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Patients With Relevant Information Required

Words: 6307 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 62180402

Merrill, in the UK. Following his experience with heart surgery using innovating surgical techniques, the physician noted the problems he experienced in understanding all of his alternatives compared to a simpler earlier procedure, and finally trusted to the advice of his cardiologist to surgically intervene. In response to the experience, Dr. Merrill emphasized that, "As a physician talking to colleagues, I had the best information possible under the circumstances. But it wasn't the same as my hernia repair. The experience brought home to me the realization that the progress of medicine has made informed consent impossible -- even for me" (Merrill 1999: 190).

ationale of Study

Taken together, the foregoing issues indicate that there is an ongoing need for an assessment of knowledge levels of informed consent among perioperative nurses and operating department practitioners. Perioperative nurses and operating department practitioners, though, are frequently subjected to an enormous amount of stress…… [Read More]

References

Calloway, S.J. (2009) 'The Effect of Culture on Beliefs Related to Autonomy and Informed

Consent.' Journal of Cultural Diversity 16(2): 68-69.

Cobb, W.G. (2005) 'Defending the Informed Consent Case.' Defense Counsel Journal 72(4):

330-331.
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Postoperative Vision Loss Elements of

Words: 8700 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 21606334

More times than not, a patient will argue that he did not understand what the physician stated to him; even amidst documented proof the medical professional and the patient did engage in an informed conversation. "The fact that a meeting took place does not necessarily mean that there was a meeting of the minds" (Informed consent…, 2010, ¶ 5). This issue leads some health care providers to assert that informed consent forms possess little value, particularly when a legal battle ensues and the professional cannot prove the patient did, in fact, understand the informed consent process.

Currently, lawyers routinely challenge informed consent forms in courtrooms throughout the United States (U.S.). "The model consent forms incorporate substantial details of anesthesia techniques, risks and other elements of 'informed consent', so that a strong presumption is established on its face" (Informed consent…, 2010, ¶ 7). During the informed consent process, to help inoculate…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Anaesth, B.J. (2009). Perioperative visual loss: What do we know, what can we do? Department

of Anesthesia and Critical Care. University of Chicago. Retrieved January 25, 2010 from  http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/short/103/suppl_1/i31 

Booth, B. (2008). Informed consent at the heart of New York lawsuit. Retrieved January 26,

2010 from  http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2008/03/10/prca0310.htm
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Laws and Corrections the Proposed

Words: 1929 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42979032



One of the additional oversights in the Proposed Consent Decree is that it does not address the sensitive matter of cell searches of two-person cells that are focused on one inmate. The cell search conducted by Officer Anderson and Sgt. Belker was conducted in an attempt to locate contraband cigarettes that had been sold by Joe Johnson; however, they were still able to search all of Jack Jones' materials. The Proposed Consent Decree is under-inclusive in that it does not make any mention of protecting the inmate who is not the target of the cell search. As it stands, it is still possible for the cell search to be conducted under the premise of implicating one of the inmates while instead focusing on a separate inmate.

Ultimately, the Proposed Consent Decree fails to squarely address the situation, since it fails to protect the sheet of paper from being confiscated from…… [Read More]

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Knowledge Concerning Ethical Issues Involved

Words: 4963 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86009486

100). Much of the focus of personnel selection using psychological testing was on new troops enlisting in the military during two world wars and the explosive growth of the private sector thereafter (Scroggins et al., 2008). Psychological testing for personnel selection purposes, though, faded into disfavor during the 1960s, but it continues to be used by human resource practitioners today. In this regard, Scroggins and his colleagues advise, "Many H practitioners, however, have continued to use personality testing with an optimistic and enduring faith in its ability to discriminate between good and poor job candidates" (p. 101).

In cases where cheating is suspected (such as in the case of an teen applicant possibly using a smartphone or consulting crib notes during testing by visiting the restroom), psychologists have a professional responsibility to conform to relevant privacy laws with respect to the results of such tests, including following the decision-making model…… [Read More]

References

Barnes, F.P. & Murdin, L. (2001). Values and ethics in the practice of psychotherapy and counseling. Philadelphia: Open University Press.

Bersoff, D.N. (2008). Ethical conflicts in psychology. American Psychological Association.

Bonventre, V.M. (2005, Spring). Editor's foreword. Albany Law Review, 68(2), vii-ix.

Charman, D. (2004). Core processes in brief psychodynamic psychotherapy: Advancing effective practice. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Landmark Legal Cases Implications for the Counseling Field

Words: 893 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 94572732

Landmark Legal Cases, Informed Consent:

Implications for the Counseling Field

Many seek counseling each year and do not understand what services are offered, or even that the counselor they see is required by law to maintain the confidentiality of the conversation that the two of them are going to have. These issues have been clouding in the past and have led to many court cases that have helped counselors in every state outline exactly what is required of the document. The American Counseling Association (ACA), and the associations of the different states, have specific ethical guidelines which require members to provide new clients with an informed consent document to sign. State and federal legal cases have shown the need for a document which spells out what the counseling services of a particular practice are, what confidentiality is, and oftentimes how the counseling services will be paid (Walsh & Dasenbrook, 2005).…… [Read More]

References

American Counseling Association. (2005). Code of Ethics. Alexandria, VA: Author.

Bussey, G.D. (1995). Informed consent: Its legal history and impact on medicine. Hawaii Journal of Medicine, 54(4). 469-471.

Walsh, R.J., & Dasenbrook, N.C. (2005). Implementing informed consent. ACA.

Wilder. J. (2000). The ethical question -- informed consent. Medscape Today.  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/414664_2
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Fisher C And Oransky M

Words: 889 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 8297051



Discussion -- Textbook approach gives a great deal of theory; value of the article is in taking the material and applying it to situations that are relevant to one's current profession and/or understanding different approaches to conflict.

Review -- the Million Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) - the MCMI is a psychological assessment tool that was written to provide information on psychopathology including specifics outlined in the DSM-IV. It is intended for adults over 18 who have at least an 8th grade reading level and who are seeking mental health services. The test was actually developed and standardizes on clinical populations in psychiatric hospitals or individuals with current existing mental health issues. The authors are quite specific about it not being used with the general population or with adolescents, as values will likely not be appropriate for extrapolation (Pearson, 2012).

History -- Published in 1977 by Theodore Millon based on his…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Million, T., et.al. (2006). MCMI-III Manual. Minneapolis, MN: Pearson.

Pearson Educational Services. (2012). The Million Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III.

Retrieved from:  http://www.pearsonassessments.com/pai/ca/research/resources/faqs/MCMI-III_FAQs 

Widiger, T., et.al. (1985). The MCMI and DSM-III. Journal of Personality Assessment.
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Euthanasia Is Illegal Euthanasia Otherwise Known as

Words: 1997 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38325739

Euthanasia Is Illegal

Euthanasia otherwise known as assisted suicide refers to the painless extermination of a patient suffering from terminal illnesses or painful or incurable disease. According to Cavan & Dolan, euthanasia is the practice or act of permitting the death of hopelessly injured or sick individuals in a painless means for the purpose of mercy (Cavan & Dolan 12). The techniques used in euthanasia induce numerous artifacts such as shifts in regional brain chemistry, liver metabolism and epinephrine levels causing death. Advocates of euthanasia trust that sparing a patient needless suffering or pain is a good thing. If an individual is hopelessly hurt or ill with no hope of ever getting well, if such a person is in an unending and unbearable pain and cannot experience the things that make life meaningful, the best option for such patients is euthanasia. Euthanasia raises questions on morals, legal and essence of…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Baird, R. Caring for the Dying: critical issues at the edge of life. New York: Prometeus Books 2003, pp.117

Cavan, Seasmus, Dolan, Sean. Euthanasia: The Debate over the right to die. New York: The Rosen Publishing Group, Oct 1, 2000.

Cohen-Almagor, R. Euthanasia in the Netherlands: The policy and practice of mercy killing. Netherlands: Springer, Aug 3, 2004.

Devettere, Raymond. Practical decision making in health care ethics: Cases and concepts. Georgetown: Georgetown University Press, 2009.
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Danville Airlines the Ethical and Legal Consequences

Words: 1331 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 31536917

Danville Airlines

The ethical and legal consequences of testing employees without their knowledge or consent puts Danville Airlines into a defensive position, having to both explain to David eiger why they are not letting him fly, and potentially to his attorneys how the testing took place at all. The issue of genetics testing raises ethical and legal conflicts, creating a paradox for companies who practice this type of screening (Howard, ichardson, Thorpe, 2009). Danville Airlines has been negligent in their process of medical screening, allowing samples taken from eiger to be sent to a genetics screening lab (Darden, 2004). Especially detrimental to eiger is the emotional trauma and pain of being diagnosed with Huntington's disease, the same disease which took his father's life as well (Darden, 2004). Danville is now in the paradoxical situation of having told people outside the company of eiger's condition, also informing eiger he will no…… [Read More]

References

Avitabile, C., Jappelli, T., & Padula, M. (2011). Cognitive abilities, healthcare and screening tests. Journal of Population Ageing, 4(4), 251-269.

Darden Business Publishing. (2004). DANVILLE AIRLINES. University of Virginia. Retrieved on August 24, 2012 from

Howard, DH, Richardson, L.C., & Thorpe, K.E. (2009). Cancer screening and age in the United States and Europe. Health Affairs, 28(6), 1838-47.

Hunter, D. (2005). Diversity and sensitivity issues in management: The case of the genetic screening questionnaire. The Business Review, Cambridge, 4(2), 249-252.
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Homelessness Addiction and Mental Illness

Words: 1447 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55796950



The recurrence of homelessness for individuals may be frequently attributed to drug addiction.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

8.

The recurrence of homelessness for individuals may be frequently attributed to mental illness.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

9.

There is a clear reciprocal relationship between homelessness, drug addiction and mental illness.

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

10.

Mental illness plays a significant role in preventing homeless individuals from f inding suitable long-term housing. .

1.

Disagree

2.

Somewhat Disagree

3.

Neutral

4.

Agree

Implementation:

Singleton identifies the systematic procedure as a form of data gathering in which a survey or interview will be utilized in order to gather information for further analysis. His text points to the large-scale probability study as a form in which substantial populations can be measured according to representative sample sets. The "scientific sampling…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

The National Institutional Health (NIH). (1979). Regulations and Ethical Guidelines. The National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research.

Singleton, R.A. & Straits, B.C. (1999). Approaches to Social Research. Oxford
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Contract Formalizes the Agreement Between Two Parties

Words: 1697 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93417493

contract formalizes the agreement between two parties regarding buying a certain item, entering into a certain service, or accepting a certain condition. Contracts cover a huge span of agreements including the sale of goods or real property, the terms of employment or of an independent contractor relationship, the settlement of a dispute, and ownership of intellectual property developed as part of a work for hire.

For a contract to be enforceable, it must constitute six factors:

Mutual consent -- both seller and buyer must be in full and comprehensive agreement of what the one is selling and the other is receiving

Offer and acceptance -- these must be clearly spelled out and comprehended by both parties

Mutual consideration -- the item / service must be one of value and turn out to be so, too.

Performance or delivery -- both must be intact. There must be, in other words, no…… [Read More]

Larson, A. (October, 2003) The Statute of Frauds and Contract Law. Expert Law.

 http://www.expertlaw.com/library/business/statute_of_frauds.html 

* Reality of Conset (Chap. 13)
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Policy Statement Analysis the Tri-Council

Words: 1336 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 73640845



Ongoing Duty to Inform

The 2008 draft version of Chapter 3: Free and Informed Consent, Article 3.3 under Section A. General Principles adds a comprehensive explanation of the specific duty of researchers to continue the information disclosure element of the duty to inform throughout the participation in the research project. In that regard, the 2008 draft version details the obligation of researchers to bring to participants' attention any information that comes to light subsequent to the initial informed consent acquisition process. That provision further details the obligation to continue providing relevant information even beyond the conclusion of the research study where appropriate or necessary.

Incidental Findings

The 2008 draft version of Chapter 3: Free and Informed Consent, Article 3.4 under Section A. General Principles adds an Incidental Findings section that is absent from the 2003 draft version. In principle, this provision defines incidental findings as findings that could have potentially…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Halbert T. And Ingulli E. (2007). Law & Ethics in the Business Environment. Cincinnati,

OH: West.

Levine C. (2008). Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Bioethical Issues. Dubuque, Iowa:

The McGraw Hill Companies Inc.
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Ethics the Institutional Review Board IRB Was

Words: 1404 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49300806

Ethics

The Institutional eview Board (IB) was created to protect human rights in research studies. Prior to the creation of ethical standards in research individual rights were frequently violated without consequence for such actions. Extreme examples of ethical violations include the experiments conducted on individuals during the Nazi Concentration Camps and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. In both cases individuals were inflicted with significant harm without knowledge of the study or willing participation. Currently the Department of Health and Human Services regulates federal guidelines to ensure the safety and protection of participants in research studies. Following ethical guidelines ensures protection of human beings' rights and the integrity of research. In the case study of Lucy, several ethical violations occurred including: lacking of formal IB approval for her research study, issues with informed consent, and misrepresentation of the research authorship.

Lucy, a special education teacher, sought IB approval for her proposed research…… [Read More]

References

Adam, Z., & Boyd, S. (2010). Ethical challenges in the treatment of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Ethics & Behavior 20 (6).

Roig, M. (2009). Avoiding plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and other questionable writing practices:

A guide to ethical writing. Office of Research Integrity. Retrieved from:

 http://ori.hhs.gov/education/products/plagiarism/ .
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Kant by Onora O'Neill Analysis of Kantian

Words: 990 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82893082

Kant by Onora O'Neill

Analysis of Kantian Morals in the Contemporary Content by Onora O'Neill

Here, Onora O'Neill examines and evaluates the contemporary relevance of Kantian philosophy within how society functions and approves of certain behaviors. Thus, when a person does use another individual as a means to an end, even in an intimate relationship or in a working environment, that person is acting immorally. Personally, despite oppositions, I would tend to agree with such notions, especially because O'Neill is using the concept of consent as a way to define moral and immoral foundations for social interactions.

Essentially, O'Neill presents a strong defense for the modern interpretation of Kantian ethics. Most of Kantian philosophy has been replaced with more recent philosophical discourse, yet there are some elements that still remain prevalent in modern theory. She argues how there is still negative connotations and criticism associated with using other individuals, and…… [Read More]

References

O'Neill, Onora. (1985). Consenting adults. Philosophy & Public Affairs, 14(3), 252-277.
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Employee Privacy

Words: 1267 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 22130665

Employee Privacy

The objective of this study is to read the case Deal V. Spears United States Court Of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, 980 F. 2D 1153 (1992) and to answer the questions of whether it is lawful to monitor the telephone conversation of an employee if the employee has given prior consent and to answer if in this case whether Deal give her employer consent in this case? This study will additionally examine whether due to the recent burglary of the store, whether the employer had a legitimate business reason to record and review the employee's phone calls made or received at work. Finally, this study will consider what, under the Watkins precedent, is the extent to which an employer can monitor personal phone calls to employees within the ordinary course of business exemption of the federal wiretapping law where is no evidence of express consent here.

Background

The basis…… [Read More]

References

Deal V. Spears United States Court Of Appeals, Eighth Circuit, 980 F. 2D 1153 (1992)
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Criminal Law Cases Examinations

Words: 2284 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95723417

People v. Goetz (1986)

1. Give an overview of the case.
The controversial People v. Goetz (1986) involves the Defendant, Bernhard Goetz (Defendant) who shot and injured four young black men on a subway train in the Bronx. Four black youths, Troy Canty, Darryl Cabey, James Ramseur and Barry Allen were riding the subway train; two of the youths had screwdrivers hidden on their person, later admitting the intention of using these screwdrivers to unscrew the coin boxes attached to arcade games. The defendant was also riding the train and had an unlicensed .38 caliber pistol, a gun he had procured in 1981. Canty approached Goetz with possibly one of the other young men beside him, and said, “Give me five dollars”: there was no use of force nor was their a display of a weapon. The Defendant answered by standing and releasing four shots from his unlicensed gun, the…… [Read More]

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Organ Donations

Words: 1504 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 85553628

ethical decision making in general and then in the nursing profession. It addresses two key questions. What are the different ethical decision making processes? How could the ethical dilemma of informed consent in the nursing profession be resolved using one of these processes? The sources used to collect information are books and academic journals. The teleological approach suggests that informed consent is ethical because its benefits exceed its costs. In other words, its consequences are more unfavourable than opposite.

Ethical decision making is the process by which individuals choose an approach to deal with a moral issue they encounter. In everyday life, professionals often have to deal with moral issues. Therefore, frameworks for dealing with ethical dilemmas are required.

"Ethics is the science of the moral life. It is concerned with human conduct in relation to character and a conception of the good, commonly referred to as the highest good.…… [Read More]

References

Caples, S.C., Hanna, M.D., Phelps, L. (2008). Linking Ethics Decisions to Philosophical Rationales: An Empirical Study. Journal of Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues. 11 (2), pp.93+

Dresser, H.W. (1925). Ethics in Theory and Application. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell.

Lachman, V.D. (2006). Applied Ethics in Nursing. New York: Springer.

McConnell, T. (2000). Inalienable Rights: The Limits of Consent in Medicine and the Law. New York: Oxford University Press.
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Locke One of the Single

Words: 5073 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43486576



This body then has the right and duty, especially if elected to represent to build the laws and enforce the judgment of those laws, as a reflection of the will of the consensus. Locke, having developed a keen sense of a rather radical sense of the rights of the individual and the responsibility of the civil government began his work with the development of what it is that constructs the "natural rights" of man. Locke, therefore begins his Second Treatise on the natural rights of man, as he puts it to illuminate the understanding of the right to rule.

Natural Rights Theory

Locke demonstrates in the beginning of his Second Treatise the idea that the government created by the people can only be so if the people accept that certain rights of nature are true to all men. The development of these rights is not necessary as they are natural…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Arneil, Barbara. John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996.

Brown, Gillian. The Consent of the Governed: The Lockean Legacy in Early American Culture. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Univ. Press. 2001.

Dunn, John. The Political Thought of John Locke: An Historical Account of the Argument of the 'Two Treatises of Government' London: Cambridge

Univ. Press, 2006.
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Psychiatry Electroconvulsive Therapy Electroconvulsive Therapy

Words: 4067 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 34718744

Evidence has been cited suggesting that ECT is particularly efficacious with psychotic depression. Experimental research and reviews of the literature tend to conclude that ECT is either equal or superior to antidepressant medication in the treatment of severe depression. In one study both depressed men and women were helped by ECT, but women tended to improve more with ECT than with imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant. Men tended to improve more with imipramine. Both men and women improved more with ECT than with phenalzine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI). It has been suggested that MAOIs and serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSIs) may be less clinically effective than heterocyclic antidepressants for severe depression. Thus, ECT's favorable comparison with imipramine is a strong endorsement.

Adverse Effects

The side effect of ECT that has received the most attention is memory loss. ECT results in two kinds of memory loss. The first involves quick forgetting of…… [Read More]

References

Breggin, P.R. (n.d.). Electroshock: Scientific, ethical, and political issues. Retrieved from  http://www.sntp.net/ect/breggin1.htm 

Electroconvulsive therapy. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.minddisorders.com/Del-

Fi/Electroconvulsive-therapy.html

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). (2011). Retrieved from  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/electroconvulsive-therapy/MY00129
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Making Choices on Sexuality

Words: 824 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67952325

Sexuality and Severe Brain Injury

Ethical issue

The ethical issue in this case study is the fact that Mr. Z decides to have sexual intercourse with his wife Mrs. Z who is brain damaged. Her current state does not allow her to make any valid and sober decision. The action by Mr. Z is unethical since for one to have sex they should give consent, this is however not possible for Mrs. Z since she is unable to speak. This is a clear indication that she is not able to participate in even basic decision making leave alone giving consent to sexual intercourse. The severe mental disability leaves Mrs. Z incapable of giving any valid consent to intercourse. The act of having sexual intercourse with a an individual without her direct consent is quite unethical since Mr. Z is engaging in intercourse with someone who has not given consent even…… [Read More]

References

Syracuse University. (1998). An Ethical Decision-Making Model. Retrieved June 25, 2014 from  http://soe.syr.edu/academic/counseling_and_human_services/modules/Common_Ethical_Issues/ethical_decision_making_model.aspx 

Rainbow, C. (2009). Descriptions of Ethical Theories and Principles. Retrieved June 25, 2014 from  http://www.bio.davidson.edu/people/kabernd/indep/carainbow/theories.htm
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Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct Among Psychologists

Words: 1460 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65983053

The field is social psychology, and the selected title is bullying. The articles selected as follows:

Mundbjerg Eriksen, T. L., Hogh, A., & Hansen, A. M. (2016). Long-Term Consequences of Workplace Bullying On Sickness Absence. Labor Economics, 43: 129-150. doi:10.1016/j.labeco.2016.06.008

This peer-reviewed article explores the effects of bullying at the place of work. The study done in the article indicates that sickness, boredom, and poor productivity are some of the results of bullying from among employees. The article is significant in that it helps to understand the effects of bullying at the workplace and hence aids in deriving ways to reduce its occurrence. The social setting at workplace relates to the social psychology effects as seen with the occurrence of bullying (Mundbjerg Eriksen et al., 2016).

Priest, N., King, T., Becares, L., & Kavanagh, A. M. (2016). Bullying Victimization and Racial Discrimination among Australian Children. American Journal of Public Health,…… [Read More]

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Locke The Natural Liberty of

Words: 1026 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89799608

As for knowledge, Locke believed that "the best and surest way to get clear and distinct knowledge is through examining and judging ideas by themselves" (Locke, 1997, VI: I).

The Family -- Locke lived in a time in which the family was patriarchal and central to the argument of the opponents to limited government. In early-modern England the family structure was more authoritarian, intolerant, and sexist. Locke's political theory had revolutionary implications that could easily be exported to governments, and as an individualist, it is easy to see why Locke would look upon inequality and mindless subjugation as unproductive and antithetical. In this the natural rights family was radical in the sense that it held that everyone born was capable of actualization. The family was a microcosm of government, and also served as a way to train individuals into their roles and responsibilities within society (Ward, 2010, pp. 136-42).

Private…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Baird, F. And Kaufman, W. (2007). Philosophic Classics: From Plato to Derrida.

New York: Prentice Hall.

Locke, J. (2003). Two Treatises of Government. Ed. Ian Shapiro. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Locke, J., R. Woodhouse, ed. (1997). An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. New York: Penguin Books.
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Ethical Scenario Without Seeing the Wording of

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12301434

Ethical Scenario

Without seeing the wording of the consent form, there is little evidence to support the rejection of the study. The British Psychological Society's guidelines on informed consent can be found on page 12 of the Code of Ethics and Conduct. They are attached in Appendix A. There is no evidence in the one-paragraph case write-up that the proposed study does not give ample opportunity for participations to understand the nature of the study (i). The consent form should explain this and the researchers also have the opportunity on multiple occasions to explain the nature and consequences of the study.

Line (ii) is adhered to, as all volunteers will be required to sign the consent form. The wording of the paragraph is "asked to sign," and this should be amended to clarify: volunteers will be required to sign, and they will sign immediately prior to the interview.

The paper…… [Read More]

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Nursing Definitions Autonomy in the Nursing Profession

Words: 3242 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47314806

Nursing Definitions

Autonomy

Autonomy in the nursing profession states the importance of the client's role in making decisions that reflect advocacy for the client (Wade, 1999, p.310). Ultimately, this includes taking care of the patient physically as well as mentally and emotionally, developing a relationship with the patient that is beneficial to his care and actively advocating for the patient's rights and care. This type of autonomy, it is important to note, is not the same as individual or work autonomy, yet it must be considered that empowerment in nursing autonomy will inevitably lead to better professional and personal autonomy and should also lead to increased job satisfaction (Wade, 1999, p.310).

Typical definitions of autonomy would include the idea of complete independence for the person making the decisions. However, in the case of the nursing profession, the client's needs and desires must be heavily weighed and, in fact, become central…… [Read More]

References Cited

Wade, G.H. (1999). Professional nurse autonomy: Concept analysis and application to nursing education. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 30(2), 310-8.

Gaylord, N. & Grace, P. (1995). Nursing advocacy: An ethic of practice. Nursing Ethics, 2(1),

11-18.

White, L. (2004). Foundations of nursing: Second edition. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Learning.
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Nursing and Ethics the Emotional Debate Over

Words: 2128 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10621242

Nursing and Ethics

The emotional debate over abortion had been mischaracterized in the media, and hence disrupted any positive attempt to make progress in resolving the ethical and medical problems which have been created by the practice. A majority of Americans recognize and desire that abortion should be available when the life of the mother is at risk, or in the cases of rape or incest. However, liberal proponets like to expand this definition under the ubiquitous definition of the 'mothers health' which has been used to justify abortion on demand, for any reason. This latter expanded definition is significantly opposed by a majority of the ameircan population. In the midst of this struggle, comes the person needing medical care, who has neither been properly informed as to the dangers of the paractive, nor adequately counseled as to the options which exist regarding the future of her unborn child. The…… [Read More]

Resources

O'rourke, Kevin. PROXY CONSENT: DECIDING FOR OTHERS October 1980 accessed 23 April 2004. Available from:  http://www.op.org/domcentral/study/kor/80100202.htm .

Bernard Lo, (July 2, 1987) "Behind Closed Doors: Promises and Pitfalls of Ethics Committees." NEJM 317;46.

Toward a More Natural Science, (1985) New York: Free Press,; p.211.

Curzer, Howard J. (6/22/1993) Fry's concept of care in nursing ethics. (response to Sara T. Fry, Hypatia, vol. 4, no.2, p.88, 1989) Hypatia.
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Consumer Internet Commerce a Rhetorical Approach

Words: 4073 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41216100

complexities of doing business in our virtual age, looking in particular at e-commerce but also asking how the presence of e-commerce on the market has affected traditional businesses as well. Once upon a time - that golden age - things were simple. You decided you wanted to grow up to be a bookstore owner. Or a hardware store manager. Or a florist. So you leased a store, bought some books, and lovingly hand-sold them to each customer who flocked to your door and then went home at night to count your money.

Of course, owning a bookstore or a hardware store or a flower shop was actually never that simple. But the picture now is even more complicated as virtual stores have entered the picture. Part of what makes engaging in e-commerce so difficult is that there are no paths that others have trod before one. And the costs of…… [Read More]

Reference:

VI.Appendix (ces)(please write around 2-3 pages)

Survey Questionnaire

MY ROUGH IDEA:

1.To successful launch an e-commerce Web site, the question is not just about if we build it, will they come?" But also if we build it, will they come to purchase and repeat purchase?" A scenario closer to the truth is that many online companies experience disappointment in converting consumers' clicks into purchases. It means attracting a large number of shoppers to the site is not the only ultimate measure of success. The true measure of success should be included retaining customers and converting them into repeat buyers. Positive shopping experiences on the site can help online buyers make an effective decision. It means positive feeling is the optimal experience that consumers will desire to repeat buying online. Therefore, marketers need to create effective Web sites for winning consumer satisfaction. Since Web sites are often the main contact with consumer in the Internet market, a company's Web site elements may include some persuasive components that has imp!
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Nursing Literature

Words: 1675 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Questionnaire Paper #: 48611587

McMillan, S.C., & Small, B.J. (2007). Using the COPE intervention for family caregivers to improve symptoms of hospice homecare patients. Oncology Nursing Forum, 34(2), 313-21.

Are there any HIPAA concerns that are evident in this study?

Both caregivers and patients were required to sign informed consent documentation in order to participate in the study. Were any concerns related to HIPAA indicated in the protocol or procedures for conducting the study, those concerns would need to be delineated in the consent documents and explained to the participants. Since caregivers were an integral component to the hospice care and quality of life measures for patients, patient privacy could be maintained just as with any other medical or healthcare services.

What methods were put in place to ensure that the subjects were giving true informed consent?

The inclusion criteria and protocol for participating in the study required that patients and caregivers both be…… [Read More]

References

McMillan, S.C., & Small, B.J. (2007). Using the COPE intervention for family caregivers to improve symptoms of hospice homecare patients. Oncology Nursing Forum, 34(2), 313-21.

Rosedale, M., & Fu, M.R. (2010). Confronting the unexpected: Temporal, situational, and attributive dimensions of distressing symptom experience for breast cancer survivors. Oncology Nursing Forum, 37(1), 28-33.
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Business General Please List Sections According to

Words: 7827 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 81408071

Business (general)

Please list sections according to instructions

Exercise 1.1: eview of esearch Study and Consideration of Ethical Guidelines

Option 1: Stanford Prison Experiment

Go to: http://www.prisonexp.org, the official site for the Stanford Prison Experiment.

What do you think the research questions were in this study? List 2 or 3 possible research questions (in question format) that may have been the focus of this experiment.

What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? Does natural or innate evil exist, or is evil situational? Are certain people simply born "bad apples" or are they made evil by "bad barrels"?

What is "reality" in a prison setting? This study is one in which an illusion of imprisonment was created, but when do illusions become real? How quickly and easily will 'ordinary men' adjust to the roles as prisoners, guards and…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Asby, M.D. And S.A. Miles (2002). Leaders Talk Leadership: Top Executives Speak their Minds. Oxford.

"Frederick W. Smith: The Entrepreneur Who Created an Industry." (2003). IBS Center for Management Research.  http://www.icmrindia.org/casestudies/catalogue/Leadership%20and%20Entrepreneurship/Frederick%20W%20Smith-The%20Entrepreneur-Leadership%20and%20Entrepreneurship.htm 

Holstein, W.J. (2007). "Fred Smith's Golden Rule for CEO's." BNet, November 19, 2007. http://www.bnet.com/blog/ceo/fred-smiths-golden-rule-for-ceos-be-selfless/1061 

Lussier, R.N. And C.F. Archua (2010). Leadership: Theory, Application and Skill Development. South-Western Cengage Learning.
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Welcoming Homosexual Lifestyles at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Words: 3029 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86596399

Black Colleges Homosexuality

In order to create more egalitarian, prosocial, and productive campus environments, it is necessary to understand attitudes toward homosexuality and homosexual students. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students experienced relatively high rates of substance abuse, depression, and stress related to discrimination, difficulties forming social relationships, and low self-esteem (Heck, Flentje & Cochran, 2011). As Kirby (2011) points out, "Having a negative self-concept plays a major role in youth suicides, in how well one does in school, and in how one interacts with society at large." Therefore, the need for a more supportive social environment on college campuses is a pressing one.

Unfortunately, traditionally white universities and historically black universities in the United States have addressed the needs of the LGBT student community differently. Historically black colleges and institutions are defined as "institutions classified as higher education that were chartered prior to 1964 and created with the…… [Read More]

References

Burleson, Douglas A. "Sexual orientation and college choice: Considering campus climate." About Campus 14, no. 6 (January 2010): 9-14. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed October 14, 2013).

Eisen, V., & Hall, L. (Eds.). (1996). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and education [Special issue]. Harvard Educational Review, 66(2).

Griffin, H. (2000). Their Own Received Them Not: African-American Lesbians and Gays in Black Churches. Theology & Sexuality: The Journal Of The Institute For The Study Of Christianity & Sexuality, 6(12), 1.

Heck, N.C., Flentje, A., & Cochran, B.N. (2011). Offsetting risks: High school gay-straight alliances and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. School Psychology Quarterly, 26(2), 161-174. doi:10.1037/a0023226
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Therapist-Client Relationship

Words: 1028 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10120037

Confidentiality and Informed Consent

Confidentiality has for a long period of time been embedded as the foundation of professional social work values. This is primarily because social workers show honesty and respect through safeguarding the confidentiality of their clients. The significance of confidentiality in social work is demonstrated in the fact that it is basis of ethical standards that govern the social work practices. The need for social workers to protect clients' confidentiality is because the nature of their work involves being provided with confidential and private information of clients. One of the events or incidents that have played a crucial role in demonstrating the significance of confidentiality in social work is the decision of Tarasoff v. The Board of egents of the University of California. The process of informed consent and refusal play an important role in confidentiality in the therapist-client relationship.

Tarasoff v. The Board of egents of…… [Read More]

References

Fisher, C.B. & Oransky, M. (n.d.). Informed Consent to Psychotherapy and the American

Psychological Association's Ethics Code. Retrieved November 30, 2014, from http://e-psychologist.org/index.iml?mdl=exam/show_article.mdl&Material_ID=79

Fisher, M.A. (n.d.). Selected Ethical Standards About Informed Consent: Counselors (from ACA

Code of Ethics). Retrieved November 30, 2014, from  http://www.centerforethicalpractice.org/ethical-legal-resources/ethical-information/ethical-obligations-informed-consent/selected-ethical-standards-counselors-from-aca-code-of-ethics/
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Locke and Property Locke's Second

Words: 1255 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 831213

"

Money can only be hoarded because it has no real use; it will not feed or cloth someone who is starving or cold. This implies that things like food and clothing, which have obvious and immediate intrinsic values, cannot be rightfully hoarded in most societies because this will cause injury to someone else.

This places a severe limit on the power of money in Locke's construct; though it is deemed acceptable to hoard any amount of gold and silver, and though this gold and silver can be used to purchase things of real value like land and other property, it is not acceptable to maintain control of vast amounts of this property at the expense of others. A lord may own the land, therefore, but only because men have agreed on the value of the money that the land was purchased with, and only as long as the landowner…… [Read More]

Reference

Locke, John. The Second Treatise of Civil Government. 1690. Accessed 12 July 2009.  http://www.constitution.org/jl/2ndtreat.htm 

John Locke. The Second Treatise of Civil Government, Ch. V, sec. 50. 1690. Accessed 12 July 2009.