Code Of Hammurabi Essays (Examples)

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Trace the Development of Law

Words: 1643 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58375618



Royal Magistrate courts were installed because of Henry II, making it easier for justice to be done, as local disputes no longer had to be arbitrated by the Crown. The English law system was antiquated during Henry's reign, given that people settled their disputes through trial by ordeal or through trial by combat. The King was supportive toward a system that would employ several individuals forming a jury meant to decide whether a particular individual was guilty or not.

Members of the church were advantaged during the early years of Henry II's reign, since they did not have to subject to the same laws applied to normal individuals. Being aware of this injustice, Henry set out several laws which were meant to limit the church's influence and to make the law equally applicable for everyone (Sherman & Salisbury, 258). In spite of his strength of mind, he experienced little success…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Dewes Winspear, Alban and Kramp Geweke, Lenore Augustus and the Reconstruction of Roman Government and Society (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1935).

2. Easton, Stewart C. And Wieruszowski, Helene The Era of Charlemagne: Frankish State and Society (Huntington, NY: Robert E. Krieger Publishing, 1961).

3. Firth, J.B. "Preface," The Reorganisation of the Empire and the Triumph of the Church (New York G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1905).

4. Hecht, N.S. Jackson, B.S. Passamaneck, S.M. Piattelli, D. And Rabello, A.M. eds., An Introduction to the History and Sources of Jewish Law (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996).
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Safety Awareness in Engineering

Words: 1185 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89184813

1. What are the leading causes of death in the United States?
Accidents are considered to be the fourth leading cause of death after heart disease, cancer and strokes.

2. When the overall cost of an accident is calculated, what elements make up the cost?

The elements making up the cost of an accident are lost wages, insurance administration, medical expenses, motor vehicle damage, fire-related losses, and indirect costs.

3. What are the five leading causes of accidental deaths in the United States?
Motor vehicle, poison, falls, drowning, and fire-related accidents.

4. What are the leading causes of death in the United States of people between the ages of 25 and 44?
Motor vehicle, poison, falls, drowning, fire-related accidents, heart, and cancer disease.

5. Explain how today’s rate of accidental work deaths compares with the rate in the early 1900s.
Per a population of 100,000, accidental work deaths have reduced…… [Read More]

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a historical comparison of christianity and buddhism

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54334620

Two of the world’s most important and magnificent religions share little in common on the surface. Yet as the Dalai Lama’s recent interfaith dialogues have shown, locating points of intersection between Christianity and Buddhism can be a more fruitful endeavor than focusing only on differences. Buddhism is older than Christianity, but only by about 500 years. From their points of origin, Buddhism and Christianity spread far and wide geographically: Buddhism to East Asia and Christianity to Europe. One of the things Christianity and Buddhism share in common most is that their respective faiths are not as entrenched in their places of origin as they are in the places that adopted these religions later. For instance, Christianity is more popular in the Americas, Africa, and Europe than in the Middle East, and Buddhism is more popular in the rest of Asia outside of India than in India, where the Gautama Buddha…… [Read More]

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Law in Ancient Times Comparison

Words: 2944 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44453630



If the purpose of law is to maintain the order of society yielding the best possible circumstance for each individual man, woman, and child, then the argument arises as to whether such direct revenge is actually conducive to preventing further disorders. Revenge can easily run in endless cycles, and fear of punishment may not in and of itself be any deterrent at all, in particular if the act which is to be punished was committed in the heat of passion or without premeditation. Philosophers of law and ethics have long discussed the precise nature of the divine code that was given to Moses. On a fundamental level, there exists the question as to whether these laws are immutable expressions of an unchanging natural order such as has always existed, or whether these Mosaic laws represent merely the decrees of God that are applicable to a particular, time, place, or situation.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=58992717

Dalley, Stephanie, a.T. Reyes, David Pingree, Alison Salvesen, and Henrietta McCall. The Legacy of Mesopotamia. Edited by Stephanie Dalley. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106890738

Del Testa, David W., ed. Government Leaders, Military Rulers, and Political Activists. Westport, CT: Oryx Press, 2001.
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Management History of Management of

Words: 2610 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39689124

This differentiation refers to the management and administration of the agricultural resources of the kingdom. This in turn involved an organized network of royal foundations. (Wilkinson 116) the second area of administrative concern was the processing of government revenue and "…its redistribution to the various state operations…" (Wilkinson 116) Wilkinson in his book also deals extensively with managements issues in relation to the Egyptian treasury. (Wilkinson 125)

In understanding the background to management in ancient Egypt one has to continually take into account the wide range of concerns and activities that required ordered control and administration. As Erman states in his work Life in Ancient Egypt (1894), "The enormous properties belonging to the temples required of course complicated machinery for their administration & #8230;certain members of the priestly college were deputed to manage the affairs of the treasury, the commissariat and the correspondence…" (Erman 303)

Taking into account the above…… [Read More]

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Oppose Capital Punishment

Words: 2154 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79163927

Capital Punishment: A Capital Offense in Today's Easily Misguided orld

The debate surrounding the usage of capital punishment in the modern era has raged for generations. hile there have always been arguments for the positive aspects of capital punishment, today's world is less optimistic about the death penalty -- and with good reason. The death penalty affects more than just the convicted, it affects all of society. In order to show why capital punishment should be avoided, it is helpful to draw lessons from history, literature, and psychology.

The historical case for capital punishment has long been made. Capital punishment has existed in every major society in one form or another throughout the centuries. As Michael Kronenwetter states, in every society "all punishment is based on the same simple proposition: There must be a penalty for wrongdoing" (1). Kronenwetter is correct in asserting as much: all major societies have had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arriens, Jan, ed. Welcome to Hell: Letters and Writings from Death Row. UK: UPNE,

2005. Print.

Bacon, Francis. "Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature." Essays of Francis Bacon (The

Harvard Classics), 1909. Web.
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History and Development of Master Builder and Design Build Tradition of Western Civilization

Words: 6891 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11303212

Architecture through the Ages

Mesopotamia

Construction in ancient times is second only to agriculture-it reaches back as far as the Stone Age and possibly further (Jackson 4). Before the existence of master builders in design and construction the Code of Hammurabi (1795-1750 B.C.) referred to design and construction as a simple process (Beard, Loulakis and undrum (13). Hammurabi was the ruler of Babylon, the world's first metropolis and he codified his code of laws (Beard 13). This is the earliest example of a ruler introducing his laws publicly. The code regulated the organization of society including the extreme punishments for violating the law. The builder's work is addressed in the code, however faulty design and improper construction were viewed as one (13). Six specific laws address the builder. These laws are;

228. If a builder build a house for some one, and does not construct it properly, and the house…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Albert the Great." The Masonic Trowel. Web. 26 Mar. 2010. .

"Architecture and the Medieval Builder." Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia. Web. 26 Mar. 2010. .

"Basilica of Santa Maria Novella." Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia. Web. .

Beard, Jeffrey, Michael Loulakis, and Edward Wundrum. Design-Build:planning through Development. McGraw-Hill, 2001. Print.
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Socially Progressive Countries Have the

Words: 1694 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73401140

Again, this is where a multi-national organization, like the UN, can help eliminate this bias to really determine if the practice is a human rights violation.

Conclusion:

Human rights has been a concern for societies since ancient times. Today, although many strides have been made, there are still concerns about human rights violations. Thanks to advancements in communication technologies, now the plight of those suffering on the other side of the globe can be acknowledged by others, who in the past would not have known about it. Also, multi-national organizations, such as the UN, have made human rights a priority. Yet, this does not simply give a singular nation carte blanche to intervene when they believe a violation of human rights is occurring. This is due to both State sovereignty and cultural practices. A singular nation cannot make an unbiased decision on whether or not a practice is truly a…… [Read More]

References

Alley, L., Fairley, T., Cardinez, C., & Pordell, P. (2007) "Key cancer and public health concepts and definitions." In Global health care: Issues and policies. ed. Carol Herz. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

Eliminating female genital mutilation. (2008). Retrieved November 3, 2009, from http://www.uneca.org/daweca/Documents/fgm_statement_2008.pdf.

Herz, J. "Rise and Demise of the Territorial State." World Politics 9.4. (Jul 1957): 473-493.

Human rights timeline: From antiquity to the Magna Carta. (No date). Retrieved November 3, 2009, from http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/humanrights/timeline/timeline1.cfm.
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East Asian Politics When Compared

Words: 2622 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47847982

It must be recognized that religion in East Asia has had a complex and long history, including its influence upon the law. itual and religion in the region have been much more integrated and for a much longer time in history than has been the case for the Western paradigm. Hence, although the country appears to have adopted the basic paradigms of Western legislation, it is also true that the heart of the region remains in its history, and is likely to be extracted only by time and patience.

Xinping notes that there are two opinions that relate to the religious paradigm as it relates to the Chinese context specifically. The first views religion in the country on a positive and active platform; where religion adapts itself the socialist and contemporary society of the region. eligion is thus easily and actively able to adapt itself to the applicable laws of…… [Read More]

References

Glenn, H. Patrick. Legal Traditions of the World: Sustainable diversity in law. Oxford University Press, 2007.

Qin, Guoji. The Thinking Way of Confucianism and the Rule of Law. Journal of Politics and Law Vol. 1, No. 1. March, 2008.

Xinping, Zhuo. Religion and Rule of Law in China Today. Brigham Young University Law Review. 1 May 2009. http://www.allbusiness.com/society-social/religion-spirituality-religion/13411800-1.html
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Human Rights Improve Around the

Words: 1983 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36980176

Social ideals and ethics are secondary. As such, if it were most beneficial to the State to commit genocide while conquering another nation, that would be the course of action taken. However, again thanks to increased media coverage, the world and governing bodies such as the U.N. Would not sit idly by. For this reason, this perspective is quickly becoming antiquated. Idealism, in contrast, is on the other end of the international relations spectrum.

Idealism surmises that a State's internal policies should be reflected in their foreign policies -- what they wish to occur within their boundaries is what they should support outside of their boundaries. Followers of idealism live by the Golden un -- Do unto others as you'd have them do unto you. The promotion of human rights globally would be incredibly important, from this perspective, as they too would want to enjoy the benefits of human rights…… [Read More]

References

Human rights timeline: From antiquity to the Magna Carta. (No date). Retrieved October 28, 2009, from http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/humanrights/timeline/timeline1.cfm.

Human rights timeline: From European expansion to the Enlightenment. (No date). Retrieved October 28, 2009, from http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/humanrights/timeline/timeline2.cfm.

Human rights timeline: From the American Revolution to Napoleon. (No date). Retrieved October 28, 2009, from http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/humanrights/timeline/timeline3.cfm.

Human rights timeline: From the Indian Removal Act to the U.S. Sedition Act. (No date). Retrieved October 28, 2009, from http://www.gwu.edu/~erpapers/humanrights/timeline/timeline4.cfm.
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Women in Iraq Brief History

Words: 2169 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35367982

Once the practice of Islamic worship the women of that region began to be subjected to stricter codes, from marriage to dress and the risk of honor becoming an even greater issue grew. The terrorization by the Mongols and Turks was quite different from the terror under Saddam. The Mongols and Turks utilized slavery, rape, beatings and murder. Saddam instead took on an entirely different approach. His first goal was fear coupled with violence to maintain the plans he made for the society and culture. He was less about Islam and more about self-promotion and the glorification of Iraq. This type of leader is most like Josef Stalin of the Soviet Union. One never knew when or why you might be targeted.

Following the fall of the Ba'th government, the population of women in Iraq was at approximately 60%. They are a definite majority and should be in a better…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"AEI - Post-Saddam Iraq Conference Series." Welcome to AEI. Web. 7 July 2010. .

Chesler, Phyliss. "Are Honor Killings Simply Domestic Violence?" The Phyllis Chesler Organization. Web. 7 July 2010. .

Coleman, Isobel. "Women, Islam, and the New Iraq | Foreign Affairs." Home | Foreign Affairs. Web. 7 July 2010. .

"Culture in Post-Saddam Iraq:: Middle East Quarterly." Middle East Forum. Web. 7 July 2010. .
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Human Trafficking Is a Global

Words: 1207 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86773187



A previous casualty of trafficking names Given Kachepa, said that human trafficking is so concealed you will not be aware of who you're fighting because the victims are so frightened, they're not going to say anything that is happening to them (the Associated Press, 2005).

Nevertheless, the fatality of human trafficking acquired some main characteristics that makes this person appealing to the trafficker in accordance to the aimed trade that they are being employed -- for female victims, this may varies from simply being female, or being beautiful or having exotic characteristics, to possessing skills to operate a sewing machine quickly; or for men, having massive physical strength or simply age are often main characteristics; in both instancesm the victim is to be expected to have some defenselessness that will make him/her be effortless to ensnare with ideas of exciting city life and job prospects (Iselin & Adams, 2003).

Lined…… [Read More]

References

Hooker, R. (1996). Retrieved March 22, 2009 from Mesopotamia: The Code of Hamurabi: http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/MESO/CODE.htm

Human trafficking is a global problem. (2008). Retrieved on March 22, 2009 from Marketplace: http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2008/01/11/human_trafficking/

Human Trafficking Defined. (2008). Retrieved on March 22, 2009 from U.S. Department State: www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2008/105487.htm

Iselin, B. & Adams, M. (2003 April) Distinguishing between Human Trafficking and People Smuggling. UN Office on Drugs and Crime, Regional Centre for East Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok.
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English Legal System the Law

Words: 2141 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96673053

For example, the Parliament passed the "Year and a Day ule" Act in 1996 that changed the previous murder and manslaughter law that specified that a person could be charged with murder or manslaughter if the victim died within a year and a day of receiving his injuries. The change was made to reflect modern development in medical science, which enabled injured people to remain alive for longer periods.

Changes in the UK laws have also reflected the growing strength of the egalitarian ideal over the last two centuries. It has led to changes in laws that have encouraged the gradual emancipation of married women and the prohibition of discrimination based on race or sex. For instance, an old law applicable until recently did not allow married women to refuse sex with her husband. However, in . v (1991), the House of Lords decided that if a wife did not…… [Read More]

References

Atiyah, P.S. (1995). Law and Modern Society (2nd ed.). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press

Harris, P. (2007). An Introduction to Law (7th ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press

Martin, J (2005). The English Legal System (4th ed.). London, UK: Hodder Arnold

Lord Justice Coke described customs as "one of the main triangles of the laws of England" (Martin, 14). Others dispute this theory and contend most of the "customs" were in fact invented by the judges themselves.
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History of Master Builder and Design Build Tradition of the 4 Periods in Ancient Civilization

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38744496

Master Builders

Today, the professions of architect, engineer and construction worker are well-known. Yet, from the earliest civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome, the "master builders," who planned and directed the design and construction of many of the greatest structures, held one of the most prestigious positions in society. The fact that some of these structures -- thousands of years old -- remain standing, and many of these same engineering sciences are still used, pay tribute to the abilities of these master craftsmen who were responsible for all steps in the "design-bid-build" project delivery method.

Before the existence of master builders in design and construction, the Code of Hammurabi referred to building as a simple process. Produced approximately between 1792 to 1750 B.C., this is the first known building code. Its rules and responsibilities and acceptable standards of workmanship were carved on stone tablets. Failure to adhere to these…… [Read More]

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Women with Authority in a Patriarchal World

Words: 2011 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62320228

omen ith Authority in a Patriarchal orld

In the contemporary world, the cultural and literary spheres acknowledge female interests and activities. Females have overtly exerted their rights by demanding their due status in society, thereby being accepted as important societal members. But the scenario was vastly different about a hundred years ago. Females belonged at home, with the general society believing that raising children and taking care of domestic affairs sufficed as their emotional fulfillment. Between 1850 and 1900, societies were chiefly patriarchal and dependent women had to fight to enjoy equal social status. They were governed completely by a male-fashioned society, and had to be the image of the era's feminine ideal.[footnoteRef:1] In this paper, female authority within patriarchal societies will be addressed, with particular emphasis on the many restrictions when it came to them exerting power and what effective strategies they applied. [1: Pamela, Balanza. "The Role of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Balanza, Pamela. "The Role of Women in the 19th and 20th Centuries." Aglaun. 2014. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

Bobby, Chippy Susan. "Resisting Patriarchy-A Study of the Women in The God of Small Things." Language in India 12.10 (2012).

History World International. "Women in patriarchal societies." 1992. Web. 5 Dec. 2016.

Moghadam, Valentine M. "Patriarchy in transition: Women and the changing family in the Middle East." Journal of Comparative Family Studies (2004): 137-162.
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Death Penalty the Debate Surrounding Capital Punishment

Words: 2353 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92674485

Death Penalty

The debate surrounding capital punishment is not as clear as one might think -- in fact, there is a great deal of gray within this debate. The actual definition is State controlled taking of a human life in response to some crime committed by a person who was legally convicted of that crime (Lacayo, 2009). Capital punishment has been part of human history, and currently 58 global nations actively practice it, 95 have abolished it, and the remained have not used it in over a decade (Amnesty International, 2010). Some scholars tout the view that capital punishment produces an extremely strong deterrent effect to crime that actually saves lives, is supported by the majority of Americans, and that each execution actually results in a statistically viable reduction in murders (Muhlhausen, 2007). As of 2010, however, Amnesty International categorizes most countries as abolitionist regarding the death penalty (Figures on…… [Read More]

REFERENCES and WORKS CONSULTED

Atkins v. Virginia (2002). U.S. Supreme Court 536 U.S. 304.

"Campaign to End the Death Penalty." (2010). NoDeathPenalty.com. Cited in:

http://nodeathpenalty.org/content/index.php

"Capital Punishment, 30 Years On: Support, but Ambivalence as Well." (2006).
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The Historical Development of Penology

Words: 833 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60098072

History Of Penitentiaries

With nearly 10% of its population incarcerated, it is important for Americans to understand the purpose and history of penitentiaries in this country. To this end, this paper reviews the relevant literature to provide a history of punishment, the history of prison development, and a comparison of the Pennsylvania system and the Auburn systems. Finally, an analysis of the impact and involvement of prison labor over time is followed by a summary of the research and important findings concerning the purpose and history of penitentiaries in the conclusion.

History of punishment

Although humans have used various punishments for different purposes such as infractions of social, religious or legal codes such as the Code of Hammurabi for millennia (Voglis, 2002), the term has assumed a formalized modern meaning that includes a legal process. For instance, according to the definition provided by Black's Law Dictionary (1990), punishment is "any…… [Read More]

References

Black's law dictionary. (1990). St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Company.

Chain gangs. (2017). Public Broadcasting System. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/tpt/ slavery-by-another-name/themes/chain-gangs/.

Derrick, F. W. & Scott, C. E. (2004, Fall). Prison labor effects on the unskilled labor market. American Economist, 48(2), 74-77.

Ford, A. (2014, May 2). Florida sheriff reintroduces chain gangs. USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/05/02/brevard-county-sheriff-chain-gang/2130335/.
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Hobbes Locke & Federalism One of

Words: 861 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72126103

So, who was right? Well, it seems that history has taught us again and again that in certain conditions, humans do express their evil and competitive natures (e.g. fascism, genocide, etc.); but that in other situations, the species can be incredibly giving and benevolent (think of Mother Theresa, people helping people). The complexity is that humans are not all one type or another, but a combination. Most sociologists believe that it is culture and society that form the basis for behavior. For example, the Kung! Bushmen of South Africa have no crime, very little disagreement, and understand they must cooperate for the good of the tribe. owever, if we look at the Epic of Gilgamesh or the Code of ammurabi, we find that the earliest civilizations had to provide structure and that evil nature was as much a part of humanity as goodness. The debate remains -- is the cup…… [Read More]

Hobbes looked around, and saw a sewer of urban life; poor people struggling, disease, trash, pestilence and believed that without control mankind was nothing more than animalistic. Locke thought otherwise, that humans, given a chance to actualize, would cooperate, work towards a common good, and provide a generalized and goal-oriented society. So, who was right? Well, it seems that history has taught us again and again that in certain conditions, humans do express their evil and competitive natures (e.g. fascism, genocide, etc.); but that in other situations, the species can be incredibly giving and benevolent (think of Mother Theresa, people helping people). The complexity is that humans are not all one type or another, but a combination. Most sociologists believe that it is culture and society that form the basis for behavior. For example, the Kung! Bushmen of South Africa have no crime, very little disagreement, and understand they must cooperate for the good of the tribe. However, if we look at the Epic of Gilgamesh or the Code of Hammurabi, we find that the earliest civilizations had to provide structure and that evil nature was as much a part of humanity as goodness. The debate remains -- is the cup 1/2 empty or 1/2 full -- or is it both?

The Federalist movement surrounding the writing and eventual ratification of the U.S. Constitution focused on one basic premise: how much power and authority should the national, versus State, government control. Certainly, once can view that if the Articles of Confederation were deemed to be too weak and inappropriate for the new Republic, then the Federalist faction won. Rhode Island and North Carolina especially opposed the Federalist view, but eventually the Bill of Rights seemed to satisfy most of the delegates who realized that the alternative would be suicide. This did not stop individual States from wanting to secede long before the Civil War, and indeed, the actual finality of the issue of State's rights was not really solved until the mid-20th century, when the Supreme Court issued several decisions requiring that the tenets of the Bill of Rights be established in all 50 States.

If one considers the political issues of the Jeffersonian Era up to the War Between the States, then one might say that although the Constitution provided a legal means for a strong centralized government, that was on paper and States tended to act and react in their own ways to a point. There was consternation during the 1812 issues with the British, when new States entered the Union there were issues on whether they would be Slave or Free States. Thus, the Federalists really only had the appearance of victory after the Constitutional Convention, not the buy in and acceptance of the policy for decades afterwards.
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Ayurveda and Western Science Compare

Words: 1946 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27267966

The largest difference exists in the basis of the Western holistic treatment and the basis of Ayurveda. Western holistic treatments are based on TCM or 'Traditional Chinese Medicine'. The key components of TCM are as follows:

Qi (pronounced like "chee") - this is the vital energy necessary for life (blood, body fluid)

Zang-Fu - the internal organs; and Jing-Luo: - this governs the meridian and collateral systems of the body. (rown, 2001)

Practitioners of TCM also used a system referred to as "The Eight Principles" which are used to categorize illness or disease. These eight principles are comprised of "four pairs of polarities, including:

interior/exterior;

hot/cold;

deficiency/excess; and Yin/Yang." (rown, 2001)

These principles are stated to determine:

1) Disease location;

2) the nature of imbalance;

3) the presence of a pathological (disease) factors; and 4) the strength of the body's own energies. (rown, 2001)

Summary and Conclusion

Ayurvedic medicine is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brown, Liz (2001) East Meets West and Western Medicine Takes a Back Seat: Why Ayurvedic and Chinese Medicines are at the Core of All That's Right with Holistic Healing Today. Better Nutrition Journal. December 2001. Online available at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FKA/is_12_63/ai_83076770/print.

Cooper, Edwin L. (2004) 12th International Congress of Oriental Medicine. Oriental Medicine and Biotechnology in the Post-Genomic Era - WHO's Traditional Medicine Strategy 2002 Date: November 6-9, 2003. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Journal. 2004 1(1):103-106 Oxford University Press.

Healing Choices (2007) Guide to Complementary and Alternative Healthcare. Online available at  http://www.healingchoicesonline.com/ .

Herlihy, John a. (2003) the Mystery and the Miracle Ayurveda. 13 April 2003. AuthorsDen.com. Online available at http://www.authorsden.com/visit/viewShortStory.asp?AuthorID=1363&id=7866.
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Race and the Death Penalty

Words: 2630 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39455793

It is difficult to argue that the death penalty is being applied evenly and fairly as required by the Supreme Court's Furman v. Georgia decision. In fact, it could be argued, with statistics like these, that the application of the death penalty is being influenced by racial factors.

If the race of the victim is a factor in deciding whether or not the defendant receives the death penalty, then the race of the defendant is even more of a factor. For decades, critics of the justice system have asserted race to be a factor in crime and prosecutions in the United States, and it was ultimately the arbitrary imposition of the death penalty on African-Americans in Georgia that led to the Supreme Court's banning it in 1971. Black defendants are still overwhelming prosecuted more often than white defendants, but it is not only death penalty cases where this is the…… [Read More]

References

"ACLU: Race and the Death Penalty." (2003). The American Civil Liberties Union.

Retrieved from http://www.aclu.org/capital-punishment/race-and-death-penalty

Banner, Stuart, the Death Penalty: An American History. (2002) United States: Harvard

UP. Print.
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Financial and Economic Impact of Worker's Compensation

Words: 4773 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27687898

Financial and Economic Impact of Worker's Compensation egulations And Compliance

The program and concept of Workers' Compensation might appear to be a product of a civilized society and the modern era, but nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, Workers' Compensation has essentially been around for as long as people have been completing task for payment of some form of another, because people have always been getting hurt in some way, on the job. "The history of compensation for bodily injury begins shortly after the advent of written history itself1. The Nippur Tablet No. 3191 from ancient Sumeria in the Fertile Crescent outlines the law of Ur-Nammu, king of the city-state of Ur. It dates to approximately 2050 B.C.2. The law of Ur provided monetary compensation for specific injury to workers' body parts, including fractures. The code of Hammurabi from 1750 B.C. provided a similar set of rewards…… [Read More]

References

Benyamin, R., Buenaventura,, . R., Datta, S., & Adlaka, R. (2008). Opioid Complications and Side Effects. Pain Physician, S106-S111.

Boggs, C. (2008, July 29). Workers' Compensation History: The Great Tradeoff! Retrieved from mynewmarkets.com:  http://www.mynewmarkets.com/articles/91833/workers-compensation-history-the-great-tradeoff 

Ceniceros, R. (2012, December 12). State reduces workers comp opioid prescriptions. Retrieved from Businessinsurance.com: http://www.businessinsurance.com/article/99999999/NEWS080102/399999826

Eley, L. (n.d.). FEDERAL AGENCY HELPS COAL MINERS DETECT BLACK LUNG DISEASE. Retrieved from Denversworkerscompensationattorney.com: http://www.denverworkerscompensationattorney.com/2011/03/federal-agency-helps-coal-miners-detect-black-lung-disease.shtml
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Gender in the Collector and the Comfort of Strangers

Words: 4727 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13086527

Gender in Fowles and McEwan

[oman] is defined and differentiated with reference to man and not he with reference to her; she is the incidental, the inessential. He is the Subject, he is the Absolute -- she is the Other. -- Simone de Beauvoir.

Simone de Beauvoir's influential analysis of gender difference as somehow implying gender deference -- that the mere fact of defining male in opposition to female somehow implies placing one in an inferior or subaltern position -- becomes especially interesting when examining how fiction by male authors approaches questions of gender. I propose to examine in detail two British novels of the post-war period -- The Collector by John Fowles, published in 1963, and The Comfort of Strangers by Ian McEwan, published in 1981 -- and hope to demonstrate that, in point of fact, the existence of the feminist movement has managed to shift the portrayal of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cooper, Pamela. The Fictions of John Fowles: Power, Creativity, Femininity. Canada: University of Ottowa Press, 1991. Print.

Dwelle, Josh. "Ian McEwan." In Schlager, Neil and Lauer, Josh. (Editors). Contemporary Novelists. Seventh Edition. New York: Saint James Press, 2001. Print.

Fowles, John. The Collector. London: Jonathan Cape, 1963. Print.

Gindin, James. "John Fowles." In Schlager, Neil and Lauer, Josh. (Editors). Contemporary Novelists. Seventh Edition. New York: Saint James Press, 2001. Print.
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History of Management Accounting

Words: 2266 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30844540

history of Management Accounting in a ten-page paper and review product costing, investment analysis and organizational performance evaluation over the past 150 years.

Read Relevance Lost: The Rise and Fall of Management Accounting and reference four other articles that describe the evolution of Management Accounting.

This paper examines the role of management accounting over the years as a system for determining an organization's performance and profitability. This paper further analyses the evolution of certain management accounting practices and their role in global competition and productivity.

Today's management accounting information, driven by procedures and the cycle of the organization's financial reporting system, is too late, too aggregated, and too distorted to be relevant for managers' planning and control decisions.

"In attempting to understand the genesis and scope of modern cost and management accounting systems, accounting historians adopting what has been labeled as a "Foucauldian" approach have been rewriting the history of…… [Read More]

HYPERLINK http://www.acct.tamu.edu?

www.acct.tamu.edu?, "A Short History of Accounting"

Dan R. Hansen & Maryanne M. Maven, Management Accounting, 5th Ed., Oklahoma State University
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Bringing Capital Punishment Down to Practicalities While

Words: 1437 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35848833

Bringing Capital Punishment Down to Practicalities

While there are probably as many arguments for and against capital punishment as there are people on earth, historically there are two main philosophical viewpoints on which most arguments are based. These are the utilitarian viewpoint and the retributive viewpoint. Either one can be used to argue for or against capital punishment.

For example, the utilitarian argument holds that, "capital punishment is justified if it (1) prevents the criminal from repeating his crime; or (2) deters crime by discouraging would-be offenders," writes James Feiser in the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Feiser also writes that, "The retributive notion of punishment in general is that a) as a foundational matter of justice, criminals deserve punishment, and (b) punishment should be equal to the harm done." He subdivides this philosophical basis for capital punishment into lex talionis retribution, which he describes as "an eye for an eye,"…… [Read More]

Sources Cited

Bureau of Justice Statistics. 2003. OJP Freedom of Information Act page. 9 May 2003. www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/

Feiser, James. University of Tennessee at Martin. 2001. The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 8 May 2003. http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/c/capitalp.htm

McAdams, John. Title page. 1998. Pro-Death Penalty.com. 8 May 2003.  http://www.prodeathpenalty.com
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Using the Museum as a Medium How Museums Function as a Medium in Paris France

Words: 2347 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51417192

Museums in Paris

The Louvre Museum can be categorized as one of the world's largest and most magnificent museums. It also marks a monument and an attractive sightseeing location for tourists from all over the world. Standing near the River Seine and stretching over 60,000 meters square, this museum has its own unique history.

The museum was a transformation from the Louvre Palace, built as a fortress for King Louis XIV. He considered the Palace too small for his needs and then went on to making the Palace of Versailles. He left behind this beautifully structured monument to become the museum of beautiful art. The Louvre Museum was initiated in 1793 with initially just 537 paintings. Many of these were the confiscated church paintings and the others were donations from the prestigious and powerful people of the time. Slowly and gradually, the collection of the museum started increasing under Napoleon…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Danilov, Victor J. Museum careers and training: A professional guide. Greenwood Press, 194.

Dean, David. Museum Exhibition: Theory and Practice. Routledge, 1996.

Friedlander, Max J. Early Netherlands Painting: From Van Eyck to Bruegel. Phaidon Publishers, 1956.

Greenhill, Eileen Hooper. Museum, Media, Message. Routledge, 1995.
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Positive Effects of CSR

Words: 4374 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32336805

Corporate social responsibility and business ethics have become the focus of an increasing amount of attention from the business sector and academicians following the scandal-ridden era of Enron and others during the 1990s. Although the findings from the research to date are mixed, there is a growing body of research in this area that has lent support to the notion that ethical business practices and corporate social responsibility initiatives have a positive impact on companies in terms of profitability as well as other less quantifiable areas. This review of literature examines these issues systematically to identify current trends and to describe the positive impacts that ethical business practices and corporate social responsibility programs can have for companies of all sizes and types.

The Positive Impact of Business Ethics and Corporate Social esponsibility on an Organization

To act in a socially responsible way requires organizational leaders to consider the effect of…… [Read More]

References

Creel, T. (2011, Summer). Corporate social responsibility: An examination of practices in the retail industry. Management Accounting Quarterly, 12(4), 23.

Fisher, R. (2007, September). In touch: Comment on corporate social responsibility. New Zealand Management, 11.

Jewe, R.D. (2008, Spring). Do business ethics courses work? The effectiveness of business ethics education: An empirical study. Journal of Global Business Issues, 1-5.

Jones, A. & Jonas, G.A. (2011, February). Corporate social responsibility reporting: The growing need for input from the accounting profession. The CPA Journal, 81(2), 65-69.
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Why There Is No Objective Justice in Today S World

Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65263145

Blind" Justice In The Modern Era

There are three different types of justice that can be understood within the frame of the readings: revenge, eye for an eye, and advantageous justice (the outcome is beneficial for society). hile justice is an abstract notion that all can, to some extent, agree is a good thing -- in reality, the exercise of justice is less certain, regardless of the type. Indeed, in many cases, the type of justice that one pursues has a fundamentally subjective character to it, whereas objective justice is often missing from the public discourse. The reasons for the lack of objective justice could stem back to the erection of the modern era, when Lady Justice herself became "blindfolded" as Miller notes (2). hy should justice be blind? Does that not mean that it cannot see what the object that it intends to strike? Such are the questions that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dunne, Dominic. "Oil, Money, and Mystery." YouTube. Web. 20 Sep 2015.

Miller, William Ian. Eye for an Eye. NY: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Print.

Thucydides. On Justice, Power, and Human Nature. IN: Hackett Publishing, 1993.

Print.
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Management and Leadership Strategies Were

Words: 5635 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38896307

Specifically, Caesar masterfully showed how through building alliances one may achieve power and rise to the top of the leadership tier even in a group or society as vast as the Ancient Roman Empire (Abbott, 1901, p.385).

The Roman Empire also provides an example of organizational systems within the public domain through the Republican system. In the Roman Republican system of government, one man did not have the power to make law. Instead, power was balanced amongst three different branches of government: the executive, the legislative, and the judicial ("The Roman Empire"). In fact, this form of government introduced the concept of a senatorial body to the public. In Rome, the Senate was designed as a separate body of government from that of the Emperor so as to avoid the tyranny of one leader. Through the advent of the Senate, the Romans laid the groundwork for leadership structure of Britain…… [Read More]

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Death Penalty

Words: 2930 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72920709

egardless of social status, defendants who are poorly represented by their attorneys are more likely to receive death sentences than those who are zealously represented by counsel. (in Opposition to the Death Penalty: Arbitrariness and Discrimination, 2004). While death penalty opponents cite the fact that an Alabama woman whose attorney was so drunk during her trial that the trial judge held him in contempt had her death sentence upheld by the Alabama Supreme Court as a reason to abolish the death penalty, that same incident could just as easily be used as a reason to overhaul the legal system, not abolish capital punishment (the Lack of Competent Legal Counsel, 2004).

One of the most controversial arguments regarding the death penalty is that the imposition of the death penalty is a violation of human rights. Opponents of the death penalty cite the very "different"-ness of death as a reason that it…… [Read More]

References

Atkins v. Virginia, 536 U.S. 304 (2002).

Blume, J., T. Eisenberg, and S. Johnson. 1998. "Symposium: Post-McCleskey racial discrimination claims in capital cases. Cornell Law Review. 1771-1810.

Furman v. Georgia, 408 U.S. 153 (1972).

Green, M. (2005). History of the death penalty & recent developments. Retrieved May 3, 2005 from Focus on the Death Penalty. Web site: http://justice.uaa.alaska.edu/death/history.html
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Moral Dimensions of Punishment Is

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99783115



Capital punishment, however, does reflect the retributive perspective and is the most obvious modern manifestation of Hammurabi's code. Even so, the moral righteousness of capital punishment is questionable for several reasons. First, capital punishment is illogical and hypocritical. If killing another human being is wrong, and if the state kills human beings, then the state is committing a wrongful act. Second, capital punishment can be considered cruel and unusual. Third, capital punishment precludes the state from promoting positive moral values in favor of a perceived increase in public safety. Whether public safety is increased by the use of capital punishment is also questionable. For the most part, capital punishment is used "solely for symbolic purposes," (Turow, cited by Stern, 2003). Capital punishment is the epitome of revenge-based, retributive justice. It would seem that even if revenge were morally just, that the state would have no justifiable role in exacting revenge.…… [Read More]

References

Primorac, I. (nd). Is Retributivism Analytic? The Royal Institute of Philosophy. Retrieved June 17, 2007 at http://www.royalinstitutephilosophy.org/articles/article.php?id=20

Stern, S. (2003). Discussing the morality of capital punishment. Christian Science Monitor. 12 Nov 2003. Retrieved June 17, 2007 at  http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/1112/p16s01-usju.html 

Townsend, C. (2005). The morality of punishment. Cambridge Papers. 31 May 2005. Retrieved June 17, 2007 at  http://www.leaderu.com/humanities/moralityofpunishment.html
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Capital Pun

Words: 1370 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17632885

Death Penalty

Of the major forms of punishment meted out by the criminal justice system in the United States, the death penalty seems the most severe. Fines, probation, restitution money, community service, and even incarceration all offer the potential for the accused to rehabilitate, or perform restitution in the form of service to the victim. This may be why the United States and Japan are the only modern industrialized democracies to have the death penalty: it may be perceived as overly harsh by some other cultures ("Death Penalty Fast Facts," n.d.). In spite of some problems related to its use, the death penalty remains in place in the United States for several reasons. For one, the death penalty is not used often and is applied judiciously due to "declining support," (Mears 1). It is a severe option that is taken seriously and invoked only to serve the fundamental core values…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Death Penalty Fast Facts." CNN. Retrieved online: http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/19/us/death-penalty-fast-facts/

Death Penalty Information Center. "Facts About the Death Penalty." 2014. Retrieved online: http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/documents/FactSheet.pdf

Mears, Bill. "Death Penalty in the United Stats Gradually Declining." CNN Politics. 19 Dec, 2013. Retrieved online: http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/19/politics/death-penalty-us/

Sarisky, Kenny. "History and Controversies of Capital Punishment." Retrieved online: https://www.csustan.edu/sites/default/files/honors/documents/KSarisky.pdf
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Pre-Islamic Semetic Tribe the History

Words: 970 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25692254

These constant pressures exercised by subsequent powers in the region made the Babylonians fear their neighbors but at the same time increase the value of their defense and their culture. It can be said that from this point-of-view the clashes that took place in the early days of our world enabled cities and cultures to establish themselves according to the threats they had to face. This was indeed an important means of defining one's culture and establishing it as the strongest or weakest in the region.

In the seventh century BC the Babylonians gave birth to a new dynasty and ruler that would eventually offer a new perspective to Babylonian history. In this sense, "Nebuchadnezzar, in a reign of more than forty years, gives Babylon its period of greatest fame. He is prominent in the Bible as the ruler who destroys Jerusalem and carries off the Jews into their Babylonian…… [Read More]

References

History World. The empire of Hammurabi: 18th century BC. N.d. 31 Jan. 2008  http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=aa10 

Leick, Gwendolyn. The Babylonians: An Introduction. Routledge: London, 2003.
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Storni Alfonsina You Want Me White the

Words: 1783 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32838464

Storni, Alfonsina. "You ant Me hite." The Norton Anthology of orld

Vol. F. Ed. Sarah Lawall and Mayard Mac. New York: Norton, 2002. 2124-2125

The poem titled "You ant Me hite" written by Alfonsina Storni explores the issue of women mistreatment by men. The women complain how men expect them to be virgins when they (men ) are not.

Atwood, Margaret and Martin, Valerie.The Handmaid's Tale . Anchor.1998

In this book the author portrays how women are only valued for their fertility and they are allowed access to education in the patriarch society. This work is important to the research since it shows how women were mistreated by being regarded as sex symbols as well as not being allowed access to education.

Staves, Susan. Married omen's Separate Property Rights in England, 1660(1833. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1990.

This work is a recollection of the actual case studies and examples of various…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. Oxford: Heinemann, 1996.

Atwood, Margaret.The Handmaid's Tale . Anchor.1998

Staves, Susan. Married Women's Separate Property Rights in England, 1660(1833. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1990.

Stewart, Maaja A. Domestic Realities and Imperial Fictions: Jane Austen's Novels in Eighteenth-Century Contexts. Athens: U. Of Georgia P, 1993.
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History of Economic of the 4 Periods in Ancient Civilization

Words: 5166 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16341967

Economics in Ancient Civilization

It is said that "Rome was not built in a day." Indeed, the Roman Empire was the last of a series of civilizations to emerge in the Mediterranean by the First Millennium, B.C. Precursors to the culture most identified as the seat of estern political economy, the Ancient Egyptians, Etruscans, Greeks, Syrians, Carthaginians and Phoenicians all had contact with the Romans, and eventually were incorporated through territorial expansion of the Empire in Asia Minor, Cyrenaica, Europe, and North Africa. Prior to the Roman period, Europe was primarily occupied by Barbarian tribes; societies where no written language, legal system or alternative mechanism of governance was in place. hen we discuss the advancement of Ancient civilizations, then, it is through the transmission of law, literacy and polity that we find source to retrospect on early economic forms. In Feinman and Nicholas (2004), Perspectives on Political Economies, the difficulties…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Buck-Norss, S. The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1991.

Benjamin, W.(1927). Das Passagen Werken. Notebooks.

Bitros, George C., and Anastassios D. Karayiannis. "Morality, institutions and the wealth of nations: Some lessons from ancient Greece." European Journal of Political Economy 26.1 (2010): 68-81.

Boyazoglu, J., I. Hatziminaoglou, and P. Morand-Fehr. "The role of the goat in society: Past, present and perspectives for the future." Small Ruminant Research 60.1/2 (2005): 13-23.
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Analyzing Capital Punishment Issues

Words: 3245 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92392684

Capital Punishment

Solitary confinement represents one among the best means of keeping modern-day prisoners from communication and conflict, but has the most injurious effects on their health. Individuals imprisoned in conditions of solitary confinement demonstrate more psychotic behavior compared to normal prisoners; this includes higher rate of suicides (Thesis Statement). After a prisoner loses his/her mental capacity of understanding the reason for his/her imprisonment or punishment, subjecting him/her to solitary confinement is pointless. If one loses one's ability of understanding punishment, the consequences associated with one's actions become irrelevant and have no value. Thus, solitary confinement is crueler than capital punishment.

Lately, the subject of whether or not solitary confinement constitutes greater torture for prisoners than capital punishment (or death penalty), is gaining popularity (Writer Thoughts). The debate has reached a juncture where the favored option is capital punishment.

Solitary Confinement/Capital Punishment Background

During the early part of the 19th…… [Read More]

References

Berke, Jeremy. "Famous U.S. Judge Admits There's a Punishment That's Just as Bad as the Death Penalty -- If Not Worse." Business Insider. N.p., 19 Jan. 2016. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. .

Biggs, Brooke. "Solitary Confinement: A Brief History." Mother Jones. N.p., 2 Mar. 2009. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. .

"Introduction to the Death Penalty." Death Penalty Information Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. .

Keim, Brandon. "The Horrible Psychology of Solitary Confinement." Wired. N.p., 10 July 2013. Web. 2 Mar. 2016. .
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Change About the Criminal Justice

Words: 2999 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36936272



(d) etribution serves towards a constructive purpose of -- as Braithwhite calls it -- 'restorative shame' rather than 'stigmatizing shame'

In 1988, John Braithwaite published "Crime, shame, and eintegration" where he introduced his idea of restorative shaming (Braithwaite, 1997). The conventional criminal justice stigmatizes the individual in that it not only makes him a pariah of society thereby making it harder to reform himself, but also crushes his esteem, causing others to deride and shun him, accordingly often making him react in a reinforcing manner. Seeing himself as 'offender' and finding it extremely difficult to readjust and gain acceptance in society, the offender may be compelled to return to crime as way of livelihood to support himself and as a way of gaining the prestige and status that he m ay need and that he may, otherwise, not gain.

estorative justice, on the other hand, helps offender atone for his…… [Read More]

References

Acorn, a. (2004). Compulsory compassion: a critique of restorative justice Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press

Braithwaite, J. (1989) Crime, shame, and Reintegration New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Christie, N. (1977), Conflicts as Property, British Journal of Criminology, 17: 1-15.

Correctional Service of Canada. [Online] Retrieved from:
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Death Penalty Essay

Words: 3866 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

The United States is one of the few industrialized, democratic nations in the world which still permits capital punishment on a state-by-state basis. Not all states have the death penalty but executions are still carried out in the United States and the punishment remains controversial.

Despite the singularity of its status internationally, the death penalty has historically been a popular policy in the United States, even though it has been hotly debated throughout US history in the legislature and the courts. This essay on death penalty will examine its legal statusin the United States, its history, and its future.

[toc]

Topics
The Future of the Death Penalty in America

Why America Has a Death Penalty

Death Penalty: Arguments and Counter-Arguments

Death Penalty Pros and Cons

[ more topics for death penalty ]
Titles
A Comparison of the Death Penalty in Different Countries and the United States

The Death Penalty Debate…… [Read More]

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Sheriff Dept vs Police Dept

Words: 1192 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99473559

The Magna Charta is apparently responsible for limiting the power of sheriffs in England, meant to lessen the number of abuse cases involving a sheriff physically harming royal subjects with the purpose of collecting taxes. If the colonists had not taken it in the U.S. In the seventeenth century it is likely that the sheriff profession would have ended in England.

hile sheriffs in England were perceived as merciless lawmen willing to apply any measure in order to be in agreement with the king's requirements, those in the U.S. were seen as noble men who risked their lives in order to protect the law. U.S. citizens appeared to be supportive regarding the sheriffs in their jurisdiction. Thomas Jefferson was particularly interested in supporting sheriffs in their endeavor to perform their duties, as his book, "The value of Constitutions" states that "there is no honorable law enforcement authority in Anglo-American law…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Arado, Matt, "Sheriff Investigating Death of Epileptic Restrained by Police," Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL) 24 Feb. 2000: 4.

2. Glenn, Russell W. Panitch, Barbara R. Dionne Barnes-Proby, Williams, Elizabeth Christian, John Lewis Matthew W. Gerwehr, Scott and Brannan, David W. Training the 21st Century Police Officer: Redefining Police Professionalism for the Los Angeles Police Department / (Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 2003).

3. "HISTORY OF THE SHERIFF," Retrieved September 13, 2010, from the Camden County Website:  http://www.camdencounty.com/sheriff/History%20Of%20The%20Sheriff.htm
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Overarching Purpose of Criminal Justice

Words: 1973 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49541281

If citizens do not trust the courts to deliver fair sentences, then trust in the government itself falls apart. If citizens do not recognize the legitimacy of the correctional institutions that embody punishment, then the entire criminal justice system has failed.

Punishment by the state for crime must be legitimate. The act of punishment must be systematic and not arbitrary, dealt in an unbiased manner and according to rule of law. For years, differential sentencing for crack cocaine and powdered cocaine in the United States reveals an arbitrary punishment that reflects race and class conflict. Such irrational manifestations of punishment serve to delegitimize the authority of the state. When the legitimacy of the state is lost, the foundation of a free society crumbles.

Ideally, the state possesses credible authority. That authority is used to uphold the rights and freedoms upon which a liberal democracy is based. The shared values of…… [Read More]

References

Bedau, H.A. (2010). Punishment. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved online:  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/punishment/ 

Fagan, J. (2008). Legitimacy and criminal justice. Retrieved online: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:CCgCViIiz_QJ:moritzlaw.osu.edu/osjcl/Articles/Volume6_1/Fagan.Intro.PDF.pdf+punitive+legitimacy+criminal+justice&hl=en&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShJXobcMDmglV5TlF0d0d8XPcpqHyHT7gApxqlyHB-ynAXZXXBPBiOhsyEDeO_9hXlAmWbI6NALIf6VspF0Ox77-F-8kGN04vmftun6kxQh1cvaeK8KZQMg92kQ3GRmlfssgPQ2&sig=AHIEtbTOhZcNkalDBm6G11ceblm6HlrRng

Johnson, D. (2009). Anger about crime and support for punitive criminal justice policies. Punishment & Society. January 2009 vol. 11 no. 1 51-66.

Levine, B.B. (2005). Legitimacy and the process why which it is pursued. In Encyclopedia of Economic Sociology. Eds. Beckert, J. & Zafirovski, M. Retrieved online: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=7&ved=0CE4QFjAG&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww2.fiu.edu%2F~levineb%2FReadings%2FLegitimacy_for_Milan_final.doc&rct=j&q=weber%20legitmacy&ei=0yeaTYvCJMOBhQfLh6j5CA&usg=AFQjCNFY2ueJB2ECMxAN1Wz9m0_b248JAQ&sig2=lZTHzm5bjGI4oVULeml3wg&cad=rja
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Gibran Khalil Gibran and the

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72463521

15). Much of his early work was set in Lebanon and other familiar childhood places. His work criticized the monk and their wealth in relation to the impoverished peasant population (McHarek, p. 15). One example of this is in the poem War where another is punished for someone else's crime (Gibran, War). This work was a play on Hammurabi's code, where an eye for an eye was used as punishment. As these works were published first in Arabic, it is apparent that the intended population was that of his native heritage. This drew much criticism, as his works condemned a state that was not accustomed to such open criticism. Gibran also drew inspiration from writers such as Neitzsche and William Blake (McHarek, p. 25).

Gibran's work became more committed towards ending oppression of Syrians all over the world and an attempt to stress the interconnectedness o everyone. "My path is…… [Read More]

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Criminal Justice References in the

Words: 896 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35964776

hile this is the amendment that allows prison work camps and work programs, as well as the requirement that criminals participate in the maintaining of their prisons, it serves a much larger purpose, mainly expressing that a right contained in the constitution may be taken away if citizens do not behave lawfully.

The implications of these amendments and the others so similarly worded are indicative of the Classical School of Criminology. Offered as an incentive, the rights encourage rational, but criminally inclined humans to make the rational choice towards the non-criminal action. Because it would be in the humans' self-interest to keep their rights, they are encouraged to choose non-criminal action. Thus, the drafting of the constitution this way suggests that the founders were relying on the Classical School of Criminology when considering human behavior, rational choice, and the desire to keep a lawful society.

Further relying on the Classical…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Classical School." 1998. Crime Theory. 4 July, 2008. http://www.crimetheory.com/Theories/Classical.htm.
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Death Penalty Evolution of the Death Penalty

Words: 1773 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64265095

Death Penalty

Evolution of the Death Penalty in Supreme Court Jurisprudence

Capital punishment has been in existence for centuries. As early back as the Eighteenth Century B.C., the use of the death penalty was found in the Code of King Hammurabi (Death Penalty Information Center [DPIC], 2010). The utilization of the death penalty for designated crimes continued through the years and became incorporated in Britain's penal system (DPIC, 2010). Britain's use of capital punishment carried over into colonial America (DPIC, 2010). Since that time, the death penalty has been a part of the American criminal justice system. However, its use has not been without strong opposition. This paper explores the Supreme Court cases exploring this controversial topic and discusses the evolution of jurisprudence on the subject matter.

Much of the legal support or opposition for the use of the death penalty has been at the state level. Where the death…… [Read More]

References

Atkins v. Virginia, 536 U.S. 304 (2002).

Death Penalty Information Center. (2010). Part I: History of the Death Penalty. Retrieved November 17, 2010, from  http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/part-i-history-death-penalty 

Furman v. Georgia, 408 U.S. 238 (1972).

Gregg v. Georgia, 428 U.S. 153 (1976).
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Rebekah What Happens When a

Words: 5361 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60570676

Isaac and ebekah seemed to have a happy and healthy functional marriage. While it is never overtly stated in the text, the implication is that the two love one another. However, despite what one assumes is a fairly active sex life, ebekah is unable to conceive and they do not create a child during ebekah's childbearing years. She passes into old age, which makes one believe that she will never be able to conceive, making her conception of Esau and Jacob even more extraordinary.

Furthermore, though her mother-in-law Sarah also experienced barrenness, she did not have the same tension about conception as ebekah. Sarah always had God's favor; she was a major component of God's plan for Abraham. Therefore, there was some understanding that she would eventually have a child to continue the nation of Israel. In contrast, ebekah was not considered an essential part of Isaac's story. As a…… [Read More]

References

Carole Armstrong. Women of the Bible. (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998).

Alice Ogden Bellis. Helpmates, Harlots, and Heroes: Women's Stories in the Hebrew Bible.

(Louisville: John Knox Press, 1994).

Eryl Davies. The Dissenting Reader: Feminist Approaches to the Hebrew Bible. (Bodmin:
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Solicit Your Help in Fighting

Words: 1273 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14694758

We will write this law on stellas. There will be a system of police to maintain order and to ensure that trouble does not occur. There will also be a system of judges (and a legal system of sorts) that will not only answer people's questions in terms of the laws but also decide change and legal minutia during cultural changes that warrant it. The judges too will decide conflicts between people according to the minutia of the law.

The classical Mayan system of priests and shamans will be retained. There will be the same titles Ah K'uhun, Ah K'uhul Hu'n, and Ah K'uhuun (namely "he of the holy books," "keeper of the paper/headbands," and "he who worships signifying the various tasks) (Maya culture; Miller & Taube, 1993).

Good sirs, we will establish an elevated educational system based on the highest wisdom of the time and run according to wisdom…… [Read More]

Sources

Coe, Michael D. (1999). The Maya (Sixth ed.). New York: Thames & Hudson

Culbert, T.Patrick (Ed.) (1977). Classic Maya Collapse. University of New Mexico Press.

Maya Culture

 http://www.authenticmaya.com/maya_culture.htm
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Histories by Herodotus

Words: 1178 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98763112

Histories of Herodotus

In his Histories, which chronicles the historical aspects of ancient Greece, Egypt and other regions of Asia Minor, Herodotus focuses in the beginning on the myths associated with these cultures and civilizations from his own distant past which at the time had acquired some relevance based on what was viewed as historical truth. Some of these myths, which now through archeological evidence may have some basis in fact, include the abduction of Io by the Phoenicians, the retaliation of the Greeks by kidnapping Europa, the abduction of Helen from Sparta by Paris and the consequences which resulted in the Trojan War.

Following this, Herodotus examines the activities and consequences of more recent historical myths associated with the cultures of the Lydians, the Egyptians, the Scythians and the Persians, all of which are interspersed with so-called dialogue spoken by the leading figures of these cultures. However, Herodotus' ability…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Rawlinson, George, Trans. Herodotus: Histories. UK: QPD, 1997.
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Good and Evil Aristotle Bases

Words: 2990 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45386152

.. The superior man is broad and fair; the inferior man takes sides and is petty... A superior man shapes the good in man; he does not shape the bad in him.

It is said that a disciple once asked Confucius to define the conduct of one's entire life with a single word. The Chinese philosopher replied: "Is not reciprocity such a word? What you do not want done to yourself do not do to others." This rule might be considered the foremost principle of Confucius' ethics, as it is often repeated in the literature. However, despite the importance of this principle, Confucius does not explain other notions by using this particular idea, as a derivate thereof, nor does he present in greater detail what a man should do in the relationship with others (parents, friends), when faced with opposite choices, as a natural consequence of "reciprocity."

Confucius did not…… [Read More]

Reference:

1. Encyclopedia Britannica 1997 Edition

2. Classic Note on Aristotle's Politics www.gradesaver.com/ClassicNotes/Titles/politics/shortsumm.html

3. The Internet Classic Archive - Confucius, Analescts

http://classics.mit.edu/Confucius/analects.3.3.html
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Gender in the Mediterranean

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50758608

Gender

Leila Ahmed's 1992 book Women and Gender in Islam: Historical oots of a Modern Debate is divided into three parts. One is devoted to the pre-Islamic Middle East including Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean. This background section provides an historical and cultural context that is often omitted from discourse on gender and Islam. The second section of Women and Gender in Islam is on the founding discourses, and encompasses the period from the beginning and Muhammad to the Medieval era of Islam and its spread throughout the Mediterranean world. The last part of Ahmed's book is entitled "New Discourses," and it bridges the gaps between past and future, and between the Muslim and non-Muslim worlds. Ahmed's thesis in Women and Gender in Islam is multifaceted. The author suggests that the multiple and heterogeneous discourses on the subject of gender in Islam must be taken into consideration of their cultural and…… [Read More]

References

Ahmed, Leila, 1992. Women and Gender in Islam: Historical Roots of a Modern Debate. Yale University.

Bass, Laura R. And Wunder, Amanda, 2009. The Veiled Ladies of the Early Modern Spanish World: Seduction and Scandal in Seville, Madrid, and Lima. Hispanic Review, Vol. 77, No. 1, Re-Envisioning Early Modern Iberia: Visuality, Materiality, History (Winter, 2009), pp. 97-144.

Berkey, Jonathan P. 1996. Circumcision Circumscribed: Female Excision and Cultural Accommodation in the Medieval near East. International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 28, No. 1 (Feb., 1996), pp. 19-38.

Martin Riesebrodt. Review of Women and Gender in Islam: Historical Roots of a Modern Debate by Leila Ahmed. The Journal of Religion, Vol. 73, No. 3 (Jul., 1993), pp. 453-454.
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Death Penalty Capital Punishment Also Known as

Words: 677 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11168980

Death Penalty

Capital punishment, also known as the Death Penalty, is a legal penalty enacted against a person who has been found guilty, via the judicial process, of committing a capital offense. his paper seeks to briefly introduce the history of the death penalty, and introduce current thought for and against the use of the death penalty in the United States.

he earliest record of an established death penalty law is found in the Code of King Hammurabi of 18th century BC Babylon, which allowed the death penalty for 25 crimes.[footnoteRef:1] One famous ancient examples of the death penalty can be found in the rial of Socrates who was sentenced to death, by consumption of hemlock, in a Greek court. In the United Sates, the first recorded legal execution was carried out by British soldiers in 1776 against Nathan Hale, a revolutionary War Solider, who was hung for treason. Hanging…… [Read More]

The rightness or wrongness of the death penalty has been a long held civil debate. Those who favor the death penalty ultimately believe that the death penalty is justified, i.e. It offers the victims and the state retribution for the crime committed. Since the punishment fits the crime it is fair and offers victims closure and a sense of justice. In addition, many believe that it is an effective deterrent to would-be killers. The belief that capital punishment deters crime was an underlining reason that criminals were crucified by Roman soldiers or drawn and quartered by English executioners. They believed that if the punishment was horrible enough, the criminal will think twice before committing a capital offense. Opponents believe that crimes worthy of capital punishment are committed under an array of circumstances unaffected by the sentencing standard.

Those who oppose the death penalty are often motivated by humanitarian issues. No doubt the humanitarian issues that are raised are numerous. They range from the question of cruel and unusual punishment, to disproportionate death penalty demographics for poor or minority defendants. One issue of great interest for those who support a moratorium on the death penalty is the increasing recognition that the court system is fallibility. Craig Haney, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, points out the many things that can, and do in fact, go wrong in death penalty cases which, in his opinion, creates a situation where defendant are not 'death worthy.' He cites cases where death row inmates are exonerated and notes that these cases are striking to public opinion and causes a second-look at the system. However, he moves forward with a more nuanced argument that defendants who are guilty of a crime endure many judicial errors which cause them to face harsher sentence than legally necessary. He writes, "The failure to follow these minimal standards is likely to continue to produce miscarriages of justice at the penalty phase stages of capital cases, resulting in wrongful condemnations that would have resulted in life sentences had competent counsel handled them."[footnoteRef:2] [2: Craig Haney, Exoneration and Wrongful Condemnations: Expanding the Zone of Perceived Injustice in Death Penalty Cases, Golden University Law Review [Vol 37], 9/17/2006, p.172]

The debate regarding the death penalty is both somber and complex. Both sides offer compelling arguments and ask thought provoking questions: How thin is the line between retribution and revenge? How can a punishment be both a) not "cruel and unusual" and b) severe enough to be a deterrent? Is the humanity of society compromised when an innocent man is executed? Is life in prison true justice for a criminal who has committed the most horrendous crimes in society? The answers may be allusive but the search in none-the-less noble.
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Democracy the Classical Features of

Words: 3340 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86333447

15).

He argues that there is a duty resting on convention, which he considers in a deep and morally weighty sense, based on an implied but nonetheless binding contract between the individual and the state:

It is a fact, then," they would say, "that you are breaking covenants and undertakings made with us, although you mad them under no compulsion of misunderstanding, and were not compelled to decide in a limited time; you had seventy years in which you could have left the country, if you were not satisfied with us of felt that the agreements were unjust (Plato, 1993, p. 89).

In other words, Socrates has enjoyed the benefit of the laws all his life and cannot now break them without breaking an implicit agreement he has made with the state based on his acceptance of the law over his lifetime.

Plato's ideal state is not a democracy, and…… [Read More]

References

Burn, a.R. (1949). Pericles and Athens. New York: Macmillan.

Kimball, R. (2002). Freedom and Duty: Pericles and Our Times. The National Interest, 81-85.

Lakoff, S.A. (1996). Democracy: History, Theory, Practice. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.

Plutarch (1909). Plutarch's Lives: Volume 12. New York: P.F. Collier & Son.
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Sleignt's Assertions Regarding Education and

Words: 385 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36051416

Even though it is not education, several kinds of training have been used and continue to be used as technology develops. on-the-job training, classroom training, and systemic training are all methods of training. Because training does not require the extensive cognitive abilities that education requires, some fear that expert mechanical systems will be used to replace humans, though Sleight argues that an extensive reliance on this technology will decrease company competence.

3. Why or why not?

I understand this distinction because of the goals that education and training try to accomplish. Education has the goal of producing responsible members of society that can function in a career, while training is simply responsible for company economics. Although it can be manifested in a variety of methods, one can observe that the goal of training is simply adequate completion of a task. Education, however will generally ask students to apply their knowledge…… [Read More]

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Slavery and Race Relations Slavery

Words: 1838 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29591358

But tat doesn't really cange te istory or te reality of any event. Emancipation sould ave been our first concern but fortunately it was not even one of te main concerns let alone te first one. Lincoln along wit oter political eavyweigts were more interested in appeasing te Sout and various efforts were made to please te Soutern elite since secession was an imminent possibility.

So for various political and economic interests, te ugly practice of slavery was allowed to continue in te country tat claimed to be te campion of democracy. Te blacks and Americans will forever remember Abraam Lincoln as te man wo emancipated te slaves and abolised tis abominable practice once and for all, but te trut is tat Lincoln did tis only for political reasons. As researc indicates: "Despite te common perception to te contrary, te Civil War was not fougt primarily on te slavery issue.…… [Read More]

http://www.britannica.com/presidentsWebapp/article.do?articleID=9116928

Abraham Lincoln: Inaugural address:

http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/ebooks/pdf/LinFirs.pdf.
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Islam and Christianity

Words: 2022 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83060640

belief systems of Christians and Muslim, particularly in how they view angels. Both religions believe angels exist, and that they are an important part of their religious beliefs. They both believe angels can guide and support people here on Earth, and they are messengers of God or Allah. They also believe they can be vengeful and destructive, and angels play an important role in the stories of the Qur'an and the Bible. Angels are only one of the commonalities between these two religions, but they are an important link to two very diverse religions, and they show that many religions have core beliefs that link them together, whether they want to admit it or not.

Comparing Angels in Islam and Christianity

The purpose of this paper is to introduce, discuss, and analyze the topic of Islam and Christianity issues. Specifically it will compare and contrast the faith doctrine of angels…… [Read More]

References

Akbar, M.J. (2002). The shade of swords: Jihad and the conflict between Islam and Christianity. London: Routledge.

Ali, A.Y. The holy Qur'an. London, UK: Wordsworth Editions.

Gauss, J.A. (2009). Islam and Christianity: A revealing contrast. From Christian Broadcasting Network. Retrieved June 11, 2009 from http://www.cbn.com/spirituallife/BibleStudyAndTheology/perspectives/Gauss_Islam_Christianity.aspx.

Holy Bible (New King James Version). (2009). From Bible Gateway. Retrieved June 11, 2009 from http://www.biblegateway.com/.
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Health Advocacy Lesson

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8455575

Health Advocacy Lesson Guidelines for 2nd Grade

This is a paper that outlines a health advocacy lesson guideline for second grade and show how the community members, parents and students can participate in the campaign. It has sources.

Teaching elementary school students is a great responsibility which at times takes over the role of the parents as well as other loved ones. A teacher is not only a friend but a mentor, general physician and caretaker and therefore has to be aware of the health status and the mental well being of the student too. In the process of anticipating these health related problems, the teacher needs to learn before hand of the ongoing issues and attempt to advocate it in the class by integrating it into the lessons. Young children I think need their educators to be aware more than any level of learning as they are totally unaware,…… [Read More]

Reference

The Food Guide Pyramid, Accessed on 11-1-2003 at http://www.nal.usda.gov:8001/py/pmap.htm

Education World, Accessed on 11-1-2003 at http://www.education-world.com/a_lesson/lesson054.shtml