Canadian Culture Essays (Examples)

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To wit, in order to either "mitigate" (Ramos' reference) or otherwise water down the impact of the francophone-leaning newspapers, the English-language newspapers interviewed celebrities and politicians (Federalist politicians) about Richard's career. The English-language papers were out to "counterbalance" (Ramos, p. 430) the effect of the francophone emphasis on Richard as a cultural giant -- and they did so by interviewing "apolitical athletes."
It wasn't that the English-speaking media were overtly trying to play down Richard's impact on the Canadian sporting and social scene, it is just that they were coming from a place that was anti-separatist and they did not want to raise Richard's legacy higher than simply a great hockey player who skated with a vicious abandon and made all of Canada proud.

On page 430 the authors point out that the Quebec newspapers were not only celebrating Richard as an hero for French-speaking citizens -- left on the sidelines….

Culture and Health Disparities - Filipinos
PESONAL SOCIAL STATUS: In researching this project, I found a study prepared by the Canadian Nurses Association (2005). It reviewed the social determinants of health and how one's social status impacts their or their family health outcomes. The focus of this piece was on issues such as poverty, economic inequality, social isolation and social support systems and their impact on the health of minorities, many of the same categories and characteristics mentioned in the Journal of Transcultural Nursing (Andrews et al., 2010). While their study was more on a broad base of Canadian conditions, their findings seem to reflect the circumstances of many first and second generation Filipinos. First and later generations of Filipinos who move to new cultures do act differently, but for the most part there remain many family connections and networks that cannot be overlooked.

My social status is mostly a reflection of….

For the aboriginal population of British Columbia, industrialization and capitalism threatened and later undermined traditional ways of life. Trading was soon replaced by wage labour systems. Shifting from barter to a labour market unraveled the essential social institutions of traditional aboriginal society. Potlatches once served as a "bulwark which enabled the aboriginal people to resist acculturation," (p. 252). Lutz, unlike Kealey or DeLottinville, examines the effects of colonialism on industrialization. Colonial power structures legitimized the social hierarchies that form the backbone of capitalist infrastructure.
The ways capitalism transformed traditional aboriginal society from being barter-based to being wage labour-based closely resemble the ways capitalism transformed traditional European skilled labour culture. As Kealey points out, the European artisan model of labour persisted until the Industrial evolution. Skilled labourers like coopers and smiths once apprenticed their work, entering into careers that offered a high degree of control over the means of production and….

One of the failures of the current system is that it often does not account for cultural and resource differences between nations - instead a one-size fits all economic system is imposed universally. Over time, each society will find its own path. Some societies will fail to adapt and ultimately disappear. That is part of the evolutionary process. The key is that right now all societies are not given the same opportunity to succeed whereas the fundamental principles of capitalism suggest they should be.
As more people realize that happiness is more important than money, we will see profound shifts towards knowledge and culture, and the pursuit of wealth will be taken up by other cultures. As they too achieve the type of sustained comfort experienced today in many estern societies, they too will shift towards the pursuit of happiness over money. There will be a major obstacle to overcome….

Canadian
Canada is one of the largest countries in Northern America, covering more than 9 million square metres. It has a population of over 31 million people. Even though the country is ethnically diverse, two main languages the people use are English and French. The Canadians use these two official languages. This makes it a bilingual country. People whose ancestry is British make the largest percentage of the people who live in Canada. Economically, Canada is one of the largest economies in the world, with an average per capita income of over twenty thousand dollars (Kalman & Bobbie, p. 4).

Values that the Canadians uphold

The Canadians uphold several values. These values include coexisting peacefully, equality and freedom, respecting the cultural differences that exist between them and keeping the law among other values. Keeping peace is one of the metiers that the Canadians cherish. Canada has been very active in peacekeeping missions….

In histoy, in most of the Indian families, the inheitance of the estates of the family is left to the lineage of males in the family. Though since the yea 1956, the law in India has always teated females and males as equals in mattes of inheitance whee thee is no legal will witten. Cuently, Indians have become wise and ae using legal wills fo the inheitance and succession of popety. The usage of legal wills at of the yea 2004 stands at about 20%.
The ate of divoce in India is extemely low. It stands at 1% as compaed to 40% which is expeienced in the U.S. These statistics of divoce do not, howeve, give a complete pictue of the divoce situation in India. This is because many maiages that end up being split do so without a fomal divoce. Thee is a eseach gap in the scientific studies….

Following are Hofstede's four categories and what they measure:
Power Distance (PD) is the "extent to which the less powerful members of institutions and organizations within a country expect and accept that power is distributed unequally" (Hofstede 1998) with a small PD meaning more equality in the society, and a large PD meaning less.

Individualism (ID) defines whether the society expects people to look after themselves or not. Its opposite is Collectivism, which Hofstede (1998) defines as "the extent to which people in a society from birth onwards are integrated into strong, cohesive in-groups, which throughout people's lifetime continue to protect them in exchange for unquestioning loyalty."

Masculinity (MA) defines the degree of distinction of gender roles. High MA means men are supposed to be "assertive, tough, and focused on material success; women are supposed to be more modest, tender, and concerned with the quality of life" (Hofstede 1998). Its opposite is….

Culture Case Study it Is
PAGES 4 WORDS 1412

A merger is not about one business dominated another. It should be seen more like a marriage where both parties involved should have an equal say in all matters. It cannot be stated enough that the merger must be seen as a win-win situation for all parties involved. If anyone is feeling slighted or uncomfortable, the situation must be brought to the manager's attention and addressed immediately.
The main thing for the manager to understand is that staff wants to feel appreciated. They do not want to get lost in all the events surrounding the merger. Appreciation ranks high on the list of what staff members need in order to feel a sense of obligation to remain at the hospital after the merger has taken place. If there is a sense of appreciation and the staff members have a connection with the community in which the hospital is located, there….

Canadian criminal justice system corrections
The Canadian justice system

Since the last decade, there's been a huge hue and cry pertaining unjust convictions and its disastrous consequences. As in the case of Canada, there have been numerous high profile cases which concluded with unjust verdicts, putting the Canadian justice system and its judicial process in question. Even though, the media's attention has increased on this matter, academic literature on the issue is razor-thin in case of Canada (Denov & Campbell, 2005). The media's coverage of crimes and criminal justice is now excessively given coverage during the last decade, since it's a form of entertainment and news. Criminal justice and crime have emerged as a viable form of entertainment across the media spectrum. In case of TV shows, depictions of criminal justice and crime are observed in courtroom TV seasons as well as daily talk's shows.

Popular culture and criminal courts

The crime investigation….

As Ross (2004) notes, one should never “underestimate the importance of qualitative/subjective information in understanding a process and/or result” (p. 4). Grossmann, Karasawa, Kan and Kitayama (2014) essentially embrace this same idea when they conduct their examination of how adults experience emotions in unpleasant situations across cultures. The aim of Grossmann et al. (2014) was to assess the power of the situation on social psychology from a cultural perspective. This aim is important because, as Heine and Norenzayan (2006) point out, “cultural psychological research is as important in documenting robust similarities across cultures as it is in documenting variability” (p. 254). It is especially important because it enables psychologists in the field “to identify the extent to which psychological phenomena are culture-specific or are psychological universals” (Heine & Norenzayan, 2006, p. 254). This paper will critique the study by Grossman et al. (2014) and assess it by applying one lesson….

hen Europeans colonized Brazil, for example, the indigenous peoples intermarried or otherwise bonded intimately with those Europeans and the result was a hybrid identity, "mestizaje," which Noh refers to as a native Brazilian combining his or her identity with a Portuguese identity.
Hence, in the twentieth century hybridity has been transformed into a "…cultural phenomenon" which is now explored by anthropologists and other social scientists -- and it means that growing volumes of people are moving "…from one place to another" and as they move they create "…new cultural and sociodemographic spaces and are themselves reshaped in the process" (Luke, 2003, p. 379). The point of Noh's article -- boiled down to a safe overview -- is that cultural borders between countries and regions "…have been blurred" and in their place is an "intercultural mixture" because "…all cultures are involved in one another" (p. 7). In fact some scholars insist….

Thus, some suggest that the competition between the workers was crucial. More precisely "competition between high-wage white workers and low-wage Asian workers explains racial exclusion (...) labor competition was the central feature of ethnic division in the working class, and exclusion was the only viable strategy under these circumstances." (Creese, 1988, 294)
Despite this possible explanation there were other factors as well that determined the white workers to exclude Asians. However, there was a sense of lack of organization at the level of immigrant workers especially because they were considered to have no desire for such an organization. Even so, in some cases, there was also a fear of the extremist workers who were considered to be capable of radicalism (Creese, 1988, 294). Other opinions suggest that economic factors as well as ideological ones are also viable for offering an explanation. In this sense, there were irreconcilable differences in terms….

Introduction
The health care system in the United States is often compared with that of other countries, and the one that comes up the most frequently in Canada. The Canadian system has better outcomes in general than the American system, and is completely different in terms of structure. This paper will examine the key areas where the systems differ, and seek to extrapolate what that means.

Basic Systems

At its heart, the US system relies on market forces for much of its activity. Health care is providers are usually paid by insurance companies (or the government, which will be discussed in a moment). The insurance market is generally a free market, where insurers compete for customers the same way that insurers in other fields compete for customers. Employers will often pay the cost of coverage under an employer plan for workers, but there are many types of jobs where this is not the….

CIBC
The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) is one of the "Big Five" Canadian banks. It was founded in 1961 by the merger of the Canadian Bank of Commerce (founded 1867) and the Imperial Bank of Canada (founded 1875). Today, the CIBC is the fifth-largest of these by total revenue, earning $12.09 billion in FY2010 (PC, 2011). This report will evaluate the CIBC in terms of a number of different factors in order make a judgment about the merits of investing in the bank's stock. The analysis will comprise of an industry analysis, a company analysis, and a valuation analysis.

According to the company's 2011 Annual Report, the CIBC earned total revenue of $12.249 billion in FY2011. This was split between interest income (51.8%) and non-interest income (48.2%). From this, the bank earned a net income of $3.079 billion. The recession years of 2008 and 2009 saw a sharp decline in….

Abnormal Psychology:pop Culture
Abnormal Psychology: Pop Culture

(You're name)

(You're school)

Abnormal Psychology: Pop Culture

In asking the question of what abnormal psychology is really supposed to be, it makes sense that we must first quickly think about the very definition of our word "abnormal . By all rights, is a remarkably puzzling word that is very dependent on what is called "normality . Both terms may justifiably change fundamentally from one era to another and one culture to a different one. How then do we choose upon what is abnormal and what is normal? Of course, this is much more of a philosophical issue than a psychological one. For logical reasons of practicability, it is essential to generate an approximately uniform definition of abnormal psychology that we can more or less decide upon as a cluster of caregivers. This general definition would obviously be typical in its nature, but the shared definition of the….

Coping with the Stress of Cultural Adjustment for Immigrants in Canada

Immigrating to a new country is a major life event that can bring with it a myriad of challenges and stressors. For immigrants in Canada, adjusting to a new culture and society can be particularly daunting, given the country's diverse population and vast geographical span. However, by understanding the common challenges faced during cultural adjustment and implementing effective coping mechanisms, immigrants can navigate this transition more successfully.

Understanding the Common Challenges

One of the most significant challenges immigrants face is culture shock, which refers to the feelings of disorientation and anxiety experienced....

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4 Pages
Research Proposal

Communication - Journalism

Maurice Richard and Canadian Culture

Words: 1369
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Research Proposal

To wit, in order to either "mitigate" (Ramos' reference) or otherwise water down the impact of the francophone-leaning newspapers, the English-language newspapers interviewed celebrities and politicians (Federalist politicians)…

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4 Pages
Research Paper

Family and Marriage

Culture and Health Disparities - Filipinos Personal

Words: 1665
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Culture and Health Disparities - Filipinos PESONAL SOCIAL STATUS: In researching this project, I found a study prepared by the Canadian Nurses Association (2005). It reviewed the social determinants of…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

Sociology

Canadian Labour in The Honest

Words: 1489
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

For the aboriginal population of British Columbia, industrialization and capitalism threatened and later undermined traditional ways of life. Trading was soon replaced by wage labour systems. Shifting from…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Economics

Canadian Perspectives of Capitalism as

Words: 1932
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

One of the failures of the current system is that it often does not account for cultural and resource differences between nations - instead a one-size fits all…

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6 Pages
Capstone Project

Government

Canadian Canada Is One of the Largest

Words: 1775
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Capstone Project

Canadian Canada is one of the largest countries in Northern America, covering more than 9 million square metres. It has a population of over 31 million people. Even though…

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16 Pages
Essay

History - Asian

Culture Refers to the Accumulated

Words: 4685
Length: 16 Pages
Type: Essay

In histoy, in most of the Indian families, the inheitance of the estates of the family is left to the lineage of males in the family. Though since…

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16 Pages
Term Paper

Teaching

Culture on Learning Styles Multiculturalism

Words: 5049
Length: 16 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Following are Hofstede's four categories and what they measure: Power Distance (PD) is the "extent to which the less powerful members of institutions and organizations within a country expect…

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4 Pages
Case Study

Business - Management

Culture Case Study it Is

Words: 1412
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Case Study

A merger is not about one business dominated another. It should be seen more like a marriage where both parties involved should have an equal say in all…

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5 Pages
Essay

Business - Law

Canadian Corrections and Criminal Justice System

Words: 1715
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Canadian criminal justice system corrections The Canadian justice system Since the last decade, there's been a huge hue and cry pertaining unjust convictions and its disastrous consequences. As in the…

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2 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Culture Studies and Psychology

Words: 625
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

As Ross (2004) notes, one should never “underestimate the importance of qualitative/subjective information in understanding a process and/or result” (p. 4). Grossmann, Karasawa, Kan and Kitayama (2014) essentially embrace…

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3 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Intersecting Cultures Are Creating a

Words: 1067
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

hen Europeans colonized Brazil, for example, the indigenous peoples intermarried or otherwise bonded intimately with those Europeans and the result was a hybrid identity, "mestizaje," which Noh refers…

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9 Pages
Term Paper

Sociology

History of Canadian Labour- the

Words: 2713
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Thus, some suggest that the competition between the workers was crucial. More precisely "competition between high-wage white workers and low-wage Asian workers explains racial exclusion (...) labor competition…

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5 Pages
Essay

Healthcare

comparing the US and Canadian healthcare'systems

Words: 1671
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Introduction The health care system in the United States is often compared with that of other countries, and the one that comes up the most frequently in Canada. The Canadian…

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7 Pages
Essay

Economics

CIBC the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

Words: 1923
Length: 7 Pages
Type: Essay

CIBC The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) is one of the "Big Five" Canadian banks. It was founded in 1961 by the merger of the Canadian Bank of Commerce…

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5 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Abnormal Psychology pop Culture Abnormal Psychology Pop Culture

Words: 1812
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Abnormal Psychology:pop Culture Abnormal Psychology: Pop Culture (You're name) (You're school) Abnormal Psychology: Pop Culture In asking the question of what abnormal psychology is really supposed to be, it makes sense that we must…

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