Drama Essays (Examples)

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Death of a Salesman as a Tragedy as Defined by Aristotle

Words: 2818 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76605001

drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Brief overview of the play

Miller's work

Story

Characters

Obstacles

Argument for tragedy

Aristotle's definition

Pro argument for tragedy

Con argument against tragedy

Own conclusions

What the critics say

Death of a Salesman as Tragedy

This paper analyzes the play Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller. Specifically, it discusses the definition of tragedy by Aristotle, and research if it is correct to label the play as a tragedy.

Death of a Salesman is indeed a tragedy of epic proportions. The drama is tragic not only because of Willy Loman's suicide, but because he has left his family with nothing, and his sons with no hopes and abilities of their own.

Arthur Miller wrote Death of a Salesman in 1948,…… [Read More]

References

Adamczewski, Zygmunt. The Tragic Protest. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1963.

Amsden, Robert. "Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy." Ripon College. 2002. 29 Aug. 2005.

< http://www.ripon.edu/Faculty/Amsdenr/THE231/GreekTheatreFolder/AristotlePage.html#3

Bloom, Harold. Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1988.
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Historical View of the Greek Heroic Ideal

Words: 790 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87791054

Greco-oman Tradition

How does the ideal of heroic citizenship change from the Greek mythopoetic tradition through the emergence of Greek tragic drama to the late Stoicism of oman imperialism?

Mythopoeic thought holds that the occurrences of events are the result of an act of will on the part of gods and spirits. A thread of anthropomorphism runs through this mythopoeic thinking as impersonal laws of nature and the deductive generalizations of logic are not a part of the mythopoeic framework: instead, every event is an aspect of some personal being. A mythopoeic orientation is one of the most primitive lenses used by humans to explain and attribute meaning to phenomena. Sensemaking in naive cultures typically involves attribution of human motivation to the inanimate and to otherwise inexplicable events. Indeed, the term mythopoeic means myth-making, from the Greek muthos or myth and poiein which means to make. From the anthropomorphic position…… [Read More]

References

Bowra, C.M. (1957). The Greek Experience. New York: Praeger. In Steven Kreis, History Guide (2006).

Dunkle, R. (1986). The classical origins of western culture. Brooklyn, NY: Brooklyn College, The City University of New York.

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Heroic Ideal Greece Rome an Analysis of

Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49939858

Heroic Ideal Greece, ome

An Analysis of the Heroic Ideal from Ancient Greece to oman Empire

The mythopoetic tradition in Greece begins with Homer's Iliad, which balances the heroic figures of Achilles and Hector, two opposing warriors and men of honor, amidst a war on which not even the gods are in agreement. Hector and Achilles mirror one another in nobility and strength and both represent an ideal heroic archetype of citizenry -- men who do battle to honor both their countries and their names. To illustrate, however, the way the ideal of heroic citizenship changes from the Greek mythopoetic tradition through to the late Stoicism of oman imperialism, it is necessary to leap ahead several centuries and survey the several different bodies of work.

The mythopoetic tradition in Greece somewhat continually dwells on the same themes with regard to heroic citizenship, whether in Homer or in the Golden Age…… [Read More]

Reference List

Aristophanes. (1973). Lysistrata/The Acharnians/The Clouds. Trans. Alan Sommerstein. NY: Penguin Classics, 1973.

Homer. (2008). The Iliad. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. UK: Oxford University Press.
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Idea of Battle and War in the Two Stories

Words: 731 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41818725

ar at Home in Ellison, ar Abroad in O'Brien

The inhumanity of war is a common theme in literature, as brilliantly illustrated in Tim O'Brien's "The Things They Carried," a tale that functions as a short story but is actually an excerpt from his great novel about the Vietnam ar Going after Cacciato. In O'Brien's story, several soldiers fighting in Vietnam are defined by the objects they carry in their pockets, such as photographs of loved ones, as well as their military gear and outfits. Yet the battles of individuals oppressed by society, such as African-Americans, may be equally, if not more, soul destroying, when conducted on the home front of America, on daily basis. This fact is evidenced by the evisceration of the spirit of the young African-American men in an excerpt from Ralph Ellison's seminal novel Invisible Man, entitled, "Battle Royal."

In "Battle Royal," the best and brightest…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ellison, Ralph. "Battle Royal." From Literature An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Eight Edition. 2001.

O'Brien, Tim. "The Things They Carried." From Literature An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Eight Edition. 2001.
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Maladies Failed Saviors Sophocles' Oedipus

Words: 725 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94997440

Mr. Kapasi and the Dases are all Indian, but in the interpreter's eyes, Mr. And Mrs. Das are foreigners because they dress and speak like Americans. Mina Das sees Kapasi not as a romantic partner, as he desires her to see him as, but as a kind of romantic confessor, who will wash her clean of her sins, much as the citizens of Thebes see their king.

Eventually, when Oedipus' unintentional sin of marrying the queen of Thebes and killing the former king is revealed to the city, the citizens realize that Oedipus is not the great man they hoped he would become, and their illusions are shattered. Oedipus' own illusions about himself as a wise and saving figure of the city are shattered, as he must obey the banishment he laid down for the person who brought the plague upon the city. Mrs. Das must also come to terms…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lahiri, Jhumpa. "The Interpreter of Maladies." From the Interpreter of Maladies. New York: Mariner Books, 1999.

Sophocles. "Oedipus the King." Internet Classics Archive e-text. [3 Dec 2006] http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/mirror/classics.mit.edu/Sophocles/oedipus.html
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Ghosts Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts as

Words: 939 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11218400

Mr. Alving's many affairs on the other hand, including with their maid (resulting in Regina's birth), though not exactly condoned by society are not frowned upon as much as Mrs. Alving's leaving. This hypocrisy forms one of the central conflicts of the play, and is also one of the major sources of controversy.

Another issue that is raised in the play is inheritance. Mrs. Alving is building the orphanage at least in part so that no one, especially her son, can benefit from the fortune that her husband made. She considers everything that Mr. Alving ever touched to be corrupt, and therefore corruptive for others. She sent her son to live abroad so that he would not be exposed to his father's debauchery, but he seems to exhibit many of the same negative qualities that Mrs. Alving hated so much in her husband. The inheritance would have been yet one…… [Read More]

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Teaching as a Profession and

Words: 398 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78399610



In short, I wish to become a teacher. That will be my new role. For no matter how awesome and inspiring the characters of drama, to help others find themselves through the dramatic art form, to see children gain in self-confidence as they express themselves by proudly proclaiming the words and song of a playwright, is the greatest inspiration and challenge for any theatrical practitioner's heart.

The ideal teacher is a performer, a director, and a facilitator of other's light and talent. The ideal teacher uses drama to excite students about writing, language, and teaches students the vale of practical, hands-on, hard work and the reward that labor can produce. Drama teaches students to empathize with the life of the individual they portray and the audiences they minister to. Yet being a part of a drama also encourages them to communicate with the world, to come outside of their own…… [Read More]

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New Historicists' Viewpoints on Renaissance

Words: 2688 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62994132

In addition, Lett (1987) emphasizes that, "Cultural materialists maintain that a society's modes of production and reproduction determine its social structure and ideological superstructure, but cultural materialists reject the metaphysical notion of Hegelian dialectics that is part of dialectical materialism" (80). Indeed, according to Bradshaw (1993), "the British cultural materialist knows that the 'radical,' 'subversive,' 'marginal,' or 'dissident' perspective is always superior (9). This author maintains that British cultural materialist readings of Shakespeare tend to assign particular characters or speeches a privileged, supra-dramatic significance that may override meaningful analysis if care is not taken (Bradshaw 9).

According to Bate (1994), it has become increasingly common in recent years for scholars to adopt either the new historicism or cultural materialist perspective alone when considering these literary works, particularly as they apply to Shakespeare. In this regard, MacDonald (1994) suggests that the New Historicist camp enjoys a clear advantage because they "define…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bate, Jonathan. Shakespeare and Ovid. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Bertens, Hans. Literary Theory: The Basics. London: Routledge, 2001.

Bradshaw, Graham. Misrepresentations: Shakespeare and the Materialists. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993.

Cartelli, Thomas. Marlowe, Shakespeare and the Economy of Theatrical Experience. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991.
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Victor Hugo Romantic Writings of Victor Hugo

Words: 2912 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64431488

Victor Hugo

Romantic ritings of Victor Hugo

The romantic period was partly in reaction to the impact that the industrial revolution had on the psyches of artists of all stripes. The move toward an industrial culture had moved many people from the pastoral scenes of the country into the grungy hearts of the cities. Many of the people worked in the factories six days a week for many hours a day, or they worked in mines and other industries to support the industry in the cities. The response from the artistic community was to remind the public of two things. They wanted people to remember where they came from and they wanted to help people see the true emotion of life.

One of the most influential writers of the period was a young Frenchman who was known for his poetry early in his career (Halsall x), but who gained international…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Halsall, Albert W. Victor Hugo and the Romantic Drama. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998. Print.

Hugo, Victor. Selected Poems of Victor Hugo. Trans E.H. And A.M. Blackmore. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001. Print.

Hugo, Victor. Ruy Blas. Boston D.C. Heath & Co., Publishers, 1888. Print.
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Renaissance English Theater

Words: 1177 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17424448

Supernatural in Renaissance Drama

There are things in heaven and earth, not dreamt of in the philosophy of Horatio, not simply in "Hamlet" but also in the "Midsummer's Night Dream" of Shakespeare, and the "Dr. Faustus" of Christopher Marlowe. But while all of these plays deal with the theme of human aspirations in a world with a permeable, rather than an impermeable wall between humanity and the supernatural, "Dr. Faustus" suggests that breaking down this wall is initially fun and playful, although it has dire consequences at the end for the play's protagonist. Marlowe's cartoon characters and images of conventional morality, combined with heightened language convey humor rather than horror, until Faustus is condemned to hell for all eternity. The even lighter "Midsummer's Night Dream" also suggests in its early language an initial playfulness for the human and supernatural lovers who engage in transgressing sensual activities. But this comedy set…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Marlowe, Christopher. "Dr. Faustus." Text B. Edited by Hilary Binder. Tufts Classics Edition online. Last updated 2003. Retrieved from Perseus. Database at 8 December 2004 at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.03.0011& layout=norm%3Dreg& query=act%3D%235

Shakespeare, William. "A Midsummer's Night's Dream." MIT Complete Shakespeare. Retrieved 8 Dec 2004 at http://www-tech.mit.edu

Shakespeare, William. "A Midsummer's Night's Dream." MIT Complete Shakespeare. Retrieved 8 Dec 2004 at http://www-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/midsummer/midsummer.4.1.html
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Goldberger's War

Words: 1653 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1215052

GOLDBEGE'S WA"

Early 20th century saw the outbreak of a deadly mysterious disease, pellagra that could cause anything from fever to dementia to death. The disease that had killed over 100,000 people by the end of 1914 was shrouded in deep mystery because of the fact that the epidemic was largely limited to the South and was exclusively affecting the peasant class. It was indeed a poor man's disease and conventional wisdom suggested it had something to do with sanitary conditions.

"Pellagra, a classic dietary deficiency disease caused by insufficient niacin, was noted in the South after the Civil War. Then considered infectious, it was known as the disease of the four Ds: diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia, and death. The first outbreak was reported in 1907. In 1909, more than 1000 cases were estimated based on reports from 13 states. One year later, approximately 3000 cases were suspected nationwide based on…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

1. Etheridge EW. The Butterfly Caste: A Social History of Pellagra in the South. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Company; 1972.

2. Harkness Jon M. Prisoners and pellagra, Public Health Reports; 9/1/1996;

3. Kraut, A.M. 2003. Goldberger's war: the life and work of a public health crusader. Hill and Wang. New York, New York, USA.

4. Roth, J. Goldberger's war:The life and work of a public health crusader -- Journal of Clinical Investigation 113 (5):650 2004
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Gucci and LVMH Gucci' Was

Words: 1660 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42223761

Gucci too moved immediately, and along with PP, purchased from Francois Pinault, the Sanofi Beaute Division, and also the Yves St. Laurent's couture and fragrance businesses. Ford agreed to stay on for another four years, and the PP investment was formally approved by 80% of Gucci shareholders. However, Gucci now had a new problem, in which PP could control Gucci with Gucci's management, and LMVH also had a stake, with 20.7% interest. (Moffett; amaswamy, 163)

How could Gucci uphold the promise that stockholders would get a premium if the ownership changed? In the meanwhile, LMVH wanted to free $1.4 billion of its investment in Gucci, and in November 2000, all the involved parties were back in Court. Gucci finally agreed to distribute a special dividend of $7 per share to all shareholders, except those held by PP, but this act annoyed quite a few analysts and experts, because the premium…… [Read More]

References

Moffett, Michael; Ramaswamy, Kannan. Fashion Faux pas Gucci. pp: 159-170
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A Scene of Dialogue in the Crucible Contextual Analysis

Words: 1344 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80603857

Conflict in the First Scene of Dialogue in Miller's The Crucible

The piece of dialogue at the beginning of The Crucible in which Abigail and Parris reveal their respective characters through snippets and snatches of admissions is an important scene that sets the tone and initial conflict of the drama. The tone is serious but chaotic: a child is in danger; the doctor has no cure; foul play in the form of "possession" is suspected by the community, many members of which are talking in the parlor where the "rumor of witchcraft is all about" (Miller 9). Parris, who is a Reverend in the community, and who himself is at odds with his parish, is afraid because such talk will put him in a very bad light: "There is a faction that is sworn to drive me from my pulpit. Do you understand that?" Parris cries to Abigail. He is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Miller, Arthur. The Crucible. NY: Dramatists Play Service, 1982. Print.
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Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

Words: 1075 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23859722

aisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry [...] elements of drama and literary qualities of the play. This play was anything but conventional when it debuted on Broadway in 1959. It explored issues of racism, prejudice, and the dreams of others that made playgoers stop and think about what they were seeing acted out on stage, including themes Broadway theatergoers did not expect and it made many firsts on the Broadway stage.

"A aisin in the Sun" became Lorraine Hansberry's first play, and it made a lot of history in the American theater. One literary critic notes, "The first play by a black woman to win the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award, the first play by a black woman to be performed on Broadway, the longest-running play by a black writer on Broadway for a quarter of a century and a production which launched the career of a number…… [Read More]

References

Bigsby, C.W.E. Modern American Drama, 1945-2000. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Domina, Lynn. Understanding a Raisin in the Sun: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents. Ed. Johnson, Claudia Durst. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1998.

Emerson, Ralph Waldo. "Hansberry's a Raisin in the Sun." Explicator 52.1 (1993): 59-61.

Hansberry, Lorraine. A Raisin in the Sun. New York: Signet, 1988.
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Roman in the Context of

Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38723858

And an owner could set his slave free as a reward for that slave's noble service, transforming this piece of property into a human being with a touch of the hands and a few words.

Plautus depicts the absurdity of this legal reality with a humorous edge, but his humor has a great deal of societal bite. Plautus' most famous play, which provides the plot of "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," is entitled "Pseudolous." The main character and incidentally the main character in Stephen Sondhiem's musical. Pseudolous means false or "trickster" and Pseudolous is indeed a mendacious individual. However, Pseudolous is also part of a mendacious Roman society, a society which denies him rewards equal with his intelligence and his cunning and rewards the falsely pious can't of the young man's father he is attempting to help.

Plautus deals with this issue even more explicitly…… [Read More]

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Henry V Using Barthes Theory Myth- a

Words: 1588 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90465965

HENY V

Using Barthes theory myth- a type speech defined presenting a transforming, order meaning- analyze comment important myth themes found Henry V. Cite Barthes essay points.

Barthes theory of myth: Henry V

Shakespeare's history play Henry V functions as a drama of nation-building as well as a drama of a king's self-mythologizing. In the play, the formerly profligate hero Henry V shows himself to be an upstanding leader as he emerges victorious over the effete French. The play establishes an image of the English as hardy, rough-hewn souls. The army unites Britons of all different nationalities and ethnicities under the banner of Henry, who is able to lead, because of his history, with a common touch. This underlines the greatness of the English monarchy. Henry's inclusive spirit and his victory come to symbolize the greatness of England and English values. Over the course of the play, there is also…… [Read More]

References

Barthes, Ronald. (1984). Mythologies. Translated by Annette Lavers, Hill and Wang, New York.

Retrieved: http://www9.georgetown.edu/faculty/irvinem/theory/Barthes-Mythologies-Myth_Today-1984-2.html

Shakespeare, William. Henry IV. Retrieved:

 http://shakespeare.mit.edu/2henryiv/
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Rev Doctor Charles Todd Quintard

Words: 2527 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21288300

Todd Quintard: Civil War Doctor, Preacher, Soldier and Friend

Personal Chronology (Todd Quintard was born in Stamford, Connecticut, 22 December, 1824. His father, Isaac, was born in the same house, and died there in the ninetieth year of his age. Todd was a pupil of Trinity school, New York, and he studied medicine with Dr. James . Wood and Dr. Valentine Molt. He graduated at the University of the City of New York in 1847. He afterward removed to Georgia, where he began to practice medicine in Athens. Elliot, 2003) in 1851 he accepted the chair of physiology and pathological anatomy in the medical college at Memphis, Tennessee, and became co-editor with Dr. Ayres P. Merrill, of the Memphis "Medical ecorder."

In 1855 he took orders as a deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was advanced to the priesthood in the following year, and in January, 1857, became rector…… [Read More]

Resources

Noll, A. (ed.), Doctor Quintard, Chaplain C.S.A.... Sewanee, Tennessee, 1905.

Cunningham, H. Doctors in Gray: The Confederate Medical Service. Louisiana State University Press, 1958

Quintard, Charles Todd. 1824-1898, comp. By The Confederate Soldier's Pocket Manual of Devotions. Charleston: Evans & Cogswell, 1863.

Linderman, G. Embattled Courage: The Experience of Combat in the American Civil War. 1989.