Crimes Essays (Examples)

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Crime on March 9th 2013 Two New

Words: 5716 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8975565

Crime

On March 9th, 2013, two New York City police officers shot and killed a sixteen-year-old Kimani Gray, and claimed afterward that he had brandished a handgun at them after being told to show his hands (Goodman, 2013). More remarkable than the New York Police Department's killing of a young black male, however, was the outpouring of community grief and anger that followed the shooting. The following Monday, March 11th, saw what started as a nighttime vigil turn into a mob, parts of which ended up looting a Rite Aid chain store and a local bodega, and by Wednesday night of that week, forty-six people had been arrested, a bricks had been thrown at both a police officer and a police van (Goodman, 2013). The explosion of disorder and discontentment took some in the media and policing community by surprise, but these evens could only be surprising to someone lacking…… [Read More]

References

Alanezi, F. (2010). Juvenile delinquency in kuwait: Applying social disorganization theory.

Domes, 19(1), 68-81.

Borg, M.J., & Parker, K.F. (2001). Mobilizing law in urban areas: The social structure of homicide clearance rates. Law & Society Review, 35(2), 435-466.

Brisman, A. (2011). Advancing critical criminology through anthropology. Western Criminology
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Crime Reporting What Do You Think Crime

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43855853

Crime Reporting

What Do You Think?

Crime Reporting: UCR and NCVS

The Uniform Crime Report is a compilation of offensives collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) from all police stations in the United States. Data collected is divided into two groups, Part I and Part II. Part I data includes violent and property crimes such as aggravated assault, forcible rape, murder, robbery, arson, burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. Part II offenses include simple assault, curfew offenses and loitering, embezzlement, forgery and counterfeiting, disorderly conduct, driving under the influence, drug offenses, fraud, gambling, liquor offenses, offenses against the family, prostitution, public drunkenness, runaways, sex offenses, stolen property, vandalism, vagrancy, and weapons offenses ("Uniform Crime Reports.," 2012).

The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) is conducted by telephone and collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to the police against persons age twelve and older from a nationally…… [Read More]

References

"Crime rates are down." (2012, June 11). Crime in the United States 2011. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2012/june/crimes_061112/crimes_061112

Schmalleger, F. (2009). Criminolology today: An integrative introduction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education Inc.

Truman, J.L. & Planty, M. (2012, October). Criminal victimization, 2011. U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from  http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/cv11.pdf 

"Uniform crime reports." (2012, October). Crime in the United States 2011. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/index-page
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Crime Theory in the World of Criminology

Words: 1589 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16714251

Crime Theory

In the world of criminology, several theories have been constructed to help legal professionals understand the nature of and motive behind criminal activity. Studying these more closely can help with the rehabilitation of criminals and curb criminal activity. Criminal theory, therefore, is constructed to determine ways in which to prevent crime and mitigate the crime being committed. Theories such as the social control theory, strain theory, differential association theory, and neutralization theory can therefore be used for the purposes mentioned above. Each theory has its strenghts and weaknesses; to determine the theory to use could be determined on a case by case basis, hence enhancing the strengths and minimizing the weaknesses of the theory in question.

According to Welch (1998), Hirschi wrote his Causes of Delinquency, in which he developed the social control theory, during the 1960s. This was a troubled time in social terms, and American society…… [Read More]

References

Ball, R.A. (2006, Mar 7). An Empirical Exploration of Neutralization Theory. Criminology, Vol 4, Iss 2. Retrieved from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-9125.1966.tb00147.x/abstract

Matsueda, R.L. (2000). Differential Association Theory. Retrieved from: http://www.soc.washington.edu/users/matsueda/DA.pdf

Nash, M. (2002, Nov. 15). General Strain Theory as an Explanation for Crime and Deviance. Retrieved from: http://web.viu.ca/crim/student/nash.pdf

Welch, K. (1998, Nov. 30). Two Major Theories of Travis Hirschi. Retrieved from: http://criminology.fsu.edu/crimtheory/hirschi.htm
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Crime Theories Psychological Theories of Criminal Behavior

Words: 1548 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27773820

Crime Theories

Psychological theories of criminal behavior focus on the individual, rather than on contextual factors (as sociological theories of crime do) or on biological factors (such as genetics). Personality, traits, and cognitions are all covered under the rubric of psychological theories of crime. One of the prevailing and most widely accepted psychological theory of crime is rational choice theory. Rational choice theory " is perhaps the most common reason why criminals do the things they do," accounting for a wide variety of criminal behaviors (Dechant, 2009). The theory was first suggested and developed by William Glasser, and has since become a default theory of explaining everything from petty theft to white-collar crime.

Rational choice theory is relatively straightforward. The individual is believed to be acting rationally, making decisions based on personal need, convenience, and expediency. The theory permits for individual differences, as each person may be motivated by different…… [Read More]

References

Dechant, A.B. (2009). The psychology of criminal behavior: Theories from past to present. Coastline Journal. Retrieved online: http://coastlinejournal.org/2009/04/13/the-psychology-of-criminal-behaviour-theories-from-past-to-present/

Gul, S.K. (2009). An evaluation of the rational choice theory in criminology. Sociology and Applied Science 4(8): 36-44.

Li, H., Zhang, J. & Sarathy, R. (2010). Understanding compliance with internet use policy from the perspective of rational choice theory. Decision Support Systems 48(4): 635-645.

Scott, J. (2000). Rational choice theory From Understanding Contemporary Society: Theories of The Present, edited by G. Browning, A. Halcli, and F. Webster. Sage Publications.
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Crime Rates and Abandoned Buildings Is There

Words: 1399 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97455983

Crime Rates and Abandoned Buildings

Is there a relationship between crime rates and abandoned buildings?

Theoretical background

A vast portion of research on crime and its relation with location is centered at either validating or refuting 'broken window theory'. The theory states that disorders such as graffiti, litter, and broken windows may encourage or cause increase in other disorders and petty crime. The theory by virtue of its title, research objectives, and conclusions does not merit our research question regarding relationship of abandoned building and crime rate. Most policing and preventive efforts for curtailing crime in the U.S. And elsewhere have also been based on broken window theory. Disorder does not imply that any serious crime will take place at a place and serious crimes are neither taking place at littered or disordered places. Policing activities are focused on securing the abandoned buildings and how far is that helped by…… [Read More]

References

Braga, A.A., & Bond, B.J. (2008). Policing crime and disorder hot spots: A randomized controlled trial. Criminology, 46(3), 577-607.

Harcourt, B.E., & Ludwig, J. (2006). Broken windows: New evidence from New York City and a five-city social experiment. The University of Chicago Law Review, 271-320.

Immergluck, D., & Smith, G. (2006). The impact of single-family mortgage foreclosures on neighborhood crime. Housing Studies, 21(6), 851-866.
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Crime and Gender First Document

Words: 573 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8485181

This gap suggests that men commit the majority of crimes. While the gap exists for all crimes, it is the largest for violent crime, such as homicide, rape, and robberies, and the smallest for property crime. Unlike self-report data, official statistics and victimization reports generally describe the gender-gap as most apparent, as these types of crime reporting suggest large gaps in the number of crimes committed by men and women. Official statistics and victimization reports probably show the largest gender gaps both because they deal more with violent crimes, whose perpetrators tend to be men and because self-report data allows researchers to choose samples that have equal amounts of men and women to study similarities and differences across gender. In other words, self-report data generally has a lower sex-gap because researchers can have a great deal influence in manipulating the data set.

Many crimes are not reported to the police…… [Read More]

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Crime as Schmalleger Explains the American Juvenile-Justice

Words: 1570 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34971095

Crime

As Schmalleger explains, the American juvenile-justice system was designed a century ago to reform kids found guilty of minor crimes, but more and more, the system has to cope with more violent crimes committed by younger people. The response on the part of lawmakers has been largely to siphon the worst of these young people out of the juvenile system by lowering the age at which juveniles charged with serious crimes can be tried in adult courts, a trend that seems to increase around election time. The underlying philosophy of early juvenile courts was parens patriae, which means that the courts took the role of parent and protected the rights of the child. Shifting the child to adult court reduces his or her rights rather than increasing them and also bring son harsher punishments. As Daniel P. Mears notes, the creators of the juvenile court system thought it would…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Eskridge, Chris W. Criminal Justice, 4th edition. New York: Roxbury, 1993.

Schmalleger, Frank. Criminal Justice Today 8th edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2005.
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Crime and Punishment in Dante's

Words: 1324 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56533510

When considering the effectiveness and logic of this, I do not think that similar methods should be used to punish those who have been judged guilty of crimes in our era.

The first reason I disagree with Dante's methods is that there seems to be no point to the punishments given. I believe that punishing people in a way that is fitting to the crime will only work to reinforce the kind of behavior that led to the crime. One clear example is with people who have committed wrath, with all these people placed together so they will be violent against each other. In considering these people, there is little chance that they will become better people because of the punishment. Instead, they will have little choice but to become increasingly violent. In this way, the crime fitting the punishment has no positive outcome, but has a negative one. It…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dante, A. "Inferno." The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces. Eds. Sarah Lawall and Maynard Mack. New York W.W. Norton & Company, 1999: 1293-1409.
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Crime Detection and Prevention it Is an

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49799329

Crime Detection and Prevention

It is an unfortunate fact of modern society that crime and criminal activity are part of our world today. This is particularly the case in situations that make an easy target for criminals. Rape and robbery, for example, tend to be encouraged in environments that appear to be easy targets. All-night convenience stores, for example, may appear to be easy targets because they have low security features and often have only one employee per shift. The specific crime under discussion in this case is therefore the night-time robbery of all-night convenience stores.

When considering the factors in the Problem Analysis Chart offered by Clarke and Eck (p. 29), the environment provides a significant incentive for criminal activity. A convenience store at a remote location, for example, might appear to be an "easy" target for robbery. The problem analysis triangle, or crime trianble, may therefore offer valuable…… [Read More]

References

Center for Problem Oriented Policing. (n.d.). Twenty Five Techniques of Situational Prevention. Retrieved from:  http://www.popcenter.org/library/25%20techniques%20grid.pdf 

Clarke, R.V. And Eck, J.E. (n.d.) Crime Analysis for Problem Solvers in 60 Small Steps. Center for Problem Oriented Policing. Retrieved from: http://www.popcenter.org/library/reading/PDFs/60steps.pdf

Crime in America.net (2011, Feb 22). Top 10 Factors Contributing to Violent Crime. Retrieved from: http://www.crimeinamerica.net/2011/02/22/top-10-factors-contributing-to-violent-crime/
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Crime Maps

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56130860

Crime maps offer a visual component to crime data and statistics. It allows criminologists, law enforcement analysts, and sociologists to understand the connections between demographic data and criminal incidents. However, sociologists and criminologists must be careful to refrain from drawing illogical conclusions or inferring a false causal relationship. In some cases, crime maps are more useful in terms of helping law enforcement officials allocate resources than they are in making assumptions about demographic components in crime. Crime maps can also be used to help public policy officials create more effective programs for a target demographic. In the case of Riverside, there is no clear relationship between race and crime. Criminal incidents are scattered throughout the county. However, there are a few core regions of concern and both contain high numbers of non-blacks. This information suggests that African-American neighborhoods in Riverside have lower rates of crime than non-black neighborhoods. Law enforcement…… [Read More]

References

Maps of Riverside

Riverside Police Department (2014). Crime statistics. Retrieved online:  https://www.riversideca.gov/rpd/crstats/
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Crime Reporting and Data Collection

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11362953

S. Why or why not? Be specific in your response.

Not necessarily. The NIBRS is not designed to provide national coverage (Hirschel, 2009; USDOJ, 2005). In practice, the NIBRS does provide a reliable method for estimating the incidence of those types of crimes that are defined similarly in the NIBRS and in other data collection methods and in reporting jurisdictions covered by the NIBRS. Conversely, the NIBRS is a less reliable method to the extent specific crimes are defined differently and to the extent the data collection omits jurisdictions not covered by the NIBRS. Typical examples would include the underreporting of robberies and car thefts in the NIBRS by virtue of the absence of large urban areas from NIBRS reporting jurisdictions (Schmalleger, 2009).

5. Identify the obstacles to law enforcement agencies to full implementation of NIBRS data collection protocol.

According to a comprehensive review conducted jointly by the U.S. Department…… [Read More]

References

Hirschel, D. "Expanding Police Ability to Report Crime" The National Incident-Based

Reporting System." U.S. Department of Justice -- Office of Justice Programs -- National Institute of Justice Doc # NCJ 225459 (July 2009).

Safir, H. (2003). Security: An Inside Look at the Tactics of the NYPD. New York: St.

Martin's Press.
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Crime and Corrections Historically Crime Has Been

Words: 1025 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50776325

Crime and Corrections

Historically crime has been a concern for the public, and by extension policy makers because of the ways in which it can change and shape society. Criminal activity has the potential to influence social and economic environments within a society thus it is critical to identify measures that reduce outcomes of crime and support the reintegration of offenders into society. Consequently, crime and corrections have become big business in the United States (Smith). The money from the public purse that is expended to deal with crime is increasing in all of the states. More money is being moved from other areas of the budget to address the challenge of crime and criminal behavior. This increase in expenditure occurs in multiple areas of the criminal justice system and in spite of cost control measures. Additionally, there are fewer prisoners in within the system. This reduction in prisoners has…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Calvo-Armengoi Antoni and Zenou Yves Social Networks and Crime Decisions: The Role of Social Structure in Facilitating Delinquent Behavior International Economic Review

Vol. 45, No. 3 (2004):939-958.

Minton Todd D. Jail Inmates at Midyear 2010 - Statistical Tables U.S. Department of Justice

Office of Justice Programs Bureau of Justice Statistics. (2011) Web.
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Crime Reduction and Prevention Proposal for Detroit

Words: 626 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26693638

Crime Reduction and Prevention Proposal for Detroit

Crime Prevention Proposal for Detroit, Michigan

In the midst of a very instable economic environment around the nation, it is crucial for all cities to bump up their strategies at preventing crime in order to be able to avoid future costs associated with fighting crime and imprisoning criminals. Crime prevention is one of the most cost effective strategies in criminal justice, and it can help save property and lives. This is especially crucial for the city of Detroit, which faces its own set of unique challenges in a severely volatile economy that has the potential to lead to increase in a wide variety of crimes, making prevention methods and strategies a crucial tool for local law enforcement.

First and foremost, the city of Detroit needs to bolster its community policing programs through increased community involvement with its law enforcement agencies. Unfortunately, the number…… [Read More]

References

Gray, Steven. (2009). In Detroit, improvement on crime? Time Magazine. Web. http://detroit.blogs.time.com/2009/10/26/in-detroit-improvement-on-crime/

Kerlikowske, Gil & Davis, Robert. (2008). Twelve Tenets to Prevent Crime and Terrorism: Major Cities Chiefs Association. Homeland Security Committee. Web.  https://www.majorcitieschiefs.com/pdf/MCC_12TenetFinal52108.pdf
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Crime and Deviance Crime Is

Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81308266



The changing nature of crime should make criminology, in terms of criminal laws, flexible and up-to-date. The law must have a regular review to ensure that the society is governed by proper and accurate directives to guarantee peace and equality among the people. Moreover, flexibility is important to ensure that right punishment is rendered to every crime. Another impact that criminology holds because of the changing nature of crime is the goal and objective of assessing their tools and technology that fight against crime.

Unlike some decades ago, guns and written laws are not the only tools these days that can prevent crimes and put the criminals in bars. Because of the diverse high technology that emerges, it is important that criminology has the right and advance instruments that can enhance their purpose of serving and ensuring peace to society.… [Read More]

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Crime Punishment Philosophy Since the Beginning of

Words: 753 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54149184

Crime Punishment Philosophy

Since the beginning of the 70s, the number of people inducted in jails and state facilities has increased to an astonishing level. In the present, more than two million individuals are serving jail time in either jails or state prisons. The growth of crime rate and imprisonment can be greatly attributed to the African-American and Hispanic communities residing in the U.S., who still categorize as the poor communities in the urban areas of the country. Even though, the increasing number of arrests and incarceration should in theory have reduced the crime rate, considering that the incarcerated offenders are no longer free to rob, mug or assault (Ezorsky, 1972).

Historical Context of Crime Related Policies and Punishment

However, no large scale crime reduction was recorded till the 1990's, that's when an actual decrease in crime was observed throughout the country. The most important point to be noted here…… [Read More]

References

Ezorsky, G. (1972). Philosophical Perspectives on Punishment. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Foucault, M. (1977). Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Translated by Alan Sheridan. New York: Vintage.

Garland, D. (1993). Punishment and Modern Society: A Study in Social Theory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993.

Hart, H.L.A. (1968). Punishment and Responsibility: Essays in the Philosophy of Law. New York: Oxford University Press.
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Crime and Punishment Rodion Romanovitch

Words: 869 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92192783



First, the old pawnbroker may be viewed an evil person who is actually harming society by her vile and cynical grasp on the poor citizens who come to her for pawning. According to Hegel, any harmful segment of society should be removed. Therefore, Raskolnikov reasoned that by murdering the old pawnbroker, he would be removing a harmful thing from society.

Next, Hegel believed that the ends justified the means, i.e., if the ends are noble, then the means may be justified. Using this rationale, the old pawnbroker has a lot of money which will be wasted upon useless masses and requiem services after her death. With this money, Raskolnikov would be able to complete his education without being cramped and the may devote himself to the service of humanity.

Lastly, Hegel argued that one small crime may be wiped out by thousands of good deeds. Raskolnikov could use the money…… [Read More]

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Crime Victim Complain Form Identity Theft Centerville

Words: 797 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47679176

Crime Victim Complain Form: Identity Theft

Centerville Police Department

101 Centerville Street

Centerville, Kansas, 05699

Tel [HIDDEN]

Date Complaint Filed: July 5, 2011

Victim Information:

Crime Victim Complaint Form: Identity Theft

Sally Gertrude Frederick

123 12th Avenue, Centerville, KS 05699

Tel [HIDDEN]

DOB: 01/24/1962

SSN: 466-55-1254

Drivers Lic.: Kansas, 18955243

Length of Residence at Current Address: 3 days

Victim's Previous Home Addresses for Past 5 Years:

435 14th Street, Apt. 233, Centerville, KS 05699

How long at this address: 7-1/2 years

Victim Information at Time of Fraud:

435 14th Street, Apt. 233, Centerville, KS 05699

Tel [HIDDEN]

SSN: 466-55-1254

Drivers Lic.: Kansas, 18955243

Email:

Declaration:

The victim declares that she has never authorized anyone to use her personal information to obtain money, credit, loans, goods, services, or for any other purpose, nor has she received any of the same as a result of the events described here. Ms. Frederick also…… [Read More]

References

Federal Trade Commission. (n.d.). Identity theft victim's complaint and affidavit. Retrieved July, 2011 from http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/resources/forms/affidavit.pdf

Romanosky, Sasha, Telang, Rahul, and Acquisti, Alessandro. (2011). Do data breach disclosure laws reduce identity theft? Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 30, 256-286.
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Crime and Punishment in the

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74049281

Some of the entries are closely related, but the search function appears to pull up every entry that has any of the words for which a person searches. That can be very frustrating, because it produces a large number of entries that are not related in any way to the original search. Encyclopedia Britannica also requires a person to sign up for a free trial period in order to read any of the entries (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2011). After that trial period is over, one must pay for the service. Wikipedia requires no sign-up, and there is no cost for searching or reading on the site (Wikipedia, 2011).

Overall, Wikipedia excels over Encyclopedia Britannica when searching for crime and punishment in the 18th century or anything else. While neither site has a page specifically dedicated to that issue and it is necessary to perform several searches on each site in order…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Encyclopedia Britannica. 2011. Britannica - the Online Encyclopedia. Web. 30 September 2011.

Wikipedia. 2011. Wikipedia. Web. 30 September 2011.
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Crime Journal They Picked Up Their Fists

Words: 677 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8955133

Crime Journal

"They picked up their fists instead of guns" was how a reporter noted the outbreak of a gang fight in the city of Richmond, California, on Friday afternoon, October 14, 2011. What was unique about this crime story was that the fist fight broke out inside the City Hall complex within the Office of Neighborhood Safety. The seven people involved in the incident were in that office to collect some incentive payments as part of a privately funded initiative called Operation Peacemakers, the purpose of which is, curiously enough, to engage young people in mental health, anger management and other productive efforts to keep them out of trouble. On the day of the altercation, members of rival gangs showed up at about the same time and the confrontation occurred, spreading blood about the office, breaking furniture, and causing concern for many. The police received numerous 911 calls. When…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

ABCNews7 (2011), Gang fight erupts at Richmond City Hall. Viewable at http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/local/east_bay&id=8396462.

Lee, H. And Kane, W. (2011), Witnesses mum on gang brawl at Richmond City Hall. Viewable at http://articles.sfgate.com/2011-10-23/bay-area/30322974_1_gang-brawl-power-drill-gang-members.
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Crime Fraud Is Defined as

Words: 365 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32853033

He is serving a twenty-five-year sentence for his conviction.

The reason Ebbers was found guilty of criminal fraud, despite being in a business, is because his actions met the above referenced elements of fraud. For example, his filing of false statement was an intentional act that contained an untrue representation of an important fact: WorldCom's accounting. Further, this untrue statement was believed by the company's investors, or in this case, the victims. Further, the investors relied upon Ebbers' statement as being true and thus acted on it in terms of their investment decisions. Finally, as a result of the investor's reliance and action upon Ebbers' false statements, they lost a significant amount of money. Thus, because Ebbers' actions satisfy the elements for criminal fraud, it does not matter whether or not he was acting within a business capacity.… [Read More]

Bibliography

Associated Press (2005): "Former WorldCom Chief Signs Agreement Over Fraud Charges."

Floyd, Nell Luter. (2006): "Ebbers Receives Prison Order." The Clarion-Ledger.

Moritz, Scott. (2003): "Judgment Day Coming Sooner for Ebbers." The Street. 27 Aug. 2003.
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Crime & the Treatment of

Words: 1602 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10798349



Once inmates were encouraged to complete an education while in prison and gain skills to get a paying job so they could be self-supporting once they got out, but that is no longer so. The public attitude was, "Why should criminals get a free education? Law abiding citizens have to pay for college." The overcrowded conditions, caused by long mandated sentences for non-violent drug offenses put an end to social programs in the prisons aimed at preparing prisoners to live as law-abiding citizens when they got out.

Privatization of prisons, which makes them cheaper to run, has had negative effects. Some researchers contend that by putting private companies in charge of prisons, we have created a market economy for crime with a market demand for prisoners. More people in prison provide more business for these companies. These companies have strong lobbies that pressure for harsher and longer sentences. For example,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beaudoin, Jack. "Does the U.S.Abuse Human Rights," Scholastic Update. 8 Dec. 1997.

Bohm, Robert. "Crime, Criminals, and Crime Control Policy Myths," Justice Quarterly,

Chavez, Linda. "One of the Keys to Reducing Crime is Ridding our Prisons of the Crimes Committed There," Enterprise/Salt Lake City, May 15, Vol 29, Iss. 46,

Green, Bonnie L.; Miranda, Jeanne; Daroowalla, Anahita; and Juned Siddique. "Trauma
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Crime and Criminals

Words: 498 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39578061



Pictorial description of the criminal

Responses on the criminal description obtained show that a criminal is an individual who is.

1. Dirty and crazy

2. Dirty sloppy - messy

3. Sociopathic

4. Dirty, twisted

5. My rapist, his face is exactly what I see when I see any crime, brawn hair, gross.

6. Kids who did not have a good upbringing, living with parents addicted to drugs.

7. Mentally unstable and dirty

8. Shady looking individual

9. Dirty living in poor properties in underdeveloped cities

10. Sociopathic, strong, and dirty

Among the responses above, it is observed that a criminal individual is likely to be untidy with an unstable mine. This is observable from the respondents saying the likely image they have is that of a person who is dirty and crazy. Since the most observed crimes are those that go against moral teachings in the society, it is likely…… [Read More]

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Crime in the Beginning the Main Focus

Words: 1861 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68215282

Crime

In the beginning the main focus of the drug addiction theory was on the habituated pleasure reinforcement as well as the potential of the drug for the reward. Drug affects the dopamine receptors that are present in the brain and the individual is flooded with the desirable emotions by using dopamine, these desirable emotions are considered to be the reward for using the substance (Pinel, 2009). When the relationship of dopamine to the reward was recognized it was thought to be the major cause of addiction but when further researches were carried out, they showed that there were some other factors involved in the addiction as well.

When initially the psychotropic substance like cocaine or amphetamine is used, some changes take place in the brain and these changes then influence a cycle of addiction. Although different drugs have different probability of addiction but the individual characteristics like cognition, mental…… [Read More]

References

Alberta Health Services -- Addiction and Mental Health. (2009). Challenging assumptions: The association between substance use and criminal behaviour. Edmonton, AB: Author.

Gottfredson, D.C., Kearley, B.W. And Bushway, S.D. (2008). Substance Use, Drug Treatment, and Crime: An Examination of Intra-Individual Variation in a Drug Court Population. Journal of Drug Issues 0022-0426/08/02 601-630.

GSS Codebook. (2010). General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined. Accessed from:  http://www.thearda.com/Archive/Files/Codebooks/GSS10PAN_CB.asp 

Idaho State Police. (2010). The Relationship Between Substance Abuse and Crime in Idaho: Estimating the Need for Treatment Alternatives. Idaho State Police, Statistical Analysis Center.
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Crime Rate Analysis of Beaverton

Words: 483 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84479551

Just from looking at the way these crime statistics compare to those of other similar-sized cities, it would be reasonable to assume that Beaverton is slightly more affluent than average. The rate and type of crime is skewed more towards the profit-driven types of crime and less to those that are generally associated with "fits of passion," gang behavior, and drug use (especially murder and robbery).

The fact that Beaverton keeps it crime rates so low with only one hundred and twenty officers (and twenty-nine civilians) is also a testament to the area's probable affluence. A comparison of this number to the number of officers in other cities makes it clear why crime is kept so low -- they have one of the highest number of officers per capita of any city in Oregon. For this reason, it seems reasonable to surmise that an adequate number of law enforcement officers…… [Read More]

Beaverton compares well in other areas of violent and irreversible crime, too. The eighteen forcible rapes and thirty robberies that occurred in 2006 show that, though not perfect, Beaverton's a relatively safe city in which to live, especially when compared wit other cities of comparable size. The town of Bend for instance, with a population almost twenty thousand people smaller than that of Beaverton, has higher rates in all of the violent crimes discussed so far: murder, rape, and robbery. Beaverton seems poised and able to effectively combat such violent crimes in a way that leaves other cities far behind.

Their record is less stellar in the area of non-violent crimes, however. It appears to be about average when it comes to instances of property crime and arson, and has higher rates of burglary and larceny and theft, too. Just from looking at the way these crime statistics compare to those of other similar-sized cities, it would be reasonable to assume that Beaverton is slightly more affluent than average. The rate and type of crime is skewed more towards the profit-driven types of crime and less to those that are generally associated with "fits of passion," gang behavior, and drug use (especially murder and robbery).

The fact that Beaverton keeps it crime rates so low with only one hundred and twenty officers (and twenty-nine civilians) is also a testament to the area's probable affluence. A comparison of this number to the number of officers in other cities makes it clear why crime is kept so low -- they have one of the highest number of officers per capita of any city in Oregon. For this reason, it seems reasonable to surmise that an adequate number of law enforcement officers exists in Beaverton. Though more could be added to the patrol in an attempt to curb the burglaries and thefts that seem so prevalent in the area, the added effectiveness would probably be very little, and would almost certainly not be worth the added cost to the city. Crime is an unfortunate by-product of a society; it will always exist to one degree or another. Extra law enforcement officers are not necessary and might actually be a burden in the community of Beaverton, Oregon.
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Crime Punishment and Criminal Justice

Words: 2589 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77445927

Crime, Punishment & Justice in Great Expectations

Crime, Punishment and Justice in Great Expectations

In his novel Great Expectations Charles Dickens' characters often seem to be operating outside or just outside the law in gray areas where what is legally correct clash with what is morally the right thing to do. The theme of crime in Dickens' novels is used as a focal point to explore his deep concern for the pervasive array of social problems that permeated England in the nineteenth century (Ford 82-83).

Dickens frames this novel as an individual's struggle to rise above the social and political conditions of that time. Criminality, punishment, and a perverse sense of justice are some of the themes Dickens surfaces to explore this world. At several points throughout the novel convicts come into the story, Pip encounters Magwitch on the marshes in the first chapter (Dickens 2), Magwitch and Compeysen are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davie, Neil. "History Artfully Dodged? Crime, Prisons and the Legacy of 'Dickens's England'." Dickens Quarterly, Vol. 28, Issue 28, December 2011: 261-272. EBSOC Web. 6 December 2012.

Dickens, Charles. Great Expectations. Janice Carlisle (Ed.) New York: Bedford Books of St. Martin's Press, 1996. Print.

Ford, George H. Dickens & His Readers. New York: W.W. Norton & Company Inc., 1965. Print.

Lucas, John. The Melancholy Man: A Study of Dickens's Novels. London, UK: Methuen & Co. LTD., 1970. Print.
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Crime Trends in Indiana 1981-2011 With an

Words: 1687 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51825625

Crime Trends in Indiana, 1981-2011

With an economy founded on agriculture and industry, and few blighted urban centers, Indiana's crime rates in all indexed categories have historically been lower than the national average. However, data collected between 1995 and 2005 shows a disturbing trend: the crime rate for many categories is declining in the rest of the country faster than in the state of Indiana. This data is shown in Figure 1, below.

Indiana Crime Index Rate per 100,000 Residents Compared to National. From Indiana Criminal Justice Institute.

Currently, Indiana's cities are suffering from the loss of jobs in the state and the region, especially the northern cities like Gary and Hammond. Trends in urban crime are different from trends in rural crime, and it is also helpful for business owners and community leaders to understand the answer to the question "who commits crimes?" Community members and prospective Indiana homebuyers…… [Read More]

References

Agnew, R. & White, H. (1992). "An Empirical Test of General Strain Theory." Criminology 30(4): 475-99.

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2011). Labor Force Overview. Retrieved from  http://www.stats.indiana.edu  August 15, 2011.

Checkpoint (2010). The Global Retail Theft Barometer, 2010 Edition. White paper retrieved from http://globalretailtheftbarometer.com August 15, 2011.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (2010). Uniform Crime Report. Retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov August 19, 2011.
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Crime in Urban Cities Is at Least

Words: 1372 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87267949

Crime in urban cities is at least 1.5 times higher than suburban or rural areas. Many factors account for this difference including higher poverty, more densely populated centers, presence of poor minorities, low education, limited resources etc. The paper studies crime in urban cities from the perspective of causes and impact so explain why higher urbanization translates into higher crime rate.

Crime in urban cities

Crime in urban cities of the United States continues to be a major problem for the society. The effect of violent crime against persons and property on general welfare is unmistakable since it takes a serious toll on mental, physical and emotional health of people while it places a huge burden on society's resources and finances. It is important to mention that while crime has a profound impact on welfare of people; it also costs the country almost 0.7% of GDP in variety of ways…… [Read More]

References

GLEASER, EDWARD L. And SACERDOTE, BRUCE. (1996) Why is there more crime in cities? NBER Working Paper # 5430, January.

MASIH, ABUL M.M. And MAS-H RUMI. (1996) Temporal causality and the dynamics of different categories of crime and their socioeconomic determinants: evidence from Australia, Applied Economics, 28, 1093-1104.

Winters, Clyde A. "Learning Disabilities, Crime Delinquency, and Special Education Placement." Adolescence 32.126 (1997): 451.
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Crime Is a Social Phenomenon

Words: 1921 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38278426

Crime a Socially Constructed

One's conduct or deeds turn into a crime or an offence via a progression of societal or communal conditioning. The same deed can be regarded as wrong in one community and act of valor in another or in the same community at a different point in time. The lawful status of a deed-whether it is an offense-does not depend on its substance, but on the communal reaction to that deed or to the individual who does it (Rosenfeld, 2009). Shifts in the lawful status of a particular deed can be due to communal changes or may be part of serious communal differences. The latest debates and confrontations over assisted suicide and abortion policy are two fine examples in the U.S. Lastly, the communal reaction to crime, social science theories on illegal behavior included, is founded on the significance of the deed and also the communal and…… [Read More]

References

1)

Rosenfeld, R. (2009). The Social Construction of Crime . Available: http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195396607/obo-9780195396607-0050.xml. Last accessed 9 Mar, 2015.

2)

Henry. (2009). Social Construction of Crime. Available: http://www.sagepub.com/haganintrocrim8e/study/chapter/handbooks/42347_1.2.pdf. Last accessed 9 Mar 2015.
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Crime and Gender as Steffensmeier

Words: 1279 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12940363

"Greater freedom has increased female participation in the public sphere," which would expose greater numbers of women to criminal behaviors and the opportunities to commit crimes (Steffensmeier & Allan1996, p. 469). Combined with social control theory, opportunity theory offers a plausible explanation for the gender gap in criminal behavior. Social control theory and opportunity theory share in common the basic assumption that deviance is a natural human instinct; that left to their own devices both men and women are predisposed to crime. Criminal behavior is always an option, according to social control theory and opportunity theory. The two sociological theories suggest that deterrents to committing crime, such as a lack of opportunity or strong social bonds, determine patterns of criminal behavior. Moreover, social control theory and opportunity theory emphasize sociological variables at the expense of psychological or personality-based ones.

The opportunity theories such as theories of routine activities present deviance…… [Read More]

References

Chapple, C.L., McQuillan, J.A., & Berdahl, T.A. (2004). Gender, social bonds, and delinquency: a comparison of boys' and girls' models. Social Science Research 34(2005): 357-383.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (2005). Crime in the United States: Ten-Year Arrest Trends. Table 33. Retrieved Aug 1, 2008 at http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/05cius/data/table_33.html

Smith, D.A. & Paternoster, R. (1987). The gender gap in theories of deviance: Issues and evidence. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency. 24(2): 140-172.

Steffensmeier, D. & Allan, E. (1996). Gender and crime: Toward a gendered theory of female offending. Annual Review of Sociology. 22: 459-487.
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Crime Versus Sin

Words: 2183 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31020683

Crime vs. Sin

A criminal justice agency, specifically the police department relies very heavily on its organization to fulfill its duties to society, which is to protect from crime and to serve justice (Kenney & McNamara, 1999). The justice which is to be served depends on the severity of the offense or crime. Crime is quite a complex subject which can be divided into two different categories: natural crime and legal crime. Only legal crime can be processed/punished by the Criminal Justice System. These are acts which are the direct violation of the law which varies from state to state and country to country (Finnis, 2007). This is known as Mala prohibita, or something which is known as a legal crime which is punishable by the law (Vila & Morris, 1999). Natural crime is something which is not written; it is determined by the society you live in and most…… [Read More]

References

Bronsteen, J., Buccafusco, C., & Masur, J.. (2010). Retribution and the Experience of Punishment. California Law Review, 98(5), 1463. Retrieved February 7, 2011, from Criminal Justice Periodicals.

Conlon, B., Harris, S., Nagel, J., Hillman, M., & Hanson, R. (2008). Education: Don't Leave Prison Without It. Corrections Today, 70 (1); 48-49, 51-52.

Davis, M.S. (2006). Crimes Mala in Se: An Equity-Based Definition: Criminal Justice Policy Review, 17 (3) 270-289. Sage Publications, 2006.

Finnis, J. (2007). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Natural Law Theories. Retrieved February 4, 2010, form web site:  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/natural-law-theories/
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Crime and Gender Sampson and

Words: 386 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46167675

females. For example, joining a gang would be a powerful turning point but one that might result in greater male vs. female criminality. Males may also be more pressured by peers to join gangs and commit gang-related crime in order to sustain the deviant social network. Males and females might also experience different trajectories due to their differential parental and peer social bonding.

Opportunity theories of crime explain why boys are exposed to a greater number of opportunities to commit crime. One potential reason why boys are exposed to a greater number of opportunities to commit crime is their different methods of social bonding. Family ties and nurturing behaviors are discouraged as being stereotypically feminine expressions, whereas deviant behaviors are encouraged as being expressions of masculinity. In other words, gender norms determine opportunities for crime. Another reason why boys may be exposed to more opportunities to commit crime is related…… [Read More]

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Crime and Punishment There Are

Words: 413 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43977783



The second reason punishment is handed out following a conviction is to appease the victim or the victim's family and let them know that justice was served. If someone is the victim of a crime they often feel violated and angry that someone could do this to them. Idea of revenge may enter their mind or they may find themselves dwelling on the event. The punishment lets them know that the criminal did not get away with the commission of the crime and that society does in fact recognize that they committed it.

Both of these are foundations for the court system handing out punishment following the conviction of a criminal.

A side note to the entire process is political. Politicians often use the punishment system as a platform for election reminding voters that they supported this punishment tier system or that one. They do so in the effort to…… [Read More]

REFERENCE

Chemerinsky, Erwin (2004) the Constitution and punishment.(how Supreme Court

Stanford Law Review
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Crime of Conspiracy

Words: 682 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70836317

Crime of Conspiracy

The recent case whereby criminal charges were imposed in Aaron Swartz caused frenzy throughout the country. In my perspective, a criminal penalty was essential for this case. Swartz had announced he would be committed to opposing the law as a moral impervious to invalidate the federal laws in existence for information access effectively. In this case, one decided to disobey the law intentionally, just because he wanted to achieve a goal in an anti-democratic policy way and there is a display by both deeds and words that he will precede. It is very deliberate for the criminal law with its power to enforce a penalty under the law that the individual violated intentionally. In actual sense, the law is the fact about civil disobedience: the main function of the punishment is to focus on the same law deemed unjust. As was in this case, I think the…… [Read More]

References

Samaha, J. (2011). Criminal Law (10th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Gillies, P. (2009). The law of criminal conspiracy. Sydney: Federation Press

Rowlett, C. (2005). Labyrinth 13: True tales of the occult, crime, & conspiracy. United States:

Lulu.com.
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Crime-Native Americans Crime Issues for

Words: 557 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19623737

By contrast, other studies have revealed that 69% of those committing violent crimes against whites are also white, and that 81% of those committing violent crimes against African-Americans are also African-Americans (Violent pp).

In 2004, Thomas B. Heffelfinger, the United States Attorney for the state of Minnesota, called for a major overhaul of the criminal law enforcement system in Indian Country, calling it a "national shame" (Federal pp). Heffelfinger said statistics reveal that Native American Indians and Alaska Natives are the victims of violent crime more than the any other group in the country, and that includes every crime, child abuse, sexual assault, homicide, assault, etc. (Federal pp).

Heffelfinger complained that the current system of law enforcement "is taking the leaders of our national tribes, making them victims of crime and sending them to prison" (Federal pp). Heffelfinger, who chairs the Native American Issues sub-committee for the Department of Justice,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Federal prosecutor seeks to change 'national shame.' April 19, 2004. Retrieved October 20, 2005 at  http://indianz.com/News/archive/001804.asp 

Some crimes, arrests increase among Native Americans. October 18, 2005.

Retrieved October 20, 2005 at http://indianz.com/News/2005/010832.asp

Violent Crime and Native Americans. February 16, 1999. Retrieved October 20, 2005 at http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=03/04/07/0356209
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Crime Theories Comparison Social Organization

Words: 1076 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7198572

Unlike the previous theories, social process theories explain criminal behavior on more microsociological terms. The emphasis of social process theories are not on the institutions, but on the relationships formed between individual family members, peer groups, teachers, church leaders and other agents of socialization.

The key concept of all social process theories is based on learning. Sociologists have believed that individuals learn social values and norms from agents of socialization. Thus, if those agents engage in behavior that is deviant or criminal, then there is a greater chance for an individual to engage in similar behavior.

Edwin Sutherland, the father of American criminology, is one of the greatest exemplars of social process theory. Though his theory of differential association was devised largely to explain white collar crime, many of the pronouncements are also applicable to violent crime. In response to psychologists who tried to explain criminal behavior in terms of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shaw, C. & H. McKay. (1942). Juvenile Delinquency and Urban Areas. Chicago: Univ. Press.

Sutherland, Edwin H. 1983. White Collar Crime: The Uncut Version. Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group.
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Crime Journal Second Person in

Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79897419

Most of these products have not been scientifically tested. Yet consumers continue to waste their money on such products rather than go to the gym. Thus, there is a fascinating sociological aspect of this crime story.

To conform to the prevailing social standards of beauty, women like the victims in this case are willing to go to extreme lengths. The story therefore raises difficult questions related to victims' roles in crime. Criminologists should still question what is essentially a controversial slant in cases like these: victims sometimes do play important roles in enabling crimes to take place. Thankfully, the victims in this case survived but they are no doubt scarred emotionally and physically by the experience. We cannot blame the victims entirely, but must acknowledge the importance of personal responsibility in cases such as these. To use a possibly inappropriate analogy, a person who leaves their laptop alone in the…… [Read More]

To conform to the prevailing social standards of beauty, women like the victims in this case are willing to go to extreme lengths. The story therefore raises difficult questions related to victims' roles in crime. Criminologists should still question what is essentially a controversial slant in cases like these: victims sometimes do play important roles in enabling crimes to take place. Thankfully, the victims in this case survived but they are no doubt scarred emotionally and physically by the experience. We cannot blame the victims entirely, but must acknowledge the importance of personal responsibility in cases such as these. To use a possibly inappropriate analogy, a person who leaves their laptop alone in the school library can only blame herself or himself if the machine is stolen.

Another issue at play is that of medical malpractice. In this story, neither of the suspects appears to have been licensed physicians at any time. They were both posing as doctors to scam consumers into receiving butt implants. However, had the two suspects been licensed physicians, the story would have been appreciably different. The main difference would be the violation of professional codes of ethics. Doctors who knowingly scam their patients are committing a crime far more severe than scam artists pretending to be doctors. This is mainly because patients imbue doctors with their trust; doctors who are licensed to practice medicine are responsible for the health and well being of their patients. Scam artists are expected to commit crimes such as the one in question in this case.

Ovalle, D. (2011). "Second person in 'toxic tush' case posts $5,000 bond." November 24, 2011. Retrieved online: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/11/24/2517469/second-person-in-toxic-tush-case.html#ixzz1eriaMVIa
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Crime and Gender Criminology What

Words: 340 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22260605

What is "hegemonic masculinity"? Explain one way in which "hegemonic masculinity" is related to violent crime.

Connell (1987) suggested that cultural definitions of what constitutes "ideal" masculinity strongly influences the way that males interact with their social environments. Specifically, if a culture values professional success, social power, physical strength, and emotional independence in males, most males within that culture will strive toward those ideals. According to Connell (1987) this is equally true irrespective of how successfully individual males achieve those ideals because they still motivate males to strive to meet elements of those particular ideals. Since a large part of hegemonic masculinity in many cultures relates to maintaining one's "honor" or respect, males are generally much more inclined to respond to insults or to perceived issues of lack of respect with violence. Similarly, since cultural concepts of masculinity often relate to providing for one's family financially, males often experience a…… [Read More]

In the context of violent crime, doing gender has been suggested as part of the reason that crime, and violent crime in particular, are perpetrated much more often by males than by females. Males are more likely to react to personal struggles by ignoring them until erupting in violence; females are more likely to share their feelings with others and seek assistance instead of lashing out against others (or themselves). Males are also more likely to form delinquent or deviant associations that increase their respective propensity to violence and criminal conduct

2. What is "hegemonic masculinity"? Explain one way in which "hegemonic masculinity" is related to violent crime.

Connell (1987) suggested that cultural definitions of what constitutes "ideal" masculinity strongly influences the way that males interact with their social environments. Specifically, if a culture values professional success, social power, physical strength, and emotional independence in males, most males within that culture will strive toward those ideals. According to Connell (1987) this is equally true irrespective of how successfully individual males achieve those ideals because they still motivate males to strive to meet elements of those particular ideals. Since a large part of hegemonic masculinity in many cultures relates to maintaining one's "honor" or respect, males are generally much more inclined to respond to insults or to perceived issues of lack of respect with violence. Similarly, since cultural concepts of masculinity often relate to providing for one's family financially, males often experience a more intense urge to engage in criminal conduct for profit where their efforts to do so lawfully are unsuccessful.
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Crime and Punishment Acutely Aware of and

Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5528623

Crime and Punishment

Acutely aware of and deeply concerned about Russia's social, political, and economic problems, Fedor Dostoevsky infused his literature with realism and philosophical commentary. Crime and Punishment, besides being a superbly crafted novel, captures the economic despair that characterized life in Russia before the revolution. Dosteovsky's novel serves as a historical marker that delineates the social, political, and economic motivators for the Russian Revolution. Through the minds of the novel's main characters, modern readers perceive the various changes that swept through Russian society at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. In Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky focuses primarily on the economic despair that caused widespread social and psychological problems in pre-Revolutionary Russia. However, the author denounces radicalism as a viable solution to social and economic woes. Instead, Dostoevsky proposes humanitarian ideals such as love, compassion, and friendship, as the only real means to creating…… [Read More]

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Crime and Punishment Crime and

Words: 487 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95204284

From a good soldier, he turns into a bad king. He becomes a man who believes the transparent lies of the witches who, along with the urging of his ambitious wife, motivated him to commit the murder of King Duncan.

Hamlet: Hamlet's depressed and uncompromising nature resonates with anyone who has ever been an adolescent. Hamlet is intensely critical of aspects of his society others take for granted, such as King Claudius' right to marry his brother's widow and Old Hamlet's suspect death. Hamlet's criticism can be harsh, and misogynistic as well as misanthropic, but he is an inspiring example for young readers. He urges readers and playgoers today to continually question the morality of their elders and betters, and strike out against the 'smile' or lie that hides the real truth about power in society.

The Scarlet Letter: Nathaniel Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter shows that the appearance of religion without…… [Read More]

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Crime Kirkpatrick 2005 in the

Words: 1196 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3476382

Every culture may identify some behavior as deviant, but a given behavior will not be defined as deviant in all cultures:

Deviance" refers to conduct which the people of a group consider so dangerous or embarrassing or irritating that they bring special sanctions to bear against the persons who exhibit it. Deviance is not a property inherent in any particular kind of behavior; it is a property conferred upon that behavior by the people who come into direct or indirect contact with it (Erikson, 1966, p. 6).

Erikson suggests that the deviance identified by a community says something about the boundaries that community sets for itself. He notes that both the conformist and the deviant are created by the same forces in the community, for the two complement one another. Indeed, Erikson says that deviance and conformity are much alike, so much so that they appear in a community at…… [Read More]

References

Erikson, K.T. (1966). Wayward Puritans. New York: Macmillan.

Kelly, DH (1979). Deviant behavior. New York: St. Martin's Press.

Kirkpatrick, D.D. (2005, May 12). House bill toughens penalties for gangs. The New York Times.

Schoeman, M.I. (2002). A classification system and interdisciplinary action plan for the prevention and management of recidivism. University of Pretoria.
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Crime and Social Theory Deviance Interpreted by

Words: 1590 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21153466

Crime and Social Theory

Deviance Interpreted by Social Theories

Illicit Drug Use

Illicit drug use has historically been seen as a global threat towards society and a primary contributing factor for the prevalence other crimes, such as smuggling, home invasions, property crimes, assault, and murder. In 1969 President Nixon stated publicly that illicit drug use is a serious national problem and in 1971 declared the "War on Drugs" (National Public Radio, 2007). Over the two decades since, other governments around the world, including the United Nations, followed suit, but differed substantially from the United States in how much emphasis was placed on deterrence through incarceration (Bewley-Taylor, Hallam, and Allen, 2009, p. 1).

Prevalence of Illicit Drug Use

An estimated 21.8 million Americans were using illicit drugs in 2009, which represents about 8.7% of the population (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2010, p. 1). Of these, 16.7 million used…… [Read More]

References

Bewley-Taylor, Dave, Hallam, Chris, and Allen, Rob. (2009). The incarceration of drug offenders: An Overview, Report Sixteen. The Beckley Foundation Drug Policy Programme, International Centre for Prison Studies, Kings College of London, University of London. Retrieved June, 2011 from http://www.idpc.net/php-bin/documents/Beckley_Report_16_2_FINAL_EN.pdf

Giugliano, John. (2004). A sociohistorical perspective of sexual health: The clinician's role. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 11, 43-55.

Lo, Celia C. (2003). An application of social conflict theory to arrestees' use of cocaine and opiates. Journal of Drug Issues, 33, 237-266.

Mauer, Marc and King, Ryan S. (2007). A 25-year quagmire: The War on Drugs and its impact on American society. The Sentencing Project: Research and Advocacy for Reform. Retrieved June, 2011 at  http://www.sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/dp_25yearquagmire.pdf
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Crime Mapping in the Data

Words: 305 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43434634

Instead, the three features that should be used to identify other key cases are the car, the initial approach of the assailant asking for change or information, and the basic physical characteristics including white skin, brown hair, blue eyes, and weight around 160 lbs.

The other cases in this pattern are record numbers 9-14, 16, 19, and 22. Each of these cases involved a blue Taurus station wagon with Arizona plates, and each incident began with the assailant asking for change or information. All of these incidents also include a description of a white male weighing around 160 lbs. with brown hair, and all but #11 include a description of blue eyes. Record #12 makes note of the license plate, and several of the incidents clustered around the same dates include mention of a moustache. Other reports of clean shaving or a shadow (numbers 9 and…… [Read More]

In the data on sexual assaults from January through May of 2000, a clear series pattern emerges involving a single assailant driving a blue Ford Taurus station wagon with Arizona. The identical descriptions of the car for all of these incidents, including two matching identifications of the vehicles year, was the detail that drew my eye to the pattern initially, and the pattern's classification as a series is evident from the several months over which these assaults occurred.

The primary case is record #14; it has the most complete information regarding the assault and the assailant, including the license plate number of the car. Only one other record involving a blue Taurus included the license plate number, which was a match, confirming that these attacks were made by the same person. Facial hair descriptions varied slightly, but the ease with which this feature can be altered or even faked should in no way discount the single-assailant assumption. Instead, the three features that should be used to identify other key cases are the car, the initial approach of the assailant asking for change or information, and the basic physical characteristics including white skin, brown hair, blue eyes, and weight around 160 lbs.

The other cases in this pattern are record numbers 9-14, 16, 19, and 22. Each of these cases involved a blue Taurus station wagon with Arizona plates, and each incident began with the assailant asking for change or information. All of these incidents also include a description of a white male weighing around 160 lbs. with brown hair, and all but #11 include a description of blue eyes. Record #12 makes note of the license plate, and several of the incidents clustered around the same dates include mention of a moustache. Other reports of clean shaving or a shadow (numbers 9 and 10) occurred far enough off for facial hair to have changed.
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Crime Affiliates

Words: 1282 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33777753

Crime in Literature

Capitalizing on Elastic Computing

Aside from its potential to integrate and aggregate a host of resources and technologies, Cloud Computing can most prominently benefit the enterprise through the enabling of Elastic Computing.

Elastic Computing is the utilization of the Cloud's nearly limitless scalability to provision resources on demand and at scale without conventional architectural concerns associated with doing so on-premise such as:

Scaling Up and Down -- In physical environments, substantially adding or subtracting resources requires reconfiguring one's architecture to do so -- which is time consuming. Moreover, it is possible that after reconfiguring architecture to scale up, scaling back down again can require even more time than the former process, if doing so is even possible.

Storage -- Storage in on-premise environments is significantly more costly than Cloud-based storage, and was the principle reason that the philosophy of minimizing data within a physical warehouse was derived…… [Read More]

Resources -- The degree of specificity for changing and manipulating the various resources to power the database enables users to dedicate particular amounts to computing and storage, which allows them to issue queries while loading the database.

Automation -- Snowflake Elastic Data Warehouse can automate various aspects of data warehouse management (copying data, tuning performances, or spreading data across the system) and assist end users in these processes as they go, instead of involving database administrators or other IT personnel.

Vs. Hadoop

The initial explosion of Big Data largely involved Hadoop as a means of accessing semi-structured and unstructured data, and came to result in organizations attempting to utilize it as an integration hub for their proprietary, on premise data and those that were otherwise. When compared with Hadoop, Snowflake Elastic Data Warehouse is a native relational environment as opposed to the former. This fact accounts for an expedience and ease of integration, in addition to querying and optimization that requires less effort and resources than the latter does. These same factors limit Hadoop's efficacy with transactional data, although Hadoop is open source and is much more cost-effective than a traditional database. Still, it is not a data warehouse.

Final Thoughts
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Crime the Purpose of This

Words: 2753 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71668087

Many people using illicit and illegal drugs often have no impulse control and may turn violent or to another form of crime. Once an individual's mind is altered from the constant use of drugs, he or she will often steal, lie, and cheat to make the next dollar to obtain more drugs.

Many people could share family related drug stories that have led to criminal activities. About 10 years ago, several acquaintances under the influence of cocaine robbed a pharmacy and stole thousands of narcotics. The man and women then stole a car and cocaine from a dealer and drove across the country; several days later they were both apprehended and sent to jail for a long time. This example illustrates that one impulsive behavior after another can lead to a series of crimes committed. Freud's Psychoanalytical Theory offers a rationale to why individuals would use illegal drugs -- impulse…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of justice statistics- drug use and crime. (2009, October). Retrieved from http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=352

Crime. (2011, June). Retrieved from  http://www.thefreedictionary.com/crime 

Freud, S. (1961). The Complete Works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 19). London: Hogarth.

Lerner, L., Lerner, B.L., & Cengage, G. (2006). Criminology. World of forensic science, Retrieved from http://www.enotes.com/forensic-science/criminology
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Crime Arm New York to

Words: 690 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54089909



New York City has some of the toughest gun laws in the country. And it's essentially impossible for a normal, law-abiding citizen to acquire a concealed handgun permit. The result is that the majority of New Yorkers are defenseless against the criminals who wish to prey on them. As pointed out by the NY Times article, the SQF program does little to stop criminals, but does a great deal to strip away a New Yorker's fundamental right of self-defense. This is counterintuitive to public safety. While crime prevention is an important aspect of police work, the reality is the majority of the time law enforcement arrives after a crime has been committed.

The answer then is to arm New York. Arm the public. Restore their fundamental right of self-defense. There's an old saying, "An armed society is a polite society," and this rings true all across the country (except for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blannelberry, S.H. (2011). Ron Paul on Guns. Guns.com. Retrieved from http://www.guns.com/ron-paul-on-guns.html

McKnight, G.D. (1998). The Last Crusade: Martin Luther King, Jr., the FBI and the Poor People's Campaign. Boulder, CO: Westview Press

Rivera, R., Baker, a. & Roberts, J. (2010, July 6). A Few Blocks, 4 Years, 52,000

Police Stop. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/12/nyregion/12frisk.html?_r=1
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Crime Mapping the Map Portrays

Words: 662 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17452505

Most likely, it was secondary data -- that is, analysis -- that led to these houses' placement on the map.

There are several elements that could be useful to this map that are not included. For example, the division of the community into different areas (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) might provide some more clues to the rate/placement of the burglaries. Similarly, median incomes/home prices for each given area might be important elements. There is very little about the map that is not pertinent, however; though there appears to be little relation between the burglaries and the location of suspected drug houses, this is important to know and recognize, and leaving the drug houses off the map would eliminate this knowledge. Other information that could usefully be included in this map includes some basic details about the individual burglaries -- whether cars were broken into or left unlocked (especially important in…… [Read More]

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Crime Criminal Justice Administrator's Responsibilities

Words: 1401 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62427450

Managers and human resource administrators therefore have to be aware not only of the legal aspects related to diversity but also to the dynamic potential that is an intrinsic part of this diversity.

With Regard to the criminal justice system, diversity is an important part of protecting the rights of the employees, as well as adding to the depth of skills and talents in the system itself. A good example is the diversity training program developed by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Human Resources Division. This program allows for the protection of the rights of employees and subscribes to affirmative action legislation, while at the same time allowing for the application of the criminal law Federal Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Laws. These EEO laws include the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), 1967's Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the American Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the…… [Read More]

References

Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences: Code of Ethics. Retrieved from  http://www.acjs.org/pubs/167_671_2922.cfm 

Allen L. ( 2010) Rights of Employees in Public Criminal Justice Agencies. Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/list_7257805_rights-public-criminal-justice-agencies.html#ixzz1CJtL1yzw

Chaires R. And Lentz S. Criminal justice employee rights: An overview. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 18(2), pp. 259-288). Retrieved from https://springerlink3.metapress.com/content/r6332435227u2273/resource-secured/?target=fulltext.pdf&sid=yg4izprlpy1eoz45mlixk355&sh=www.springerlink.com

NEW LEGISLATION GIVES CRIMINAL JUSTICE EMPLOYEES GREATER 'PEACE
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Crime Delinquency Teenagers Adolescent Terror Virtually No

Words: 3128 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14952653

Crime Delinquency Teenagers

Adolescent Terror

Virtually no one can deny that there is a definite, tangible link between adolescence and crime. Anyone not familiar with this subject would be hard pressed to dispute the eminent statistical data that alludes to that dangerous link. In 1990, teenagers were more than 3.5 times likely to commit an indexed crime than were adults in the United States. Index crimes are both violent criminal activity such as "murder & non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault" as well as serious property crime such as "burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson" (No author 1990). This point is underscored by the fact that in 2005, approximately 10,000 prisoners in the United States were serving life sentences for actions that were committed before they turned 18 (Liptak 2005). This proclivity of teenage criminal offenders is evinced overseas in other countries as well, such as in…… [Read More]

References

Krueger, J.G. (2006). "Brain science offers insight to teen crime." ABQTrib. Retrieved from http://www.abqtrib.com/news/2006/dec/08/brain-science-offers-insight-teen-crime/

Liptak, A. (2005). "Jailed for Life After Crimes as Teenagers." New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/03/national/03lifers.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

No author. (1990). "Teenagers have the highest crime rates." Race Matters. Retrieved from  http://www.racematters.org/hicrimer.htm 

Reynolds, J. (2007). "Crime and the teenage brain." The Monterey County Herald. Retrieved from http://www.montereyherald.com/ci_7109878
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Crime Has Been Taking Place Although the

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63695941

crime has been taking place. Although the forms of crime have evolved, so too has the strategies used to prevent crime. This essay will compare and contrast three of most common Crime Prevention strategies, which are, environmental design, social intervention and situational intervention. Crime prevention generally refers to preventing crime and anti-social behavior before it occurs. Crime Prevention Victoria, defines crime prevention as "any public or privately based initiative or policy aimed at reducing or eliminating criminal behavior, violence and fear of crime or violence in the community" (Armstrong, 2002). This essay aims to demonstrate not only the strengths and weaknesses of these three strategies but also to identify the individual crime causation theory that each strategy is based around. These being

One of the main crime prevention strategies used around the world is environmental design. This strategy is based on the relationship that is created between people and the…… [Read More]

One of the extreme levels of environmental design strategies being used today is through gated communities. Gated communities are small groups of residents who are enclosed and separated from the rest of society. A good example of gated communities can be seen in South Africa, which is known for its extremely high crime rates, it also has the highest amount of gated communities (Landman,2008). Gated communities in South Africa incorporate all physical elements by either high walls, gates, electric gates, alarm systems, boom gates, check ins and even access cards (Landman,2008). Gated communities are created with the basic principles of the environmental design strategy (Landman,2008). These communities are defensible spaces, target hardened and have advanced access control. Throughout the U.S., two and a half million citizens live in gated communities (Blakely & Snyder 1998).

Environmental design theory also has a strong connection to routine activity theory. Routine activity theory states that for a crime to be committed, three things need to be present, an offender, a target and no one watching the target (Chainey,2005). Environmental theory aims at removing two of these mentioned items, by closing off areas to the public possible offenders are removed and by using such things as natural vision or CCTV there is always the possibility of someone watching. According to routine activity theory without any one of these items the crime can not take place (Chainey,2005).

However people argue that changes made to the built environment to reduce crime often simply cause offenders to move their criminal behaviors to other locations. For this reason design theory can be seen to do little against causes of crime (CSRI,2003). By increasing protection, people argue that they are just funneling criminals to more unprotected areas or forcing criminals to commit more dangerous crimes (CSIR,2003). Environmental design can therefore not always be totally preventive and needs to be constantly reviewed and adapted to fight against the ever learning criminal mind. It is also important for crime preventions strategies to be adapted to specific areas as what works in one situation might not be appropriate in another. Numerous factors influence crime and all of these will affect the way in which it needs to be
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Crime When a Person Commits

Words: 1799 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52521823

But as the morality associated with a society changes as that society changes, it may be that someday people will no longer maintain a difference between attempted murder and actual murder, without it leading to some dystopian future where everyone is hounded by the legal system.… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boutellier, Hans, Crime and Morality: The Significance of Criminal Justice in Post-Modern Culture, Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, 2000, p. 4.

Gardner, John, "Law and Morality," retrieved 5 April 2012, http://users.ox.ac.uk/~lawf0081/pdfs/lawmoralityedited.pdf

"Rowe v. Wade," Legal Information Institute, retrieved 5 April 2012, http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0410_0113_ZS.html

Singer, Richard. John Q. La Fond, Criminal Law: Examples and Explanations, Aspen, New York, 2010, p. 56.
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Crime Causation I Uploaded Material Text Choose

Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36667190

Crime Causation

I uploaded material text choose theory unit 3, unit 4. Reference: Seigel L.J. (2011). Criminology: The core (4th ed.). Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning. Examine major theories crime causation. Use materials text / resources support crime occurs theories.

Sociologists and psychologists alike have over the years attempted to create theories that explain why people commit crime in the U.S. As well as the rest of the world. There have been several questions that have lingered in the minds of the scholars one of which has been on what the major theories reveal about the patterns of crime and how they contribute to tactics of combating crime. Crime is extremely complex and trying to explain it in a single theory is next to impossible. This is because crime ranges from the savage violent acts and the white collar crimes that are highly sophisticated. On the other hand, crime can be…… [Read More]

Britt, C.L., & Gottfredson, M.R. (2003). Control Theories of Crime and Delinquency. Piscataway, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers.

Goodwin, C.J. (2005). A History of Modern Psychology 2nd Edition. Hoboken, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Siegel, L.J. (2012). Criminology: Theories, Patterns, and Typologies. Florence, KY: Cengage Learning.
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Crime for Many Years Sociologists Criminologists and

Words: 1637 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39857678

Crime

For many years, sociologists, criminologists, and other scientists have been examining crime and what deviant behavior to help understand and gain control on society and prevent potential victims and fairly treat offenders who do commit crimes. However, many experts like Emile Durkheim feel there is a lot to be considered besides what is deemed as wrong. Durkheim, a French sociology expert from the late 1800s, who felt that deviance was a typical part of a society in order for it to function normally because it sets the moral margins of a society that lets people know what is and what is not tolerated (Henry, Lanier 1-80). Theories and conflicts of crimes and the assumptions and contrasting arguments of what influences and provokes deviance within a given culture have caused people to develop different views and beliefs.

People, like Stuart Henry and Mark Lanier, who examine crime and the subsets…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Walsh. "Introduction and Overview of Crime and Criminology." Sagepub.

(2008): 1-19. Web. 7 May 2011
/23879Page119.pdf>.

"Criminological Theory: Past to Present." Essential readings (2002): n.
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Crime Discuss Reasons Crime Increased Todays Society

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83252970

crime discuss reasons crime increased todays society. (Submit a 500

Crime is a transgression of the law on the part of a person or an organization. In order for a crime to be committed, there has to be some formal law enacted which prohibits an action or an occurrence. Furthermore, that law has to then be transgressed for a crime to take place. One of the main areas of crime is violent crime. Violent crime occurs when individuals act aggressively or hostilely towards one another, and choose to inflict corporal pain and punishment. This sort of crime can take place virtually anywhere. In the United States, for example, violent crime occurs fairly regularly in urban environments. Common types of violent crime include shootings, stabbings, and physical violence in the form of fighting.

Violent crime is actually stratified into blue collar crime, which is crime committed by working class people. Working…… [Read More]

References

Valdmanis, T. (2008). "Senate report blasts SEC's Enron oversight." USA Today. Retrieved from  http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/banking/2002-10-06-sec_x.htm
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Crime Actus Reus May Be the Most

Words: 1352 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67934394

Crime

Actus Reus may be the most essential element involved in deciding what exactly makes up a crime. Most commonly defined as a voluntary act or an omission of an act, actus reus is one of the most objective elements in determining whether a crime has been committed since its result ( typically some form of injury to another or a group of people) is what largely comprises criminal activity. To fully understand the scope of actus reus, deliberate attention must be given to what exactly constitutes an act, or a criminal omission of an act.

In order for an actus reus to be linked to a crime it must be voluntary, meaning the accused must be aware of what is being done. An act can be any type of voluntary human behavior, and generally takes the form of some sort of physical movement which a person is conscious of.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Emanuel, S. (1997). Criminal Law [Google Books version]. Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?id=PTH_8p6kriIC&pg=RA1-PA55&lpg=RA1-PA55&dq=harmful+result+causation&source=bl&ots=ZFDKqB0Ooj&sig=Wa3lyg1tncsD86Df08kLpctHhns&hl=en#v=onepage&q=harmful%20result%20causation&f=false

2. Elements of a Crime. (n.d.). In Sask Schools (4th ed.). Retrieved from http://www.saskschools.ca/curr_content/law30/criminal/lesson6/6a.html
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Crime Workplace Is Not Safe From Numerous

Words: 3278 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2555299

Crime

Workplace is not safe from numerous types of crimes. These crimes can range anywhere from burglary to homicides and from discrimination on the basis of sex to even rape for that matter. But these crimes are physical crimes and it is easy to avoid them or keep them at bay by making use of physical barriers, security cameras and a few sensible risk/security management tactics. For instance, if only 3 or 4 people work at night-time, it is easy to target anyone of them but if a considerable amount of people work together and have no hostility towards each other, these types of situations can be avoided. Use of security systems is a pre-requisite for the protection of material wealth and belongings. These types of systems can help avoid theft and burglary but if somehow these do occur, it will inform the managers of the incident at the earliest…… [Read More]

Reference List

McCollonel '(2000). Cybercrime And Punishment. Page 8-9. www.mcconnellinternational.com.

Balkin J. M (2007)Cybercrime: digital cops in a networked environment. NYU PRESS. New York. USA.

Perline I.H. & Goldschmidt J. (2004). The psychology and law of workplace violence:a handbook for mental health professionals and employers. Charles C. Thomas Publisher. USA

Keats J. (2010) Virtual Words: Language on the Edge of Science and Technology. Oxford University Press. USA.
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Crime 21st Century White Collar If True

Words: 579 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29446192

crime 21st century white collar. If true, major type cybercrime? How safeguard ? 2.MIT, prestigious universities world, began sharing online content free class ten years ago (2000).

White collar crimes focus on the concept of deception as a primary tool to harm the social order. Even though it does not involve violence, it typically concentrates on identity theft, online fraud, and bank account theft. In order for people to be able to counterattack such crimes, it is essential for the authorities to provide extensive education meant to assist people to differentiate between actions that are likely to turn them into a victim of cybercrimes and actions that are not.

Cyber ethics is not a common concept among cybercriminals and this means that the masses need to be able to protect themselves by adopting attitudes that decrease the chances of them falling victim to online scams. People need to understand that…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Burns, Jan, "Build Your Online Community: Blogging, Message Boards, Newsgroups, and More," (Enslow Publishers, Inc., 01.02.2011)

Edmunson, Mark, "The Trouble With Online Education," Retrieved March 17, 2013, from the NY Times Website: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/opinion/the-trouble-with-online-education.html?_r=0

"White Collar Crime in 2011: The Martin Act, Cybercrime, and Beyond," Retrieved March 17, 2013, from the New York County District Attorney's Office Website:  http://manhattanda.org/white-collar-crime-2011-martin-act-cybercrime-and-beyond
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Crime the Importance and Significance

Words: 1606 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3336847

The view, for example, of criminal behavior from a labeling perspective tends to focus on the social and cultural background from which the criminal emerges; and Rational Choice theory stresses individual decision-making and culpability in crime. However, both theories are important in that they provide a basis from which to understand, intercept and prosecute criminal behavior.

3. Conclusion

In conclusion, the importance of crime analysis lies in the fact that information and intelligence about crime enables the law enforcement authorities to conduct a comprehensive crime combating program and develop suitable policies for crime prevention. Understanding the social and culture milieu or context from which crime develops can for instance be an essential tool in dealing with various types of crimes.

These theories and analyses also benefit from computer and Internet technology, where tendencies in crime can be more easily discerned by the patterns that remerge from the collation of data…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bruce C.W. Crime Analysis. 16 October 2007. http://64.233.169.104/search?q=cache:Rv5FYusFZ4gJ:www.iaca.net/ExploringCA/exploringca_chapter1.pdf+importance+of+analysis+of+crime&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=2&gl=ukFundamentalsof

Keel, R. (2004) Rational Choice and Deterrence Theory.

Retrieved October 17, 2007. from the University of Missouri. Web site. http://www.umsl.edu/~rkeel/200/ratchoc.html

Overview of Labelling Theories. October 16, 2007. http://www.hewett.norfolk.sch.uk/curric/soc/crime/labeling.htm
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Crime Victims Have Begun to

Words: 1728 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62273380

Secondly, the victim, being more involved with the crime and understanding of the situation as well as more intimate with it than the legislators is better able to articulate his opinion than they. Thirdly, it is only logical that the victim be involved and heard. After all he was the one who was hurt. And finally, victim advocates work towards the objective that victim's rights be granted constitutional protection so that average citizens will be aware that not only do offenders have rights but that victims have rights too and that these are equally as strong. For all these reasons, groups such as the Victims Constitutional Amendment Network is seeking to grant victims rights constitutional protection in order to increase the strength, enforceability, and permanence of victims' rights

Source

Acorn, a. (2004). Compulsory compassion: a critique of restorative justice Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press

Braithwaite, J. (1989) Crime, shame,…… [Read More]

Dignan, J. (2002) Restorative Justice and the Law: The case for an integrated, systematic approach, Stanford Law Review, 52, 168-190

Dignan, James (2003), Towards a Systemic Model of Restorative Justice, Stanford Law Review, 135-156,

The National Center for Victims of Crime. Rights of victims of crime http://www.ncvc.org/ncvc/main.aspx?dbName=DocumentViewer&DocumentID=32463