Words: 1291
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Athlete Relationship Critically evaluate the use of questionnaires to research the coach-athlete relationship In this paper, we aim to present arguments for and against the use of questionnaires to conduct…

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5 Pages
Research Paper

Sports

College Athletes Be Paid Whether

Words: 1693
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Paying them to play sports in college would devalue their education and encourage them to continue on a path that will never be profitable in the long-term (Hill,…

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9 Pages
Term Paper

Sports

Pay for Play for Major College Athletes

Words: 2335
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Term Paper

College Athlete Pay The question of payment for college athletes may seem trivial at first glance, when one considers the variety of other, seemingly more pressing issues facing universities today,…

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7 Pages
Case Study

Sports

Case Study of Athletes

Words: 3001
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Case Study

athlete concerning intimidation, eligibility and elimination, technology in sports, commercial sports, ergogenic aids, violence and principles and exceptions. The explanation is going to be based on the types…

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1 Pages
Essay

Sports

Drama Athlete Who Uses Performance

Words: 391
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Essay

Besides the fact that they are dangerous they taint the game as a whole. In the game of baseball the elusive home runs record that was chased for…

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