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We have over 153 essays for "Dead Poets Society"

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Leadership Film Project Dead Poets

Words: 2105 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89185782

"An older, more experienced teacher questions whether 15- to 17-year-old kids are really ready yet to handle Keating's brand of freedom. 'Gee, I never pegged you for a cynic,' says Keating. 'I'm not,' says the other teacher. 'I'm a realist.'… Although there's a carefully placed scene in which Keating tries to make the distinction between unfettered self-expression and self-destructive behavior, the principles behind the re-formation of the Dead Poets Society eventually lead to catastrophe. It becomes clear that at least some of the boys really aren't emotionally equipped to incorporate into their own lives the kind of freedom and nonconformism that Keating is selling" (Emerson 2010). The extremity of Neil's reaction shows the vulnerability of his unformed adolescent emotions and his inability to deal with his resistance to his father in a rational fashion.

However, for all of his faults, by the end of the film, Keating's students have clearly…… [Read More]

References

Dead Poet's Society. (1989). Directed by Peter Weir.

Emerson, Jim. (2010). Dead Poets Society. Retrieved February 13, 2010 at Screening room. http://cinepad.com/reviews/deadpoets.htm

Straker, David. (2010). Charismatic leadership. Changing Minds. Retrieved February 13, 2010 at  http://changingminds.org/disciplines/leadership/styles/charismatic_leadership.htm
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Psycho-Social Concepts in the Dead

Words: 1208 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47156953

"

Wallace x) Three psycho-sociological concepts which are well represented in the film are conformity of group behavior, gender roles in adolescents, especially boys and narrow tradition based attitudes about what is valuable in society.

The whole film is based upon conformity of behavior according to accepted traditions and accepted societal standards of the 1950s in America. Acting was not an accepted vocation, as accepted vocations were those which carried prestige and high salaries. Society's judgment of the value of a job was its monetary worth. The school and its teachers are bound by the traditional mode of teaching, which is largely stale drill and practice with attendant exams. The value is based upon the idea of education being based upon how much information a student can store and regurgitate. It is especially well illustrated by the scene with Keating where he has the students tear out the introduction in…… [Read More]

References

Bernard, L.L. (1926). An Introduction to Social Psychology. New York: Henry Holt. Retrieved December 18, 2006, from Questia database:

 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=174772 

Hedley, M. (2002). The Geometry of Gendered Conflict in Popular Film: 1986-2000. 201+. Retrieved December 18, 2006, from Questia database:

 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000612442
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Poet Ethridge Knight

Words: 423 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 94792218

Etheridge Knight is effectively explained as an example of Whitman calls and egalitarian poem. At the same time, the analysis acknowledges that Knight finds himself forced to use language which some people would find offensive or even inappropriate. Rather than an unintentional slipping into common vernacular, this author explains that Knight's usage of profanity is an intentional commentary on the marginalization experienced by people in minority groups. The fact that they suffer from such widespread oppression throughout their lives breeds an inescapable and palpable frustration with the larger world which can only really be expressed by exclamations of profanity. The oppression of minorities is a common entity in literature written by people who have an ethnic heritage with a history of marginalization and social minimization.

Further, this author suggests that the oppression of minority groups seems to be such a force in their lives that they cannot help but be…… [Read More]

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John Keatings and the Prep School in

Words: 1626 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66305985

John Keatings and the prep school in Dead Poet's Society: Where do they fit in the philosophies of education?

John Keatings is, if not anything else, an original thinker and teacher in Dead Poet's Society. The film does not at all bother to hide this fact even in the opening sequences: Keatings is shown as different from the other teachers even by virtue of his grimaces and squeamishness.

John Locke wrote of education, "Virtue is harder to be got than knowledge of the world; and, if lost in a young man, is seldom recovered." John Keatings believes in this Lockian principle, but only to a certain degree. In his classroom, Keatings stressed virtue: He taught his students how to live and feel and treat one another as much as he taught them to classics. In fact, he deliberately skips the theoretical works in the class -- even having his students…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnson, Tony & Reed, Ronald. "Philosophical Documents in Education." Second Edition.
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Leadership as it Is Expressed

Words: 1588 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75001430



Surprisingly, Keating successful leadership was not imposed on his students, even with the fact that he influenced them greatly and was challenging in his teaching. Transformational leadership is present all across the motion picture as Keating goes through great efforts to assist students as they put their problems behind. The influence that Keating has on students is limited by none other than himself, as he trusts that most will do exactly as he wants in spite of the fact that they have the power to decide. Keating puts great price on the personal needs of his subordinates, as he knows that only through giving them what they want he can hope to become a successful leader. Being an inspirational leader is largely based on knowing what followers want and advising them in accordance to their interests.

Unconventional leadership involves a great deal of risk, since it regards doing things differently,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Machiavelli, Nicollo. (1952). "The Prince." Plain Label Books.

Northhouse, Peter G. (2009). "Leadership: Theory and Practice." SAGE.

Dir. Lumet, Sidney. "12 Angry Men." United Artists, 1957.

Dir. Weir, Peter. "Dead Poets Society." Touchstone Pictures, 1989.
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Management Lessons About Leadership Styles in Movies

Words: 2068 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69109407

Leadership Styles in Movies / Management Lessons about Leadership styles in Movies

Leadership is a major organizational resource, demonstrated by individuals via a wide range of skills and talents (Lester, 2015). Leadership represents a key means by which individuals change others' minds, moving people and organizations forward for achieving established aims (IAAP, 2009). Several leadership models exist, with some of them proving to be rather effective and helpful. However, rapid transformations in the world, particularly in the last decade, owing to emergence of globalization and extensive adoption of information technology, have led to drastic changes in workforces' behavior and expectations. One cannot now lead a workforce using conventional techniques of the past, if one desires to leverage staff talents and achieve optimal performance. A majority of successful companies today seek knowledge workers -- well-trained, skilled and experienced individuals desiring to utilize their abilities to their optimum potential in a work…… [Read More]

References

Argintar, L. (2014). The Devil Wears Prada, A Boss, Not AB*tch: Why Women In the Workplace Get A Bad Rep. Elite Daily. Retrieved from  http://elitedaily.com/women/devil-wears-prada-boss-btch-women-workplace-get-bad-rep/ 

Balzac, S. (2015). Princess Bride Problem Solving. LinkedIn. Retrieved from  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/princess-bride-problem-solving-steve-balzac 

Batke, k. (2015). How Not to Manage Like Bill Lumbergh. Jostle Corporation. U.S.. Retrieved from  http://www.jostle.me/blog/how-not-to-manage-like-bill-lumbergh 

Casse, P & Claudel, P. (2011). Leadership styles: a powerful model. Training Journal. www.trainingjournal.com.
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Autocratic and Transformation leadership

Words: 1717 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12235448

Dead Poets Society (Autocratic and Transformation Leadership)

The transformational and autocratic leadership approaches as a novel quality standard impact organizational process and role development. An organizational leader is required to apply the leadership process to make sure long-run corporate targets are achieved, particularly in the current competitive, unstable business climate. Normative principles and policies, methodical management and strict discipline mark Mr. Nolan's leadership. Follower obedience is grounded in both set agreements and realistic regulations and standards. Followers are restricted by the limits and duties fixed for them. Hierarchical systems pre-establish and rank worker compensation. They explicitly delineate coercive procedures and apply them under particular predetermined conditions. Meanwhile, Mr. Keating espouses devotion, valor and insight. Based on their individual faith in him and his aims, his followers enthusiastically accept his vision, mission and personality. They regard him as a prophet, a futurist, or a gallant warrior (Nikezic, Puric, & Puric, 2012).…… [Read More]

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Carver Given Poet and Author

Words: 2663 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37619766



The story "The Bridle," for instance, tells about what could have turned out to be a family tragedy. However, written by Carver it becomes much stronger and more positive. After going bankrupt in agriculture, a family moves with its few belongings packed into a station wagon to a cheap apartment in a hotel somewhere in the Midwest. The narrator, who is the unfriendly and uncaring woman who runs the hotel, relates the story of what happens to the mother, Betty, and the horrible temporary jobs she takes to take care of her family.

One day at a drunken party at the hotel's pool, her husband, Holits, climbs to the roof of one of the units to jump into the water. Betty cries out, "What are you doing?" But he just stands there at the edge. He looks down at the pool, deciding how much he will have to run to…… [Read More]

References

Carver, Raymond. A New Path to the Waterfall. New York: Atlantic Monthly, 1989.

Carver, Raymond. Call if You Need Me. New York: Vintage, 2000.

Kibble, Matthew (Ed). "Raymond Carver" from Literature Online biography. London: Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company, 2001.

Scribner's Writing Series. Raymond Carver. Writers A to Z. Section. New York: Thompson Gale.
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Formation of Ancient Societies the

Words: 2084 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91389503

Both Spartan men and women exercised together in the nude, and both were "encouraged to improve their intellectual skills" ("omen in Ancient Greece"). Being a woman in Sparta certainly ensured a greater sense of gender equality -- but that does not necessarily mean Sparta was the preferred residence of women in Greece. After all, Sparta did without a lot of the creature comforts that other city-states like Athens took for granted as essential to civilization. There is a reason the phrase "Spartan living" has come to be synonymous with the bare necessities.

As for variance in the social structure of the various states, democracy prevailed in Athens for a time (but so did tyranny and corruption as well). Thebes also had its monarchy and later on its heroic warrior citizens. Sparta had two kings who ruled simultaneously. But its social structure was also more slave-based than anywhere else. In fact,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Haaren, John. Famous Men of Rome. NY: American Book Company, 1904.

Johnston, Sarah. Religions of the Ancient World. Harvard University Press, 2004.

Kyziridis, Theocharis. "Notes on the History of Schizophrenia." German Journal of Psychiatry, vol 8, 42-48, 2005.

Sikora, Jack. Religions of India. Lincoln, NE: Writer's Club Press, 2002.
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EE Cummings Modernist Poet

Words: 962 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24458150

Modernist literature refers to a literary period from the first half of the 20th century, one that reacted to the external influences of an increasingly industrialized society, and one that was becoming more and more globalized. This was a population of people who had been hardened and drained by two world wars. This was a population of people who were pondering the future of humanity, human existence, the human condition and their place in the world. When compared to the romantic period, modernism appears edgier and less serene. The romantic period had more of a focus on the natural world and the experience of being; modernism focused more on the inner self, seeing more of a decline and fraught fragmentation with the external world. From a literary perspective, the period meant a subversion of typical norms: modernist prose and poetry played with structure and form in ways that readers weren’t…… [Read More]

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Classic Critiques of Society's Negative Aspects

Words: 1380 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62282235

Negative Aspects of Society

The author of this report is asked to review Augustine, Dante and Machiavelli when it comes to their views about the negative aspects of society. Indeed, they are major figures throughout history and their views are similar in many ways. However, they are also very different as well. Over the four total pages of this report, each of those three will be viewed one at a time. While some people dismiss what the people of the past have to say about society, the prior and current critics of the negative aspects of society have a right to say what they are saying.

One thing that dominated the words of Augustine was his challenging of the secular (non-religious) world with his Christian views. James O'Donnell had some words to say about Augustine and what he felt. Indeed, he notes that "ordinary men and women, left to their…… [Read More]

References

Biography. (2015). Biography.com. Retrieved 23 June 2015, from  http://www.biography.com/people/dante-9265912#the-divine-comedy 

Novel Guide. (2015). MACHIAVELLI'S VIEW OF HUMAN NATURE | Novelguide. Novelguide. Retrieved 23 June 2015, from  http://www.novelguide.com/reportessay/history/general-history/machiavellis-view-human-nature 

O'Donnell, J. (2015). Augustine: Christianity and Society. Faculty.georgetown.edu. Retrieved 23 June 2015, from  http://faculty.georgetown.edu/jod/twayne/aug3.html 

Share Faith. (2015). The Last Supper - Judas Iscariot's Betrayal of Jesus. Sharefaith.com. Retrieved 23 June 2015, from  http://www.sharefaith.com/guide/Christian-Holidays/judas-iscariot-betrayal-of-jesus.html
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Herrick and Marlowe Poems the

Words: 1110 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64086730

For Marlowe, the muse of song and dance are juxtaposed with the senses to inform a larger world -- not of innocent threats and fears, but rather one of coy teasing and delight.

Further, this rather flirtatious repartee' leads one to view the symbolic nature of love as part of the reason to make each day the most -- for what does one have if not love? Marlowe is full of symbols that evoke not only the season of Spring, but of more sylvan delights -- "valleys, groves, hills and fields," "shepherds and their flocks." Yet, Marlowe can be blunt as well, as he makes a bed of roses with "a thousand fragrant poises." Too, there is almost sexual tension and symbology when he comments on "ivy buds," "coral clasps," and "amber studs," -- clearly then indicating, "And if these pleasures may they move, Come live with me, and be…… [Read More]

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Blocks to Critical Thinking

Words: 815 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10676390

Cultural Conditioning Block

Cultural conditioning refers to how society's standards and values are passed on to all members of society. Cultural conditioning is a block to critical thinking when people accept society's standards blindly, with this impacting how a person thinks by creating bias and selective perception.

Example: When Nolan tells Keating he does not approve of his unorthodox teaching methods, he is basing his judgment on the fact that Keating's methods and expectations of the students are different to the accepted standards of the school. This is an example of the cultural conditioning block because Nolan does not actually judge Keating's views but shows bias against them because they go against the school's standards and values.

eliance on Authority Block

Definition: eliance on authority is a block to critical thinking when people accept the views of the majority in place of thinking for themselves and forming their own opinions…… [Read More]

Reference Block

Definition: Frame of reference refers to how people see the world based on their own knowledge, experiences, and position. This is a block to critical thinking because it limits people's perceptions and prevents them from seeing the bigger picture.

Example: When McAllister speaks to Keating, he tells him that he is misguided and that encouraging students to be artists will only lead to later disappointments. He also says that encouraging students to dream and think for themselves will not help them. This is an example of frame of reference because McAllister is judging what he has observed on the class based on his own ideas on the value of dreams and free thinking. McAllister's frame of reference is a block to critical thinking because he is not able to consider what the lesson might mean to the students.
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Group Dynamic Concepts Theories and

Words: 1526 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1014634

Yet the film ends on an optimistic, even triumphant note, with the raised hand of Bender symbolizing victory over the stereotypes subject to which the characters began the film.

Conclusion

The film "The Breakfast Club" contains myriad examples of group dynamics at play. Doing a close reading of the film was valuable in that it provided insight into how narratives can be shaped by psychological principles. In dissecting the actions of the film's principal characters, it became apparent that the filmmakers were not simply trying to create a plotline that would entertain a mass audience. The film also integrates psychological inquiry into its teenaged protagonists. Each character is given a back story which motivates his or her behavior and later undergoes a realization of his or her flaws in order to make a change. The film goes beyond just a high school narrative; it is about how to break free…… [Read More]

References

Aronoff, J., & Wilson, J.P. (1985). Personality in the social process. Hillsdale, NJ: L. Erlbaum

Associates.

Golembiewski, R.T. (Ed.) (2000). Handbook of organizational consultation. New York, NY:

Marcel Dekker.
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Edgar Allen Poe the Controversial

Words: 2753 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87049968

Such evidence as there is can be taken up at a later time. But of one thing we can be sure. If Virginia was the prototype of Eleonora she was not the model for Morella or Berenice or Ligeia."(Quinn, 255)

These feelings can also be inferred from Poe's letters to Mrs. Clemm, Virginia's mother:

I am blinded with tears while writing this letter-- I have no wish to live another hour. Amid sorrow, and the deepest anxiety your letter reached -- and you well know how little I am able to bear up under the pressure of grief -- My bitterest enemy would pity me could he now read my heart -- My last my only hold on life is cruelly torn away -- I have no desire to live and will not but let my duty be done. I love, you know I love Virginia passionately devotedly. I cannot…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Felman, Shoshana. "On Reading Poetry: Reflections on the Limits and Possibilities of Psychoanalytical Approaches." In Edgar Allan Poe: Modern Critical Views, edited by Harold Bloom, pp. 119-39. New York: Chelsea House, 1985.

Hayes, Kevin J. The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Hoffman, Daniel. "O! Nothing Earthly...' / the Poems." In Poe, Poe, Poe, Poe, Poe, Poe, Poe. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1972.

Kaplan, Louise J. "The Perverse Strategy in 'The Fall of the House of Usher'," in New Essays on Poe's Major Tales, ed. Kenneth Silverman, Cambridge University Press, 1993, pp. 45-64.
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Treatment Representation of Women or Children in Nineteenth Century Victorian Literature

Words: 3472 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 95230579

Victorian literature was remarkably concerned with the idea of childhood, but to a large degree we must understand the Victorian concept of childhood and youth as being, in some way, a revisionary response to the early nineteenth century Romantic conception. Here we must, to a certain degree, accept Harold Bloom's thesis that Victorian poetry represents a revisionary response to the revolutionary aesthetic of Romanticism, and particularly that of ordsworth. The simplest way to summarize the ordsworthian child is to recall that well-known line from a short lyric (which would be appended as epigraph to later printings of ordsworth's "Ode: Intimations of Immortality, from Recollections of Early Childhood") -- "the child is father of the man." Here, self-definition in adulthood, and indeed the poetic vocation, are founded in the perceived imaginative freedom of childhood.

Thou little Child, yet glorious in the might

Of heaven-born freedom on thy being's height,

hy with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arnold, Matthew. "The Forsaken Merman." Web. Accessed 15 April 2012 at:  http://www.bartleby.com/101/747.html 

Arnold, Matthew. "William Wordsworth." In Steeves, H.R. (ed.) Selected Poems of William Wordsworth, with Matthew Arnold's Essay on Wordsworth. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1921. Print.

Arnold, Matthew. "Youth's Agitations." Web. Accessed 15 April 2012 at: http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/12118/

Bloom, Harold. "Introduction." In Bloom, Harold (ed.). Bloom's Major Poets: A.E. Housman. New York: Chelsea House, 2003. Print.
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John Dryden Was One of the Most

Words: 998 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44226437

John Dryden was one of the most important literary figures in the 17th century because he excelled in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Dryden was a master of many literary techniques, most particularly the extended metaphor. His poem "Absalom and Achitophel" is a political satire which deals with the then-current political situation in England in a most sly and intelligent way. The piece is an historical allegory wherein the author uses historical events to explore the deeper meaning behind more recent events that have shaped is own society. The rebellion of Absalom against King David is used to parallel the various plots to take over the throne of England through the Exclusion Crisis, the Popish Plot, and the Monmouth Rebellion. Dryden uses the relative safety of the allegory to make a scathing remark about the politics of his country and to subtly recommend ways in which the country could be strengthened…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Dryden, J. (1889). "Absalom and Achitophel." Macmillan: Oxford, UK. 83-115.
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Neruda Nathalie Handal Bei Dao

Words: 3319 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99000449

This first collection of poetry relates of these experiences of dislocation, refuge and identity crisis, as Abinader, one of the reviewers of Handal's work, points out: "Nathalie Handal's new collection of poetry, the Lives of Rain, places us in gritty scenes of exile, occupation, dislocation, refuge, and solitude -- scenes that are often associated with poets of Palestinian background."(Abinader, 256) These themes are obviously common with Palestinian poets due to the fact that they generally experience violence and political conflict more closely and therefore more poignantly. As Abinader emphasizes, the people who are depicted in Handal's poems are invariably the victims of history itself and the pressure it puts on the individual: "Handal's heroes are the survivors not only of war but of the mutability of time and the volatility of history."(Abinader, 256) One of the very significant poems in this collection is Gaza City, a text which describes a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abinader, Elmaz. "The Lives of Rain.(Book review)." MELUS 31.4 (Winter 2006): 256(3)

Dao, Bei. "Bei Dao and Modern Chinese Poetry. http://www.lingshidao.com/hanshi/beidao.htm

Handal, Nathalie. "Gaza City." The Literary Review 46.2 (Wntr 2003): 330(2).

James, a. Bei Dao. "The Answer and Declaration." The Democracy Reader (Edition 1992): 270(2).
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Poetry Case Study

Words: 1143 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 42782599

Emily Dickinson

The poems of Emily Dickinson have been interpreted in many ways and often it is hard to separate the narrator of her works with the woman who wrote them. Dickinson lived such a small and sad little life that it is easy to see these feelings of loneliness and despair in the words she writes. She never married and spent her days isolated from her primarily Christian community for her family's beliefs in a less rigid and more spiritual idea of what God is and how they could communicate with Him. People have speculated about Dickinson's mental state. She became known for wearing only white and for living a reclusive existence until she finally died. Her poems came not from a desire to sell, but from her individual need to express herself. Emily Dickinson never intended to publish her poems. Rather the poems we have were found among…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brownell, Johanna Ed. Emily Dickinson: Poems. Castle Books: Edison, NJ, 2002. Print.

Wolff, Cynthia Griffin. Emily Dickinson. New York: Knopf, 1986. Print.
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Robert Hayden One of the Most Important

Words: 1663 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89616034

Robert Hayden, one of the most important black poets of the 20th Century, was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1913 and grew up in extreme poverty in a racially mixed neighborhood. His parents divorced when he was a child and he was raised by their neighbors, illiam and Sue Ellen Hayden, and not until he was in his forties did he learn that Asa Sheffey and Gladys Finn were his biological parents. During the Great Depression he was employed for two years by the Federal riter's Project, and published his first volume of poetry Heart-Shape in the Dust in 1940. He taught English at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee for twenty-three years, and then at the University of Michigan from 1969 until his death in 1980. Among his other works were The Lion and the Archer (1948), Figure of Time (1955), A Ballad of Remembrance (1962), orks in Mourning Time…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Bloom, Harold. Robert Hayden. Chelsea House Publishers, 2005.

Fetrow, Fred M. "Middle Passage: Robert Hayden's Anti-Epoch" in Bloom: 35-48.

Gates, Henry Louis and Evelyn Brooks Higgenbotham. Harlem Renaissance Lives: From the African-American National Biography. Oxford University Press, 2009.

Kutzinski, Vera M. "Changing Permanences: Historical and Literary Revisionism in Robert Hayden's Middle Passage" in Bloom: 306-21.
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Tom Shulich Coltishhum a Comparative Study on

Words: 9196 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Chapter Paper #: 33144233

Tom Shulich ("ColtishHum")

A comparative study on the theme of fascination with and repulsion from Otherness in Song of Kali by Dan Simmons and in the City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre

ABSACT

In this chapter, I examine similarities and differences between The City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre (1985) and Song of Kali by Dan Simmons (1985) with regard to the themes of the Western journalistic observer of the Oriental Other, and the fascination-repulsion that inspires the Occidental spatial imaginary of Calcutta. By comparing and contrasting these two popular novels, both describing white men's journey into the space of the Other, the chapter seeks to achieve a two-fold objective: (a) to provide insight into the authors with respect to alterity (otherness), and (b) to examine the discursive practices of these novels in terms of contrasting spatial metaphors of Calcutta as "The City of Dreadful Night" or "The City of…… [Read More]

References

Barbiani, E. (2005). Kalighat, the home of goddess Kali: The place where Calcutta is imagined twice: A visual investigation into the dark metropolis. Sociological Research Online, 10 (1). Retrieved from  http://www.socresonline.org.uk/10/1/barbiani.html 

Barbiani, E. (2002). Kali e Calcutta: immagini della dea, immagini della metropoli. Urbino: University of Urbino.

Cameron, J. (1987). An Indian summer. New York, NY: Penguin Travel Library.

Douglas, M. (1966). Purity and danger: An analysis of concepts of pollution and taboo. New York, NY: Routledge & K. Paul.
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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

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Dark Age and the Archaic Age

Words: 1920 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36563837

Dark Age and the Archaic Age

Having watched the lectures for the prior learning unit on video, I was prepared to enjoy the video lecture presentation for this learning unit. I previously found the presentation of lectures in the video format to be very convenient because I could observe at my own pace, rewind if I missed part of the lecture, have flexibility about when I was viewing the lecture, and not be distracted by the behavior or questions of other students. I acknowledged that there were some negatives to the video-learning environment, such as missing out on the organic and natural question and answers that develop in a live classroom setting, but had decided that missing those was an acceptable trade-off given the other benefits that I was receiving from the video lecture environment. Therefore, I was surprised to find that I did not enjoy the video lectures for…… [Read More]

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Lights Up to Reveal a

Words: 1858 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 97985807



AUDRE: I still say I'm the only one who even comes close to understanding the struggle Obama has gone through, even though he is a man

ALLEN: And heterosexual

ADRIENNE: And alive

WILLIAM: Let's just take a step back and look at this objectively. Scientifically. Medically.

AUDRE: I think you've got the wrong hat on, doc. Figuratively speaking.

ALLEN: No, no, this could help. William, you want to right it because your sense of rhythm is uniquely American, right?

WILLIAM: Well, more or less -- m rhythm is the unique American rhythm, I would say

ALLEN: OK, buut close enough. And Adrienne, you think that because you're alive

ADRIENNE: And for other reasons, like, uhh...subjectivity, and er

ALLEN: Right. And Audre

AUDRE: The subjugation of this society which has made me an outcast in every

ALLEN: Yeah, yeah we know. Those are all some pretty valid reasons. As for me,…… [Read More]

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Metaphysical Poetry Journal Exercise 3 1A

Words: 3452 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 67044569

The Lord will lead one to safety always. One can simply believe in something higher to get the meaning of this; it doesn't have to be Jesus. Psalm 127, contrarily is confusing because it states that unless the Lord builds the house, it is built in vain. This seems to be more literal, but I do get the idea. Unless the people building the house are doing it with the love of the Lord in their hearts, or building it for him, then what is the point?

Didactic poetry can be quite comforting as seen in Psalm 23 or it can be much too literal and seen as both confusing and condescending. Psalm 127 isn't very instructive spiritually speaking, unlike Psalm 23.

Updated Proverb: A broken toe can hurt, but a broken heart can kill.

Metaphors: Obscure or Illuminate? Didactic literature with its use of metaphors can sometimes obscure the…… [Read More]

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A E Housman Poetry Is Above

Words: 943 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62515989



The "ill for mending" is his homosexuality, a factor shared by the poet, who also knows that society sees this as an ill and that it is not something that can be "repaired." The apparent admiration the poet expresses for the suicide might be seen as based on thoughts he may have himself had about suicide when he discovered his homosexuality and when that was rebuffed by his chosen target. Maude H. Hawkins writes that "Housman had been almost overwhelmingly obsessed with the desire to kill himself, but was saved from it by native courage and ambition" (164). Here, the poet writes about the process as if he had been through it and failed by drawing back, while he admires this young man who followed through:

Oh you had forethought, you could reason,

And saw your road and where it led,

And early wise and brave in season

Put the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

A.E. Housman Biography." Famous Poets and Poems.com (2007). August 29, 2007.  http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/a__e__housman/biography .

Hawkins, Maude M.A.E. Housman: Man behind a Mask. Chicago: Henry Regnery, 1958.

Reed, J.D. "Dual Nature." Time (28 July 2007). August 29, 2007.  http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,922100-1,00.html .
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Literature Poetry

Words: 2039 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3532402

Fred D'Aguiar's surreal poems like "Mama Dot" and "Air Hall Iconography" stir up imagery of the African homeland and convey a sense of detachment from the modern world. This detachment is not apathetic, but rather, D'Aguiar poignantly portrays the plight of colonized Africans. The poet chooses to focus on the archetypal African matriarch in "Mama Dot." Like a creation story, Fred D'Aguiar's "Mama Dot" outlines the evolution of the titular Mama Dot by progressing through a seven-day week. Each symbolic day represents possible decades or centuries in historical, linear time. D'Aguiar's talent in "Mama Dot" is revealed through his ability to create a time-transcendent, abstract recreation of the tragedies of slavery and the sense of "otherness" that the descendents of slaves feel long after their ancestors were captured and sold.

orn on a Sunday / in the kingdom of Ashante," (lines 1-2) Mama Dot's beginnings feel regal, as the poet…… [Read More]

Bibliography

D'Aguiar, Fred. "Mama Dot." Other: British and Irish Poetry since 1970. Ed. Caddel, Richard and Quartermain. Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1999. 45.

D'Aguiar, Fred. "Airy Hall Iconography." Other: British and Irish Poetry since 1970. Ed. Caddel, Richard and Quartermain. Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1999. 48.

Leonard, Tom. "100 Differences Between Poetry and Prose." Other: British and Irish Poetry since 1970. Ed. Caddel, Richard and Quartermain. Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1999. 129.

Leonard, Tom. "The Evidence." Other: British and Irish Poetry since 1970. Ed. Caddel, Richard and Quartermain. Hanover: Wesleyan University Press, 1999. 130.
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Emily and Dickinson and Walt

Words: 1797 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58060262

The poet is in turmoil and he turns from his love in order to prevent tarnishing or "spoil" (Pound 2) her because she is surrounded by a "new lightness" (3). This poem reflects upon the importance of experience. Like the poets mentioned before, this poet wants us to consider every aspect of our actions. e should not only think of what we want to do but also how that desire and acting upon it will alter our lives. Robert Frost is focused upon the experience of nature. In "Dust of Snow," the poet brings poetry to life as if it were music. hen we read:

The way a crow

Shook down on me

The dust of snow

From a hemlock tree (Frost 1-4)

Here the poet wants to explore rather than embark on some discovery. These writers are different in their individuals styles but they each desire to connect with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dickinson, Emily. "Because I could Not Stop for Death." Masterpieces of American Poets. New York: Garden City Publishing. 1936.

Eliot, T.S. "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock." The Bedford Introduction to Literature.

Boston: Bedford Books of St. Martin's Press.1993.

Dickinson, Emily. "Because I Could Not Stop for Death." The Complete Poems of Emily
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American Eulogies to the Old

Words: 2289 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15024290

Nelson's violent images call upon the reader to behold the corpse of Till, forcing the reader into a state of seismic cultural shock, as America has long been eager to forget its racist legacy (Harold, 2006, p.263). Trethewey's first lines of her book are gentler, but there is always the urge to remember: "Truth be told, I do not want to forget anything of my former life" (Trethewey, p.1)

The calls her poetic collection an act of memory "Erasure, those things that get left out of the landscape of the physical landscape, things that aren't monumented or memorialized, and how we remember and what it is that we forget. I wanted to kind of restore some of those narratives, so those things that are less remembered (Brown, 2007). Her use of the sonnet form over her cycle of poems is not as perfectly consistent as Nelson's, but repetition and remembrance…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Black Soldiers in Blue: African-American Troops in the Civil War Era. Edited by John

David Smith. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

Brown, Jeffery. "Pulitzer Prize Winner Trethewey Discusses Poetry Collection."

Transcript of Online New Hour. 25 Apr 2007. 6 Jun 2007.  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/entertainment/jan-june07/trethewey_04-25.html
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Miller Williams' 1989 Poem Entitled

Words: 975 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74393458

" The stanza discusses how Bill's friends tried to "persuade" both themselves and him that they were not afraid and therefore showed this by comforting him with kisses. However, the following stanza shows how this statement is not entirely true. The poet goes on to state, "If we had more, we would have given more. As it was we stood next to your bed, stopping, though, to set our smiles at the door." At first the poet tries to convince himself that they did all they could, more than necessary, even going as far as standing guard over his deathbed. Yet in the last line the poet admits that this was not enough and was in fact nothing but prefabricated "smiles at the door."

The feelings of guilt continue in the final stanza, which states: "Not because we were less sure at last. Only because, not knowing anything yet, we…… [Read More]

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Printing Press and the Internet

Words: 6637 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64054291

)

"Sonnet 130" by Shakespeare and "Sonnet 23" by Louis Labe both talk about love, as so many sonnets do. Their respective techniques however, differentiate them from each other. Shakespeare uses a rhyme scheme that became known as Shakespearean rhyme scheme or English rhyme. He writes about love in a sarcastic manner though. He is mocking the traditional love poems and the usual expressive manner in which women are often compared to. It is ironic in a way because Shakespeare himself also uses the very techniques in his previous writing when he is writing from a man's point-of-view and describing a woman. But in this sonnet he uses the technique of mocking this exaggerated comparison. Usually women are compared to having skin as white as snow, however, in reality, Shakespeare points out, women don't really fit this description, "If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun."

Louis Labe…… [Read More]

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Victor Hugo Romantic Writings of Victor Hugo

Words: 2912 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64431488

Victor Hugo

Romantic ritings of Victor Hugo

The romantic period was partly in reaction to the impact that the industrial revolution had on the psyches of artists of all stripes. The move toward an industrial culture had moved many people from the pastoral scenes of the country into the grungy hearts of the cities. Many of the people worked in the factories six days a week for many hours a day, or they worked in mines and other industries to support the industry in the cities. The response from the artistic community was to remind the public of two things. They wanted people to remember where they came from and they wanted to help people see the true emotion of life.

One of the most influential writers of the period was a young Frenchman who was known for his poetry early in his career (Halsall x), but who gained international…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Halsall, Albert W. Victor Hugo and the Romantic Drama. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998. Print.

Hugo, Victor. Selected Poems of Victor Hugo. Trans E.H. And A.M. Blackmore. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001. Print.

Hugo, Victor. Ruy Blas. Boston D.C. Heath & Co., Publishers, 1888. Print.
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Inter-Relations in Manyoshu Poetic Wordplay

Words: 1697 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 16750768

" The repetition of the "f" sound, which also sounds like the "v" sound in heaven, is indicative of the sound of swiftly moving air, which alludes to the speed the author wishes this blaze would destroy her husband's means for leaving her.

However, the ghostly quality of this poem that coincides with the sadness the poet feels is suggested by the connotations of the word "ashes," which is suggestive of cremation and the end of life. There is a definite mortal quality of this poem, which becomes clearer to the reader when analyzing the second and final stanza, which is contained within the following quotation. "These are the clothes/Your adoring woman has sewn,/Thoughts all astray./to keep until the day we meet again/Do not be troubled about me:/if only life lasts" (Nakamura 2009, 7-8). The poet emphasizes the fact that a reunion with her husband is largely dependent upon their…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Keene, Donald. Anthology of Japanese Literature, From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century. New York: Grove Press. 1955 Print.

Keene, Donald. Sources of Japanese Tradition: Volume 1: From Earliest Times to 1600. New York: Columbia University Press. Print. 2002.

Morrow, Avery. "The Undecipherable Poem, No. 9 of the Manyoshu." 2004. Web.  http://avery.morrow.name/studies/manyoshu 

Nakamura, Dr. Hisashi. "Ten Thousand Leaves." Tanka Society. 2009. Web. http://www.tankasociety.com/Tanka%20booklet%20Final%202.pdf
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Contemporary Irish Literature

Words: 1094 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75816058

Irish Literature

Ireland has a rich literary tradition with a legacy of authors who have each contributed something to the creation of a cultural identity. For centuries, the authors of Ireland have utilized the beautiful landscape as a counterpoint to the violent political history of the Emerald Isle. Quite literally, the whole history of Ireland can be traced through the literature of the country's writers, both the good and the bad. This tradition lives on in contemporary Irish authors and poets. Two such poets, Ciaran Carson and Allan Gillis, have used their chosen literary type to illustrate their own understanding of Ireland's history. Through their poetry, readers can simultaneously travel back in time and also listen to the eye witness of Ireland's current historical moment. This can be traced through Carson's "Belfast Confetti" and Gillis's "The Ulster ay" in the poetic form, the techniques that the poets utilize, and then…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Carson, Ciaran. "Belfast Confetti." The Poetry Archive. 2010. Web. March 2012.

 http://www.poetryarchive.org/poetryarchive/singlePoem.do?poemId=339 

Gillis, Allan. "The Ulster Way." Somebody Somewhere. Ireland: Gallery Press. 2004. Print.
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Earl of Rochester Aphra Behn Masks

Words: 4609 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80132401

Earl of Rochester / Aphra Behn

Masks and Masculinities:

Gender and Performance in the Earl of Rochester's "Imperfect Enjoyment"

and Aphra Behn's "The Disappointment"

Literature of the English Restoration offers the example of a number of writers who wrote for a courtly audience: literary production, particularly in learned imitation of classical models, was part of the court culture of King Charles II. The fact of a shared model explains the remarkable similarities between "The Imperfect Enjoyment" by the Earl of Rochester and "The Disappointment" by Aphra Behn -- remarkable only because readers are surprised to read one poem about male sexual impotence from the late seventeenth century, let alone two examples of this genre by well-known courtly writers. In fact, Richard Quaintance presents ten more examples by lesser-known poets as he defines the literary sub-genre of the neo-Classical "imperfect enjoyment poem," written in imitation of Roman poems on the same…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Butler, Judith. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, 1990. Print.

Empson, Sir William. "Rochester." Argufying: Essays on Literature and Culture. Ed. John Haffenden. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1988. 270-7. Print.

Farley-Hills, David. Rochester: The Critical Heritage. London: Taylor and Francis, 2005. Print.

Hughes, Derek. "Aphra Behn and the Restoration Theatre." The Cambridge Companion to Aphra Behn. Ed. Derek Hughes and Janet Todd. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. 29- 45. Print.
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Black Poem The Convergence of

Words: 1127 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13118317

In fact, he identified himself entirely with it, even in his own self-reflection. In the reflective poem "leroy," published in 1969 under his newly adopted name Amiri Baraka, a nostalgic comment on his mother becomes a lofty vision of himself as the bearer of black wisdom -- that "strong nigger feeling" (5) -- from his ancestors forward to the next generation. He refers to this legacy that he is passing on as his "consciousness" (11), an indication that he had by this point in his life entirely adopted his race as his identity.

This wholehearted self-identification with race, along with a keen awareness of his cultural power as a poet, combined to create an artist absorbed with his own capacity for social comment and change. After the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965, Baraka became disenchanted with the somewhat passive anti-establishment attitudes of the Greenwich Village artistic community, and moved…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Amiri Baraka: Biography and Historical Context." Modern American Poetry. The University of Illinois. Web. 29 May 2010.

Baraka, Amiri. "Speech to Rutgers University." Chicago Review. Chicago: Fall 1997. Vol. 43, Iss. 4, 109. Print.

-, and William Harris. The LeRoi Jones / Amiri Baraka Reader. New York: Avalon, 1999. Print.

Lease, Joseph. "Progressive Lit: Amiri Baraka, Bruce Andrews, and the Politics of the Lyric 'I'." African-American Review. Terre Haute: Summer 2003. Vol. 37, Iss. 2, 389. Print.
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Death in Poetry Ruba Poetry Is an

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67969262

Death in Poetry

Ruba

Poetry is an effective form of literature wherein the significance and importance of human experience are depicted. Life as people perceive and live it are the most common issues and topics used in poetry, although death is becoming a dominant topic in contemporary poetry because of its enigmatic and subjective quality. Death has many meanings for people: death can be an escape, relief, punishment, pain, suffering, or a meaningless void in a person's life. These different depictions of death will be discussed in the analyses of 5 poems wherein the theme of death is used.

Emily Dickinson's poem entitled, "Death" is a poem that talks about the futility of Man's greatness after death. The poem illustrates two dead people who had been known for their beauty (character 1) and a champion for the truth (character 2). Although these people had been great in their previous lives,…… [Read More]

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Wordsworth Blake Shelly and Other Greats of the Romantic Era

Words: 1186 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19543527

Romantic Era

The years in which the Romantic Era had its great impact -- roughly 1789 through 1832 -- were years in which there were "intense political, social, and cultural upheavals," according to Professor Shannon Heath at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (Heath, 2009). The beginning of the Romantic Era actually is traced to the French Revolution, and though that tumultuous event was not in England, illiam ordsworth and others sympathized with the French Revolution -- at least at the beginning of the Revolution.

The demands for democracy in the Era were manifested through poems that reflected solidarity with principles of "equality and individuality," Heath explains. The principles of fairness and equality were needed in England as well as in France, and Heath suggests that poets were not just responding to revolutions but rather were critiquing English government. According to Giovanni Pellegrino the struggles for democracy and the "political…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Heath, S. (2009). The Culture of Rebellion in the Romantic Era. Romantic Politics. University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Retrieved April 24, 2014, from  http://web.utk.edu .

Pellegrino, G. (2011). Romantic Period in England. Centro Studi La Runa. Retrieved April 24,

2014, from  http://www.centrostudilaruna.it .
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Henry James Is a Plot That Is

Words: 1014 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75293292

Henry James is a plot that is replete with symbolism both in its overarching theme and in its subcomponents.

The Aspern Papers devolves around the plot of a man who would stoop at almost nothing to procure and publish the papers of Jeffery Aspern a famous poet. The character, this nameless narrator, goes to Venice to locate Juliana Bordereau, former lover of a famous, now dead, American poet. He erreoneously believes that Juliana has papers written by this poet and is prepared to court her niece Miss Tita, an unappealing and simple woman, in order to catch a glimpse of these 'Aspern papers'. Miss Tita agrees to help him. Juliana later offers to sell a miniature portrait of Aspern to the narrator for an exorbitant price, but shortly after catches the narrator rifling through her room searching for the alleged papers. Juliana calls the narrator a "publishing scoundrel," collapses, the…… [Read More]

References

James, H. The great short novels of Henry James, New York, Dial Press, 1944

Kaplan, F. Henry James: the imagination of genius: a biography . New York: Morrow, 1992.
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Homer's Life and Epics and Their Effect and Contribution to Western Civilization

Words: 2309 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16156867

Homer was a legendary Greek poet who is traditionally credited as the author of the major Greek epics the "Iliad and the Odyssey," as well as the comic mini-epic "Batracholmyomachia" (The Frog-Mouse ar), the corpus of Homeric Hymns, and various other lost or fragmentary workd such as "Margites" (Homer pp). Some ancient authors credited him with the entire Epic Cycle, which included other poems about the Trojan ar as well as the Theban poems concerning Oedipus and his sons (Homer pp). According to legend, Homer was blind, and aside from several Ionian cities claiming to be his birthplace, there is nothing else known about him (Homer pp). Aristotle and Pindar believed that Homer was born in Smyrna, on the coast of modern-day Turkey, and enjoyed years of fame on the Aegean island of Chios (Tolson pp). Although the great scholar-librarians of Alexandria scrutinized the epics for historical and geographic errors,…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Tolson, Jay. "Was Homer a solo act or a bevy of bards?"

U.S. News & World Report; 7/24/2000; Tolson, Jay

Boorstin, Daniel J. "The reign of the spoken word; Homer spun epics that survived while marble temples fell to ruin." U.S. News & World Report; 8/31/1992; pp.

Due, Casey. "Homer and the Papyri: Center of Hellenic Studies."
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Hero The Definition of Hero

Words: 2709 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 10495696



Madam Eglantyne the Nun, is also an ironic charater. She eats in a very refined manner and attempts other fine characteristics such as speaking French, although she fares poorly at this. Ironically, not all her language is pure, as she swears cosntantly by "St. Loy," a saint renowned for not swearing. Unlike the general conception of the Nun, she is very concerned with outward appearances and did not much care for human beings. Indeed, she cared much more for her three dogs than the human beings around her. Another irony is that she has a coral trinket to fight worldly temptations, which is clearly failing badly.

A second character is the Friar, Hubert. While he is jolly, merry, and festive, his actions are nevertheless evil and cunning. He impregnates girls, for example, and marries them off. He deceived the faithful by hearing confessions for a fee, and even begged from…… [Read More]

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Pippa Passes Robert Browning's Lengthy

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86211152

What many of these other people have to say about themselves and their situation an about the change of hear they may have now that they have heard Pippa sing could be fodder for a dramatic monologue in the way Browning would later shape that form.

The poem covers an entire day, New Year's Day, a day of remembrance and renewal, a day of change from one year to the next and from one state of mind to another. Significantly, then, Pippa's songs serve as a form of forced New Year's resolution for many of these people, making them rethink their lives and make a decision where before they could not. This story contrasts in some ways with that of Sebold and Ottima. The lovers now are Jules and Phene. Jules is the butt of a cruel joke by his fellow art students. He is inclined to leave Phene and…… [Read More]

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2pac Keepin' it Real Irony

Words: 1108 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61485331

Again, he uses dialect that his fans can relate to instead of being concerned about 'proper English'. This is very effective at making the words identifiable to his audience. The more people can relate to what you are saying, the more likely they are to take it to heart and actually do what you are asking them to do: "It's time for us as a people to start makin' some changes." The most ironic thing about this song is the last few lines. I cannot help but wonder if 2 pac was having some kind of premonition when he wrote: "Cause I always got to worry 'bout the pay backs/some punk that I roughed up way back/comin' back after all these years/rat-tat-tat-tat-tat that's the way it is."

That may be the way it is, but to 2 pac, that did not mean things had to stay that way. "Keep Ya…… [Read More]

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Fall to Spring's Sprouting The

Words: 3355 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39314195



The Aeneid

Taking a character from The Iliad and setting him on his own journey, the Roman Virgil's epic The Aeneid necessarily contains certain parallels with the earlier Greek text. The overall story of this lengthy poem in and of itself reflects many of the same basic understandings of mankind's place in the universe, its relationship to the gods, and the relationships that exist within society and between men that are already described above, demonstrating that no real fundamental change has occurred in this schema. Aeneas, the titular hero of the tale who flees his native Troy after it is sacked by the Greeks, is as important as the individual heroes of the war itself, but more than a tale of individual heroism The Aeneid is the story of the founding of a people and the long trajectory of history and humanity. It is a tale for and in many…… [Read More]

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Visions of Death as Part of the

Words: 1952 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30692943

Visions of Death as Part of the Life Cycle

While the terms "life" and "death" are considered to be polar opposites by most standards, some authors view them as part of the same infinite cycle. For writers like Emily Dickinson and Jean hys, death is merely a transitional stage; it is not the end of existence any more than life is the beginning. Evidence of this view of death as a part of the ongoing cycle of life can be seen most prominently in Dickinson's "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" and in hys' "I Used to Live Here Once."

The most notable similarity between Dickinson's poem and hys' short story is that both of the narrators watch children play in the splendor of the natural world while they themselves are no longer a physical part of that world. The primary difference between these two works is that Dickinson…… [Read More]

References

Dickinson, E. Because I could not stop for death, Retrieved from  http://www.online-literature.com/dickinson/443/ 

Rhys, J. (1992) I used to live here once, In The Collected Short Stories, W.W. Norton & Company
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Impressions of War the Most

Words: 6472 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55535844

" There is a more calm feeling to his description. This is not to say that the author was portraying war as being a patriotic act, but the author was not as graphical in his describing what the soldiers were seeing and going through. The reader is more connected to the actions of the poem and not the fact that someone is dying. He ends his poem by referencing "hell" and the reader is left wondering whether the hell that he is referring to the war that is being left behind, or to dying itself.

3) Rites of Passage Activity

In speaking to my grandmother, I was able to find out what it was that she took when she first left her home. At the age of sixteen, she was married to my grandfather and was getting ready to start her knew life as a wife and very soon, as…… [Read More]

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Classical Mythology Penelope

Words: 2774 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 88198114

Penelope: The Crafty Ideal of Greek omanhood

One might think of Achilles, the hero of the Iliad, as the Greek masculine ideal. He triumphs over his enemies in an open agonistic contest because he is a greater warrior than they. He shows the virtue of compassion when he finally yields Hector's body to Priam. Even Achilles's arrogance and his obsession with honor, his inability to deal with slights to his reputation, though they might seem repugnant to our sensibilities, are clearly meant to elicit the sympathy from Homer's audience. They might wish to act in the same way if they stood in his shoes. Yet Odysseus, the hero of the Odyssey, presents an entirely different masculine ideal. He shuns glory because it brings responsibilities that are not really in his best interest. Though a brave and able fighter, he is "the man of many wiles" who triumphs because of his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Marrou, Henri-Irenee. A History of Education in Antiquity. George Lamb, trans. New York: Sheed and Ward, 1956. 25 Apr. 2008  http://books.google.com/books?id=wv6kSdSFTgMC&printsec=frontcover&sig=xw5IKGFqpYWuvJYrmE0eiYrf1Bk#PPR5,M1 .

Ovid. Heroides. Trans A.S. Kline. 2001. 25 Apr. 2008 http://www.tonykline.co.uk/PITBR/Latin/Heroides1-7.htm.
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Dickinson the Poem by Emily Dickenson Titled

Words: 767 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 34503621

Dickinson

The poem by Emily Dickenson, titled It feels a Shame to be Alive, it is talking about the opposition that many people had directed at the government and the Civil War itself. This is because a large number of women in society were considered to be second class citizens and did not have a voice in these matters. Dickson is challenging these views by showing her opposition to the war and the carnage it caused. What drew us to the post is that these ideas were questioned, as they believed that there are greater sacrifices from war. Moreover, many of the ideas that are presented are illustrating the way Dickinson is questioning the status quo through using it is a form of civil disobedience. This is highlighting how she wanted to voice her concerns about current events and challenge the views of traditional society. The questions being asked were…… [Read More]

References

Dickenson, E. (1865). It Feels a Shame to be Alive. American Poems. Retrieved from:  http://www.americanpoems.com/poets/emilydickinson/10396 

Kuipers, K. (2004). My First Lover Returns from Iraq. Swarthmore.edu. Retrieved from:  http://media.swarthmore.edu/bulletin/?p=462
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Romantic Lit Romantic Notions in Blake's The

Words: 775 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29200765

Romantic Lit

Romantic notions in Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper"

Romanticism was an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that occurred during the second half of the 18th century. During this time, a shift from previously established Enlightenment ideals to more natural, emotional, and personal themes was seen. Opposing forces within Romantic literature were Nature and the Self; Nature was seen as the source of goodness and it was through society and civilization that innocence of what was natural, and the natural order of things, was lost. One of the Romantic poets that best exemplified this concept was illiam Blake.

illiam Blake's Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience can be used to demonstrate how society and civilization have corrupted the inherent innocence of children. In Reading Between the Lines: A Christian Guide to Literature, Veith (1990) writes that "civilization was seen as corrupting the natural innocence of human beings; more primitive…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blake, W. (1979) "The Chimney Sweeper" from Songs of Experience. Blake's Poetry and Designs.

Ed. Mary Lynn Johnson and John E. Grant. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Blake, W. (1979) "The Chimney Sweeper" from Songs of Innocence. Blake's Poetry and Designs.

Ed. Mary Lynn Johnson and John E. Grant. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.
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Loss Read P 305 Leaving

Words: 7913 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75963209

" The differences in these two lines seem to be only a matter of syntax but in actuality, it also differs in the meaning. The King James Bible version makes it seem like the Lord is making the individual do something, as if by force or obligation, while the Puritan version states that the Lord causes the individual to do something, as if out of their own will. This alone relays the message that faith itself is driving the action, not a perceived obligation.

Another distinction between the two translations can be found with the lines "Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: / and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever" (King James Bible) and "Goodness and mercy surely shall / all my days follow me. / and in the Lord's house I shall / dwell so long as days…… [Read More]

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Anecdote of the Jar by

Words: 653 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 54561237

In it, Stevens demonstrates how social progress was preceded and by rustic and natural living, which the jar exemplifies. The jar as a symbol carries with it significant meanings for the poem: as one of the earlier works of ancient human culture, the jar became the tool through which humans lived (as a tool for gathering food) and died (serving as an urn for the remains of the dead). Apart from symbolism, Stevens also used colorful imagery to demonstrate the progress of human society from being nomadic to being sedentary and progressive. The use of the words "roundness," "wilderness," "gray," and "bare" are effective words through which ancient human life is illustrated. Similarly, the progress of human civilization through time is depicted in the phrases, "wilderness rose up," "no longer wild," "tall and of a port in air," and "took dominion everywhere."

In "Daystar," paradox is utilized to generate an…… [Read More]

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Tim O'Brien Any Writer Is

Words: 2716 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14398495

At the same time, the style is expected to give the reader an idea of what is happening, and that too in a more refined version. In his language there are poetic references for the brutality and masculinity of war as feminine features. He has talked about the "star shaped hole" and this reminds most about the American flag as also the expectation of the country to kill and destroy for the country.

At the same time, the language is graphic enough to indicate the bloodshed that is going on all around. All combined these bring out the emotion draining nature of war. These probably reflect that O'Brien probably could not come to terms with war, which was expected of him, but was not possible due to the voice of his conscience. The sum total is that he was able to match the image of being a part of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dreilinger, Danielle. Tim O'Brien: coming in from the cold. Sing Out! The Folk song Magazine. Winter, 2004. Retrieved at  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1197/is_4_47/ai_111695567Accessed  on 30 May, 2005

Piwinski, David. J. My Lai, Flies, and Beelzebub in Tim O'Brien's in the Lake of the Woods. Retrieved at  http://www.wlajournal.com/12_2/Piwinski.pdf . Accessed on 30 May, 2005

Timmerman, John. H. Tim O'Brien and the Art of the True War Story: 'Night March' and 'Speaking of Courage' - Critical Essay. Twentieth Century Literature. Spring, 2000.

Retrieved at  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0403/is_1_46/ai_63591266Accessed  on 30 May, 2005
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Francois Truffaut's Film Les Quatre Cents Coups

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99873016

Francois Truffaut's film Les quatre cents coups (The 400 Blows) details the life of a boy frustrated by authoritarian teachers and insensitive parents. The film traces Antoine's development and maturation, as he channels his frustration increasingly into his writing. The semi-autobiographical picture offers a wealth of insight into the changing roles of children in modern society.

The opening scene reveals the structural issues in intergenerational conflict. Antoine did nothing wrong, and was one of many boys passing around the pinup picture. He was singled out, leading him to internalize a sense that authority figures target him unfairly. Moreover, the filmmaker establishes the structural problems in the adult-child and parent-child relationship. In a paternalistic society, children are not offered respect. Without respect, they struggle to develop self-respect and self-awareness. Adults are not communicative with children. The problems that Antoine has at school are mirrors of the problems he has at home.…… [Read More]

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Affect of the Enlightenment on the French Revolution

Words: 3655 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73628922

Enlightenment on the French evolution

evolutionary changes in the leadership of 18th Century France did not occur overnight or with some sudden spark of defiance by citizens. The events and ideals which led to the French evolution were part of a gradual yet dramatic trend toward individualism, freedom, liberty, self-determination and self-reliance which had been evolving over years in Europe, and which would be called The Enlightenment. This paper examines and analyses the dynamics of The Enlightenment - and also, those individuals who contributed to the growth of The Enlightenment and to the ultimate demise of the Monarchy - in terms of what affect it had on the French evolution.

Introduction to the French evolution

When the legitimate question is raised as to what role, if any, The Enlightenment played in the French evolution, the best evidence from credible historic sources is that The Enlightenment did indeed play an important…… [Read More]

References

Brians, Paul. "The Enlightenment." Department of English, Washington State University (May 2000). http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~brians/hum_303/enlightenment.html.

Chartier, Roger. The Cultural Origins of the French Revolution. Durham: Duke

University Press, 1991.

Fieser, James. "Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)." The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Available at http://www.utm.edu/ressearch/iep/r/rousseau.htm.
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Odyssey Homer's Odyssey and the

Words: 1437 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35084088



For Aristotle, true freedom and liberty consists in ruling and being ruled in turn and not always insisting on fulfilling one's own personal desires at the cost of others. Thus, for dysseus, true freedom can only come about when one is allowed to contribute to society for the betterment of everyone involved, a sure sign of moral correctness and rational thinking.

In addition, Aristotle stressed the importance of justice and goodness, for he believed that people possess a sort of inborn knowledge concerning what is right and what is wrong; however, irrational desires often overrule such knowledge and leads people to commit wrong acts or behave inappropriately. This conflict of desires in human beings could be overcome by achieving self-control via training the mind to win out over primitive instincts and passions. Thus, intelligence is the finest human quality and the mind is the true self, the god-like aspect of…… [Read More]

One special dramatic festival was devoted to Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, and featured what were known as satyr plays, so-called because the actors portrayed half-human, half-animal roles, often in the form of a goat. The term tragedy is derived from the words "goat" and "song" and refers to plays with plots involving fierce conflicts and characters which symbolized powerful human and divine forces. Certainly, Homer's Odyssey could be viewed as one of these types of plays, due to the conflicts encountered by Odysseus on his way home to Ithaca and the will of the gods who often attempted to complicate his journeys through sorcery and magic, such as Odysseus and his troubles with Circe, the beautiful female witch that turned his men into pigs as a form of punishment.

A the ultimate example of a democratic social system with freedom, personal responsibilities and moral direction. However, although Odysseus the man was not without his faults and failures, he does symbolize the true Greek hero and citizen elite, due to his unfaltering goal to return home to his wife Penelope and to bring peace and tranquillity to Ithaca.

Connolly, Peter. The Ancient Greece of Odysseus. UK: Oxford University Press, 2003.
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Assembling Culture Archives Documents Exhibitions

Words: 6890 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 25075072

Assembling Culture

Assembling Southern Appalachian Belief Culture from the Foxfire Archive

This project looks at the belief structure of people in the Southern Appalachian mountains as recognized through the Foxfire archival project, documentary evidence and artistic interpretation. Through an examination of belief systems it is believed that unique cultural aspects of this isolated group of people can be determined. The Foxfire project is an archive that documents how the people lived prior to the mass introduction of outside influences that happened concurrent to the ability of residents to electrify their houses which occurred from approximately 1935 and into the 1950's. Prior to this time the residents of these southeastern mountains were isolated due to the remoteness of villages, and they were able to remain relatively self-contained even though some sections were being encroached by industry. The belief systems in this examination include religion and healing, but mainly relate to how…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Breton, Andre. Nadja. New York: Grove Press, 1960. Print.

Cheek, Angie, and Lacy Hunter Nix. The Foxfire 40th Anniversary Book: Faith, Family, and the Land. New York: Anchor Books, 2006. Print.

Cohen, Margaret. Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surreal Revolution. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1995. Print.

De Caro, Frank. The Folklore Muse: Poetry, Fiction, and Other Reflections by Folklorists, Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 2008. Print.
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Doll's House Henrik Ibsen's Play a Doll's

Words: 3654 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58019738

Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll's Housemade him the father of modern literature. His writing showed tragedy and drama in a new and rather modern way. Prior to an analysis of the story at hand, it is only relevant that the plot and main characters are discussed in detail. This story does not revolve around a whole bunch of characters and is based on only a few days. The story starts off on A Christmas eve when Nora is in the living room and has just gotten back from a shopping trip. Nora is the protagonist of the play and is a wife and a mother. As soon as the play commences, the audience can tell about the rigid relationship between Nora and her husband, Torvald Helmer.

The conversation that the two are having shows that the couple and the family had to go through some tough times before.…… [Read More]

Works cited

Adams, Robert Martin. "Henrik Ibsen: The Fifty-First Anniversary." The Hudson Review, 10. 3 (1957): 415 -- 423. Print.

Fjelde, Rolf. Four major plays: Volume I. New York City: Signet Classic. 1992. Print.

Forward, Stephanie. "A New World for women? Stephanie Forward considers Nora's dramatic exit from Ibsen's A Doll's House." The English Review, 19. 4 (2009): Print.

Freedman, Morris. The moral impulse. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1967. Print.