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Corporate Compliance Plan for General
Words: 1654 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 7521554
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PENALTIES - CIVIL & CIMINAL

There are statutes that impose penalties both civil and criminal for government contractors who commit fraud, waste or abuse. Some of those statutes are as follows:

False Claims Act;

False Statements Act;

Forfeiture Statute;

Anti-Kickback Act

Bribery and Gratuities statutes;

Mail and Wire Fraud statutes; and the Public Integrity Act and recent legislative initiatives to strengthen criminal penalties for violations of conflict of interest laws. (Peckar & Abramson, 2007)

The government has the right to audit the records of the contractor for up to three years following a contract for the government being completed. Companies with contracts exceeding $5 million are required to: (1) post a fraud hotline poster; (2) establish a written code of ethics; (3) establish an employee ethics and compliance training program; and (4) establish an internal control system. (New ule for Government Contractors, nd)

SUMMAY & CONCLUSION

The Corporate Compliance Plan…

Corporate Governance as Some Queries About Corporate
Words: 5545 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39945568
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Corporate Governance

As some queries about corporate governance were there ever since 1932 - the period of erle and Means, the expression of the concept of Corporate Governance was not found in English vocabulary until 25 years ago. However, in the previous two decades, matters relating to corporate governance have gained importance in academic literature as well as in public policy deliberations. Corporate governance came to be acknowledged as being synonymous with takeovers, financial restructuring, and activities of institutional investor's during this part of the era. Corporate Governance is now at a turning point. Several budding and up-coming economies that are on the path of development have identified by now that excellent corporate governance is vital for sustainable economic development. Furthermore, a lot are on the lookout for a novel or appropriate standard for making it relevant for their particular internal situation. (erle and Means, 1932)

The last ten years…

Bibliography

Berle, A; G. Means (1932) "The modern corporation and private property" Macmillan, NewYork. pp.54-58

Hart, O. (1995). "Firms, contracts and financial structure" Clarendon Press, Oxford. pp.32-36

Jensen, M and Meckling, W. (1976). "Theory of the firm: Managerial Behavior, Agency Costs and Ownership Structure" Journal of Financial Economics, Volume. 3.pp. 305-360

Shleifer, Andrei; Vishny, Robert W. (1997) "A Survey of Corporate Governance," Journal of Finance Volume. 52. pp. 737-83.

Corporate Leadership an Analysis of
Words: 2392 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66076683
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Like many of the great charismatic military leaders of the past such as Alexander the Great (Bristol 204) or General George S. Patton (Rosenback & Taylor 223; Rost 72), Gibson and Blackwell report that Kelleher is not afraid to get down in the trenches with his "troops" and endure the same types of challenges that his employees typically encounter on their jobs. Kelleher is also well-known for his insistence on allowing his employees to identify appropriate solutions to the problems with which they are most familiar, just as George Patton was fond of saying, "Never tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity" (Valle 1999:245). In addition, both Alexander the Great and General Patton were famous for leading their troops into battle and for being willing to suffer the same types of deprivations and make the same personal sacrifices…

Works Cited

Blackwell, Charles W. And Jane Whitney Gibson. (1999). "Flying High with Herb Kelleher: A Profile in Charismatic Leadership." Journal of Leadership Studies 120.

Blackwell, Charles W., Jane Whitney Gibson and John C. Hannon. (1998). "Charismatic Leadership: The Hidden Controversy." Journal of Leadership Studies, 5(4):11.

Bristol, Michael D. (2001). "Charismatic Authority in Early Modern English Tragedy." Shakespeare Studies, 203.

Chaganti, Rajeswararao and Hugh Sherman. Corporate Governance and the Timeliness of Change: Reorientation in 100 American Firms. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998.

Corporate Cultural Change Making Significant
Words: 346 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22282687
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This may be a complex task requiring detailed input from all levels. He also says that the company's mission and corporate values should be clearly articulated (Drummond, 2003). He also recommends that the final plan be written down clearly so that everyone has a roadmap to help in times of change.

As Seijts (2004) says, "The true test of leadership is being able to take people in a direction where they would not go on their own." That journey will be most successful when everyone knows where they are going and why, and when they have clear guidelines, exactly what they have to do to help bring the needed cultural changes about.

ibliography

Drummond, Carl N. 2003. "Strategic planning for research administration (Case Study)." Journal of Research Administration, July.

McClenahen, John S. 2005. "Restoring Credibility." Industry Week, February 1.

Seijts, Gerard H. 2004. "Walking on water or sinking without a…

Bibliography

Drummond, Carl N. 2003. "Strategic planning for research administration (Case Study)." Journal of Research Administration, July.

McClenahen, John S. 2005. "Restoring Credibility." Industry Week, February 1.

Seijts, Gerard H. 2004. "Walking on water or sinking without a trace? Six behaviours that describe strong crisis leaders." Ivey Business Journal Online, November.

Corporate Social and Environmental Reporting Companies Have
Words: 1787 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17585803
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Corporate Social and Environmental eporting

Companies have presented investigations about their motivation towards voluntarily social and environmental as insolvent. This paper argues in agreement with Adam's view that the goal of CS reporting is to promote credibility and corporate image of stakeholders operating in a particular industry. Whereas companies must focus their efforts on enhancing their profitability, they should also ensure that the welfare of other stakeholders is protected.

Previous literature offers a revelation on various competing theories based on why companies make voluntarily report and engagements in corporate social responsibility. The major perspectives considered are within the scope of application include accountability and image promotion. Many studies hold consequential evidence towards accountability to shareholders making it difficult for organizations to distinguish relevance from accountability based on continued practice. The absence of actual legitimacy crises makes it hard to identify voluntarily reporting as a proactive measure in preventing future crises…

References

Adams, C. (2002). "Internal organizational factors influencing corporate social and ethical reporting beyond theorizing." Accounting, Auditing, and Accountability Journal, Vol. 15 No. 2, pp. 223-250

Bebbington, J., Larringa-Gonzalez, C., and Moneva, J. (2008). "Corporate social responsibility reporting and reputation risk management." Accounting, Auditing, and Accountability Journal, Vol. 21 No. 3, pp. 337-361.

Brennan, N.M. And Merkl-Davies, D.M. (2013). "Accounting Narratives and Impression management," In Jackson, L., Davison, J., and Craig, R. (Eds.). Routledge Companion to Communication in Accounting. Routledge, pp. 109-132. (on blackboard)

Daft, R.L. (2011). The leadership experience (5th ed.). Mason, OH: Thomson, Southwestern

Corporate Shenanigans at Healthsouth Who
Words: 1269 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28341033
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The stock was trading on pink sheets at $0.165 per share at the end of April 2003" (8).

As noted above, one of the key factors involved in what happened at HealthSouth was the enormous pressure to perform in the increasingly competitive for-profit healthcare industry, pressure that directly affected the decisions that were made concerning the types of accounting practices that were needed to "deliver the goods," at least on paper. Although absent from the foregoing list, Scrushy's name appears time and again in the investigation that followed. According to Jennings, "Like Enron, orldCom, and Tyco, HealthSouth placed tremendous pressure on employees to 'meet the numbers.' In April 1998, CEO Richard Scrushy told analysts that HealthSouth had matched or beat earnings estimates for 47 quarters in a row" (8). The role played by Scrushy in engineering the corporate culture that would allow these estimates to be reported with a straight…

Works Cited

Brickey, Kathleen F. 2006. "In Enron's Wake: Corporate Executives on Trial." Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 96(2): 397-399.

Geyman, John P. The Corporate Transformation of Health Care: Can the Public Interest Still Be

Served? New York: Springer, 2004.

Jennings, Marianne M. 2004. "Incorporating Ethics and Professionalism into Accounting

Culture in This Briefing New Employee Human
Words: 2541 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73785062
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Culture

In this briefing new employee human resources, we will be considering cultural management issues in the tourist industry and how they impact upon our business. Our company, Beach Bum Ltd. is a travel consultancy Agency which was recently hired to provide a critical analysis on whether or not sustainable tours can attract American ecological tourists to travel to countries such as Tanzania and Namibia. We are a culturally eclectic group of advisors specialising in all aspects of tourism. Cultural sensitivity is not only our watchword, but our bottomline. Please do not feel overwhelmed by all of this information. Some of you may feel as though you are back in college. est assured, the difference between profit and bankruptcy in our business is the ability to sell in that person's culture. People like to feel important and an acknowledgement of their importance is not just being nice. It is also…

Reference: Managing an International Workforce . San Francisco: Pfeiffer. p65-67.

Hofstede, G, and Hofstede, GJ (2004). Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind. 2nd ed. New York: New York. P16-17.

Kwintessential.co.uk. (2011). Intercultural Training and the Expatriate Assignment. Available:  http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/cultural-services/articles/expatriate-intercultural-training.html . Last accessed 24 Nov 2011.

Thomas, D (2003). Readings and cases in international management: a cross-cultural perspective . Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. p17-18.

Wang, X and Wall, G. (2002). Cultural Tourism: an Assessment of Marketing Strategies in Dalian, Nanjing and Hainan, China. Available: lin.ca/Uploads/cclr11/CCLR11-163.pdf. Last accessed 24 Nov 2011.

Culture Concept and Overseas Subsidiaries
Words: 2919 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 11683844
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They wanted to know the best places to go after work, and expected him to help them in that regard.

Hanes finally told his Japanese trainers "he preferred not to mix business with pleasure." ithin a couple days, the group requested another instructor. The critical issue here, one can quickly discern, is that Hanes did not do his homework on the Japanese business culture; if he had, he would know the Japanese are intensely committed to their work, on duty and off duty.

The "Miscue No. 2" involves Ray Lopez, top salesperson for his company who was fluent in Spanish; he was sent to Buenos Aires to make a marketing pitch to a distribution firm there. He arrived and was picked up at the airport and surprised to learn that the meeting had been postponed for two days "...so that Ray could rest after the long trip" and also have…

Works Cited

Hult, G. Tomas M.; Cavusgil, S. Tamer; Deligonul, Seyda; Kiyak, Tunga; & Lagerstrom,

Katarina. (2007) What Drives Performance in Globally Focused Marketing Organizations? A Three-Country Study. Journal of International Marketing, 15(2), 58-85.

Keeley, Timothy Dean. 2001, International Human Resource Management in Japanese Firms: Their Greatest Challenge, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kim, Youngok, Gray, Sidney J. 2005, 'Strategic factors influencing international human resource management practices: an empirical study of Australian multinational corporations', International Journal of Human Resource Management, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 809-830.

Culture a Mechanistic Culture Exhibits
Words: 1383 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29347642
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In this instance, the stronger culture can easily consumer the lesser culture. Employees tend to be more receptive due primarily to the lack of culture and also by the prestige and power of the acquiring firm. Assimilation often occurs will smaller, less established companies being acquired by much larger competitors. As the company is just beginning to emerge, many culture qualities have not become entrenched. Assimilation however, is very rare in the context of mergers.

What is a more common strategy is that of deculturation. This is due primarily to the fact that employees usually resist organizational change, particularly when they are asked to throw away personal and cultural values. Under these conditions, some acquiring companies apply a deculturation strategy by imposing their culture and business practices on the acquired organization. The acquiring firm strips away artifacts and reward systems that support the old culture. People who cannot adopt the…

Corporate Character Individual Res as
Words: 3677 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4261060
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WorldCom (CEO Bernard Ebbers) supported by years of profitability arising from the deregulation of phone companies was a fast moving stock that was highly toted by stock specialists as a must buy, even while it was seriously hemorrhaging from bad and fraudulent business deals and its own shoddy accounting, cover ups and bad investment deals.

WorldCom quickly supplanted at&T as the favorite of many investors, based heavily on Grubman's recommendations. The investment world quickly sang WorldCom's praises as a result. A technology magazine, Network World, named it one of the ten most powerful companies, behind only Cisco and Microsoft. After listing its virtues, the magazine went on to conclude that, "MCI WorldCom will probably be a keeper on this list." 18 as for its investment virtues, Grubman claimed that it was a traditional "widows and orphans" stock, to be held for the long-term. Based partially upon his recommendations, Fortune listed…

References

Beauchamp, Tom. L. Bowie, Norman. E. Ethical Theory and Business 7th Ed. New York: Prentice Hall, 2003.

Dalla Costa, John. The Ethical Imperative Why Moral Leadership Is Good Business. Reading, MA: Perseus Publishing,1998.

Fox, Loren. Enron: The Rise and Fall. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2003.

Geisst, Charles R. Wall Street: A History: from Its Beginnings to the Fall of Enron. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.

Corporate Social Responsibility the Good
Words: 3605 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24176728
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But the shareholders themselves need to be more aware and more involved in their company's business in order for any meaningful change to sustain itself:

Shareholders, the intended beneficiaries of the corporate vehicle, are the ultimate capitalists: avaricious accumulators with little fiscal risk and no legal responsibility for the way in which they pursue their imperative to accumulate. Shareholders, not corporations, show indifference to the needs and values of society. It is their behaviour that is most appropriately characterized as amoral indifference to the plight of others and their environment. Shareholders, not corporations, behave in a pathological manner. And shareholders should be the targets for the cure that we need for our ills. (Glasbeek 2005: 24)

There is also the problem of victimisation of other cultures in a global market. As Strike, Gao and Bansal (2006) point out in their article, 'Being Good While Being Bad: Social esponsibility and the…

References

Berkhout, Tom. 2005. 'Corporate Gains: Corporate Social Responsibility Can Be the Strategic Engine for Long-Term Corporate Profits and Responsible Social Development.' Alternatives Journal, January/February, pp. 15-22.

Carroll, B.A. 2004 'Managing ethically with global stakeholders: Annual Editions' Business Ethics 06-07: Contemporary Learning Series 30, pp. 114-120.

Dean, Dwane Hal. 2004. 'Consumer Reaction to Negative Publicity: Effects of Corporate Reputation, Response, and Responsibility for a Crisis Event.' The Journal of Business Communication 41:192-201.

Dickens, Charles. 1912. A Christmas Carol. Chicago: Rand McNally.

Culture and Diversity Issues in
Words: 2845 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13936527
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Silence too is an important part of communication in Singapore. It is customary to pause before answering a question, to indicate that the person has given the question the appropriate thought and consideration that is needed. Westerners habit of responding quickly to a question, to Singaporeans, often indicates thoughtlessness and rude behavior. Their demeanor is typically calm, and Westerners more aggressive style is often seen as off putting ("Singapore: Language," 2009). Authority is to be respected for both employees of an organization, in Singapore, and when dealing with other organizations (Tse, 2008), and communication content and tone should represent this respect. Business etiquette is also different in Singapore than in many Western countries.

Cultural Business Etiquette in Singapore:

Business is more formal in Singapore than non-Asian organizations are often used to. There are strict rules of protocol, with a clear chain of command, which is expected to be kept on…

References

Choy, W. 1 Jul 2007, "Globalisation and workforce diversity: HRM implications for multinational corporations in Singapore," Singapore Management Review,  http://www.allbusiness.com/public-administration/national-security-international/4509815-1.html .

Edewor, P. & Aluko, P. May 2007, "Diversity management, challenges and opportunities in multicultural organizations," International Journal of Diversity in Organisation, Communities & Nations vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 189-195.

Hofstede, G. Feb 1993, "Cultural constraints in management theories," Executive, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 81-94.

Ismail, R. & Shaw, B. Feb 2006, "Singapore's Malay-Muslim minority: Social identification in a post 9/11 world," Asian Ethnicity vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 37-51.

Corporate Social Responsibility
Words: 1051 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 715549
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CSR

Corporate Social Responsibility

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has recently reached an unprecedented level of salience with the emergence of global protests that seem to be driven in a large part by concerns over social issues such as equality as wells as environmental issues such as the regulation of greenhouse gas emissions. Although the protestors are occupying various parts of the world for a plethora of mixed motivations, it is reasonable to speculate that much of these individual motivations are embodied in the concept of CSR. The concept of CSR covers a lot of ground but there are two core principles that account for most of the commentary.

The first concept embodied within the notion of CSR is in respect to the manner that people are treated. Under classical models this would only include investors, customers, and internal employees. However the CSR approach includes all stakeholders locally, regionally, or even…

Works Cited

Drucker, P. "What is Business Ethics?" The Public Interest (1981): 18-36.

Friedman, M. "The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits." The New York Times Magazine 13 September 1970.

Hui, L. "Combining faith and CSR: a paradigm of corporate sustainability." International Journal of Social Economics (2008): 449-465. Web.

Peloza, J. And L. Papania. "The Missing Link between Corporate Social Responsibility and Financial Performance: Stakeholder Salience and Identification." Corporate Reputation Review (2008): 169-181. Web.

Corporate Social Responsibility
Words: 2284 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 54889826
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Corporate Social esponsibility

The purpose of this case study is close synopsis of the Enron case and its impact on consumers and corporate business practices alike. Prior to its collapse Enron had been named one of America's top 10 admired corporations, and its boards "was acclaimed one of the U.S.' best five" (eed, 2004). Throughout the 1990s the company experienced tremendous growth and profits exceeding $180 billion, employing more than 30,000 people worldwide (eed, 2004).

Enron collapsed however and went bankrupt, a process that "outraged and impacted stakeholders tremendously and resulted in numerous congressional investigations" (eed, 2004). The "implosion" of the company "wreaked havoc on accounting like no other case in American history; the collapse of the system called into question the adequacy of U.S. disclosure practices and the integrity of independent audit processes" (Thomas, 2002).

Overview of the Case

In October of 2001 Enron executives announced they were taking…

References:

Berlau, John; Spun, Brandon. (2002). "Is Big business ethically bankrupt? Boom in business ethics courses is likely in the wake of the Enron scandal, but critics say these classes need to focus on moral rather than political corrected ness." Insight on the News, Vol. 18, Issue 10, p. 16

Farrell, G. (2002). "Impact to reverberate from Wall Street to D.C." USA Today. October 10, 2004,  http://www.usatoday.com/money/energy/enron/2002-06-17-andersen.htm 

Hoops, J. (2004). "Enron revisited: where are we today?" The Trusted Professional,

October 11, 2004,

Corporate Executives Be Bound by
Words: 1556 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37585578
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This is too simple a solution. An analysis of the corporate strategies shows that the flaw in the lack of any ethics in the formulation of these strategies is greater the culprit and the corporate executives that were responsible for the development of these flawed strategies, lacking in ethics were more to blame than a few leaders in the organization. (Leadership: Facing Moral and Ethical Dilemmas)

In conclusion a corporate executive may choose to employ ethical and moral values at the time of formulating corporate strategies, but should he choose to ignore the immense good that morals and ethics bring to a corporate strategy he does at not just his peril but puts at risk the whole organization with the chances of it collapsing like Enron very high.

eferences

Ethics Must Come From the Top. Jacksonville Business Journal. August 27, 2004. etrieved from http://www.foley.com/publications/pub_detail.aspx?pubid=2226Accessed on March 3,

Implementing Ethics Strategies…

References

Ethics Must Come From the Top. Jacksonville Business Journal. August 27, 2004. Retrieved from  http://www.foley.com/publications/pub_detail.aspx?pubid=2226Accessed  on March 3,

Implementing Ethics Strategies within Organizations. Retrieved at  http://www.aicpa.org/cefm/management_control_02.asp . Accessed on March 3, 2005

Leadership: Facing Moral and Ethical Dilemmas. Retrieved at http://www.leadershipadvantage.com/moralAndEthicalDilemmas.shtml. Accessed on Orlitzky, Marc. A case for ethics. August 30, 2001. Retrieved at http://www2.agsm.edu.au/agsm/web.nsf/Content/AGSMMagazine-AcaseforethicsAccessed on March 3, 2005

Tishler, Carla. Where Morals and Profits Meet: The Corporate Value Shift. November 18, 2002. Retrieved at  http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item.jhtml?id=3530&t=strategyAccessed  on March

Corporate Governance Goals and Challenges
Words: 1496 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62859096
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Moffett, M.H., Stonehill A.I., & Eitemen, D.K. (2012).

Fundamentals of multinational finance (4th Ed.). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

In completing these assignments the university requires that you follow APA guidelines and include (in-text citations) in preparing all works, citations, and references.

Each essay question response should be numbered, answered separately, and be at least 200 words (each question) in length but should be submitted as one file.

Some information has been added to responses. Please ONLY add to these responses and format correctly.

In your own words, contrast international financial management with domestic finance.

International financial management and domestic finance share many commonalities. Each deals with interest rates and making the best financial use of assets. However, in international financial management the primary difference is that there is also interest rate risk and risks associated with exchanges. When currencies float, the rate can be subject to volatile movements. For example,…

References

Moffett, M.H., Stonehill A.I., & Eitemen, D.K. (2012). Fundamentals of multinational finance (4th Ed.). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

Corporate Governance Shell What Occurred
Words: 2084 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 30992730
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4. If Enron shareholders had been fully aware of the LJM partnership agreement, do you believe they would have been willing to continue investing in Enron?

LJM was created by Fastow allegedly to buy poorly performing Enron assets, but in reality to hide debt and inflate profits of Enron in order to leverage its stock price. It is almost certain that Enron shareholders would have ceased to continue investing in Enron had they been aware of the full significance of LJM.

LJM, in its essence, entailed that Enron was far below that which it's displayed to the public and that likely its debts were more massive and its profits far less than those claimed. Investors, obviously, would not want to invest in a poorly performing company.

Even if Enron's profits were higher and debts lower than those that the company tried to conceal, the very fact that Enron was not…

References

Arping, H., & Sautner, B. (2010). "The Effect of Corporate Governance Regulation on Transparency: Evidence from the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002." Papers.ssrn.com.  http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1561619 . Retrieved 5/11/2012

Environment and Society. (2007)"Environment and Society -- Shell General Business Principles." Shell International B.V.

Fombrun, C. & Foss, C. 2004, 'Business ethics corporate response'. Corporate Reputation Review, 7, pp.284 -- 288

Healy, Paul M. & Krishna G. Palepu (Spring 2003). "The Fall of Enron" (PDF). Journal of Economic Perspectives 17 (2): 15.

culture clash of civilizations and global conflict
Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Other (not listed above) Paper #: 18156333
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Post: Global Conflict: Mass Population Migration and the EU

The Brexit crisis reflects ongoing tensions in the European Union related to a complex of problems including the decreased relevance of national sovereignty within the European Community and also the increased relevance of immigration policy in light of mass population migrations into Europe. Individual European nations have also contended with domestic crises linked to the same cluster of issues, which at the risk of oversimplification can be boiled down to economics. The Greek economic crisis shows that while national and cultural identity do matter, economics matters far more in the fomentation of international crises. Crises generally emerge over perceived or real resource scarcity: those resources can be tangible such as land, water, oil, money, or minerals. However, often those resources are intangible or symbolic as with power, clout, and status. The United Kingdom has for centuries wielded considerable power, retaining global…

References

Chua, A. (2014). A world on the edge. Wilson Quarterly, 38(1), 101-122.  http://library.esc.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx ? direct=true&db=a9h&AN=94318652&site=ehost-live

Fox, J. (2001). Two civilizations and ethnic conflict: Islam and the West. Journal of Peace Research, 38(4), 459- 472. Retrieved from:  http://www.jstor.org.library.esc.edu/stable/424897?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents 

Huntington, S. P. (1993). The Clash of Civilizations. Foreign Affairs, 72(3). 22-49. Retrieved from:  http://eds.a.ebscohost.com.library.esc.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=d984c31e-a98a-4d90-a8bc - 408bb26072f4%40sessionmgr4007&vid=1&hid=4105

Organizational Culture and HR Policies
Words: 1617 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 56308795
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Corporate Culture

In a contemporary business environment, organizational culture is one of the strategic methods that an organization employs to achieve competitive advantages. Culture is a technique that organizations employ to differentiate among one another. Each organization has its own unique culture that guides the conduct of the employee. Organizational culture consists of the organizational personality and it is the value, norm and behavior of the member of an organization.

The objective of this paper is to explore the concept of organizational culture and how the concept is translated into the organizational acts.

High Performance Culture

In the present competitive environment, each organization is searching for the method to achieve market competitive advantages and differentiate its products and services from the markets. In the contemporary business environment, culture of innovation is a method a high performing organization employs to differentiate itself from other organizations. The success of an organization depends…

References

Apple (2010). Culture of Innovation and Creativity. Apple Inc.

Apple (2011).Apple Reports Fourth Quarter Results. Apple Inc.

Apple (2011).Annual report . Apple Inc.

Rogers, R.W. & Ferketish. B.J. (2010). Creating a Value Driven Change Process through High-Involvement Culture. Development Dimensions International, Inc.

Corporate Roles in Environmental Ethics
Words: 5925 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 39363295
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Corporate Social esponsibility and Environmental Ethics

Abstract/Introduction -- No one can argue that the international business community is becoming more and more complex as a result of globalism. In turn, this complexity is driven by an increasing understanding of sustainability, going "green," and bringing ethical and moral philosophy into the business community. British Telecom, for instance, noted in 2007 that it had reduced its carbon footprint by 60% since 1996, setting itself a target of 80% reductions by 2016 (Hawser, 2007). Francois Barrault, CEO, BT Global Services, said that by supporting sustainability his company hoped not only to reduce its carbon footprint but also to attract younger people who prefer to work for environmentally and socially responsible companies. He didn't always think that way, though. Barrault said that when he first met former U.S. vice president and environmental activist Al Gore, who showed him pictures of icecaps melting, he thought…

REFERENCES

Career Services. The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from:

 http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/careers .

Corporate Social Responsibility in the Global Supply Chain.. APEC

Human Resources Development Working Group. Retrieved from: http://hrd.apec.org/index.php/Corporate_Social_Responsibility_in_the_Global_Supply_Chain.

Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility
Words: 2934 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28673365
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"hen Congress returned in 1934 to complete the federal disclosure tapestry, it created express private causes of action for misleading reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as part of the newly enacted continuous disclosure requirements, (3) provided private recoveries for market manipulation, (4) and authorized suits on behalf of reporting companies for short-swing profits garnered by certain insiders (Cox, Thomas, and Kiku, 2003)."

The creation of the SEC as a government body for oversight arose out a recognition by the courts that private action was not enough to protect investors and consumers from the materially misleading representations of corporate America (Cox, Thomas, and Kiku, 2003). Since its creation, however, the numerous laws and regulations that have come to frame the world of corporate governance have exceeded the limits of manageable governance. By the time the SEC has identified a problem, pursued investigation of the corporate representations of…

WORKS CITED

Anderson, Jonas V. 2008. Regulating Corporations the American Way: Why Exhaustive Rules and Just Deserts Are the Mainstay of U.S. Corporate Governance. Duke Law Journal 57, no. 4: 1081+. Database online. Available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5027008674 . Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.

Angelidis, John P., and Nabil A. Ibrahim. 1993. Social Demand and Corporate Supply: A Corporate Social Responsibility Model. Review of Business 15, no. 1: 7+. Database online. Available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001675246 . Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.

Bavly, Dan A. 1999. Corporate Governance and Accountability: What Role for the Regulator, Director, and Auditor?. Westport, CT: Quorum Books. Book online. Available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=114694551 . Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.

Besser, Terry L. 2002. The Conscience of Capitalism: Business Social Responsibility to Communities. Westport, CT: Praeger. Book online. Available from Questia,  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106996136 . Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.

Corporate Governance Under Globalization in
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It should not be treated as a separate exercise undertaken to meet regulatory requirements." (ICA, 29) Here is expressed a philosophical impetus that drives the focus of this research, that such compliance which will generally concern matters such as corporate accounting, the practice of internal oversight and the practice of financial transaction must be considered inextricable from other aspects of practical, procedural and legal operation in terms of its relevance and necessity.

Chapter 3-Practice

The practice of corporate governance may perhaps best be understand from the perspective that deregulation has largely defined the processes and direction of the global economy across the two decades following the Cold ar and its inevitable opening of economic channels. This is because in practice, corporate governance is a concept which has suffered much neglect. To the point, the statistics availed by organizations such as the orld Bank and the International Monetary Fund illustrate that…

Works Cited:

Aguilera, R.V. & Yip, G.S. (2004). Corporate Governance and Globalization:

Toward an Actor Centred Institutional Analysis. University of Illinois: College

of Business. Online at .

ASB. (1999). Reporting Financial Performance. Financial Reporting Council. Online at

Corporate Social Responsibility I Attaching Assignment Paper
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Corporate Social esponsibility

I attaching assignment paper write essay CS.

Given the heightened level of international operations and globalization, pressure is mounting for corporations to behave ethically. Corporations are forced to developing standards, policies and behaviors as a demonstration of their sensitivity to concerns of stakeholder. The policies behaviors and standards are what a European commission called corporate social responsibilities. The Commission defined corporate social responsibility (CS) as "a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis" Commission, 2001.

Complementing this definition, McWilliams and Siegel. (2001)

, said CS include all actions that are intended to forge, beyond the firm's interest, a social good, and is a requirement in law.

Composition Corporate Social esponsibility

Corporate social responsibility entails coming up with solutions specific to a society. The corporation is however, not forcefully charged with an…

References

Balmer, John M.T., & Dinnie, K. (1999). "Corporate identity and corporate communications: the antidote to merger madness," Corporate Communications: . An International Journal,, 4, 68-86.

Balmer, J.M.T. (2001). Corporate Identity, Corporate Branding and corporate marketing European Journal of Marketing 34(4), 248-291.

Buckley, P.J., & Ghauri, P.N. (2004). Globalisation, Economic Geography and the Strategy of Multinational Enterprises. Journal of International Business Studies, 35(2), 81-98.

Commission, E. (2001). Promoting a European Framework for Corporate Social Responsibility.' Green Paper, 264.

Corporate Entrepreneurship the Purpose of
Words: 1739 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85309915
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For IBM, it took Louis Gerstner getting angry about unfulfilled opportunities for new businesses to create the EBO structure. For Nokia, the similarities with IBM are at a very high structural level, yet Nokia relies on a completely different set of processes for fostering innovation and corporate entrepreneurship. The rapidly changing world of laptop computers needed a corporate nonconformist to accomplish what carefully defined processes in Toshiba could not. In the case of Trilogy the need for creating a steady stream of significant new innovation forced the creation of a proving ground where PhDs in software and mathematics could quickly define entirely new product and business concepts.

eferences

Abetti, P (2004) - Informal corporate entrepreneurship: implications from the failure of the Concorde alloy foundry and the success of the Toshiba laptop;. J. Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, Vol. 4, No. 6, 2004, pp. 529-545

Arthur D. Little (2002) - Developments in…

References

Abetti, P (2004) - Informal corporate entrepreneurship: implications from the failure of the Concorde alloy foundry and the success of the Toshiba laptop;. J. Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, Vol. 4, No. 6, 2004, pp. 529-545

Arthur D. Little (2002) - Developments in the area of Corporate Venturing based on a global Arthur D. Little Study. December, 2002. Page 11 quoted with the Nokia graphic. Accessed from the Internet on March 30, 2007:  http://www.adlittle.com/insights/studies/pdf/corporate_venturing_study_report.pdf 

Garvin, D.A., & Levesque, L.C. (2006). Meeting the Challenge of Corporate Entrepreneurship Harvard Business Review, Business School Publishing. Pages 102-112.

Nunes, S. (2004). IBM research: Ultimate source for new business. Research Technology Management, 47(2), pages 20-23.

Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility
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Both proposals were consequently amended and eventually accepted by the SEC.

The audit committee makes sure that the books aren't being cooked and that shareholders are properly informed of the financial status of the firm. Characteristically, the audit committee advocates the CPA firm that will audit the company's books, appraises the activities of the company's independent accountants and internal auditors, and reviews the company's internal control systems and its accounting and financial reporting requirements and practices. The compensation committee usually does the following: (1) recommends the selection of the CEO, (2) reviews and approves the appointment of officers who report directly to the CEO, (3) reviews and approves the compensation of the CEO and the managers reporting to the CEO, and (4) administers the stock compensation and other incentive plans. The suggested committee establishes experience for potential directors (Lunnie, 2007; pg. 90). It also puts collectively a list of candidates…

Corporate Communication it Has Been
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With this position, she gained a wide variety of skills in many different areas of P such as corporate reputation, product marketing and placement, crisis communications, employee communications and social marketing. She says that some people get frustrated at the beginning of a communication position because of all the administrative and coordination work.

With the changes that are rapidly occurring across the world, crisis communication is an area that is growing in importance. All organizations are vulnerable to crises, from an oil spill or 9-11, to Enron and Worldcom, the Asian Tsunami Disaster, Hurricane Katrina and Virginia Tech killings. Organizations have to be prepared for the very worst and have an emergency plan in action for handling all areas of communication.

In a "crisis document audit," they look for a failure to address the many communications issues related to crisis/disaster response. Organizations do not understand that, without adequate communications: Operational…

References

Berkeley Career Center (May 13, 2005). What's a Communication Manager? Retrieved  http://career.berkeley.edu/article/050513a-rh.stm 

Bernstein, J. Ten steps of crisis communication. March 8, 2008  http://www.bernsteincrisismanagement.com/docs/the_10_steps_of_crisis_communications.html 

Encyclopedia of Careers and Vocational Guidelines. (2005) New York: Ferguson.

Fogg, N., Harrington, P.E., and Harrington, T.F. (2004) College Majors Handbook.

Corporate Governance When a Merger the Size
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Corporate Governance

When a merger the size of the AOL ime Warner merger takes place and then disintegrates, it is time to look for what went wrong. Both companies were regarded as important in their fields; both had been successful, one for many years (ime Warner), the other for only a short while (AOL), but that success was extreme.

What did go wrong? he simple answer is that is was probably a classic clash of old paradigm vs. new paradigm.

In fact, the simple answer is the whole answer, and it appears in graphic detail on the 91st page of Alec Klein's book, Stealing ime: Steve Case, Jerry Levin, and the Collapse of AOL ime Warner. On that page, Klein describes the scrambling of the lawyers for both firms -- AOL and ime Warner -- when operation Alpha ango is revealed to them. (Both Case and Levin chose to keep…

The shareholders need to be stinking mad. Time Warner executives, even after the truth was coming out, didn't want to challenge the belatedly charismatic Steve Case. Case had also belatedly reassumed his former pretty persona, perhaps to meld, at last, with the 'suits' at Time Warner. Too little too late. On Sunday, January 12, 2003, Case finally stepped down as chairman of AOL Time Warner. Too late for Jerry Levin. And Ted Turner, who had turned his initial 'nay' reaction to a yea, eased on out the door to become a philanthropist. He didn't lose enough loot to matter. Levin is sitting pretty, despite not cashing in on his AOL Time Warner stock. Case cashed out for millions. The AOL Time Warner Center, costing $1.8 billion, killed at least one worker in the building, and sits as a tony home to those who can afford $2 to $40mliion for a condo.

Very likely, few stockholders can afford that. And some stockholders actually invest with two aims: to make a good return for themselves, and to be part of the growth of American business.

In the case of AOL Time Warner, investors lost on both those fronts, and suffered the embarrassment of hatching the world's biggest merger turkey, whether they had actually cast a proxy ballot or had merely sat back and watched, as well.

Corporate Training Universities Have Become
Words: 2342 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18598489
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Today many institutions of higher learning are trying to implement it in some form (Bass, Dellana, & Herbert, 1996, p. 339).

In developing the institution of higher learning for the future, the administration will have to consider the new technologies that can be adopted, the consequences of doing so, ways in which those technologies can be used both on and off campus, and the way education should be organized to accomplish the tasks needed for the future. This will require rethinking the way the institution is currently structured:

eengineering in education is about developing a delivery process which is coherent and progressive in scope in order to maximize the learning experiences of students. Since reengineering focuses on coherent processes, not structures, it negates the perpetuation of typical educational structures, such as departments in high schools, and focuses more on sequential, progressive learning through the rearrangement of the curriculum and instruction…

References

Bass, K.E. & S.A. Dellana (1996, August 1). Assessing the use of total quality management in the business school classroom. Journal of Education for Business 21, 339.

Dobni, D. & B. Dobni (1996, October 1). Canadian business schools: Going out of business? Journal of Education for Business 72, 28.

Gadbow, N. (2001). Teaching Strategies That Help Learners with Different Needs. Adult Learning, Volume 12, Issue 2, 19.

Golhar, D.Y. & Deshpande, S.P. (1997, July 1). HRM practices of large and small Canadian manufacturing firms. Journal of Small Business Management 35, 30-39.

Corporate Universities -Investigation of Their Development
Words: 16387 Length: 60 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62224137
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In summary, we recommend that the IESBA reconsiders the proposals in the Exposure Draft and provides more guidance on safeguards applicable to sole practitioners and small accounting firms to ensure that the benefits of the changes outweigh the costs to SMEs. Under a principle-based approach, there should be safeguards and practical relief for all practitioners rather than rules-based outright prohibitions. The rewrite of this Independence component of the Code is substantially rules-based rather than principles-based. In this regard, we also encourage the IESBA to prioritize the redrafting of the entire Code using a similar drafting convention to that used by the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board in its Clarity project" (IESBA Exposure Draft of Sections 290 and 291 of the Code of Ethics on Independence - Proposed Additional equirements in relation to Internal Audit Services, elative Size of Fees and Contingent Fees 2007).

There will also be an all-time…

References

Kreitner, R., and Kinicki, a. (2004). "Organizational behavior," 6e; [Chap. 17]; [Chap. 18]. Accessed December 19, 2007, from MBA520, eResource, week 5, eBook Collection database.

McShane, and Von Glinow. (2005). "Organizational behavior" (3rd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

); Muret, Don. (1999). "Former Disney VP stresses teamwork at cafe." Amusement Business, 111(49), 22. Accessed August 17, 2007, from EBSCOhost database.

Frazee, Bonnie. (2004). "Organizational Behavior and the Learning Process" Accessed December 19, 2007, at  http://www.clomedia.com/content/templates/clo_feature.asp?articleid=698&zoneid=29

Corporate Governance Theorising Limits Critics
Words: 872 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 2511342
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The statement "What is worse is that it legitimizes the self-serving managerial behaviors" in the context of CEO pay. This statement I agree with as CEOs have used governance to rationalize giving themselves exceptionally large raises without accountability and governance in place. Conversely the statement "Furthermore, markets or organisational hierarchies are assumed to provide genuine alternative optimal or appropriate governance structures" in the context of the discussion at this point in the paper is inaccurate. Organisations in fact produce governance structures that are highly inefficient and lack the necessary framework and foundation to accomplish these goals. Instead there is the need for continually turning trust into an accelerator and engraining governance into companies, not legislating it from the outside. This is the fatal error of the statement shown.

Critical Analysis

This is a well-researched peer review article that has the potential to deliver entirely new governance frameworks with additional effort…

References

Bernoff, J., and C. Li. "Harnessing the Power of the Oh-So-Social Web. " MIT Sloan Management Review 49.3 (2008): 36.

Stephen Letza, James Kirkbride, Xiuping Sun, and Clive Smallman. "Corporate governance theorising: limits, critics and alternatives" International Journal of Law and Management 50.1 (2008): 17-31.

Corporate Strategies The Importance of Leadership
Words: 3149 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46595671
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Corporate Strategies: Why are they so Important?

Domino's Pizza

Strategic Leadership

Strategic Entrepreneurship

Innovation Applied

What is your biggest Professional Accomplishment?

Organizational Design and Culture

The 80s and Deregulation

The Election of Barack Obama

US rise as a world super power

Domino's Pizza

Dominoes use the strategy by depending on the population and household. They believe that the population and household income are what needs to help when it comes to figuring out if people are willing to pay the pizza price and how much is the request for pizza. They think that this method is important because the population is what helps figuring out the demand for pizza as a consequence of the law of the demand, the bigger population the greater the demand. The household income will help likewise for the reason that the more disposable income the more individuals will purchase a common good. However, Pizza is…

References

Albarracin, D. (2012). The Effects of Chronic Achievement Motivation and Achievement Primes on the Activation of Achievement and Fun Goals. J Pers Soc Psychol., 1129 -- 1141.

Broken Racial Barriers Pave the Way for Obama Presidency. (2013, May 2). Retrieved from Voice of America:  http://www.voanews.com/ 

Dukes, E. (2013, May 21). 4 Ways Technology Has changed the Modern Workplace. Retrieved from Office:  http://www.iofficecorp.com/blog/4-ways-technology-has-changed-the-modern-workplace 

Goldsmith, J. (2014, April 3). Three Approaches to Innovation. Retrieved from CBSMoney Watch:  http://www.cbsnews.com/news/three-approaches-to-innovation/

Corporate Business Marketing Structure Analysis of the
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Corporate Business Marketing Structure

Analysis of the Sony Corporation's Market Structure

Sony Corporation is a leader in consumer and professional electronics around the world. It is a company founded in Japan in 1946 with headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. Sony produces a variety of products such as cameras, headphones, speakers, and more. Sony Corporation also generates a great deal of income in the entertainment industry, distributing media such and film and television. It is a brand recognized for quality worldwide. This is a company that makes business partnerships that are prudent and profitable. Japanese cultural and economic histories influence and contribute to Sony's market structure and general success.

Sony is heavily involved with audio recording and engineering technologies. It is possible to construct and supply and high caliber, professional recording studio using only Sony products. This corporation has an outstanding reputation for its cameras. Sony produces numerous consumer cameras, lenses, and…

Reference:

Barrett, Jimmy, Mike Bridges, Steve Day, Matt Klingman, & Chris Mattie. Sony Inc. [Webpage]  http://www.boydassociates.net , 2011, [cited 2011]. Available from

Corporate Approach to Solutions Innovation
Words: 3055 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51168818
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Henry W. Chesbrough uses this exact notion of "permeable boundary," when he gives his definition of open innovation: "In the open innovation model a company commercialises both its own ideas as well as innovations from other firms and seeks ways to bring its in house ideas to market by deploying pathways outside its current business. Note that the boundary between the company and its surrounding environment is porous, enabling innovations to move more easily between the two." (MIT Sloan Management Review: The era of open innovation, Henry W. Chesbrough) Having this in mind Procter and Gamble created their "Connect and Develop" innovation model.

In order for "Connect and Develop" to become what Procter and Gamble envisioned the company realized it was of the outmost important not to use time and valuable resources on ideas that may be interesting at first but later on prove to have no concrete, specific application.…

Bibliography

MIT Sloan Management Review: The era of open innovation, Author: Henry W. Chesbrough (undated) Available. Online. HTTP://sloanreview.mit.edu/wsj/insight/pdfs/4435.pdf (accessed 6th May 2007)

Harvard Business Review: Connect and Develop, Authors: Larry Huston and Nabil Sakkab (undated) Available Online HTTP: http://custom.hbsp.com/custom/INNOCR0603C2006032833.pdf;jsessionid=YVENOB4MC1EKCAKRGWDSELQBKE0YIISW (accessed 6th May 2007)

P&G Connect+Develop Homepage Available Online HTTP:

http://pg.t2h.yet2.com/t2h/page/homepage (accessed 6th of May 2007)

Corporate Alliances Are Mostly a 50 50 Bet
Words: 882 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94031744
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Corporate alliances are mostly a 50/50 bet since only about half of these ventures give returns to partners above the cost of capital. This is very worrying since alliances and partnerships are what many business models are based on. The article points out the reason as to why these alliances fail is the fact that they are traditionally managed and organized. Most alliances are normally defined by service level agreements which mainly identify what is committed to be delivered by each side rather than what they hope to attain from this partnerships. The SLAs put emphasis on the operational performance metrics and not the strategic objectives .the managers of the alliances are not sure whether they stick to the agreement made initially or renegotiate afresh.

The article focusses on Solvay which is ranked among top 40 pharmaceutical companies that develops neuroscience, influenza vaccine, cardio-metabolic and pancreatic enzyme products. Since the…

References

Kaplan, R.S, Norton, P.D & Rugelsojen, B., (2013). Managing Alliances with the balanced scorecard.

Zaman, M. & Mavondo, F.(2010). Measuring strategic alliance success: A Conceptual Framework. Retrieved August 4,2013 from  http://www.anzmac.org/conference/2001/anzmac/AUTHORS/pdfs/Zaman.pdf 

Segil, L., (20O2).5 Key to creating successful strategic alliances. Retrieved August 4, 2013 from  http://www.forbes.com/2002/07/18/0719alliance.html

Culture Crash Culture Conflicts Liu
Words: 610 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Reaction Paper Paper #: 64745024
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There are circumstances as Crane a. And Matten D. (2004)

discussed showing that the compromise on standards is likely to occur owing to the idea of gifts.

Contrary to this notion, in china gifts are not given to influence one decisions but as a norm of appreciating. While no specific standard to the gift is required, the gift works only to share one appreciation of the business undertaken. Looking at the situation at Almond and it potential business relations there is a specific value assigned to the gift expected. This clearly comes out as a measure to influence potential business relation an aspect that Singh J. et al. (2005)

describe as bribery. Singh J. et al. (2005)

argue that, assigning of value to a gift demonstrates bribery that is against international business code. The case for Almond having to give a specified volume of commission is indication of bribery.

Codes…

References

Crane a., & Matten D. (2004). Business Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Singh J., Carasco E., Svensson G., Wood G., & M., C. (2005). A Comparative Study of the Contents of Corporate Codes of Ethics in Australia, Canada and Sweden. Journal of World Business, 40, 91-109.

Corporate Social Responsibility in a
Words: 3110 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 44759927
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This has lead to a greater corporate awareness of their impact in the multitude of regions they work and sell in. It has lead the concept of Corporate Social esponsibility to become a highlighted feature in the nature of global business today.

There are numerous examples of successful implementations of Corporate Social esponsibility in today's marketplace. Take one for example, the Caremark Corporation which is typically known to Americans as the owners of the CVS chain pharmacy and drug stores. This corporation has expanded rapidly over the past few years and has now become a global powerhouse. Yet, within its store locations, even in nations many corporations might exploit, they sill over excellent employee health packages that are equitable with the ones they offer their American employees in the United States. This seemingly small token shows corporate responsibility for their employees. However, not all seemingly wholesome American companies end up…

References

Assadourin, Erik. (2006). "State of Corporate Responsibility and the Environment." Georgetown International Environmental Law Review. Bnet.com. Retrieved August 8, 2009 at  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3970/is_200607/ai_n16692849/ .

Eom, Sean B. (1994). "Transitional Management Systems: An Emerging Tool for Global Strategic Management." SAM Advance Management. 59(2):22-27.

Ruggie, John Gerard. (2007). "Business and Human rights: The Evolving International Agenda." Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative. Working Paper No. 31. Harvard University. Retrieved August 8, 2009 at  http://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/CSRI/publications/workingpaper_38_ruggie.pdf .

Vogel, David. (2008). "CSR Doesn't Pay." Forbes Magazine. Retrieved August 8, 2008 at  http://www.forbes.com/2008/10/16/csr-doesnt-pay-lead-corprespons08-cx_dv_1016vogel.html .

Corporate Performance Systems Memo to
Words: 2111 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 74706784
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Actions that warrant for boundary should be on a written document and be available to employees at all time. This system should also take care of verbal and nonverbal agreement of contract expenditure, and no cost approval beyond the budget unless being approved by senior management and financing unit

These boundaries must be revised on an annual basis and edited if necessary. When employees understand the core beliefs and boundary system, then they do not just worry about delivering the bottom line results. Instead, they will strive to deliver corporate objectives without crossing boundaries.

Diagnostic control system should also be employed into the company whereby, new processes and performance measurements must be developed for the following:

Unit occupancy rate: this strives to achieve economy of scale.

Internal auditing: There should be a team of internal auditor reporting to the accounting VP. This team must constantly review the transactions and ensuring…

Managing Organizational Culture
Words: 9860 Length: 34 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 60831953
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Human esources

Managing Organisational Culture

The values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization make up the organizations culture. Organizational culture is the summation total of an organization's past and current suppositions, incidents, viewpoint, and values that hold it together, and is articulated in its self-image, inner workings, connections with the outside world, and future prospects.

In dealing with the management of organisational culture, it is firstly essential to recognize as fully as possible the characteristics of the existing or new target culture to include the myths, symbols, rituals, values and assumptions that strengthen the culture. Organisational culture is not something that can be viewed very easily it is consequently quite hard to replace it. Usually when certain leaders form a company, their values are converted into the actions of the members of that organisation. When other leaders take over, it may not…

References

Background To Business in China. n.d. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.worldbusinessculture.com/Chinese-Business-Style.html  [Accessed 18 August 2012].

Campbell, B. 2010. [ONLINE]. How To Improve Your Corporate Culture. Available at:  http://www.bcbusinessonline.ca/bcb/business-sense/2010/05/28/how-improve-your-corporate-culture  [Accessed 15 August 2012].

Differences in Culture. n.d. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.analytictech.com/mb021/cultural.htm  [Accessed 24 August 2012].

Edgar H. Schein's Model of Organizational Culture. 2010. [ONLINE]. Available at:  http://www.businessmate.org/Article.php?ArtikelId=36  [Accessed 18 August 2012].

Southwest Airlines' Culture Continues to
Words: 812 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 97797981
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There are many examples of this throughout the company's history, all pointing to the fact that employees who have a strong sense of ownership and wiliness to sacrifice for the greater good. Southwest's ability to translate cultural values into financial performance while embracing, even attacking change, in their industry is what fuels their profitability. Through the worst recession in 40 years, Southwest has been able to generate positive eturn on Investment (OI), eturn on Assets (OA), and eturn on Equity (OE).

Sustaining and Strengthening the Culture Given Strategic Decisions Made

The case study shows that while Southwest excels with their culture from a purely customer service standpoint, their leadership and management of maintenance, repair, overhaul and support has been a weakness that in 2007 became a liability. Southwest had failed to create a culture of transparency and accountability to the point of whistle-blowing in its maintenance organizations. As a result…

References

Freiberg, K. And Freiberg, J. (1996), Nuts: Southwest Airlines' Crazy Recipe for Business and Personal Success, Broadway Books, New York, NY.

Ginger Hardage (2006). PROFILE: COMMUNICATING the SOUTHWEST WAY. Strategic Communication Management, 10(3), 4.

Thomas a. Kochan (2006). Taking the High Road. MIT Sloan Management Review, 47(4), 16-19.

Dawna L. Rhoades (2006). Growth, customer service and profitability Southwest style. Managing Service Quality, 16(5), 538-547.

Organizational Cultures Annotated Bibliography and Summary Annotated
Words: 1543 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 92135419
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Organizational Cultures: Annotated Bibliography and Summary

Annotated Bibliography

Aronson, Z. And Patanakul, P. 2012. "Managing a group of multiple projects: do culture and leader's competencies matter?" Journal of the Knowledge Economy, 3(2): pp.

Web. etrieved from: LexisNexis Database. [Accessed on 21 May

This article focuses significantly on how team culture within an organization is a pivotal factor that contributes to a team being able to successfully complete a project. A focus is made on the role of the project manager to not only introduce a team to a project, but hone the group's culture in terms of knowledge, communication, and teamwork in order to maximize the team's effectiveness, which is a method that can be utilized in any working environment.

Heeroma, D., Melissen, F., Stierand, M. 2012. "The problem of addressing culture in workplace strategies. Facilities, 30(7-8): pp. 269-277. Web. etrieved from:

LexisNexis Database. [Accessed on 21 May

2012].

This…

References

Tatum, M. 2012. "What is corporate culture." Wise Geek. Web. Retrieved from:

 http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-corporate-culture.htm . [Accessed on 21 May

Administered a Culture Survey E G the Oci
Words: 833 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21187653
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administered a culture survey (e.g., the OCI) to all store employees (a.k.a. "crew members") and management, do you think espoused culture as described by management would match the culture expressed by the employees? Why or why not?

I think it likely that the espoused culture as described by the management of Trader Joe would match that expressed by the employees as a whole since, as the article indicates, employees receive intensive training during which they are likely imbued with culture expectations on n overt and covert level. More so, Trader Joe has its culture explicitly delineated and customer service is emphasized. The employee of Trade Joe who wishes to retain his or her position - and who does not given the attractive compensation, the difficulty in retain a job today, the opportunities 'at the end of the tunnel' and Trader Joe's fun and positive working environment -- would seek to…

Bloomberg Business week "Twenty Best Companies for Leadership  http://images.businessweek.com/ss/10/02/0216_best_places_for_leadership/17.htm 

Solomon, M. (2010) Exceptional Service, Exceptional Profit: The Secrets of Building a Five-Star Customer Service Organization, Solomon, Amacom Books (New York)

Twitchell, J. (June 16, 2009) upstart to $1 billion behemoth, Zappos marks 10 years. Las Vegas Sun.