Canadian Perspectives of Capitalism As Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

One of the failures of the current system is that it often does not account for cultural and resource differences between nations - instead a one-size fits all economic system is imposed universally. Over time, each society will find its own path. Some societies will fail to adapt and ultimately disappear. That is part of the evolutionary process. The key is that right now all societies are not given the same opportunity to succeed whereas the fundamental principles of capitalism suggest they should be.

As more people realize that happiness is more important than money, we will see profound shifts towards knowledge and culture, and the pursuit of wealth will be taken up by other cultures. As they too achieve the type of sustained comfort experienced today in many Western societies, they too will shift towards the pursuit of happiness over money. There will be a major obstacle to overcome - that being the depletion of resources key to today's lifestyles. This may ultimately be the catalyst for the shift towards happiness and equality, but not before the pursuit of material wealth drives us towards conflict. This sort of test is a natural part of the evolutionary process, and will refine today's concepts of equality and the pursuit of happiness further, in the process crushing the last resistance of the actor's responsible for today's materialism.

Another key way in which this shift will manifest itself is a move away from large, centralized organizations. Such organizations, as Saul points out, don't work. "They are unable to be given direction. And public policy only works when it is driven by ideas." So we will see a move away from large, overarching governmental structures to smaller ones better able to meet the unique needs of their specific set of constituents. This will take the focus away from managing and back towards meeting needs.

Works Cited

Saul, John Ralston. (2000). LaFontane-Baldwin Symposium, Inaugural Lecture. Speech online. Accessed April 3, 2008 at http://www.operation-dialogue.com/lafontaine-baldwin/e/2000_speech.html

Saul, John Ralston.(2005). The Collapse of Globalism and the Re-Invention of the World. Toronto: Penguin Canada.

Saul, John Ralston (1995). The Unconscious Civilian. Toronto: Anansi, Massey College.

Sahtouris, Elisabet. Globalization as a Natural Evolutionary Process. Retrieved April 5, 2008 at http://www.pcdf.org/Living_Economies/Supporting_Essays/globalization.htm

Potts, Jason. (2002). Evolutionary Economics: Foundation of Liberal Economic Philosophy. Policy. Retrieved April 6, 2008 at http://www.pcdf.org/Living_Economies/Supporting_Essays/globalization.htm

Paglia, Camille. (1992). The Triumph of the Technocrats. Washington Post. Retrieved April 6, 2008 at http://www.johnralstonsaul.com/REV_Voltaires_Paglia.html

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Saul, John Ralston. (2000). LaFontane-Baldwin Symposium, Inaugural Lecture. Speech online. Accessed April 3, 2008 at http://www.operation-dialogue.com/lafontaine-baldwin/e/2000_speech.html

Saul, John Ralston.(2005). The Collapse of Globalism and the Re-Invention of the World. Toronto: Penguin Canada.

Saul, John Ralston (1995). The Unconscious Civilian. Toronto: Anansi, Massey College.

Sahtouris, Elisabet. Globalization as a Natural Evolutionary Process. Retrieved April 5, 2008 at http://www.pcdf.org/Living_Economies/Supporting_Essays/globalization.htm

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