Critical Care Essays (Examples)

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Critical Thinking Professional Nursing Issue

Words: 3335 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87157399

The decade-old system that specifies least standards for staffing in nursing homes need to be restructured, the report says. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services must call for nursing homes to have at least one N within the facility during all times. Based on the departments' 2001 report to Congress on minimum staff-to-patient ratios for nursing homes, the HHS should mention the staffing levels that increased with the number of patients. Central and state report cards on nursing homes should give information on levels of nursing staff, and measuring of staffing levels should be developed for hospital report cards. The healthcare facilities should avoid using nurses from temporary agencies to fill the vacancy. (Substantial Changes equired in Nurses Work Environment to Protect Patients from Health Care Errors)

Working for long hours on the part of the nurse's makes them fatigue since it decreases their energy and reduces their…… [Read More]

References

ANA Commends IOM Report Outlining Critical Role of Nursing Work Environment in Patient Safety" (November 5, 2003) Retrieved at http://www.nursingworld.org/pressrel/2003/pr1105.htm. Accessed on 11 February 2005

Hallmarks of the Professional Nursing Practice Environment" (January, 2002) AACN White Paper. Retrieved at http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Publications/positions/hallmarks.htm. Accessed on 11 February 2005

Statement of the American Nurses Association for the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Work Environment for Nurses and Patient Safety" (September 24, 2002) Retrieved at http://www.nursingworld.org/pressrel/2002/iom924.htm. Accessed on 11 February 2005

Substantial Changes Required in Nurses Work Environment
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Care Needs Concerns and Treatment

Words: 4512 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58816657



Furthermore, one of the pillars of collaborative care that will need to be firmly established is the fostering of clear dialogue and a means for strong communication within the care management planning. For instance, there needs to be a clear decision and communication of all tests ordered and when the test results will be available. One of the most important aspects of this collaborative care will be the nursing interventions which can have significant impact on the patient's health and stabilization (Allen, 2010). In fact, strategic nursing care can even minimize readmission rates of Margaret and other patients with comparable conditions (Chen et al., 2012).

Prioritize the Nursing Care Needs of Margaret

The prioritization of nursing interventions is essential, and the way in which a nurse determines this priority is going to be something unique and distinct. "Trials reviewed demonstrated a beneficial impact of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in…… [Read More]

References

Adler, H.M. (n.d.). Toward a biopsychosocial understanding of the patient -- physician relationship: An emerging dialogue. (2007). J Gen Intern Med,22(2), 280 -- 285.

Afilala, J. (n.d.). Frailty in patients with cardiovascular disease: Why, when, and how to measure. (2011). Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep, 5(5), 467 -- 472.

Allen, J.K. (2010). Randomized trials of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure: Systematic review.

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing,25(3), 207-220.
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Care Issler Is a Patient Who Recently

Words: 1314 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36359617

Care:

Issler is a patient who recently moved with his daughter-in-law who is no longer married to his son. As part of her interest in helping to take care of Mr. Issler, she noticed that he was pale and diaphoretic after a two and a half hour flight. The daughter-in-law took him to an emergency room where he was attended to by a cardiologist and set a follow-up check up for an echo cardiogram next week. Mr. Issler has complained of congestive heart failure and a history of deep vein thrombosis. The cardiologist recommended that he seeks out a primary care provider and check up of his thyroid. As the primary care provider, the patient has also expressed his uncertainties on whether he has hyper of hypo thyroidism though he has been under thyroid medication for several years. In addition to being very pale, he has a large bag of…… [Read More]

References:

Bray, D.L. (n.d.). Thyroid Storm and the AACN Synergy Model. Journal of Nursing. Retrieved from  http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/thryoid-storm-and-the-aacn-synergy-model 

Drewes at. al. (2012, October). The Effectiveness of Chronic Care Management for Heart Failure: Meta-Regression Analyses to Explain the Heterogeneity in Outcomes. Health Services Research, 47(5), 1926-1959.

Hardin, S. & Hussey, L. (2003, February). AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care Case Study of a CHF Patient. Critical Care Nurse, 23(1), 73-76. Retrieved from  http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/content/23/1/73.full.pdf 

Kaplow, R. & Reed, K.D. (2008). The AACN Synergy Model for Patient Care: A Nursing
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Care Information Systems and Medical Records

Words: 1454 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50831582

Evolution of Health Care Information Systems Physician's Office Operation

Filling in the hole of health care information technology will endorse safe, capable, patient-centered, and patient care that is fruitful in a timely way. In this essay, the theme is to look into two modern health

care organizations and then compare and contrast many characteristics that will involve the kind of evidence systems are using at the moment, investigate the transmission of information 20 years ago and how the substitute of data today. Furthermore, this essay will cover two major events and technology developments that have inclined present Health Care Informational Services practices.

Compare and Contrast Doctor's Workplace Operation

These day's doctor's office operation is familiarizing to the health care reform that was sanctioned in 2010 by the Obama organization. During sometime in October of 2013, the exchanges in health insurance was available on the market for customers on order to…… [Read More]

References

Burke, D., Wang, B., & Wan T.T.H. & Diana, M. (2009). Exploring Hospitals' Adoptionof IT. Journal of Medical Systems, 21(9), 349 -- 355.

Callen, J., & Braithwaite, J. & . (2008). Cultures in Hospitals and TheirInfluence on Attitudes to, and Satisfaction with, the Use of Clinical InformationSystems. Social Science and Medicine, 65(4), 635-639.

Finchman, R., & Kohli, R. & . (2011). Editorial Overview -- The role of IS inHealthcare. Information Systems Research, 22(3), 419-428.
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Caring for Body and Soul Critiquing Research

Words: 1545 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92450923

Caring for ody and Soul

Critiquing Research Report

Modern nursing practice has focused more and more on treating the whole person, through four domains (Chan, 2009). These are physical, mental, social, and spiritual. Of the four, the spiritual domain is the most neglected. A retrospective study recently found that nurses with religious beliefs are more likely to extend spiritual care. The greater their spiritual perceptions, the more frequently they include a spiritual dimension to their care of patients (Chan). However, not many nurses are able to extend care in this domain.

Jean Watson's Theory of caring is applied as theoretical framework. Her concept sees caring as a process of transpersonal caring. It is something exceeding the self and recognizing the relationship as "mutual and reciprocal (Goliath, 2008)." It is in this environment that the nurse connects with the patient under his specific circumstances. Watson uses 10 carative factors in applying…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chan, MF. (2009). Factors affecting nursing staff in practicing spiritual care. Vol 19

Journal of Clinical Nursing: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Deal, B. (2010). A pilot study of nurses' experience of giving spiritual care. Vol 15 # 4

The Qualitative Report: Nova Southeastern University. Retrieved on May 18, 2011
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Critical Thinking in a Changing

Words: 2365 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35606500

The question then becomes do these nurses become worried about the long hours that they may have to work and the quality of care that the patients are getting, or do they sit back and remind the world that they knew this was going to happen, because pay has traditionally been low for nurses and this is why more people are choosing other fields of study when looking for career (Taft, 2001).

Perhaps many nurses will not choose either of these options. Many may choose to continue doing the job that they've been doing for years, for the pay that they have come to expect. Those that choose this option will likely be more concerned with care of the patient then they will with the money that they receive from their job, or how many hours they have to put in for that paycheck. Their primary concern will always remain…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beu, Burke. 2002. Nursing Issues. The Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses. Retrieved at http://www.aorn.org/journal/2002/novhpi.htm

Cheskin Life Sciences Perspectives: The emerging healthcare consumer. 2001. Cheskin. http://www.cheskin.com/life.

Grace, Helen, & Gloria Smith. Women in Health Leadership Roles: The Challenges of Change. 2002. Center for Research on Women and Gender, the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Green, David. French health service is best. 2001. Guardian Unlimited. http://www.societyguardian.co.uk/health/comment/0,7894,440883,00.html.
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Critical Thinking Case Study Let it Pour

Words: 2530 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63280289

Critical Thinking Case Study: Let it Pour - My First Assignment as Executive Assistant

Key Problems and Issues

The first of the problems are coming from the origin of the hospital as it is an organization with a lot of spiritual heritage and values. These have to be retained even while providing all the required services and satisfaction for the patients. The second problem that the hospital is facing is due to the difficulties that exist in the operations of any hospital, and those difficulties exist irrespective of the mission or the origin of the hospital. One of the problems from this origin is the headlines and extensive coverage given by the media to medical errors that hospitals are committing. These are mentioned and reflect on all hospitals whether they are a party to such errors or not. Another problem arises from the differences within the issues of living up…… [Read More]

References

Baldwin, Fred. "Emergency Room Drama: Be Prepared Before a Crisis Happens" Retrieved

from http://www.icepts.com/pennmed/25-147.htm Accessed on 23 June, 2005

Colliver, Victoria. (12 April, 2005) "St. Luke's could face merger California Pacific may join forces with S.F. hospital known for treating poor" San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved from http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2005/04/12/BUG63C6H4T1.DTL& type=business Accessed on 23 June, 2005

Evans BJ; Kiellerup FD; Stanley RO; Burrows GD; Sweet B. "A communication skills program for increasing patient's satisfaction with general practice consultations" Br Journal of Medical Psychology. 1987; December: 60 (Pt 4):373-378. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve& db=PubMed& list_uids=3426975& dopt=Abstract Accessed on 23 June, 2005
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Critical Thinking Case Study Faith Community Hospital

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30440461

Critical Thinking Case Study

Faith Community Hospital is a not-for-profit health care services organization that is currently facing a situation, which may compel it to resort to stringent cost cutting measures just to break even, and that too providing the average reimbursement rate does not change. Financial problems, however, are just one of the several problems that Faith Community Hospital must resolve in order for the organization to maintain and further build its reputation as a quality health care services provider. In brief, some of the other critical issues that the hospital needs to address are the conflict between the organization's spiritual heritage and values and the ethics of the medical profession; non-compliance with government, managed care, and insurance regulations; and non-adherence to hospital operational policies. Indeed, it is evident from the preceding list of issues that Faith Community Hospital has an organizational management problem on its hands, which needs…… [Read More]

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Critical Thinking Case Study Let

Words: 2515 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22355846

(Donoghue, 1990)

The other problem is regarding third party reimbursements and state regulators which have had a significant effect on hospitals during the last ten years. Another factor that is brought out by the study is that during both 1983 and 1986 there were important variations in the inpatient reimbursement system that helped in improving the operating and final margins of hospitals. At the same time there are the health insurance companies who provide a large portion of the funds to hospitals are continually on the look out for reducing payment amounts. There are methods through which this is done and one of that is changing from inpatient settings to ambulatory surgery. Another set of problems come from settlements with labor unions. As an example a major portion of the health care providers were affected due to the settlement with Local 1199. This settlement also created similar effects in other…… [Read More]

References

Brennan, Phil. (April 12, 2002) "Church Crises Threaten Charities, Schools, Hospitals"

Retrieved from http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2002/4/11/212641.shtml Accessed on 27 June, 2005

"Challenge of being chief of the hospitals" Retrieved from http://www.thisisworcester.co.uk/worcestershire/worcester/news/WEN_NEWS_FEATURES_COUNTY9.html Accessed on 27 June, 2005

Donoghue, Richard J. (December, 1990) "Evaluation of hospitals as entities able to continue as going concerns" The CPA Journal. Retrieved from http://www.nysscpa.org/cpajournal/old/09691991.htm Accessed on 27 June, 2005
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Critical Nursing I Recently Witnessed

Words: 811 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9560084

I also assumed that the nurse I was observing would likely support the doctor and try to talk the patient into changing her mind. My assumptions were incorrect. Later I took the time to reflect upon my reaction to the situation.

After thinking through the entire situation, it is my belief that she did make the right choice, she no longer wished to live a life tied to a machine, wheeled about in a chair and unable to enjoy even the smallest of pleasures. As a nurse, my approach would be to comfort the patient, understanding and giving support to the family and friends who are attempting to support the patient. The patient is experiencing enough trauma, and should be fully supported in making whatever decision is best for that particular individual.

Other nurses might disagree. One study determined that even though 80% of newly graduated nurses have developed a…… [Read More]

References

Drennan, J.; (2010) Critical thinking as an outcome of a Master's degree in nursing programme, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 66, Issue 2, pp. 422 -- 431

Wangensteen, S.; Johannson, I.S.; Bjorkstrom, M.E.; Nordstrom, G.; (2010) Critical thinking dispositions among newly graduated nurses, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 66, Issue 10, pp. 2170-2181
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Critical Thinking Skills Determining How

Words: 515 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88275460

For many, the focus is on creating a workable treatment plan based on solid diagnosis. Earning trust through consistency of communication, deciding when and if the level of detail about their diagnosis needs to be shared, and focusing on the patient through customer skills all when combined lead to a cured patient. Client or patient skills are an area that is the most rapid in learning from a critical thinking standpoint. To be effective as a Respiratory Therapist the client or patient skill set must improve with every interaction, because each patient is really a new learning experience as well in this area.

Technical skills require a continual state of learning and passion for improving through knwoedlge. Critical thinking from the previous years of my career to today have also taught me this can never be done in isolation. Technology only matters when patients know you care. The use of…… [Read More]

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Critical Thinking in Nursing Critical

Words: 371 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13213517



elf-regulation and analysis are interpersonal skills used by the nurse to convey potentially upsetting news, or to analyze the nurse's own behavior and professionalism in his or her nursing duties.

Critical thinking in nursing is further delineated by the UNM College of Nursing (2005). As seen above, this aspect of the profession is not only essential in terms of the patient-nurse relationship, but also in terms of the intrapersonal relationship of the nurse with him- or herself. The self-regulation and morality developed by means of critical thinking in the profession helps the nurse to make the often difficult decisions required on a daily basis. It also provides the nurse with the ability to serve as a liberating force for patients and their families, as the nurse helps them to face medical dilemmas.

ources

Facione, Peter A. (2004). "Critical thinking: What it is and why it counts." California Academic Press. http://www.insightassessment.com/pdf_files/what&why2004.pdf…… [Read More]

Sources

Facione, Peter A. (2004). "Critical thinking: What it is and why it counts." California Academic Press. http://www.insightassessment.com/pdf_files/what&why2004.pdf

UNM College of Nursing. (2005, Sept. 16-17). "What is critical thinking? http://hsc.unm.edu/consg/conct/whatis.shtml
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Critical Thinking & Generational Teams Critical Thinking

Words: 564 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3476349

Critical Thinking & Generational Teams

Critical Thinking

In the course of caring for patients, nurses deal with life threatening situations every day. This constitutes the necessity to develop critical thinking skills in order to know what to do, when to do it, and how it needs to be done to ensure safety and sensibility in patient care. Critical thinking skills develop over time with experience, developing deeper knowledge, and developing higher levels of judgment in the course of care (Alfaro-LeFevre, Apr 2000).

Critical thinking skills involve checking accuracy and reliability of information, recognizing inconsistencies, and identifying patterns of missing information. In the course of busy times, natural tendencies cause people to react without thinking. These patterns are dangerous in patient care. It is important to realize that critical thinking takes time to develop and implement. It requires knowledge, skills, practice, caution, and judgment and is best away from the patient…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alfaro-LeFevre, R. (Apr 2000). Critical thinking: Usually not rapid fire. AACN News, 2(12).

Halfer, D.S.-L. (2013). Bridging the generational gaps. Retrieved from Nurse.com: http://ce.nurse.com/RetailCourseView.aspx?CourseNum=ce478&page=1&IsA=1
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Critical Thinking Forces of Influence

Words: 1798 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59682929

Critical Thinking Styles and Forces of Influence

Any choice or decision that a manager makes influences the organization's performance. It is one of an employee's job responsibilities to make decisions that are in favor of the organization. If the decision taken serves any personal interest of one person or a few people then it is bound to prove harmful for the organization. Therefore such decisions can bring devastating results for the entire company. However it cannot be ignored that any decision made by an employee is influenced by a number of factors since decisions are not made in a vacuum. These factors include the different thinking patterns that are employed by a person in making a choice and the various forces of influences that act upon him and determine the choice he is going to make.

Critical Thinking Patterns

One of the most important factor that determines the choice or…… [Read More]

References

McAulay, Laurie, Russell, Graeme and Sims, Julian. How Do Financial Directors Make Decisions? Management Accounting (British), (1997): Vol. 75.

McCall, Morgan, Jr. And Robert E. Kaplan. Whatever it Takes. The Realities of Decision Making. Prentice Hall 1990.

Waldersee, Robert and Sheather, Simon. The Effects Of Strategy Type On Strategy Implementation Actions. Human Relations, (1996): Vol. 49, No. 1.
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Noise-Abatement Strategies for Tertiary Healthcare Facilities

Words: 4568 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14964406

educing Length of Stays on Critical Care Wards in a Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Today, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) operates the nation's largest healthcare system and provides training for more than half of all of the physicians that practice in the United States today. Based on its mission, taken from President Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, to "care for him who has borne the battle, his widow and his orphans," the VA Medical Center in Oklahoma City is committed to providing the best quality medical care possible for its veteran patients. One issue that has emerged in recent months that has been shown to adversely affect the quality of this patient care is sleep disruption on critical care wards due to the high levels of noise that are generated in these healthcare environments. In fact, the noise levels on many critical care wards as the same as…… [Read More]

References

Bijwadia, J.S. & Ejaz, M.S. (2009). Sleep and critical care. Current Opinion in Critical Care,

15, 25 -- 29.

Brindley, M. (2009, December 29). Silent bins bring peace to patients; changes made to help intensive care. South Wales Echo, 9.

Freedman, N.S., Kotzer, N., & Schwab, R.J. (1999). Patient perception of sleep quality and etiology of sleep disruption in the intensive care unit. American Journal of Respiratory
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Healthcare Policies Hospitals Should Not

Words: 2007 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78180326

In fact Congress should pass a bill that gives that prescription drug benefit to Medicare patients.

QUESTION NINE: In the United States, healthcare is so expensive that over 45 million people are without health insurance. It is a broken system, leaving out many people, especially children. Recently the executive branch vetoed a bill that would have provided health insurance to millions of middle and low-income children, indicating a lack of government concern for the well being of the population. Bush said it was too expensive, yet it's not too expensive to continue spending billions on an unpopular war in Iraq. Meanwhile, for the past 45 years, Canada has had a "government-funded, national healthcare system..." based on these five principles, according to www.medhunters.com.One, it is universally available to permanent residents; two, it is comprehensive; three, it is available regardless of income; four, it is "portable within and outside" Canada; and five,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2007). Fact Sheet: Nursing Shortages.

Retrieved Feb. 7, 2008, at http://www.aacn.nche.edu/media/factsheets/nursingshortage.htm.

Duke, Elizabeth. (2004). Report to Congress. The Critical Care Workforce: A Study of the Supply and Demand for Critical Care Physicians. U.S. Department of Health & Human

Services / Health Resources & Services Administration. Retrieved Feb. 6, 2008, at http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/criticalcare/cc1.htm.
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To What Extent Can Nurses Deliver Evidence-Based Care

Words: 6819 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32324751

nurses deliver evidence-Based care?

Define main ideas within the title supported from the literature

Nurse instructors confront many hurdles in the present healthcare environment. Educational methods, philosophies, and the content of curricula is required to reviewed to cater to the requirements of the professional nurses who would practice in the coming millennium. (Kessenich; Guyatt; DiCenso, 25) Evidence-based practice or EBP has currently emerged to be a remarkable attribute in nursing literature along with a key impetus in restructuring nursing practice. (Elizabeth; Pyle, 64) Evidence-Based Nursing or EBN is the strategy by which the nurses formulate clinical conclusions applying the best available research evidence, their clinical skill and patient prioritization. (Evidence-Based Nursing: University of Minnesota) It could be narrated as the meticulous, unequivocal and judicious application of the current best evidences in formulating decisions about the care of individual patients. When clinicians formulate health care conclusions for a population or group…… [Read More]

References

Asking Clinical Questions: Introduction. Retrieved from http://www.poems.msu.edu/InfoMastery/Questions/Questions.htm Accessed on 18 June, 2005

Beyers, Marjorie. About Evidence-Based Nursing Practice. Nursing Management. October, 1999. Vol: 11; No: 1; pp: 103-105

Code of professional Conduct. Retrieved from http://www.nmc-uk.org/nmc/main/publications/reqForPre-regNursing.pdf Accessed on 17 June, 2005

Cronenwett, L. Research, Practice and Policy: Issues in Evidence-Based Care. Journal of Issues in Nursing. February 19, 2002. Vol: 7; No.2; pp: 57-61
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Evidence-Based Approach to Health Care

Words: 2753 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7359744

.. If one of the goals of the healthcare system is to promote health and prevent illness and injury, it may be logical to start with those who work in the system." (Yassi, Ostry, Spiegel, and Walsh, 2002, p.1)

Presently the healthcare environment is characterized by nurse shortages of 25% of the entire nursing force. It is held that the working conditions along with job stress negatively impact the nursing force and its turnover rate. Injuries are also reported by nursing staff. It is likely that the nursing shortage is the number one challenge in today's healthcare provision. The negative work environment negatively impacts the nursing professional and their decision to either leave or to potentially fail altogether to enter the profession.

Naturally when there is a shortage of any type of professional worker some area suffers their absence and when this concept is applied in the field of healthcare…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Institute of Medicine. Performance Measurement: Accelerating Improvement. Washington DC: National Academy Press; 2006.

Institute of Medicine. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. Washington DC: National Academy Press; 2001.

Lewis Patricia S. And Latney, Cynthia (2003) Achieve Best Practice With an Evidence-Based Approach. Critical Care Nurse. Vol. 23. No. 6 December 2003. Online available at: http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/cgi/reprint/23/6/67.pdf

Rundall, K. (2002) Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare: Lessons from Clinical Practice. Academy for Health Services Research and Health Policy. Meeting. Abstr Acad Health Serv Res Health Policy Meet. 2002; 19: 20. Manchester Centre for Healthcare Management, Manchester Business School University of Manchester, Devonshire House, University Precinct Centre, Oxford Road,, Manchester,
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Life Care in the United

Words: 1208 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20114513

However...generally a vast difference exists between what healthcare providers understand and what laypersons are able to comprehend. This immeasurability of knowledge was evident in the participants' narratives and was exacerbated by the conveying of "false hope" or "false optimism" to patients and patients' family members.

Seconding Robichaux's argument is ackstrand's (2006) findings that hospital-based EOL programs are not the "ideal" form of healthcare that elderly patients should receive, according to a survey of nurses. For the nurses, "no patient should face death alone," which ultimately happens when patients are confined in a hospital facility receiving palliative care. Comparing ICU EOL care against the hospice and nursing home care programs, 'dying with dignity' is remote in this kind of program, since "[t]he ICU is no place to die. It would be nice to have a comfortable, quiet, spacious room for those who are dying. Let everyone in and let the rest…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, R. (2003). "Nursing home quality, chain affiliation, profit status, and performance." Journal of Real Estate Research, Vol. 25, Issue 1.

Backstrand, R. (2006). "Providing a "good death": critical care nurses' suggestions for improving end-of-life care." American Journal of Critical Care, Vol. 15, Issue 1.

Elliot, D. (2006). "Determining the financial impact of hospice." Healthcare Financial Management, Vol. 60, Issue 7.

Imhof, S. (2005). "What do we owe the dying? Strategies to strengthen end-of-life care." Journal of Healthcare Management, Vol. 50, Issue 3.
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Legacy Emanuel A Healthcare Organization Audit Summary

Words: 1793 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4977496

Legay Emanuel:

A healthare organization audit summary

Legay Emanuel Medial Center, at 2801 North Gantenbein Avenue, Portland, Oregon is

is an IRS 501 ( ) 3 not-for-profit, tax-exempt orporation omprised of five full-servie hospitals and a hildren's hospital. The Center's award-winning failities offer an integrated network of health are servies: aute and ritial are, inpatient and outpatient treatment, ommunity health eduation and a variety of speialty servies.

The area's largest loally owned, nonprofit health system, Legay Health's is a lead healthare institution in the region, ommitted to omprehensive servie provision to lients through a network of healthare providers toward a healthier and wellness ommunity. Projeted growth for the institution under the diretion of the Offie of Development advanes the mission and vision of Emanuel Medial Center, dediated to legay of good health for 'Our people, Our patients, Our ommunities, Our world' through development of sustainable programs that generate private support…… [Read More]

cited in the cultural protocol of the Medical Center's daily routine are mentioned in Table 2.

Table 2

Image: Legacy likes to be perceived as family and patient oriented, not for profit, and for giving back to the community.

Department: All RNs must wear scrubs that cannot be worn in to work. RNs cannot wear false or painted nails.

Status Symbols and Reward Systems: Kudos if the co-workers think other co-workers have done good jobs. The manager will sometimes give coffee cards of something like that. Every 5 years of service workers receive recognition and get to select a prize.
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Healthcare Crisis US Health Care

Words: 1617 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87102656

Universal healthcare is the only saving formula for this nation, which is doomed in a health care crisis of unprecedented proportions. There is a urgent need to transform healthcare from its present state of commercialism towards the humanitarian approach which guarantees 'healthcare for all' independent of their social or financial circumstances. A shared and collective responsibility of healthcare management is the only viable formula for America. It is high time we learn from Canada, UK and other European nations and restructure the current broken state of our healthcare. The successful passing of the USNHC act (H.R. 676) is the only way for America to wake up from its healthcare nightmare. Will the powerful insurance industry hold its ground yet again and resist this awakening leaving all the citizens doomed? This is an important question for all the citizens of our country.

ibliography

1) Science Daily, 'American Values lamed for U.S.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Science Daily, 'American Values Blamed for U.S. Healthcare Crisis',

Accessed May 11, 2009, Available at, http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081204160558.htm

2) Laura K. Altom, BS, MSIII and Larry R. Churchill, PhD, Ann Geddes Stahlman

'Pay, Pride, and Public Purpose: Why America's Doctors Should Support
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Healthcare Disparities in the U S

Words: 2117 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20695588

S. healthcare structure do not include the unobserved disparities. This may sound very rudimentary, even silly to point out, but in by understanding that the numbers are actually worse than they appear, and that the rising costs of healthcare services re associated with both what we see and can't see, it is easier to understand how costs rise so quickly.

It is also a sobering fact that what we cannot observe is still out there, existing beyond the scope of the government and social programs designed to help people overcome obstacles to access to healthcare and health insurance. The ethnic group that is most unobserved within the bounds of many of the studies and statistics related to the disparities in the U.S. healthcare industry is non-Mexican Latinos (Bustamante, et. al., 2009). This group represents a major portion of the U.S. population that currently lacks access to healthcare. In understanding this…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bodenheimer, T., Chen, E., and Bennett, H.D. (2009). "Reorganizing Care:

Confronting The Growing Burden Of Chronic Disease: Can The U.S. Health Care Workforce Do The Job?" Health Affairs. Vol. 28, No. 1. Pp. 164-174.

Braveman, P.A., Cubbin, C., Egerter, S., Williams, D.R., and Pamuk, E. (2010).

"Socioeconomic Disparities in Health in the United States: What the Patterns Tell Us." American Journal of Public Health. Vol. 100, No. 1. Pp. 186-196.
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Leadership and Management in Healthcare Models of

Words: 1987 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79225302

Leadership and Management in Healthcare

Models of management and leadership in health care contexts

As when it comes to modern company structures, management and leadership play a main function in health care as well, specifically focusing on reform motions, kinds of services offered, quality of services and capital use. As we specified earlier, there is no universal dish for effective management and leadership, contextual aspects like political system and socio-economic elements play a substantial part in the results.

In basic terms, a health care system has to complete 2 standard things (adjusted from Dorros, 2006):

Enhance the wellness condition of the population (according to specific requirements and targets);

Provide services in the most reliable method possible in order to achieve the first objective.

Furthermore despite the condition of the economy and nation, when attempting to reform health care systems, governments have to ask themselves 3 standard concerns: Who spends for…… [Read More]

References

Collins, J.C. (2001). Good to Great. New York, NY: HarperCollins: 17 -- 40.

Collins, J.C. And Porras, J.I. (1997). Built to Last. New York, NY: HarperCollins; 173 -- 174.

Contino, D.S. (2001). Budget training: it's overdue. Nurs Manage; 32:16 -- 17.

Contino, D.S. (2004). Leadership Competencies: Knowledge, Skills, and Aptitudes Nurses Need to Lead Organizations Effectively. Critical Care Nurse; 24: 52-64.
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Healthcare Rationing

Words: 1065 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35531353

Ethical Analysis of Healthcare Rationing

The topic of health care rationing has been the subject of debate in the U.S. The last few years as government expenditures on health care have far exceeded budgeted levels. Central to the concern is the ethical issue over whether it is better if fewer Americans profit with a greater amount of health resource allocation or if the majority benefit to a lesser degree for an equity in health care benefits. In the essay, "We've Got To Ration Health Care," (author unknown) the position is taken that America would fare better to follow the course of health care action seen in other western countries, where it is considered better to ration medical procedures to the extent that a system provides "the highest possible level of basic health care that can be delivered to all the people." With the growing concern over health care rationing, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cook, D & M. Giacomini. 1999. "The Sound of Silence: Rationing Resources for Critically Ill

Patients." Critical Care. 3: R1-R3.

Devettere, RJ. 1993, Feb. "Clinical Ethics and Happiness." Journal of Medical Philosophy.

Devettere, RJ. 2000. Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.
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Healthcare Case Study Having Grown

Words: 2957 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78799623



Trust and transparency with the public. Given the leadership position that Methodist Healthcare has it is imperative that it cultivate trust as a core part of its branding strategy with the public segments and audiences it serves.

Financial management and cost controls in place and integrated new IT system and architecture. This is a major critical success factor for Methodist Healthcare to aggressively pursue as it moves to create a more unified approach to financial management across its many medical specialty areas.

Strategic Objectives of Methodist Healthcare

The following are the strategic objectives of Methodist Healthcare. For each of these objectives a strategy for each objective's accomplishment is provided below:

To clearly differentiate Methodist Healthcare in the market

Strategies for accomplishing this objective:

While this first objective is very broad, Methodist Healthcare needs to define who they are different for. Uncovering the unmet needs of physicians is a first step,…… [Read More]

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Nursing Healthcare Business

Words: 5470 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30995758

Healthcare

We can compare the healthcare workplace to what is seen by a person when he/she looks through a kaleidoscope: since there are numerous different patterns that appear as the moments pass by. The shortage of nurses which has been publicized widely and the high turnover rates amongst the nurses are some of the unwanted patterns which have occurred. The dependence of healthcare institutions on the nurse-managers for the retention and recruitment of nurses is steadily increasing (Contino, 2004).

There are a number of routes through which the critical care nurses have become the leaders. Most of these routes don't have any educational or managerial training as a part of the process. There is a need for effective strategies for the care leaders who provide critical care in order to inspire the staff and manage the departmental operations in an effective manner to get positive results. One of the strategies…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J., Erickson, J., Jones, D., & Paulo, L. (2009). An evidence-based structure for transformative nurse executive practice, Nursing Administration Quarterly, 33(4), 280-87

Advisory Board Web site. (2004). Available at: http://www.advisory.com.

Ales, B.J. (1995). Mastering the art of delegation. Nurs Manage. August; 26: 32A, 32E.

American Organization of Nurse Executives (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. Nurse Leader, 3(1), 15-22.
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Individualized Innovations and Technology in Healthcare

Words: 4367 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88476501

Personal Healthcare Technology

Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center and the Sunrise Children's Hospital

The Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center, which includes the Sunrise Children's Hospital, is an approximately 55-year-old facility located in Southern Nevada; it serves the greater Las Vegas area and the surrounding communities. The Sunrise Health and Medical Center is proud of its quality initiatives to ensure patient safety and comfort, including direct approaches to pharmaceutical safety such as safe medication dosing via smart pump technology, and bar coding on medications. As well, the Sunrise Health and Medical Center does not discriminate with respect to HIV / AIDS or in any manner related to employment, program participation, admission and/or treatment.

Sunrise has been rated as the most popular area hospital for 15 years in patient surveys. As well, Sunrise Health and Medical Center has developed community outreach programs for health education in a variety of areas, often based…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Appari, A., & Johnson, M.E. (2010). Information security and privacy in healthcare: Current state of research. International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management, 6 (4), 279-314. Retrieved from http://www.ists.dartmouth.edu/library/501.pdf

Ayanian, J.Z., & Weissman, J.S. (2002). Teaching hospitals and quality of care: A review of the literature. The Milbank Quaterly, 80(3), 569-593. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2690120/pdf/milq0080-0569.pdf

Baker, J.J., & Baker R.W. (2000). Health care finance: Basic tools for nonfinancial managers. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen

Byington, R., Keene, R., Masini, D. (2006). The impact of federal and state funding levels on strategic decisions and how those decisions affect patient care. The Internet Journal of Healthcare Administration. (4)2. Retrieved from https://ispub.com/IJHCA/4/2/5827
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Implementation of Forced Warm Air Blanket for Normothermia Care

Words: 1006 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4456949

Evidence-Based Protocol Implementation

Influencing Multiple Systems Through Evidence-Based Change as advance practice nurse, work informed factors direct reach, influence extends context labor. Likewise, propose a nurse leader influenced multiple systems, turn, impact groups.

Nurses are encouraged to utilize and incorporate in their daily practice evident-based practice. The Evidence-based practice (EBP) is considered to be a scientific standard that determines and guides on the best clinical measure (LoBiondo-Wood and Haber). EBP has grown in its relevance to clinical decision making and support to the nursing profession since it facilitates efficiency in provision of care and quick recovery to patients. Successful implementation of EBP calls for monitoring of existing practices, documentation of relevant procedures and evaluation of possible change practices in clinical and nursing care (LoBiondo-Wood and Haber).

Possible adjustments needful for patient's care protocol

Immediate care for patients coming from SICU is critical to their recovery from the procedure they undergo.…… [Read More]

References

Grossman, S., C. Bautista, and L. Sullivan. "Using Evidence-Based Practice to Develop a Protocol for Postoperative Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients." Dimensions Of Critical Care Nursing 21.5 (2002): 206-14. Print.

LoBiondo-Wood, G., and J. Haber. Nursing Research: Methods and Critical Appraisal for Evidence-Based Practice. St. Louis: Mosby Elsevier, 2006. Print.

Melnyk, B., and E. Fineout-Overholt. Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins 2005. Print.

Schmidt, N.A., and J.M. Brown. Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses: Appraisal and Application of Research. (Eds.) United States: Laureate Education, Inc. custom ed., 2012. Print.
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Health Care Environment That Impacts the Nursing

Words: 1135 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59470988

Health Care Environment that Impacts the Nursing Profession

Natural Disasters

The objective of this work in writing is to examine the issue of natural environment in terms of impacts on the nursing profession in the health care environment. Questions answered in this study include the question of what steps should the nursing profession take to prepare the profession for provision of health care during natural disasters.

It is the opinion of the writer of this work that special preparations should be undertaken by those in the nursing profession to prepare them to properly assist those in the health care environment seeking treatment during such as natural disasters.

rief Outline

Following this section in this study will be a brief introduction followed by a literature review in this area of study and next following will be an analysis of the information reviewed and then stated will be a conclusion to the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Global Relief Efforts in Natural Disasters (2010) Canadian Nursing Student's Association. Jan 2010. Retrieved from: http://www.cnsa.ca/english/publications/policies-and-position-statements/resolutions/global-relief-efforts-in-natural-disasters

Olivia, F. et al. (2009) Nurses' Perception of Disaster: Implications for Disaster Nursing Curriculum. Nurse Education. Journal of Clinical Nursing 15, Nov. 2009. Retrieved from: http://web.ebscohost.com.rap.ocls.ca/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=185f38dc-6533-42c0-ac0b-1664fc9ec5d8%40sessionmgr112&vid=1&hid=123

Public Health -- Community Health Nursing Practice in Canada: Roles and Activities (2010) Canadian Public Health Association. 2010. Retrieved from:  http://www.cpha.ca/uploads/pubs/3-1bk04214.pdf 

Sebastian, SV (2003) Resiliency of Accomplished Critical Care Nurses in a Natural Disaster. Clinical Article. 1 Oct 2003. Vo. 23, No. 5. Critical Care Nurse. Retrieved from: http://web.ebscohost.com.rap.ocls.ca/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=3d313e8a-ed28-4e35-ac92-08c52b4b0475%40sessionmgr104&vid=1&hid=123
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Spiritual Care Practices

Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88018180

Spiritual Care Practices

Mitchell, Andrea. (2011), Focusing on mind, body, and spirit while caring for patients and their families. Critical Care Nurse, (31), 69-70.

How did the transport nurse manage the patient's physical needs?

What is so extraordinary about the story of the transport nurse, as related in Mitchell (2011) is the degree to which the nurse, even while dealing with the emotionally-fraught situation of a critically ill patient going to view the body of his dead wife, was able to be mindful of Mr. L's physical needs. For the journey, the patient Mr. L was initially switched to a travel ventilator. However, when he did not tolerate this, the nurse suggested a manual resuscitation bag instead, although the travel ventilator was still brought along during the transport. The transport nurse carefully monitored the patient throughout the visitation. During the ceremony at the chapel where his wife's body was present,…… [Read More]

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Spirituality for Palliative Care Patients

Words: 1927 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17662541

It brought continuity to the process of dying, and a way to deal with critical issues in a way everyone could understand. it's holistic because it takes the process of dying, coordinates the patient's care, and brings resolution to things often left unstated. It allows the patient to have a degree of control. And it evaporates some of the high-tech coldness that can come between caregivers and patients."

The most significant area of spirituality and palliative care still unaddressed by researchers seem to be those identified by Cohen and Koenig: "the religious and spiritual needs of people of different religions, the positive and negative effects of religion and spirituality in palliative and end-of-life care, and the contributions that religious and spiritual institutions as well as health care professionals can make to such endeavors" (Cohen and Koenig

Conclusion

Currently, there is a widely held belief that spirituality is a valuable part…… [Read More]

References

Bogin, Rabbi S. (2000) Spiritual issues of palliative care. Nursing Homes, December. Retrieved 13 March 2005 from www.findarticles.com.

Burnside, G. (1998) New paths in end-of-life care. Health Progress, May/Jun. Retrieved 13 March 2005 from www.findarticles.com.

Cohen, a.B. And H.G. Koenig. (2002) Spirituality in palliative care. Geriatric Times 3(6). Retrieved 13 March 2005 from www.findarticles.com.

Cole, B.V. (2001) Nursing care at the end of life. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care 37(3). Retrieved 13 March 2005 from www.questia.com.
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Health Care Denoted Within Dr

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40203989

, 2008, p. 66). One of the most viable means of correcting this issue is to employ a series of strategic incentives to dissuade trained instructors from retiring and to get others to engage in this occupation.

The usage of incentives can be a powerful means of compelling more individuals to engage in the teaching nursing subjects. Naturally, the more qualified instructors there are to teach in this profession, the more readily qualified individuals can be produced to handle the projected nursing shortage that will be exacerbated by the 2014 completion of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in full. However, it is quite possible that incentives can also be used to assist in the preparation and utilization of more copious supplies of physicians as well. At present, physicians have a substantial reduction in the amount and quality of incentives to enter the healthcare industry. Due to certain components…… [Read More]

References

Connolly, M.A., Keller, V., Siela, D., Twibell, K.R. (2008). "The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: what critical care nurses can do." AACN Advanced Critical Care. 19 (1): 66-67.

Garson Jr., a. (2000). "The U.S. healthcare system 2010: problems, principles and potential solutions." Circulation. Retrieved from http://circ.ahajournals.org/search?fulltext=the+U.S.+Healthcare+System+2010%3A+Problems%2C+Principles%2C+and+Potential+Solutions&submit=yes&x=0&y=0

Matthews, M., Litow. (2013). "ObamaCare's Health-Insurance Sticker Shock." The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved from http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323936804578227890968100984.html
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Healthcare Case Study

Words: 1972 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85745335

Healthcare Study

Defined as the philosophical study of right and wrong action, Ethics is a predominant subject of concern in nursing (Michael Dahnke, 2006). Being presented with various situations, the ethical and cultural problems are a serious concern faced by the nursing and healthcare staff which needs to be catered to day in and out. There is no time tested methodology that can be applied here, since the every patient is different, with a different background history, therefore the ethical and cultural implications of each decision would also vary.

Importance of Ethical Theory to Nursing

Defining what is right and wrong is a very subjective approach and even that can change from scenario to scenario. Therefore it is important to have some form of umbrella under which the functioning of nurses takes place. It is under this rationale that the importance of ethical theory emerges in front of us.

In…… [Read More]

Works Cited

DuAnne Foster Edwards, R.M. (1999, Feburary). The Synergy Model: Linking Patient Needs to Nurse Competencies. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from American Association of Critical Care Nurses: http://www.aacn.org:88/wd/certifications/content/synpract2.pcms?pid=1&menu=

Green, D.B. (2001, July). Medical Ethics. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from Priory.com:  http://priory.com/ethics.htm 

Michael Dahnke, H.D. (2006). Defining Ethics and Applying the Theories. In P.M. Vicki D. Lachman, Applied Ethics in Nursing (p. 3). New York: Springer.

Samar Noureddine RN, M. (2001). Development of the ethical dimension in nursing theory. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 2-7.
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How to Deal With Operations and Financing in Healthcare

Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61296603

Healthcare Financing and Organization

Healthcare is a field that is constantly evolving. This is because of fundamental changes in their financing and organization. The result is that the entire operation is shifting. To fully understand what is occurring requires focusing on why this is a key component for the nurse -manager. This will be accomplished by looking at the way healthcare is organized, the roles and the scope of contemporary practicum. Together, these elements will highlight the shifts and the long-term implications on the field of nursing.

Describe how health care is organized and financed, including the implications of business principles, such as patient and system cost factors.

Healthcare is organized based upon the type of entity that is established. There are three different models that are used to include: for profit, nonprofit and governmental. For profit organizations are focusing on meeting the needs of patients, reducing costs and increasing…… [Read More]

References

Lowe, N. (2015). Nursing, Nurses and Ethics. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing, 44 (3), 339 -- 340.

Orgeas, M. (2010). Selected Medical Errors. American Journal of Critical Care Medicine, 181 (2), 134-142.
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Changing Staffing Patterns and Reducing Healthcare Costs

Words: 3764 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1946637

Mandatoy Ovetime Policies

Oganizational Cultue and Readiness Assessment

The esults of the Oganizational Cultue and Readiness fo System-Wide Integation of Evidence-Based Pactice checklist, which summaizes the suvey esults, ae discussed with egad to the eadiness level of the oganization, possible poject baies and facilitatos, and plans fo integating with clinical inquiy.

The oveaching chaacteistic of the state of eadiness of this oganization fo system-wide integation of evidence-based pactice is modeately encouaging, while still indicative of some concen egading baies to implementation success. The stakeholdes in the oganization ae awae of the impotance of evidence-based pactice and they ae fundamentally suppotive. The oganization povides esouces to suppot the integation of evidence-based pactice into the institution, howeve, the availability of skilled staff who can assist with the changes is limited (Battilana & Casciao, 2012). Two elated and high scoing items in the suvey have to do with the availability of quality computes…… [Read More]

references, and Perceptions of Critical Care and Emergency Department NursesCrit Care Nurse April 1, 2011 31:e1-e11

Hospital Staff Nurses' Work Hours, Meal Periods, and Rest Breaks: A Review from an Occupational Health Nurse PerspectiveWorkplace Health Saf November 1, 2010 58:489-497

Identification of Relationships between Work System Parameters and Fatigue in Registered Nurses: A Data Mining ApproachProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting September 1, 2010 54:364-368

Effects of Extended Work Shifts and Shift Work on Patient Safety, Productivity, and Employee HealthWorkplace Health Saf December 1, 2009 57:497-502

Estimates of injury risks for healthcare personnel working night shifts and long hoursBMJQS October 1, 2009 18:336-340
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Use of Chlorhexidine to Prevent Healthcare Associated Infections

Words: 2972 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21470544

In the U.S healthcare environment, the clinical practice guidelines are the effective healthcare protocol to enhance patient’s safety as well as achieving evidence-based practice. The clinical guidelines provide recommendations to the best available practice to assist clinicians and other healthcare professionals to deliver best and quality care. More importantly, the clinical practice guidelines are designed to optimize patients’ care using the systematic assessment and evidence based review to assess pros and cons of the alternative care options. The guidelines serve as the strongest resources to assist the healthcare professionals to make clinical decisions as well as incorporating evidence gained through practice and scientific investigations into patient practice.  Healthcare organizations develop the guidelines in form and policies, which are endorsed across the organization to create a platform that employees will follow and holding employees accountable to achieve a standard of care.  

Clabsi Hospital is one of the best healthcare organizations…… [Read More]

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Nursing Care Family Centered Approach

Words: 1027 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52972152

Family Centered Care

Family-centered care is a significant part of the nursing profession, and this is becoming more important as healthcare changes and evolves. Nurses are charged with being compassionate in their duties and treating everyone as being valuable no matter what kinds of conditions they have or where they come from (The Guide, 2010). It is the first Provision of the Code of Ethics for nurses, with sub-issues that address human dignity, relationships with patients, the nature of the health problems, the right to self-determination, and relationships with colleagues and others. These courtesies, however, should also extend to the families of those patients, as caring for the family as a whole can make the process easier and more cohesive. This paper will address family-centered care in the context of the Code of Ethics Provision One and the sub-issues that are contained in it.

Provision One and Family-Centered Care

Studies…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, J.J., Sabbagh, M., Loiselle, C.G., Boileau, J., & McVey, L. (2010). Supporting families in the ICU: A descriptive correlational study of informational support, anxiety, and satisfaction with care. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, 26: 114-122.

Mitchell, M.L. & Chaboyer, W. (2010). Family Centred care -- A way to connect patients, families and nurses in critical care: A qualitative study using telephone interviews. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, 26: 154-160.

The Guide to the Code of Ethics for Nurses: Interpretation and Application (2010). Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements. Nursing World.
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PICOT Statement for Healthcare Association Infections

Words: 483 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29581999

Healthcare Associated Infections for the Nursing Profession

Despite the most rigorous and comprehensive universal precautions, healthcare facilities are still germ-ridden environments that can introduce potentially deadly infections in patients. Hospitals and clinics in particular are notoriously infectious environments, and nosocomial infections due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MSA) are increasingly commonplace across the country (Boa & ahube, 2013). For instance, Boa and ahube emphasize that, "Numerous nosocomial MSA outbreaks occur annually due to the widespread prevalence of MSA within hospitals" (p. 50).

Besides the entire array of environmental reservoirs, one potential source of MSA contamination in particular that many healthcare providers encounter on a routine basis are the public access computer keyboards that are used to input patient data and coordinate care (Boa & ahube, 2013). For instance, a study by the University of Toledo examined 24 public access computer keyboards and identified two that were MSA-contaminated (Boa & ahube, 2013). Based…… [Read More]

References

Boa, T.T. & Rahube, T.O. (2013, January-February). Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci species isolated from computer keyboards located in secondary and postsecondary schools. Journal of Environmental Health, 75(6), 50-55.

Saxena, S. & Goyal, R. (2009, September). Prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus colonization among healthcare workers and healthy community residents. Journal of Health Population and Nutrition, 20(3), 279-283.
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Information Age and Operative Care Anesthesia Records

Words: 2153 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46911808

Anesthesia ecord Keeping Needs to Change

Healthcare Informatics is a growing field (Ben-assuli, 2015). Because electronic record keeping has been shown to improve quality, decrease medical errors, improve documentation and decrease cost, there has been a large amount of encouragement toward the adaptation of electronic health records (EH) (Bloomfield & Feinglass, 2008). In 2003, the Institute of Medicine published a report that defined the core functions necessary in all electronic health record systems (IOM, 2003). The United States Government developed an Office of Health Information Technology to help support the implementation of healthcare technologies (Bloomfield & Feinglass, 2008). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid established incentive programs for EHs that include all of the Meaningful Use criteria in order to help increase the number of providers who use healthcare information technologies (CMS, 2013). Because of this, the number of EHs are growing (Ozair, Jamshed, Sharma & Aggarwal, 2015).

Anesthesia documentation…… [Read More]

References

Avidan, A., & Weissman, C. (2012). Record completeness and data concordance in an anesthesia information management system using context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 81(3), 173-181.

Ben-Assuli, O. (2015). Electronic health records, adoption, quality of care, legal and privacy issues and their implementation in emergency departments. Health Policy, 119(3), 287-297.

Bloomfield, E.L., & Feinglass, N.G. (2008). The anesthesia information management system for electronic documentation: What are we waiting for? Journal of Anesthesia, 22(4), 404-411.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid: EHR incentive program, Accessed June 1, 2015, http://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/index.html?redirect=/EHRIncentiveprograms
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Lebanese and Middle Eastern Cultural Beliefs Regarding Health Care

Words: 646 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68029225

The Lebanese and the overall middle easterners are known to be strict to their cultural beliefs and practices. Such beliefs and practices dictate every aspect of their lives and how they interact with other people from other cultures across the world as well as other aspects of life that are widely applicable in the contemporary world. This culture has a great impact on the structure and nature of health care that is appreciated among the Lebanese and other middle easterners (Shiloh, 2007). It is imperative to understand their cultural perception on care presentation, accommodation, and repatterning to offer a more effective healthcare under this cultural setting.

The Lebanese have a unique perception on culture care presentation. The cultural practices in Lebanon emphasize the importance of both nuclear and extended families. Moreover, the family members rely heavily on each other. During illnesses, the family members offer the primary care and support…… [Read More]

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Orem's Theory of Self-Care Deficit

Words: 3089 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90083470

In reaction, diabetes research looks into pharmacological options and changes in lifestyle to contain the trend. Recent findings point to the need for healthcare professionals to empower diabetes sufferers to take recourse in self-management as the best option at the moment (Kumar).

The purposefulness of a plan and its implementation in assisting a client with diabetes helped fill in her self-care deficit (Kumar 2007). The interpersonal relationship between a nurse and her client minimizes the stress experienced by the latter and her family. This enables the client or patient and her family to act more responsibly in health matters. An assessment and plan of care may use Orem's client-related concepts -- of self-care, self-care agency, therapeutic self-care demand and self-care deficit --, the concepts of nursing agency and nursing system and the basic conditioning factors. Integrating these concepts into other theories on health promotion and family systems may guide effective…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aldridge, V. (2005). Self-monitoring of blood, glucose invaluable in managing diabetes. 3 pages. Journal of Diabetes Nursing: SB Communications. Retrieved on October 24, 2008 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOMDR/is_10_9/ai_n27865119?tag=content;col1

Aliha, J.M., et al. (2006). Relation between self-care behavior and self-care needs in patients with heart failure.2 pages. Southern African Journal of Critical Care: South African Medical Association. Retrieved on October 24, 2008 at http://findarticles.com/p/article/mi_6870/is_1_23/ai_n28450856?tag=content;col1

Bruce, E., et al. (2008). Dorothea Orem's theory of self-care. 38 pages. SlideShare, Inc. Retrieved on October 24, 2008 at  http://www.slideshare.net/jben501/dorothea-orem-theory 

Cook, a., et al. (2006). Self-care needs of caregivers dealing with stroke. 9 pages.
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Thromboembolism Venous Thromboembolism Cancer Care

Words: 1776 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15623853

bmj.com/cgi/content/full/325/7369/887

Pfizer, 'NEW FRAGMIN INDICATION FIGHTS SECOND LEADING CAUSE of DEATH in CANCER PATIENTS, CANCER-ASSOCIATED THROMOSIS', retrieved feb 29th 2008, from, http://www.pfizer.ca/english/newsroom/press%20releases/default.asp?s=1&releaseID=160

Dirix LY,

Salgado R,

Weytjens R,

Colpaert C,

enoy I,

Huget P, van Dam P,

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Lemmens J,

Vermeulen P. (2002), 'Plasma fibrin D-dimer levels correlate with tumor volume, progression rate and survival in patients with metastatic reast Cancer', ritish Journal of Cancer, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11875705

John a Heit, (Sep 2005), "Cancer and Venous Thromboembolism: Scope of the Problem', Cancer Control, Vol! 2, Supplement 1.

Diana M. eck, (Oct 2006), 'Venous Thromboembolism: Prophylaxis: Implications for Medical Surgical Nurses,"

MEDSURG Nursing -- October 2006 -- Vol. 15/No. 5, Available online at, http://www.medsurgnursing.net/ceonline/2008/article10282288.pdf

Race, Tara Kay SN, RN, CCRN; Collier, Paul E. MD, (July-Sep 2007), 'The Hidden Risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis -- the Need for Risk Factor Assessment: Case Reviews.', Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, 30(3):245-254

Susan egelman MD, 'Venous Thromboembolism',…… [Read More]

Bibliography

MF Scully (2005), 'Clinical Guide Cancer and Thrombosis', retrieved Feb 28th 2008, at http://www.tigc.org/pdf/cancervte05.pdf

Alexander G. Turpie, (2002) 'ABC of Antithrombotic Therapy', British Medical Journal, available at http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/325/7369/887

Pfizer, 'NEW FRAGMIN INDICATION FIGHTS SECOND LEADING CAUSE of DEATH in CANCER PATIENTS, CANCER-ASSOCIATED THROMBOSIS', retrieved feb 29th 2008, from, http://www.pfizer.ca/english/newsroom/press%20releases/default.asp?s=1&releaseID=160

Dirix LY,
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Human Theory of Caring

Words: 4029 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85477547

Introduction

Theory guides practice. This is true of many things, but is especially true of nursing. While many processes, actions, and rules are involved in becoming a great nurse, understanding and applying theory must be the most important aspect. Nursing theory allows for one to examine concepts and then attempt practical application of these concepts when theories are tested. Evidence-based practice for example, is the wonderful lovechild of theory and application in that when theories are constructed, they are then tested, and if they work, are applied to standard practice via modification. This essay aims to provide a deeper synthesis of nursing theory by examining two important nursing theories: Orem's Self-care Theory and Watsons Nursing Theory. Additionally, one will see how nursing theory has evolved since its beginnings.

Background on Nursing Theory

Many say nursing is as old as humankind. If there was someone sick, there was someone willing to…… [Read More]

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Healthcare and Information Technologies Nursing Colleges' Vital Course Offerings

Words: 1866 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36854286

Nursing Health Care Informatics

"…At the beginning of the 21st century, nursing informatics has become a part of our professional activities…[and has] advanced the field of nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as a science…" (Saba, 2001, 177).

Nursing Health Care informatics relate to and address technology and other cutting edge issues of great interest in the healthcare field. According to the AMIA, Nursing Informatics is the "…science and practice (that) integrates nursing, its information and knowledge, with management of information and communication technologies to promote the health of people, families, and communities worldwide." New and relevant knowledge presented in the genre of informatics helps to empower nurses and other healthcare practitioners to deliver the most effective patient-center care possible. This paper presents several informatics in the belief that applying healthcare technologies and practices that are genuinely progressive and helpful to today's nurse is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AMIA (2009) Working Group Nursing Informatics. Retrieved March 9, 2014, from http://www.amia.org.

An, J.Y., Hayman, L.L., Panniers, T., and Carty, B. (2007). Theory Development in Nursing

And Healthcare Informatics. A Model explaining and Predicting Information and Communication Technology Acceptance by Healthcare Consumers. Advances in Nursing Science, 30(3), E37-E49.

Cipriano, P.F. (2011). The Future of Nursing and Health IT. Nursing Economics, 29(5).
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Kenyan Healthcare Assessment

Words: 687 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16665382

Kenyan Healthcare Assessment

Across the globe, manmade and natural calamities are on the rise, occurring almost every single day and having destructive effects on individual people, households and entire communities. People's lifestyles and quality of life are undermined by both minor and major catastrophes. The African continent has long struggled with internal conflicts that have had destructive impacts, threatening its inhabitants' survival. Extensive casualties have resulted from these occurrences. It is an undisputed fact that war and conflict interferes with communities' social, religious, economic and educational dimensions. This section attempts to understand disaster-related emergency preparedness and healthcare scenario in the epublic of Kenya.

Just like a majority of other African nations, Kenya has encountered manmade and natural catastrophes that have led to huge losses of life. One good example would be the 2007-08 post-election clashes. The nation witnessed largely politically-initiated inter-community fights that had immense, large-scale consequences. Hence, its healthcare…… [Read More]

References

Aragon Penoyer, D. (2010).Nurse staffing and patient outcomes in critical care: A concise review. Critical Care Medicine, 38(7), 1521-1528. doi:10.1097/ccm.0b013e3181e47888

Wafulapaul. (2014). Study: Staffing of medics is skewed. Read more at:  https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/health/article/2000138842/study-staffing-of-medics-is-skewed . Standard Digital [nairobi].
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Emergency Room Overcrowding Healthcare Reform

Words: 304 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22886313



F. The uninsured are increasingly using the ED for their non-emergency needs.

III. The effects of emergency room overcrowding can be deadly.

A. Boarding patients, or keeping already treated or stabilized patients in the ED, prevents patients from receiving the inpatient care they need.

B. Long wait times and inefficient service can mean loss of life

IV. Possible solutions demand health care system overhaul.

A. More efficient hospital registration would streamline emergency room procedures.

B. Standing orders would allow nurses and EMTs to proceed on critical care without doctors.

C. Special fast-track and sub-waiting areas would alleviate hallway overcrowding.

D. Re-budgeting will allocate more funds to emergency admissions.

E. Reducing non-urgent visits via universal healthcare initiative would reduce unnecessary use of the emergency room.

F. Increasing hospital capacity for acute inpatient needs would replace boarding.

G. Hospitals can add support staff during critical hours.… [Read More]

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Health Care Administration

Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24667658

Nursing -- Health Care Administration and Leadership

The modern clinical health care environment can be highly stressful for employees and lead to various types of conflicts in the workplace. Within nursing, those conflicts typically manifest themselves as abuse of authority as between different levels of authority, a hostile climate with respect to reporting problems, scheduling preferences, and numerous problems associated with social cliques within health care teams and nursing units. If not addressed by administration, power struggles often develop, requiring negotiation and conflict management after the fact. In general, the conflict management strategies of avoidance, accommodation, smoothing, and competing are not particularly helpful. Instead, administrative policies emphasizing negotiation and collaboration is the most appropriate conflict management approach within nursing units and the enforcement of clear administrative policies and protocols are the most effective method of minimizing conflict as between different hierarchical levels of authority.

Negotiation and Conflict Management in the…… [Read More]

References

Kelly, M. "Change from an office-based to a walk-around handover system." Nurse

Times, Vol. 101, No. 10; (2005): 34-35.

Marquis, B.L. And Huston, C.J. (2008). Leadership Roles and Management Functions in Nursing: Theory and Application. (6th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.

Rosengren, K., Bondas, T., Nordholm, L., and Nordstrom, G. "Nurses' views of shared leadership in ICU: A case study." Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Vol. 26,
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universal healthcare

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19337324

Universal healthcare is a political policy based on the premises of universal human rights, fairness, justice, and equity. The United States was also founded on ethical principles like justice and equity. Therefore, programs like Obamacare that promote universal healthcare are essential for upholding the premises of the Constitution. Obamacare was in some ways a stepping-stone from the completely privatized healthcare insurance system that prevails towards a universal healthcare model like those practiced in many other countries with high degrees of success. Healthcare, like education, needs to be framed more like a universal human right than as a privilege, and covered under the auspices of government spending.

There are also pragmatic reasons why universal healthcare makes sense for the American economy. According to the World Health Organization, countries that implement universal healthcare reforms have reduced their overall healthcare spending costs; if the United States adopted universal healthcare coverage the country would…… [Read More]

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Nurse Self-Care Nurses as Primary

Words: 936 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6712258

739, p=0.009, e?=0.727). This study clearly highlighted that sleep shortage and work fatigue poses a threat to patient safety and that nurse self-care is warranted.[Dorrian et.al, (2006)]

Nurse Support Services

An earlier Australian study by Moore KA (2001) which observed 201 nurses working in three different hospitals had concluded that organizational restructuring policies and the consequent work overload was a high stressor for nurses and this was made worse by the poor communication style (top -- down approach instead of consultative style) that only contributed more to nurse burnout. [Moore KA, (2001)]. Given the high levels of occupational stress and burnout among nurses, it is important that nurse self-care interventions are prioritized. A recent literature review on the subject of work stress and coping methods among Australian nurses revealed that 'work load ', 'role conflict' and 'expression of aggression' were the three main stressors. The literature study also revealed 'seeking…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Linda H. Aiken, 'Image of Nursing Global Trends', retrieved Sep 4th 2010, from,  http://www.fpnl.co.za/downloads/Presentations/Presentations/Prof%20Linda%20Aiken%20-%20Image%20of%20Nursing%20-%20Global%20Trends.pdf 

2) Jillian Dorrian, Nicole Lamond & Cameron Van del Heuvel et.al (Oct 2006), 'A Pilot study of the Safety Implications of Australian Nurses' Sleep and Working Hours', Chronobiology International, Vol 23, Issue 6, pg 1149-1163

3) Lim J, BOGOSSIAN F. & AHERN K. (2010), ' Stress and coping in Australian nurses: a systematic review. International Nursing Review 57, 22-31

4) Moore KA, (2001), 'Hospital restructuring: impact on nurses mediated by social
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Quality Improvement and Nursing Care for Ecmo Patients

Words: 2090 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63042323

ECMO

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation is a procedure that allows for the oxygenation of a patient through the use of an external machine. Oxygen is required in order to keep a body healthy and alive. The definition of oxygenation is the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream of a patient. If the oxygen level drops below 90% a condition called hypoxemia occurs. Hypoxemia can be very serious and if not addressed within a short period of time can be fatal. Hypoxemia is diagnosed through cyanosis (the skin turning blue). Patients being treated with the EMCO procedure are usually longer-term patients (3-10 days) as compared to the short-term patients who receive a standard cadriopulmonary bypass which is a support that usually only lasts for a number of hours (not days).

Purpose

According to odriguez-Cruz et al. The purpose of the ECMO is "to allow time for intrinsic recovery of the lungs and…… [Read More]

References

Adhikari, N.K.; Burns, K.E.; Friedrich, J.O.; Granton, J.O.; Cook, D.J.; Meade, M.O.; (2007). Effect of nitric oxide on oxygenation and mortality in acute lung injury: systemic review and meta analysis, BMJ; Vol. 334, pp. 779.

Bastin, A.J. & Firmin, R.; (2011) Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe acute respiratory for failure in adults: NICE guideance, Heart, Vol. 97, Issue 20, pp. 1701-1703

Berryman, S.; (2010) Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a Scottish intensive care unit, Nursing in Critical Care, Vol. 15, Issue 5, pp 262 -- 268

Brower, R.G. & Krishnan, J.A.; (2000) High frequency ventilation for acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome, Chest; Vol. 118, pp. 795 -- 807.
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Opening Visiting Hours in the Intensive Care

Words: 4570 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51021364

Opening visiting hous in the Intensive Cae Unit Hamful o Helpful to the Patient

As the healthcae system stats making that move in the diection of a client-diven model, opening visiting hous ae becoming a topic of discussion and inteest. Studies that go all the way back to the 1970s has poduced agument and conjectue ove the pefect visiting pactices in the adult intensive cae unit. This liteatue exploes the effects of having a policy that is fo opening visiting hous and how it has an effect on the patients.

Accoding to vaious studies, eve since the 1970s, thee has been visiting pactices in intensive cae units (ICU) that goes all the way back to a time whee it was not talked about much. Ove the last 10 yeas, thee has not been enough eseach o data that could measue this issue of opening visiting hous being hamful o helpful…… [Read More]

references of patients in the intensive care unit and in a complex care medical. American Journal of Critical Care, 55-65.

Livesay, S.G. (2004). Nurses' perceptions of public visiting hours in neuroscience intensive care unit. Journal of Nursing Care Quarterly,, 182-189.
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Healthcare Communications the Objective of

Words: 612 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95267442

There are however existing organizations such as the Healthcare Communications Association which was also formed in 2001, however, this organization was formed primarily for pharmaceutical companies and practitioners. The 'Coalition for Healthcare Communication" organization when searched with keywords 'skilled nursing staff' returned a 'sorry no pages found with your keyword' indicating a gap in the communication network for skilled nursing staff in the communication network for health care issues under debate and analysis. The work of Thornby (2006) entitled: "eginning the Journey to Skilled Communication" states that often skilled nursing staff were found to be avoiding communication with physicians who were known to be aggressive or abrasive instead of becoming competent in skilled communication. It is additionally noted in Thornby (2006) that skills development is needed among today's skilled nursing staff in order to enable competent skilled communication among skilled nursing staff and other practitioners and physicians.

SUMMARY & CONCLUSION…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Thornby, Denise (2006) Beginning the Journey to Skilled Communication. Advanced Critical Care. Vol. 17, No. 3, 2006 AACN. Online available at  http://www.aacn.org/WD/HWE/Docs/AACN17_3_266-271_HWE.pdf 

Coalition for Healthcare Communication (2009) Current Issues. Online available at http://www.cohealthcom.org/content/current.htm

Sorry no pages found matching your keywords' (2009) Coalition for Healthcare Communication. Online available at http://cohealthcom.org/cgi-bin/search.cgi

Healthcare Communications Association (2009) Online available at http://www.hca-uk.org/Join-the-HCA