Deviant Behavior Essays (Examples)

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Deviant Conduct

Words: 1148 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58435922

Deviant Conduct

An individual's behavior is labeled as "deviant" when the behavior goes against the prevailing norms that govern social life. These norms are generally unspoken rules designed to promote patterns in the social interactions between people. This gives rise to expectations about how people must act and behave. Those who do not conform to these expectations are therefore considered "deviant."

Generally, there are three main areas covered by unspoken social norms. The first area concerns appearance - one's clothing, hairstyle, personal grooming. This also extends to material possessions. In Western society, in particular, people reveal much about themselves by their choice of cars, houses and jewelry.

The second area of social norms concern manners. These include how we relate to others on an interpersonal as well as a group level. Personal manner norms concern areas like proxemics, the typical distances people maintain during face-to-face interactions. Group style norms are…… [Read More]

Foucault, Michel. 1967. "Illegalities and Delinquency." The Foucault Reader. Paul Rabinow, ed. New York: Pantheon Books.

Henslin, James. 1991. "The Survivors of the F-227." Down to Earn Sociology: Introductory Readings. 9th ed. James Henslin, ed. New York: The Free Press, 1997.

Jackson, Jesse. 2000. "The Death Penalty Discriminates against African-Americans." In Opposing Viewpoints in Social Issues. William Dudley, ed. San Diego: Greenhaven Press.
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Deviant Sexuality in Adolesence

Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82922692

Dishion, Ha & Veronneau (2012), adolescent problem behavior tends to peak in middle and late adolescence, for reasons largely attributed to peer pressures combined with sexual maturation (Dishion, Ha & Veronneau, 2012, p.4). The hypothesis of this quantitative article was that the phenomenon of clustering would be observed in an analysis of deviant behavior: i.e., that clusters of specific problems would be observed amongst peer groups versus general deviance, supporting the idea that deviant behavior was at least partially social in nature. The specific focus of the study was sexual behavior, including early promiscuity and childbearing, although other potentially problematic behaviors were also studied, including arguing or talking back or aggressive behavior, as reported by parents and teachers.

The model of the study was longitudinal in nature. 998 participants were assessed at age eleven and at different developmental points throughout the next eleven years. Parent, student, and teacher self-reports were…… [Read More]

References

Dishion, T.J., Ha, T. & Veronneau, M.H. (2012). An ecological analysis of the effects of deviant peer clustering on sexual promiscuity, problem behavior, and childbearing from early adolescence to adulthood: an enhancement of the life history framework. Developmental Psychology. 48(3):703-17.
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Continuum of Deviant Organizations

Words: 1230 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55201482

participation in deviant social structures. What makes people commit to a deviant identity? What makes people adhere to the social structures of deviant groups? Why are members of deviant groups so deeply loyal to each other and to the organization? The paper endeavors to offer insight into these questions and more as part of a quest to understand deviant behaviors, deviant organizations, and the construction of identity.

Exploring the Continuum of Deviant Organizations

For this essay, use Best & Luckenbill's continuum of deviant organizations as outlined in the textbook to explain how a person or group could become increasingly invested in his/her deviance. For example, consider how a youth from a gang-impacted area could move his/her way through from less organized to more organized deviant social organizations and imagine how this would ultimately impact his/her identity formation.

The higher the degree of deviant behavior demonstrated to serve and/or participate in…… [Read More]

References:

Adler, P., & Adler, P. (2012) Constructions of deviance: Social power, context, and interaction. (7th ed.) Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Best, J., & Luckenbill, D.F. (1980) The Social Organization of Deviants. Social Problems, 28(1), 14 -- 31.
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Theoretical Dimensions Involving Criminal Behavior

Words: 1371 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43899327

Criminal Acts and Offender Behavior

Theoretical Dimensions of Criminal Behavior

Laws exist to maintain order and peace and provide for the safety and well-being of all members of society. Acts that disrupt and threaten this system of order are deemed criminal in nature and are therefore punishable by law. The psychology of criminal behavior addresses the thought processes that result in deviant acts and the motivations that drive them. It is believed that criminal types operate from a self-centered framework that shows little, if any regard, for the safety and well-being of others (Merton, 1968).

There are generally three broad theoretical models of criminal behavior: biological, psychological, and sociological. Most theoretical models overlap in their analysis and point to the genetic predisposition of some individuals toward criminal behavior, as well as environmental influences (Morley & Hall, 2003). Most commonly both play a part in developing a person's tendency to engage…… [Read More]

References

Holmes, S.E., Slaughter, J.R., & Kashani, J. (2001). Risk factors in childhood that lead to the development of conduct disorder and antisocial personality disorder. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 31, 183-193.

Merton, Robert K. (1968). Social Theory and Social Structure. New York: Free Press.

Morley, K., & Hall, W. (2003). Is there a genetic susceptibility to engage in criminal acts? Australian Institute of Criminology: Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, 263, 1-6.

Raine, A. (2002). The biological basis of crime. In J.Q Wilson & J. Petrsilia (Eds.) Crime: Public policies for crime control. Oakland: ICS Press.
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Panhandling as a Deviant Activity

Words: 734 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47182467

In Orlando, when the group Food not Bombs decided to give away food in a local park:

Their well-intentioned efforts led to some negative side effects for nearby residents.

Police say that crime, along with reports of trespassing and lewd behavior, spiked after many of the large feedings, which often drew hundreds of homeless into some of the nicest parts of downtown. "I was having to pick up human waste from my yard and shoo people out from sleeping in my bushes," says obert Harding, a local attorney whose office is around the corner from Lake Eola Park. (Philips, 2006).

Clearly, there are deviant behaviors that are associated with panhandling, even if panhandling itself is not a deviant behavior. Moreover, the very serious and real life issues that contribute to homelessness and panhandling, such as addiction disorders, mental illness, and domestic violence, are all highly associated with criminal behavior. It…… [Read More]

References

National Coalition for the Homeless. (2006). Why are people homeless? Retrieved February

12, 2007 from the National Coalition for the Homeless.

Web site:  http://www.nationalhomeless.org/publications/facts.html 

National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty. (2002). Panhandling criminalization:
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Atypical Sexual Behavior

Words: 1881 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62911121

Atypical Sexual Behavior (paraphilias): Signs of a Changing Culture

New York Times article recently reported that clinical psychologists are seeing an increasing number of patients reporting that they engage in abnormal sexual behavior (Goleman, 1991). Kinsey noted that in the years 1948 and 1953 as many as half of the Americans surveyed participated in sexual activities that could be considered masochistic or sadistic (such as biting or spanking) (Kinsey, et. al, 1948: Kinsey, et. Al., 1953). This trend seems to have slightly increased in prevalence, however, still remains close to the 61% mark (Donelly and Straus, 1994).

This issue raises several questions. The first is whether society has "done something" to create this phenomenon. In other words, is there an environmental factor that is making otherwise normal people engage in deviancy? Does it mean that our definitions of "normal" are changing and that these behaviors have always been a part…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. Washington: American Psychiatric Association.

DeMause, Lloyd (1991). "The Universality of Incest." Journal of Psychohistory, 19, 123-164.

Donnelly, D., & Straus, M. (1994). "The fusion of sex and violence." In M.A. Straus, Beating the devil out of them: Corporal punishment in American families. Boston: Lexington/MacMillan.

Freud, Sigmund (1905). Drei Abhandlungen zur Sexualtheorie. Vienna: Franz Deuticke (English translation)
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Theoretical Approaches to Criminal Behavior Different Perspectives

Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25255230

Theoretical Approaches to Criminal Behavior

Different perspectives of crime are essential when an explanation of why individuals engage in deviant behaviors and just a few become a nuisance to the society. Therefore there are various theories that have been put up in a bid to find out the causes of crime. A thorough explanation of the theories and the perspectives help in explaining the different reasons for occurrence of crime and the identification of factors that make an individual become a criminal. With these theories in place there is an understanding of an individual's behavior that will provide an insight into the reasoning and minds toward crime related behaviors.

The two main theories are classical and biological theories. Focus on rationality of human nature forms the basis for classical theory of crime. This means that an individual who chooses to take part in crime does so willingly without any other…… [Read More]

Refences

Alston, J. (2005).Understanding Criminal Behavior. Retrieved October 24, 2012 from  http://www.iaca.net/ExploringCA/2Ed/exploringca_chapter3.pdf 

HubPages Inc. (2012) Society and crime theory: biological and classical theories that explain criminal behavior.Retrieved October 24, 2012 from http://miakouna.hubpages.com/hub/classical-and-biological-theories
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Delinquent Behavior

Words: 470 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19807755

Delinquent Beavior

Cildren are te future of uman civilization, and to tat extent, it is vital tat all communities, societies and governments pay attention to te growing problem of juvenile delinquency. Indeed, if society fails in its efforts to address te issue of juvenile delinquency, it will lead to a world of caos and disorder, placing in jeopardy millions of years of effort to work towards a civilization were individual citizens can be assured of a sense of socio-economic, psycological and emotional well-being. Bearing te importance of te issue in mind, it is te objective of tis researc paper, troug a review of selected literature, to examine: te nature and extent of te problem of juvenile delinquent beavior; te possible consequences to society if te problem is not redressed effectively; te range of underlying biological, psycological and social causative factors of juvenile delinquency; and suggested solutions and metods of reducing,…… [Read More]

http://www.ncjrs.org/html/ojjdp/nationalreport99/chapter3.pdf

Tappan, Paul W. Juvenile Delinquency. 1st ed. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1949.

Vedder, C.B. (1954). The Juvenile Offender: Perspective and Readings. New York: Random House.
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Understanding the Connection Between Child Abuse and Anti-Social Behavior

Words: 6698 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75798499

Abused children develop antisocial behavior that persists through three continuous generations. Such behavior grows out of angry, aggressive parenting and an overall negative home environment, perpetuated by sibling collusion, economic and biological factors. These children exhibit this in preschool by committing at least one antisocial behavior each day in class. As dysfunctional adolescents, their romantic lives and eventual marriages also fail. African-American children suffer from the affliction than Caucasian children. The current level of knowledge and efforts requires effective and efficient mechanisms at home, in school and the community in the crucial formative childhood years.

Understanding the Connection between Child Abuse and the Development of Antisocial Behavior

Abused children eventually become problem adults who are a burden to society.

ecent studies reveal the significance of parenting in the cross-generational transmission of aggressive or problem behavior up to three continuous generations. Stable evidence has long recognized and documented the negative effects…… [Read More]

References

Ary, D.V., Duncan, T.E., Biglan, A., Mitzler, C., & Smolkowski, K (April

1999). Development of Adolescent Problem Behavior. Journal of Abnormal

Child Psychology. New York: Plenum Publishing Corporation. Retrieved from the Web July 17, 2004. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0902/is_2_27/ai_55208541

2. Ballard, S. (August 18, 2003).How Your Relationships Affect Your Child. Jet.
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Predicting Criminal Behavior Is There a Genetic Link

Words: 3480 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5060457

Crime

Understanding why crime occurs requires an appreciation for the complexity of human behavior. Behavior is not determined by one factor, but rather influenced by a host of interrelated factors. Modern biological theories in criminology differ from previous theories in that they examine the entire range of biological characteristics, including those that result from genetic defects (those that are inherited) and those that are environmentally induced. In addition, theories developed since the 1980s do not suggest that biological characteristics directly cause crime. Instead, researchers argue that certain biological conditions increase the likelihood that an individual will engage in some antisocial behavior that can be defined as criminal (Fishbein, 1990). Modern theories increasingly focus on the interaction between biological characteristics and the social environment, rather than looking solely at the effects of biology.

his paper explores the research regarding genetic causes or pre-dispositions to criminal behavior and examines the evidence which…… [Read More]

Thornberry (1987) incorporates social learning theory, social bonding, cognitive theory, and social structure theories of criminal behavior to explain delinquency. Thornberry sees delinquency activities as changing over time. As youths enter adolescence, their bonds to their parents and social institutions are said to weaken. Peer groups become more important to them.

If these young people reside in socially disorganized environments, they are at high risk to have weak social bonds and peers who engage in deviance. Adolescents who are from more stable environments may engage in deviancy (they are, after all, adolescents), but their actions are better controlled by stronger social bonds and associations with peers who engage in more conventional behaviors.

Thornberry sees delinquent behaviors as influenced by age. As young people enter their late teens, the influence of peers gives way to perceptions of their roles in society. Thornberry
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Anti-Social Behavior in Adolescents Current Essay Is

Words: 2434 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80181311

Anti-Social Behavior in Adolescents

Current essay is a discussion of the antisocial behavior disorder amongst adolescents. The author critically reviewed studies on the topic. The literature suggests that neighborhood and peer holds a great influence as regards antisocial behavior amongst adolescents. Previous research has confirmed socialization experiences outside of the family shape what goes on inside of the family. Also there is possibility that peer and neighborhood characteristics are related to parenting and family relationships. Presence of violence in neighborhood may cause stress among parents resulting in poor parenthood quality.

Neighborhood Influences

Peer Influences

Mediating Effects of Adolescent Antisocial Behavior

Conclusions

eferences

Anti-Social Behavior in Adolescents

Introduction

The importance of socialization contexts outside of the family has been well documented. In particular, neighborhood (e.g., violence, collective efficacy) and peer relationship (e.g., relationship quality, peer deviancy) factors both have been linked to a number of adolescent outcomes, such as self-esteem, academic…… [Read More]

References

Barnes, J., Belsky, J., Broomfield, K.A., Melhuish, E., & the National Evaluation of Sure Start Research Team (2006). Neighborhood deprivation, school disorder and academic achievement in primary schools in deprived communities in England. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 30, 127-136.

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The ecology of human development: Experiments by nature and design. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Capaldi, D., DeGarmo, D., Patterson, G.R., & Forgatch, M. (2002). Contextual risk across the early life span and association with antisocial behavior. In J.B. Reid, G.R. Patterson, & J. Snyder (Eds.), Antisocial behavior in children and adolescents: A developmental analysis and model for intervention (p.123-145). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Chapple, C.L. (2005). Self-control, peer relations, and delinquency. Justice Quarterly,22, 89-106.
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Causes of Criminal Behavior

Words: 1923 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34845368

Causes of Criminal Behavior

Although crimes have been committed since times immemorial, a systematic study of the causes of criminal behavior (or why crimes are committed) is a relatively recent phenomenon. Various theories have been put forward and numerous research studies have been conducted to better understand the criminal mind in order to prevent or reduce crime. It is, perhaps, a tribute to the complexity of the human brain that most of these theories remain just "theories" with little evidence to support definite and irrefutable patterns of criminal behavior. This is not to suggest that all theories of "criminology" are worthless -- most of them do provide useful insight into the criminal mind and at least partially explain the reasons why crimes are committed by certain individuals. In this paper we shall explore some of the theories of criminal behavior that have attempted to throw light on the causes of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bardsley, Marilyn. "David Berkowitz"-Son of Sam. Crime Library. 2003.

Courtroom Television Network Website. November 28, 2003 http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial_killers/notorious/berkowitz/berkowitz_6.html

Bell, Rachel. "Ted Bundy -- A Time of Change" Crime Library. 2003

Courtroom Television Network Website. Courtroom Television Network Website. 2003
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Crime Theories Psychological Theories of Criminal Behavior

Words: 1548 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27773820

Crime Theories

Psychological theories of criminal behavior focus on the individual, rather than on contextual factors (as sociological theories of crime do) or on biological factors (such as genetics). Personality, traits, and cognitions are all covered under the rubric of psychological theories of crime. One of the prevailing and most widely accepted psychological theory of crime is rational choice theory. ational choice theory " is perhaps the most common reason why criminals do the things they do," accounting for a wide variety of criminal behaviors (Dechant, 2009). The theory was first suggested and developed by William Glasser, and has since become a default theory of explaining everything from petty theft to white-collar crime.

ational choice theory is relatively straightforward. The individual is believed to be acting rationally, making decisions based on personal need, convenience, and expediency. The theory permits for individual differences, as each person may be motivated by different…… [Read More]

References

Dechant, A.B. (2009). The psychology of criminal behavior: Theories from past to present. Coastline Journal. Retrieved online: http://coastlinejournal.org/2009/04/13/the-psychology-of-criminal-behaviour-theories-from-past-to-present/

Gul, S.K. (2009). An evaluation of the rational choice theory in criminology. Sociology and Applied Science 4(8): 36-44.

Li, H., Zhang, J. & Sarathy, R. (2010). Understanding compliance with internet use policy from the perspective of rational choice theory. Decision Support Systems 48(4): 635-645.

Scott, J. (2000). Rational choice theory From Understanding Contemporary Society: Theories of The Present, edited by G. Browning, A. Halcli, and F. Webster. Sage Publications.
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Merton Rather Than Attribute Deviant

Words: 1204 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52772435

Merton stops short of addressing the core social institutions, values, and structures that reinforce anomie but his essay prompts sociologists to postulate which structures or value may be culprits.

The author does offer three "success prototypes" extant in American culture. First, all Americans are encouraged to strive for the same goals and those goals are believed to be possible for all. Second, any stumbling blocks along the way will soon transform into success. Hope is integral to the American Dream. Third, by aiming high, the only way a person can fail is to not participate or not play the game.

Merton also describes five types of individual adaptations to social goals. A person may shift from one of these adaptation patterns to another depending on the circumstance. The most common adaptation tool in stable societies is conformity. Innovation is another tool of adaptation in a culture like ours, in which…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Merton, Robert K. "Social Structure and Anomie." Excerpt in Social Theory. Charles Lemert (Ed.). p. 225-237.
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Field Experiment on the Interactive Perspective of Deviance

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66312090

Behavior Experiment

The experiment took place in a busy office building at around five o'clock in the evening. It started on the ground floor and involved walking into an elevator and not turning around. The total number of people who entered the elevator was six, two stopped on the third floor, which was the first stop and the other three stopped on the fifth, which was the last stop. The experiment ended on the fifth floor and took a little over three minutes.

eactions

The other five people upon entering the elevator realized that not everybody turned to face the entrance as usual. The group seemed baffled with the occurrence. Two people, a female and a male laughed asking jokingly if they were supposed to turn around. They appeared friendly and continued with interesting comment until they left the elevator. The other three smiled but seemed less concerned. However, the…… [Read More]

Reference

Alder, P., & Alder, P. (2012). Constructions of Deviance: Social Power, Context, and Interaction (7th ed.). Belmont: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Beauvais, F. (1992). Characteristics of Indian Youth and Drug Use. American Indian and Alaska

Native Mental Health Research Journal .

Cullen, F.T., & Cullen, J.B. (1978). Toward A Paradigm of Labeling Theory. NCJRS, 53.
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Hipster Consumer Behavior Following the Publication of

Words: 2312 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76984759

Hipster Consumer Behavior

Following the publication of Norman Mailer's essay, "The White Negro" in 1957, the term "hipster" has become part of the American lexicon. The image of hipsters has changed in fundamental ways since that time, though, and marketers interested in this segment are therefore faced with some significant challenges in fine-tuning their marketing mixes to appeal to young adults who define themselves as hipsters or who are attracted to the image for other reasons. This paper provides a review of the relevant peer-reviewed and scholarly literature concerning hipster consumer behavior, including a background, a description of the lifestyle branding theoretical foundation that can be used to formulate marketing initiatives, and the findings that emerged from the research. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings are presented in the conclusion.

Background

Although adults of any age may be regarded as "hipsters," this category is commonly regarded as…… [Read More]

References

Clark, L.S. (2007). Religion, media, and the marketplace. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers

Fabre, J. (2005). Smart nursing: How to create a positive work environment that empowers and retains nurses. New York: Springer.

Greif, M. (2010, November 15). A hipster's paradise: In the late 1990s, a down-at-heel 'hood in New York's Lower East Side became an enclave for rich white kids. New Statesman,

139(5027), 39.
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Violent Criminal Behavior Uniqueness of

Words: 2324 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22464658

82).

Psychosocial background of these rapists is inclusive of physical as well as verbal abuse which can be from both or one of the parents. Abuse-based background is seen in more than 56% of the rapists in this category. More than 80% of the rapists belong to divorced households; most of these are adopted or have spent their childhood in foster care. elationships of these rapists with women in the past have failed or did not work based on which hostile feelings have developed against the opposite sex.

Background profiling on rapists has shown that these normally are raised in single parent households with increased issues. Additionally they grow up being physically as well as verbally abused facing sexual deviances. The children facing these conditions are the ones that clearly show tendencies towards sexual promiscuity. In the case of adults, it has been seen that they are married later in…… [Read More]

References

Girod, J.R. (2004). Profiling the Criminal Mind: Behavioral Science and Criminal Investigative Analysis. Iuniverse Inc.

Holmes, M.R., and Holmes, S. (2002). Profiling violent crimes: an investigative tool. Edition 3. Sage.

Innes, B. (2003). Profile of a criminal mind: how psychological profiling helps solve true crimes. Reader's Digest.

Jacobs, D. (2011). Analyzing Criminal Minds: Forensic Investigative Science for the 21st Century: Brain, behavior, and evolution. ABC-CLIO.
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Understanding Deviant Personalities

Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44972820

Psychology Discussion: Psychopathology

Read the introduction to Reading 1: Beaver, Rowland, Schwartz & Nedelec (2011). The genetic origins of psychopathic personality traits in adult males and females: Results from an adoption-based study. Journal of Criminal Justice, 39, 426-432.

Characterise psychopathy: What are the defining features?

Psychopathy is a disorder of the personality that based on three prongs of traits: affective, behavioral, and interpersonal. Perhaps because they are so striking, are observed early in a person's life, or are reliably exhibited across people with psychopathy, the affective trait domain is key to identifying and measuring the incidence of psychopathy in a population. In particular, psychiatrists and psychologists look for callousness, absence of empathy, lack of feelings of guilt or remorse, reactive short-tempers, and indifference to punishment -- other than an association with revenge seeking.

State two findings from the reading that indicate that psychopathic personality traits are inherited.

Beaver, et al.…… [Read More]

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Organizational Behavior in a Competitive Environment Where

Words: 2239 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38733706

Organizational Behavior

In a competitive environment, where change is the only constant phenomenon, learning and knowledge management are vital for sustenance and growth of organizations. A precise universal definition of knowledge can be elusive, because it is complex and manifests itself in various forms in individuals as well as in organizations. Individual or tacit knowledge is confined to the people who possess it and cannot be structured or managed in the organizational sense. Implicit knowledge is difficult to communicate from person to person and limited to the perception of the individual. Organizational or explicit knowledge can be documented into policies and procedures and can be made available to employees. In whatever form, knowledge is regarded only within a system of legitimization that permits it to be accepted as knowledge (Mouritsen et al., 736). Put differently, knowledge is perceived and accepted based on social frameworks.

The rational theory of knowledge management…… [Read More]

References

Baum, J.A and Oliver C 'Towards an institutional ecology of organizational founding', Academy of Management Journal, (1996) 39:1378-1427

Carroll, G and Hannan, M 'Density dependence in the evolution of populations of newspaper organizations', American Sociological Review (1989) (54):524-541

DiMaggio. P.J and Powell, W.W 'The iron cage revisited: institutional isomorphism and collective rationality in organizational fields', American Sociological Review (1983) (48):147-160

Kloot, L 'Organizational learning and management control systems: responding to environmental change', Management Accounting Research (1997) (8) 47-73
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Criminal Statistics and Behavior Some

Words: 822 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38209197

"Approximately 27.5% of college women reported experiences that met the legal criteria for rape," even though some of them were not necessarily aware that the actions to which they were subjected satisfied such a definition (ape and sexual violence, 2013, NIJ).

According to the FBI, which defines violent crimes as "murder and non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault," an "estimated 1,246,248 violent crimes occurred nationwide" in 2010 (ape and sexual violence, 2013, NIJ). There is obviously a great deal of overlap between the characteristics of populations that commit sexual assault and violent criminals, due to this definition. It should also be noted that although persons who commit violent crimes are disproportionately male and young (the example of stereotypes being validated by statistics); whites commit more such crimes -- 54% vs. 45% versus African-Americans. Also, "numbers also vary widely depending on the crime, with blacks responsible for more murders…… [Read More]

References

Bartol, C. & Bartol, a. (2007). Criminal Behavior: A Psychosocial Approach. Prentice Hall.

Family violence statistics. (2002). BJS. Retrieved:

 http://bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/fvs02.pdf 

Hodgins, S. & Muller-Isberner, R. (Eds.). (2000). Violence, crime, and mentally disordered offenders: Concepts and methods for effective treatment and prevention. New York: John Wiley & Sons
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Perplexing Questions About Human Psychology

Words: 1501 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42540057

The environment, has been a scientific argument since the Victorian Era. The nature vs. nurture and stability vs. change arguments remain quite controversial. In essence, it concerns the importance of an individual's innate qualities (their nature) versus the way they were raised, the interactions they have had, and their personal experiences (nurture). One asks, would we have had a Stalin had he remained in seminary, or not been part of a prison system that spurred ideas of communism, would Van Gogh or Tchaikovsky produced such masterpieces of art had they not had clinical depression and perhaps a host of psychological disorders - or, does history (a general term here for civilization and humanity), produce those individuals that are products of their time and environment, thus perpetuating the idea of change? (Ridley). Likely not, but the basis for their behavior is likely still part of their psyche. However, just because the…… [Read More]

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Fostering Community Spirit

Words: 1275 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43821097

Social Ordinance: A Means to Foster a Spirit of Community

There are usually a set of social features that are provided to man so as to regulate their behavior according to the norms and values that have been set. Some people in a community might fail to conform to these norms. The failure to conform to these norms that have been set within the community is termed as deviant behavior. In short, the violation of law that is in existence within the society is known as deviant behavior. Deviant behavior in a community includes criminal behavior, drug abuse, and gang membership and so on.

Description of changed deviant behavior

These deviant behaviors are not permanent as people who exhibit these behaviors change their ways at some point in their life. People end up changing their deviant behavior and become completely different people in the society. These people get tired of…… [Read More]

References

Kai T. Erikson (nd). On the Socialogy of Deviance. Retrieved August 28, 2012 from  http://fasnafan.tripod.com/sociologyofdeviance.pdf 

The Connexions Project, (2014). Deviance, Crime and Social Control. Retrieved August 28, 2012 from http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/SOC101_Introduction-to-Sociology_Chapter-7.pdf
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Families Delinquency & Crime What

Words: 1939 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81598206

If the child is punished for small infractions of the rules and other children are not, this makes him feel that life is unfair, and makes him act in the ways that he is expected to act. Formal labeling is manifest when teachers treat students labeled as gifted as brighter, which motivates the children to perform better on tests, or when students labeled as 'special education' or 'ESL' are assumed to be capable of less than other children. If less is expected of them, they will naturally perform at a lower standard.

Module 4

Q5. Identify some of the factors that could lead to inept parenting in single parent family households.

Even the best single parent faces considerable challenges. Single parent households tend to be less affluent economically, which automatically presents a difficulty in terms of ensuring that children have safe and healthy environments in which to live. Single parents…… [Read More]

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Sociology and Req For a Dream Arequiem

Words: 1990 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91004589

Sociology and Req. For a Dream

ARequiem for a Dream@ takes sociological deviation to the extreme. Deviation is defined as behaviors which do not conform to significant norms held by most members of a society or group. This movie uses drugs as the deviation and shows how it destroys the four main character's lives. Harry and his girlfriend start out as ambitious young adults with dreams of starting their own clothing store. Tyrone just wants happiness with his girlfriend. Lastly Sara Goldfarb, Harry's mom wants to be on television. The three friends end alone, with nothing but their addiction to heroin and Sara is committed to an asylum because of the effects of the speed she uses to lose weight in order to be on TV. There are many specific sociological principles that apply to things that happen within deviant subcultures. This movie illustrates a good many of them in…… [Read More]

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Tackling Drug Abuse

Words: 1646 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22657399

Inhalants refer to the ordinary household products that are sniffed or inhaled by individuals so as to get high. There are many household products that are misused as inhalants. Some of these products include gasoline, hair spray, fabric protector, air conditioner fluid, nail polish remover, and correction fluid, propellants in aerosol, cleaning fluids and cooking spray. These products are mainly bagged, sniffed, snorted so as one to get high. They can be sniffed directly from the containers. In most cases when an individual is under the influence of such inhalants one is likely to engage in anti-social or criminal behavior (Ksir, 2002). This report endeavors to explain the theoretical and empirical literature regarding theories of drug information and addiction.

The intoxicating inhalants that have volatile vapors are ingested through the trachea and nose. However, some inhalants are used for medical reasons as in the case of nitrous oxide. The inhalation…… [Read More]

References

Dick, DM & Bierut, LJ (2006). "The Genetics of Alcohol Dependency." Current Psychiatric Reports 8 (2): 151 -- 7

Ksir, Oakley Ray; Charles (2002). Drugs, society, and human behavior (9th Ed.). Boston

[u.a.]: McGraw-Hil

Morse, RM & Flavin, DK (August 26, 1992). "The definition of alcoholism, The Joint Committee of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism." The Journal of the American Medical Association 268 (8): 1012 -- 4
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i am alive documentary

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75509346

1. Deviance is relative, and refers to behavioral deviation from established social norms within a specific community (Schaefer, 2016). Therefore, what is deviant in one period of time will become normative in another and vice-versa. Likewise, what is deviant in one culture may not be considered deviant in another. Although deviance is typically framed as maladaptive behavior that either leads to or is categorized as criminal, deviance can also be constructive, productive, and “positive,” (Hughes & Coakley, 1991, p. 307). In fact, athletes engage in what is known as “positive deviance,” in that their behaviors constitute a cohesive “sport ethic” that includes taking risks, pushing past personal limits, and making sacrifices for the greater good of the game (Hughes & Coakley, 1991, p. 307). The 2010 documentary I Am Alive is about the Uruguayan rugby team’s remarkable survival in the Andes, and is a perfect example of positive deviance in…… [Read More]

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Paraphila the Ancient Philosopher Plato Claimed That

Words: 1412 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16482628

Paraphila

The ancient philosopher Plato claimed that all immoral behavior was the result of some disorder in the soul (Gert and Culver, 2009, p. 489). Although very few people now hold this view, deviant sexual behavior is often considered symptomatic of a mental disorder. However, not all deviant behaviors fit the clinical definition. For example, if a heterosexual man becomes aroused by dressing in women's clothing, it is considered by most people to be abnormal behavior. However, his behavior may be ego-syntonic, meaning that the man is not troubled by either the impulses or by acting them out. Such an individual would not seek treatment. He is not a danger to himself or to anyone else and unless there were objections on the part of his wife or significant other, there is no compelling reason, in the man's mind, to manage his impulses or behavior. As Bhugra and McMullen (2010,…… [Read More]

References

Bhugra, D., Popelyuk, D., and McMullen, I. (2010). Paraphilas across cultures: Contexts and controversies. Journal of Sex Research 47(2-3), pp. 242-256.

Gert, B., and Culver, C.M. (2009). Sex, immorality, and mental disorders. Journal of Medicine & Philosophy 34(5), pp. 487-495.

Gordon, H. (2008). The treatment of paraphilias: An historical perspective. Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health 18(2), pp. 79-87.

Hall, Ryan C.W., and Hall, Richard C.W. (2007). A profile of pedophilia: Definition, characteristics of offenders, recidivism, treatment outcomes and forensic issues.
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Drinking and Alcoholism

Words: 1990 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52270032

Etiology of Campus Binge Drinking

Drinking and Alcoholism

A Failed Experiment in Social Control

The consumption of alcohol has always been a focus of government efforts to limits its use, due to the potential for abuse, the financial burden imposed upon social programs, and its association with criminal activity. Between 1920 and 1934 the consumption of alcohol was outlawed in the United States, with the intention of addressing these social problems. During the first year following the enactment of Prohibition, alcohol-related deaths, psychosis, and arrests all declined by 20-40%, but between 1921 and 1927 these measures reveal a sharp increase to near pre-Prohibition levels (Miron and Zwiebel, 1991). By the end of Prohibition, which correlates with the start of the Great Depression, alcohol consumption leveled out at around 60-70% of pre-Prohibition levels despite costing three times as much for a drink. Given the infamous criminal activity that emerged around the…… [Read More]

References

Amethyst Initiative. (2008). Amethyst Initiative: Rethinking the drinking age. Retrieved July 15, 2011 from http://www.amethystinitiative.org/statement/

Beseler, Cheryl L., Taylor, Laura A., Leeman, Robert F. (2010). Alcohol-Use Disorder criteria and "binge" drinking in undergraduates. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 71, 418-423.

Grucza, Richard A., Norberg, Karen E., and Beirut, Laura J. (2009). Binge drinking among youths and young adults in the United States: 1979-2006. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 48, 692-702.

Leppel, Karen. (2006). College binge drinking: Deviant vs. mainstream behavior. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 32, 519-525.
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Family Deliquency and Crime Explain

Words: 2523 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10118708

In summary, observational preexperience had differential effects on the timing of subsequent contingency performance of infants (p. 693)."

This research supports the potential for vicarious learning as a pre-emptor to juvenile delinquency when the family, academic, and social conditions are reflective of the elements that reflect a lack of structure, participation in community, poverty, and poor education systems that are not financed to provide the infrastructure in a child's early years.

4. Explain your understanding of Baumrind's Typology of Parenting Styles. Based on your understanding of the parenting styles described by Baumrind, which style of parenting style is most effective? Which is the least effective style of parenting? Why? Be sure to support your answer.

Diana Baumrind discussed parenting types, the authoritarian parent, the permissive parent and the authoritative parent (Grolnick, W., 2003, p. 5). Baumrind's description of the parenting styles is:

The authoritarian parent attempts to shape, control, and…… [Read More]

References http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6360952

Barron, M.L. (1954). The Juvenile in Delinquent Society (1st ed.). New York: Alfred a. Knopf. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6360952 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000504042

Brannigan, a. (1997). Self-Control, Social Control and Evolutionary Psychology: Towards an Integrated Perspective on Crime. Canadian Journal of Criminology, 39(4), 403-431. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000504042 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=110022432

Grolnick, W.S. (2003). The Psychology of Parental Control: How Well-Meant Parenting Backfires. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=110022435 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5014544319

Rook, L. (2006). An Economic Psychological Approach to Herd Behavior. Journal of Economic Issues, 40(1), 75+. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5014544319 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001116573
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Abnormal Psychology Is Often Misunderstood as a

Words: 1101 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98321108

Abnormal Psychology is often misunderstood as a field of psychology because it deals with behavior that "creates a problem for an individual or society" -- and hence, the question immediately arises as to just what is "abnormal" and what is "normal"? The AP Psychology 7th Edition (Sharpsteen, et al., 2005) text suggests that abnormal behavior is "maladaptive or pathological behavior" and before determining whether a behavior is abnormal or not, the "total environment and impact of a person's behavior" must be taken into consideration. Moreover, abnormal psychology does not attempt to link "normal and abnormal" with the concepts of "good and bad," Kendra Cherry explains. Abnormal psychology deals with "psychopathology and abnormal behavior" covering a wide swath of disorders, including sexual deviation, depression, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, to name a few (Cherry, 2008).

The History and Evolution of Abnormal Psychology into a Scientific Discipline

In 800 B.C., Homer believed that mental illness…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AS Psychology. (2009). Biological and Psychological Models of Abnormality. Retrieved July 9,

2011, from http://as-psychology.pbworks.com.

Bennett, Paul. (2006). Abnormal and Clinical Psychology: An Introductory Textbook. New York: McGraw-Hill International.

Cherry, Kendra. (2008). Psychology / What Is Abnormal Psychology? About.com. Retrieved July 8, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com.
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Medical Model and Learned Helplessness

Words: 1083 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78154146

Lobotomy is a popular medical procedure introduced in curing mentally ill individuals, which requires the removal of the prefrontal lobes of the cortex of the brain, the part of the brain wherein aggressive and violent behavior is triggered. However, in the movie, lobotomy is shown to have disastrous results: McMurphy's violent behavior is indeed abated, but as illustrated in the movie, the lobotomy had turned him into a 'vegetable' neither responding to his ward mates' call for attention nor displaying his usual rowdy, obnoxious, McMurphy self.

This instance in the movie is considered as patterned after the medical model of abnormal psychology, wherein "mental disorders are described as medical diseases with a biological origin" (450). ecause this is the prevalent thinking in medical science during the time the movie (and novel) was made, Nurse Ratched decided, in order to "treat" McMurphy, to let him undergo lobotomy. Subsistence to the medical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Santorck, J. (2001). Psychology. NY: McGraw-Hill Book Co.
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Argumentative Response to Homosexuality and Marriage

Words: 1842 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73025724

Homosexuality and Marriage

Argumentative esponse

Controversial debates have been on the rise on whether gay marriages should be allowed in the society. Marriage is a key institution in the society. There are many reasons for marriage that may not apply to homosexuals. Gay marriages should not be allowed because marriage is traditional and morally for heterosexuals. This will cause a lot of chaos in the society, which will destroy the institution of marriage. Homosexuality is a sinful lifestyle and against the societies morals and, therefore, should not be encouraged at all grounds.

Gay marriages should not be allowed majorly because it is not morally upright, and it is a not normal for the society. Marriages were traditionally formed for the man woman companionship. Since the introduction of heterosexual marriages, there have never been any problems associated with these marriages. Gay marriages will serve to erode the good things on heterosexual…… [Read More]

References

Association, A.B. (1990). Homosexuality. ABA Journal, 19.

Corvino, J. (20008). Debating Same sex and Homosexuality. Atlanta: Rowman and Littlefield.

Rauch, J. (2005). Gay Marriage. Virginia: Henry Holt and Company.

Sidlow, E.B. (2005). America At Odds. New York: Cengage Learning.
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Dispositional Attributions Attribution Differences in

Words: 2216 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50847656

29, p > 0.5).

Discussion

This study set out to test the hypotheses that people from Eastern cultural backgrounds compared to those from Western backgrounds would make fewer dispositional attributions about the behavior of fictitious characters that the read about and would also demonstrate a more collective attitude towards themselves.

With respect to the first hypothesis, that Western participants would make a greater number of dispositional attributions that would participants with Eastern cultural heritages, that hypothesis was supported. However, there are a few caveats that need to be mentioned with regards to this. First, the scenarios that were presented to the participants only provided two alternatives to explain the behavior of the person. One alternative was a negative dispositional explanation, the other was a situational explanation could have been interpreted as far-fetched in some cases. Miller (1984) found that the tendency for Westerners to make internal attributions was higher for…… [Read More]

References

Chiu, C-y., Morris, M.W., Hong, Y-y., & Menon, T. (2000). Motivated cultural cognition: the impact of implicit cultural theories on dispositional attribution varies as a function of need for closure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 247 -- 259.

Choi, I., Dalal, R., Kim-Prieto, C., & Park, H. (2003). Culture and judgment of causal relevance.

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 46 -- 59.

Jones, E.E. & Harris, V.A. (1967). The attribution of attitudes. Journal of Experimental and Social Psychology, 3, 2-24.
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Neoclassical Neoclassicism -- Deterrence and

Words: 768 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6768623

Neighborhood atches have been criticized for not attempting to integrate members of the community who are at a high risk of committing crimes, like juveniles, by incorporating after-school programs for at risk youths into the watch, but it could be argued that the sense of community conveyed by being on the side of the law, as opposed to against it, has an unintended positive effective of diminishing the attractiveness of committing crimes amongst citizens within the community.

Another component to deterrence is "Hardening Up" or Target Hardening, another frequent part of Neighborhood atches ("hat is a Crime Alert: Target Hardening," 2007, Business Crime Direct). This involves making the community less attractive for criminals by adding alarm systems to homes, adding surveillance recording devices to businesses, and even simply upgrading bolts and locks or adding shutters to houses. Hardening up is also one way to potentially reduce the volume of complaints…… [Read More]

Works Cited

About Neighborhood Watch." (2007).

USAOnWatch Website. Sponsored by the U.S.Department of Justice in Partnership with the National Sheriffs' Association. Retrieved 15 Apr 2007 at http://www.usaonwatch.org/AboutUs/AboutNeighborhoodWatch.php

O'Connor, Tom. "Classical & Positivist Schools of Criminology." Last Updated:

Oct 2005. Retrieved 15 Apr 2007 at http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/301/301lect02.htm
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Psychology The Term Psychology Comes From Two

Words: 947 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90734375

Psychology?

The term psychology comes from two Greek words: psyche, which means "soul," and logos, "the study of." These root words were first combined in the 16th century, at a time when theorists were just beginning to see that there might be a connection between the mind and body, even though they were unable to actually understand and capture the essence of "thought." Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and the mind. The actual definition is comprised of three major elements:

Psychology is a scientific method. It obtains knowledge through the use of systematic and objective methods for empirical (observable) research and experimentation to validate ideas and hypothesis.

Psychology is concerned with behavior -- behavior is any action that can be observed and measured in some empirical manner.

Psychology is also concerned with the way the mind works, not necessarily focusing on the brain as a biological organism, but…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Hothersall, D. (2004). History of Psychology. New York: McGraw Hill.

Kohler, W. (1992). Gestalt psychology: An Introduction to New Concepts in Modern Psychology. Boston, MA: Liveright Publishing.

Lycan, W.G., ed. (1999). Mind and Cognition. London: Blackwell.

Papini, M. (2008). Comparative Psychology: Evolution and Development of Behavior. Minneapolis, MN: Psychology Press.
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Cultural Diversity in Organizations Organization

Words: 4681 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71138902

The solutions are numerous and more diversified.

Knowledge is crucial for business success. There are two types of knowledge: explicit or tacit. The explicit type is easily codified, stored and transmitted to other individuals. As opposed to the former, the tacit one is embedded in people. The size of the tacit knowledge is proportional to the diversity of the workplace. Therefore, organizations face the increasing challenge today of finding ways to grasp into the pool of tacit knowledge they own in order to create competitive advantage. This is the type of knowledge to which competition doesn't have access because it's embedded in unique individuals belonging to a give organization.

Knowledge can be enhanced by the learning process. Its final objective is to be materialized into products and services. This final stage of the process refers to the innovation part. Innovations are the most important tool an organization has in hand…… [Read More]

Reference list:

Brittan, S. (1996, June 6). Keynes and globalization. Financial Times, p. 12.

Hofstede, G. & McRae, R.R. (2004). Personality and Culture Revisited: Linking Traits and Dimensions of Culture. Cross Cultural Research, vol. 38(1), pp. 52-88.

Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture Consequences, 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Hofstede, G. (1984). Cultural Dimensions in Management and Planning. Asia Pacific Journal, pp.84-99.
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School-Based Mental Health Program on

Words: 8166 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67429057

This is discussed at length by Fusick and ordeau (2004) "...school-based counselors need to be aware of the disturbing inequities that exist in predominantly Afro-American urban school districts, where nearly 40% of Afro-American students attend school in the United States" (Fusick and ordeau, 2004) This again places emphasis on the need for mental health programs in these areas of concern. This is also related to findings from a study by McDavis et al. (1995) Counseling African-Americans, which refers to research that stresses the "...widening achievement gap between Afro-American and Euro-American students." (McDavis, et al. 1995)

An important study Laura a. Nabors, Evaluation of Outcomes for Adolescents Receiving School-ased Mental Health Services (2002) refers to the particular issue and problems experience at inner-city schools. The author states that, "School mental health (SMH) programs are an important setting for providing mental health services to adolescents, especially urban youth who typically face in-…… [Read More]

Bibliography.aspx www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308

Smith, P.B., Buzi, R.S., & Weinman, M.L. (2001). Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic. Adolescence, 36(142), 323. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622

Stern, S.B., Smith, C.A., & Jang, S.J. (1999). Urban Families and Adolescent Mental Health. Social Work Research, 23(1), 15. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228

Sternberg, R.J., & Dennis, M.J. (1997). Elaborating Cognitive Psychology through Linkages to Psychology as a Helping Profession. Teaching of Psychology, 24(3), 246-249. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383

Stock, M.R., Morse, E.V., Simon, P.M., Zeanah, P.D., Pratt, J.M., & Sterne, S. (1997). Barriers to School-Based Health Care Programs. Health and Social Work, 22(4), 274+. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383
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Shelter Service Utilization of Domestic Violence Victims

Words: 863 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31361815

Shelter Service Utilization of Domestic Violence Victims.

Shelters have proven to be useful for women who have been domestically abused and for their children in numerous capacities. Yet it has been found that only approximately one out of four women use them. The question then is why some women choose to use them and others not even though, by not using them, they will be harmed further. The ecological model (or systems theory) is used for understanding this conundrum.

Systems theory posits that people operate within a system of interacting spheres that affect one another. These spheres operate on the individual, family, and societal level. These spheres also have their boundaries which impact how open or closed they are as well as influencing the mode of the individual's behavior.

An open system means that individuals have extended contact to people (and organizations) in the outside world through the resources within…… [Read More]

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Emotional Intelligence Ei Beginning With

Words: 2647 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86147398

These studies show that while EI is being integrated into the British educational policy, many concrete steps still have to be taken to make full use of EI skills.

Evidence in favor of Emotional Literacy

There is growing scholarly evidence that shows definitive links between higher emotional intelligence (EI) and overall success in life. For instance, ubin (1999) in his study found that students with high EI skills are less likely to indulge in violent and aggressive acts and more likely to be social. Similarly, Ciarrochi, Chan and Chaputi (2000) in their study found that adolescents with high EI skills show empathy and understanding. In the same way, other scholars too have found positive relationships between high EI and disengagement with use of alcohol and tobacco (Trinidad and Johnson, 2002; Trinidad, Unger, Chou and Anderson Johnson, 2004). Furnham and Petrides (2003) found that students with high EI are generally happy…… [Read More]

References

Antidote. 2008. Campaign for Emotional Literacy. Available at http://www.antidote.org.uk

Bastian, V.A., Burns, N.R. And Nettelbeck, T. 2005. Emotional Intelligence Predicts Life Skills, but not as well as Personality and Cognitive Abilities. Personality and Individual Differences, 39, pp. 1135-45.

Ciarrochi, J.V., Chan, a.Y.C. And Caputi, P. 2000. A Critical Evaluation of the Emotional Intelligence Construct. Personality and Individual Differences, 28, pp. 1101-13.

Ciarrochi, J.V., Deane, F.P. And Anderson, S. 2002. Emotional Intelligence Moderates the Relationship Between Stress and Mental Health. Personality and Individual Differences, 32, pp. 197-209.
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Role of Deviance in Societies

Words: 2460 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2456834

Role of Deviance in Societies

Deviance is behavior that is regarded as outside the bounds of a group or society (Deviance pp). Deviance is a behavior that some people in society find offensive and which excites, or would excite if discovered, and is usually met with disapproval, punishment, condemnation, or hostility (Deviance pp).

Deviance is not merely behavior, but involves a moral judgement (Deviance pp). Moreover, in essence, any act can be defined as deviant (Deviance pp). It is not possible to isolate certain acts and find them universally condemned by all societies as deviant acts, not even murder or incest, and even within a given society, behavior defined as deviant continually undergoes redefinition (Deviance pp). Furthermore, it is relative to time and place, thus, it is not possible to find a behavior that is absolutely condemned by all societies, because what is deviant in one society may not be…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Boyden, Matthew; Green, Amy. "Positive Deviance."

http://64.233.187.104/search?q=cache:U0HBSqQA6f8J:www.ex.ac.uk/Psychology/docs/courses/3227/boydengreenwk7.ppt+Role+of+Deviance+in+Societies& hl=en

Campbell, LeAnne. "As strong as the weakest link: urban high school dropout."

High School Journal. 12/1/2003.
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Family Deliquency and Crime Define

Words: 2992 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18765636

In fact, many studies show that deviant or antisocial children may experience a strengthening of the bonds between parents and society in the process of their development.

Therefore, while social control theory is one view, there are many alternative theories that take other findings and variables into account. In general, the view that a deviant child who does not change by a certain age is "condemned "to a life of crime if sharply criticized, as it often does not concur with empirical findings. Theories put forward by Gottfredson and Hirsch propose another view of the life-course towards crime that takes into account the fact that in many case early deviant behavior does not necessarily lead to a life-long pattern of criminal behavior.

Question 4.

Describe the labeling theory and the consequences that labeling can have on a child. Should we be concerned with labeling? Why or why not?

In essence,…… [Read More]

References

ACF Questions and Answers Support. Retrieved April 9, 2008 from http://faq.acf.hhs.gov/cgi-bin/acfrightnow.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_sid=qnPNlL5i&p_lva=&p_faqid=68&p_created=1001610478&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9ncmlkc29y dD0mcF9yb3dfY250PTEzJnBfc2VhcmNoX3RleHQ9JnBfc2VhcmNoX3R5 cGU9MyZwX2NhdF9sdmwxPTEwJnBfY2F0X2x2bDI9MzAmcF9zb3J0X2J 5PWRmbHQmcF9wYWdlPTE*&p_li =

Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect. Retrieved April 9, 2008 at http://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/statutes/define.cfm

Crime Theories. Retrieved April 9, 2008 from NCWC. Web site: http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/111/111lect03.htm

Overview of Labeling Theories. Retrieved April 9, 2008 http://home.comcast.net/~ddemelo/crime/labeling.html
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Families Delinquency & Crime Describe

Words: 2165 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31046334

It is possible that an individual who was abused as a child was able to recover from the trauma of his/her experience, and tried to convert his/her negative experience into a positive one by helping out abused children, with the goal of helping them to also recover and develop as psychologically healthy individuals. This kind of psyche abolishes the phenomenon of double jeopardy, and provides a counter-argument to the earlier claim that abused children tend to have realtionships who will also abuse them.

7. eflect about the idea from the text regarding, "child abuse is transmitted across the generations." Do you agree with this statement?

I agree with the statement that child abuse is transmitted across the generations, as empirical studies have shown that indeed, abused individuals during their childhood (in the study's case, mothers) had indeed the tendency to also abuse their children. Again, this statement is just part…… [Read More]

References

Bates, K., C. Bader, and F. Mencken. (2003). "Family structure, power-control theory, and deviance: extending power-control theory to include alternate family forms." Western Criminology Review, Vol. 4, No. 3.

Egelman, B. And A. Susman-Stillman. (1996). "Dissociation as mediator of child abuse across generations." Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol. 20, Issue 11.

Flowers, R. (2001). Runaway kids and teenage prostitution: America's lost, abandoned, and sexually exploited children. Wesport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Simons, R., C. Johnson, J. Beaman, and R. Conger. (1993). "Explaining women's double jeopardy: factors that mediate the association between harsh treatment as a child and violence by a husband." Journal of Marriage and the Family, Vol. 55.
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Sociology Families Delinquency and Crime

Words: 1380 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68514000

11).

Perhaps the most major and identifiable sociological theorist is Emile Durkheim. He literally helped formulate the ideas and theories of modern sociology, and many of the criminal justice theories are based on his ideas. Durkheim developed many of the modern theories of criminality, such as cultural disintegration, which can lead to an individual's gradual disassociation from society, with no bonds or commitments to a society that is dissolving around him or her. Durkheim felt this could help lead to deviant behavior and even suicide (Geiger & Fischer, 1995, p. 72). He also felt crime in society is normal, and it can even lead to desirable social reforms, ideas that were very revolutionary when he lived and worked in the late 19th century. Many later theorists used Durkheim's models, including social theorist Travis Hirschi, an expert in social control theory and delinquency.

Travis Hirschi is not the father of the…… [Read More]

References

Geiger, B., & Fischer, M. (1995). Family, justice, and delinquency. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Hirschi, T. (2002). Causes of delinquency. Piscataway, NJ: Transaction Books.

Thornberry, T.P., Krohn, M.D., Lizotte, a.J., Smith, C.A., & Tobin, K. (2003). Gangs and delinquency in developmental perspective. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.