Drug Cartel Essays (Examples)

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Drug Legalization as the Country

Words: 3788 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89122943



"As a case in point we may take the known fact of the prevalence of reefer and dope addiction in Negro areas. This is essentially explained in terms of poverty, slum living, and broken families, yet it would be easy to show the lack of drug addiction among other ethnic groups where the same conditions apply." Inciardi 248()

Socio-economic effects

Legalizing drugs has been deemed to have many socio-economic effects. A study that was conducted by Jeffrey a. Miron, who was a Harvard economist estimated that by legalizing drugs, this would inject about $76.8 billion in to the U.S. every year. 44.1 billion dollars would come from savings made from the law enforcement measures and 32.7 billion would be from tax revenue. This revenue can be thought to be broken down as follows: 6.7 billion dollars from marijuana, 22.5 billion from heroin and cocaine and the rest from the other…… [Read More]

References

Blumenson, Eric, and Eva S. Nilsen. How to Construct an Underclass, or How the War on Drugs Became a War on Education. Massachusetts: Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts, 2002. Print.

Campos, Isaac. "Degeneration and the Origins of Mexico's War on Drugs." Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos 26.2 (2010): 379-408. Print.

Chabat, Jorge. "Mexico's War on Drugs: No Margin for Maneuver." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 582.ArticleType: research-article / Issue Title: Cross-National Drug Policy / Full publication date: Jul., 2002 / Copyright © 2002 American Academy of Political and Social Science (2002): 134-48. Print.

Council on Hemispheric Affairs. "Low Taxation Perpetuates Insecurity in Central America." 2011. May 5th 2012. .
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Drug's Legalization Pros Cons Own Position

Words: 818 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61873781

Drug Legalization

Pros

Most of the arguments for legalization of drugs are based on the pragmatic realities that it is difficult or impossible to legislate morality. Drug use has always been part of society and even though it may not be socially desirable there are many benefits that can be gained through legalization. One primary benefit is definitely financial. In a study by the Cato Institute, the report estimates that drug legalization would reduce government expenditure about $41.3 billion annually; roughly $25.7 billion of this savings would accrue to state and local governments, and roughly $15.6 billion to the federal government; about $8.7 billion of the savings would result from legalization of marijuana, $20 billion from legalization of cocaine and heroin, and $12.6 billion from legalization of all other drugs (Miron & aldock, 2010).

There are many other benefits beyond money as well. The United States has an expensive and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ghosh, P. (2010, October 19). The pros and cons of drug legalization in the U.S. . Retrieved from International Business Times:  http://www.ibtimes.com/pros-cons-drug-legalization-us-246712 

Lowy, J. (2014, September 1). Driving stoned? States prep for marijuana DUI. Retrieved from The Christian Science Monitor:  http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0901/Driving-stoned-States-prep-for-marijuana-DUI 

Miron, J., & Waldock, K. (2010, October 3). Making an Economic Case for Legalizing Drugs. Retrieved from CATO Institute:  http://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/making-economic-case-legalizing-drugs
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Drug Abuse in Eastern Kentucky

Words: 3027 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29623389

drug use and abuse in the United States and presents differing approaches that are used (or proposed) to get a handle on the problem. There is no doubt that the drug abuse issue is not new and it is not being reduced by any significant amount. This paper presents statistics and scholarly research articles that delve into various aspects of the drug abuse issue in the United States, with particular emphasis on drugs that are abused in eastern Kentucky and generally in the Appalachian communities.

History of Drug Use & Availability

The history of illegal drug use in the United States goes back to the 19th Century, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The DEA has a Museum in Arlington, Virginia, that illustrates the history of drug discoveries, drug use, and drug abuse through the years. The DEA reports that morphine, heroin, and cocaine were "discovered" in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bureau of Justice Statistics. (2008). Drugs and Crime Facts / Drug Use / Youth. Retrieved November 30, 2012, from http://bjs.ojp.usdog.gov.

Drug Enforcement Agency. (2012). Illegal Drugs in America: A Modern History. Retrieved November 30, 2012, from  http://www.deamuseum.org .

Grant, Judith. (2007). Rural women's stories of recovery from addition. Addiction Research and Theory, 15(5), 521-541.

Havens, Jennifer R., Oser, Carrie B., and Leukefeld, Carl G. (2011). Injection risk behaviors
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Legal Response to Drugs

Words: 1236 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9481766

Drugs

Decriminalization of drugs is an ineffective legal policy that has harmed millions of Americans. Since Nixon's declaration of "war" on drugs, American policy towards mind-altering substances has been as violent and futile as the term "war on drugs" would suggest. Drug use is not qualitatively different from alcohol use. The prohibition of alcohol failed miserably in the early 20th century, leading also to a proliferation in profitable black market businesses that fueled organized crime. The same pattern has been occurring with mind-altering substances of all types. Drug cartels have blossomed throughout the Americas, and the global black marketplace is teeming with criminal behaviors that are linked to protecting the lucrative but illegal drug trade. If trading in drugs were akin to trading in alcohol, then drug cartels would no longer need the massive stashes of weapons used to protect their property. The war on drugs has ruined far more…… [Read More]

Reference

Sledge, M. (2013). The drug war and mass incarceration by the numbers. The Huffington Post. Retrieved online:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/08/drug-war-mass-incarceration_n_3034310.html
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Drug Wars a Thin Bloody Line Borders

Words: 2167 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41282951

Drug ars

A Thin, Bloody Line

Borders are artificial lines. Even when they follow natural divisions such as rivers or mountain ranges, borders are still artificial. They are imaginary lines that different governments (or other official groups of people) have decided marks the place on the earth where the authority and power of one group ends and the power and authority of the next group begins.

Borders are in general a good idea because they tend to reduce the overall amount of violence in the world by dividing potential combatants into different regions. The fact that wars are a constant in human society demonstrates that borders are too porous to stop all violence. But borders that were absolutely closed would prevent all trade, which would be catastrophic. The United States and Mexico do not want an end to trade. The governments want an end to trade in illegal drugs (or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aguilar, Gardenia. El narco se expande en Mexico. http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=937be705b8bb9a53102ce6df63c36ec1. 2007, May 10.

Associated Press. A Look at Major Drug-Producing Countries.  http://www.newsvine.com/_news/2008/02/29/1335526-a-look-at-major-drug-producing-countries . 2008, Feb. 29.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/law-enforcement-and-criminal-justice-reform

Kraft, John. Border drug war is too close for comfort. http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-bordertown19-2009feb19,0,7443711.story. 2009.
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Drug Crime Does Research Evidence Suggest That

Words: 908 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45481255

Drug Crime

Does research evidence suggest that current policies on drugs and crime are still appropriate?

While "tough" policies designed to curb drug use and distribution are attractive politically, and look good on paper, research shows that such policies are no longer appropriate. Instead of responding to drug use as a public health problem, governments like that of the United States and the United Kingdom still regards criminalization as "the sine qua non-of responsible policy-making," (Downes and Morgan, 2007, p. 212). Unfortunately, the criminalization approach happens to also be irresponsible policy making based on emotion rather than fact. Governments with criminalization policies like the United States and Great Britain show a disturbing "state of denial" about the way criminalization creates and enhances organized crime, and may have even exacerbated some types of substance abuse (Downes and Morgan, 2007, p. 212).

Drug use patterns have also changed dramatically, requiring an intelligent…… [Read More]

References

Downes, D. And Morgan, R. (1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007) in M. Maguire, M. Morgan and R. Reiner (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

South, N. (2007) 'Drugs, Alcohol and Crime' in M. Maguire, R. Morgan, and R. Reiner (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology (4th edn). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Trafficking of Drugs Has Been

Words: 1562 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13757187



The main reason why legalizing all types of drugs will bring more good than harm is because regulation could be put into effect. Things could be more under control. The current system is not working, and that is apparent in the rates of crime that are still high, and the number of people still using, and putting themselves into very well-known danger. Either way, whether it is legal or not, people are still accessing these drugs. They are still able to go out and purchase something that is supposed to be illegal and it will continue to occur if nothing productive and progressive is done. The government, economy, and everyday folks could benefit if these substances are legalized. The policies should be based on actual effects on communities, people, and the country, not on moral and ethical grounds.

eferences:

(1) Caulkins, Jonathan P., et al. How goes the 'war on…… [Read More]

References:

(1) Caulkins, Jonathan P., et al. How goes the 'war on drugs'?: An assessment of U.S. Drug problems and policy. Pittsburgh, PA: RAND Corporation 2005. Print.

(2) Hartstein, Max. The war on drugs -- the worst addiction of all. Lincoln, NE: iUniverse Inc.

2003. Print.

(3) Courtwright, David T. Forces of habit: drugs and the making of the modern world. Boston,
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Mexican Drug War Mexico Is

Words: 2189 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70901193

Drug gangs also target priests across the country who preach against them. More than 1000 priests across the nation are threatened by the drug mafia. As Garcia, one of the priests in the village of Jacume Yards, which borders the U.S. says, "They don't like it that we preach and criticize them. They threatened to burn me and my family alive," [Lizbeth Diaz]

Mexico -- U.S. (a coordinated Approach)

The huge demand for drugs within the U.S. And the easy supply of Arms are two of the important factors that drive the drug cartels in Mexico. This implies that only a coordinated approach involving the active participation of both the governments would be effective in controlling the drug cartels and drug related crimes. President Calderon and former President George W. ush worked out the 'Merida initiative' which was passed in the U.S. congress in 2008. As per the Merida initiative…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Bernd Debussman, 'Latin America: Mexico Drug War Update', Accessed Oct 27th 2009, Available Online at, http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/604/mexico_drug_war_update

2) Stephanie Hanson, 'Mexico's Drug War', Accessed Oct 27th 2009, Available Online at, http://www.cfr.org/publication/13689/

3) Colleen W. Cook, 'CRS Report for Congress: Mexico's Drug Cartels', Accessed Oct 27th 2009, Available Online at,  http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL34215.pdf 

4) Andrew D. Selee, 'Strengthening U.S.-Mexico Cooperation against Drug
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Legalization of Drugs of Abuse

Words: 2744 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61703736

That compared with 19% for alcohol and a secondary drug; 12% for alcohol alone; 3% for smoked cocaine; 2.4% for methamphetamines; and 2.3% for heroin (Abrams).

It is estimated that by 2010 there will be 35 million teens in America (Levinson). This is a significant demographic to be concerned about. There would also be an increased chance of illicit drugs falling into the hands of children, just like cigarettes and alcohol now that are prohibited from being sold to kids. A greater availability, in general, would increase the likelihood of children being able to obtain them (Messerli).

Harm reduction is one of the primary benefits of legalizing illicit drugs; however, opponents feel that this theory is fatally flawed. Although the suffering of drug users should be reduced, their destructive habits shouldn't be tolerated. "Harm eduction advocates forget the thousands of impressionable teenagers for whom the law is a reminder that…… [Read More]

References

Abrams, J. "Report: Teen Use of Pot Will Jump with Legalization - Move to Harder Drugs Follows, Group Says." Seattle Times 13 Jul, 1999: A5. ProQuest. ProQuest. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. December 5, 2006 http://proquest.umi.com.

An Unethical Reason for Legalizing Drugs." Business Week (3678) 24 Apr. 2000: 6. Academic OneFile. Thomson Gale. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. December 5, 2006  http://find.galegroup.com .

Burden, K. "What's the Fuss About Legalizing Drugs? Many People Advocating a "Harm Reduction" Approach to Illegal Drugs are Well-Meaning but Misguided." Presbyterian Record 70(10) Nov. 1996: 10-11. Academic OneFile. Thomson Gale. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. December 5, 2006
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Economic Effect of Legalizing Drugs

Words: 2438 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41551324

Economic Effect of Legalizing Drugs

The program for banning the trading and using of narcotic drugs like cocaine, heroine, and marijuana is one of the most essential public welfare program, attracting so much political discourse on the effectiveness of the 'war on drugs' and the substitute programs like legalization, rehabilitation through decriminalization, drug treatment, and medical marijuana. Economists vehemently criticized the success of the war on drugs pointing to the adverse consequences like violent crime and corruption, and suggested the substitute programs like drug legalization and decriminalization. Milton Friedman has since been upheld the legalization of drugs. Garry, Becker, George Schultz, Thomas Sowell and William Niskanan have also approved the liberalization strategy. (Prohibition vs. Legalization: Do Economists each a Conclusion on Drug Policy?)

The legalization envisages exerting regulatory government control over drug sales more practically through the state clinics or stores. There is stringent ban on the advertisement, declaring the…… [Read More]

References

Cussen, Meaghan; Block, Walter. Legalize Drugs Now! The American Journal of Economics and Sociology. July, 2000. Retrieved from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0254/is_3_59/ai_65348069 Accessed on 15 December, 2004

Maginnis, Robert L. Legalization of Drugs: The Myths and the Facts. Family Research Council. Retrieved from http://www.sarnia.com/groups/antidrug/argument/myths.html Accessed on 15 December, 2004

News and Views from the Dismal Science. Dr. Econ's commentary on local, regional, national, and global economic affairs. Augusta Business Chronicle. September 2001. Retrieved from http://www.aug.edu/~sbajmb/abc065.htm Accessed on 15 December, 2004

Thornton, Mark. Prohibition vs. Legalization: Do Economists Reach a Conclusion on Drug Policy? Paper presented at the Southern Economic Association Convention, New Orleans, Louisiana. November 2002. Retrieved from http://www.mises.org/journals/scholar/thornton3.pdf Accessed on 15 December, 2004
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U S Get Involved Militarily in Mexico's Drug

Words: 1217 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71987506

U.S. get Involved Militarily in Mexico's Drug ar

The United States has occupied a place unique among nations since the fall of the Soviet Union. Super power is a term that can only apply to one country due to economic, military and domestic strength. Although there are other countries, most notably China, that are gaining ground, there is no other country that can currently claim to be a super power. But, this does not mean that the U.S. can act with impunity whenever it wants to. This paper will discuss the current drug war in Mexico and why the U.S. should not intervene militarily because Mexico is a sovereign nation, of the possibility of an international backlash, there could be a drug spillover into the U.S., it could cause a great deal of U.S. deaths, and of the possible added cost of the war during a recession.

Sovereign Nation

The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bricker, Kristin. "Mexico's Drug War Death Toll: 8,463 and Counting." Narconews, 2008. Web.

Chacon, Justin Akers. "U.S. Intervention in Mexico will make Things Worse." The Progressive, 2011. Web.

Harnden, Toby. Barack Obama: 'Arrogant U.S. has been Dismissive' to Allies." The Telegraph, 2009. Web.

Kearney, Kevin. "Pentagon Warns of U.S. Military Intervention in Mexico's 'War on Drugs'." World Socialist Website, 2009). Web.
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Southwestern Border Combating Drug Trade

Words: 4279 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37872183

Combating Drug Trade Along the Southwestern Border

Proposed Strategy for Combating the Drug Trade along the Southwestern Border

The issue of drug trafficking and smuggling has been a serious concern for both Mexico and the United States for decades. Mexico has been identified as the primary supplier of narcotics to the U.S., with the Southwestern border accounting for between 90 and 95% of all illicit drugs smuggled illegally into the U.S. market. In 2007, the presidents of the two countries held a summit, where they pledged to work together, collaboratively in the fight against drug trafficking. Today, substance use accounts for approximately 26% of crimes committed in the U.S. Both the U.S. and the Mexican governments recognize the security threat posed by illicit drug use, and have committed themselves to addressing the problem once and for all. The two countries have implemented numerous initiatives geared at curbing the growth of…… [Read More]

References

Beith, M. (2010). The Last Narco: Into the Hunt for El-Chapo, the World's Most Wanted Drug Lord. New York, NY: Grove Press.

BJS. (2015). Drugs and Crime Facts. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Retrieved January 6, 2015 from http://www.bjs.gov/content/dcf/duc.cfm

Campbell, H. (2010). Drug War Zone: Frontline Dispatches from the Streets of El Paso and Juarez. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

Engel, R. S. & Johnson, R. (2006). Toward a Better Understanding of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Search and Seizure Rates. Journal of Criminal Justice, 34 (6), 605-617.
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the drug war is a logical fallacy

Words: 2048 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38528914

California Proposition 64, the California Marijuana Legalization Initiative, would legalize marijuana/cannabis for adults over the age of 21. The legalization measure only applies to the state of California, as federal law continues on its war on drugs/prohibition path. Proposition 64 was on the ballot in the November 8, 2016 federal election. Prior to passing this Proposition, cannabis was illegal, and possession of cannabis was punishable by law. This proposition would not only decriminalize but fully legalize, which means that individuals 21 years of age or older can and should grow their own or purchase from a local and licensed distributor rather than using the black market. In addition to legalization, which impacts the criminal justice system and the powers of law enforcement, the California Proposition 64 created a tax and regulate method of controlling cannabis. There are two new taxes created with the new law. Those two taxes include a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Branson, R. War on drugs a trillion-dollar failure. CNN. 7 Dec, 2012. Retrieved online:  http://www.cnn.com /2012/12/06/opinion/branson-end-war-on-drugs/

"California Proposition 64, Marijuana Legalization (2016)" Ballotpedia. Retrieved online: https://ballotpedia.org/California_Proposition_64,_Marijuana_Legalization_(2016)

CAMH. Cannabis policy framework. Retrieved online: https://moodle.yorku.ca/moodle/pluginfile.php/2205714/mod_resource/content/1/CAMH%20Cannabis%20Policy%20Framework.pdf

Ingraham, C. (2015). Marijuana may be even safer than previously thought, researchers say. The Washington Post, 23 Feb, 2015. Retrieved online:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/02/23/marijuana-may-be-even-safer-than-previously-thought-researchers-say/?utm_term=.a66100be88db
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Drugs and Gangs Among Detroit Teens

Words: 2335 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70105589

Street Drug Trade Is One of the Most Important Social Institutions for Young People in Detroit

From his perspective, Bergmann writes that the street drug is one of the most important social institutions for young people in Detroit. As an institution, the drug dealings and everything surrounding it are becoming a transforming force taking people in a certain way of life and perception. Detroit is known to be a major region of the drug trade, including heroin. Like any other society, it suffers consequences of this in many ways, including the economic, cultural, social, and even psychological repercussions arising from the presence of the drug. Drugs are commonly effective and, in some way, change the way people behave, live, and interact. This is seen from his submission that "drug dealing governed the seasonal cycles of their lives and taught them about the nature and power of the state, capitalism and…… [Read More]

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Argument for or Against the Debate on Ending or Continuing the War on Drugs

Words: 2198 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56994078

War on Drugs

The concept of the 'War on Drugs' was first coined by President Nixon back in 1971 in an effort to discourage the illegal trafficking of drugs. The primary motivation for this was the way that many states were falling victim to the dynamics of the drugs and terrorism links prevalent in the region. There have many studies conducted that show various authentic connections between the drug business and how a majority of the money it produces is used to fund terrorism and destructive activities.

Throughout the late 19th century, numerous parts of the United States, from time to time, have faced numerous disruptions in their efforts for the peace process because of the growth of the drug industry. The entire debate on war in drugs now revolves around whether or not, certain drugs must be legalized/not legalized and their trafficking and distribution monitored. In a recent article,…… [Read More]

References

Duzan, M.J. (1994). Death Beat: A Colombian Journalist's Life inside the Cocaine Wars, ed. And trans. By Peter Eisner. New York: Harper Collins Publishers, p. 4.

Ehrenfeld, R. (1990). Narcoterrorism. Basic Books, pp. 31 -- 36.

Falcoff, M. (2000). Colombia: The Problem that Will Not Go Away. AEI Latin American Outlook March 2000: 1, http://www.aei.org/lao/lao11476.htm

Hudson, R.A. (1995). Colombia's Palace of Justice Tragedy Revisited: A Critique of the Conspiracy Theory. Terrorism and Political Violence 7: 100 -- 103, 119 -- 121.
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Five Major Street Drugs

Words: 2087 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34743528

flow of drugs into the United States, where the drugs are coming from, in what forms they come in and the general attitudes that are taken against the practice by both the United States law enforcement agencies in particular and the United Nations drug control treaties. The author of this report will answer all of those questions in detail and provide the proper sourcing and citations for the same. While some modest successes are made when it comes to the "war on drugs," the United States law enforcement collective is losing the battle and there is a difference of strategy when it comes to a comparison between the United Nations and the United States.

The first question is fairly specific and brief. For each of the five major illicit drugs that are available and that are used in the United States, there will be a summary of what each one…… [Read More]

References

DEA. (2011). Drugs of Abuse - 2011 Edition (pp. 1-79). Washington DC: Drug

Enforcement Agency.

Ferner, M. (2015). Colorado Introduces Major Shift In Its Marijuana Program. The Huffington Post. Retrieved 23 August 2015, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/01/colorado-marijuana_n_5548620.html

Murphy, G. (2015). Have We Lost the War on Drugs?. WSJ. Retrieved 23 August 2015,
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Classical Argument Drug Prohibition Has

Words: 1767 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53741639

Most Americans value freedoms and liberties such as those protected in the United States Constitution. Those freedoms and liberties are violated when governments prevent access to drugs, which is why legalization may eventually happen on a state-by-state basis.

Marijuana has promising applications in health care, which is why states like California have recently permitted the sale and distribution of the drug to patients with prescriptions. The trend is spreading, and several other states also permit marijuana to be used for medical purposes. As more and more states follow suit, drugs will be effectively decriminalized. Law enforcement can divert its attention to violent crime, leaving ordinary citizens alone and leaving addicts in the care of trained psychological professionals. Consumers will purchase their pot from licensed dealers who they can trust, who carefully cultivate their strains to suit certain medical conditions, and who do not use chemical pesticides or any poison to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cermak, Timmen L. Marijuana: What's a Parent to Believe? Center City, MN: Hazelden, 2003.

Gerber, Rudolph J. Legalizing Marijuana: Drug Policy Reform and Prohibition Politics. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004.

Jones, Paul and Mortin, John. Marijuana: Early Experiences with Four States' Laws that Allow Use for Medical Purposes. United States General Accounting Office, 2002.

Kleiman, Mark. Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control. Greenwood Press, 1989.
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Columbian Drug Problem and Its Political and Economic Ramifications and the United States Recourse

Words: 2979 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45899797

Columbian Drug Trade

If Americans know nothing else about Colombia, they know that it is a place where people grow and package cocaine for use on the world market. This is, of course, a highly biased view of the country because Colombians do many things other than make and sell drugs and most Colombians are not involved in the drug trade at all.

However, it remains true that much of the world's cocaine does originate in Colombia, which has important consequences for that nation's standing in the world as well as for its relationship with the United States. This paper examines some of the consequences for the relationship between the two countries of the ways in which political and economic life in Colombia have become linked to the trade in cocaine.

We must begin this assessment with some basic facts about both Colombia and the drug trade.

It is certainly…… [Read More]

References

http://www.colombiaemb.org/colombian_economy.htm

http://www.globalexchange.org/colombia/spTimes120201.html

http://www.gwu.edu/~clai/Commentary%20on%20Colombia.htm

 http://www.mapinc.org/tlcnews/v02/n101/a03.htm?203
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Legalizing Drugs the Government Creates

Words: 1877 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37845826

It is because policemen may succumb to corruption; especially when their salaries are minimal and the money earned by drug dealers are immense. The legalization of drugs will eliminate such acts of illegality.

The government and elected officials have a significant amount of say and rule as to what passes as a law and what does not. Such representatives are to symbolize and stand for what the people want. However, with so many voices and opinions of how certain issues should be and what should be ruled as legal, conflicts arise. Controversy is heavily shrouded in the dilemma around the legalization of drugs, and whether the government should permit the legal selling, purchase of narcotics like alcohol and tobacco. If such law is passed, the government and its citizens are affected economically, judicially, medically, and socially. Economically, the government is able to receive billions of dollars in revenue and reduce…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Block, W. "Drug Prohibition: A Legal and Economic Analysis." Journal of Business Ethics 12.9 (1993): 689-700. Print.

Cussen, M, and W. Block. "Legalize Drugs Now! An Analysis of the Benefits of the Legalized Drugs." American Journal of Economics and Sociology 59.3 (2000): 525-536. Print.

"Drug War Clock | DrugSense." DrugSense. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2011. .

"Economic Consequences of the War on Drugs." Drug Policy Alliance: Alternatives to Marijuana Prohibition and the Drug War. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Apr. 2011. .
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New Drug Development

Words: 782 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98013671

Future of Clinical esearch: Focusing on New Drug Costs

The objective of this study is to examine the future of clinical research with a focus on new drug costs. Toward this end three reports will be examined that analyze this issue. Drug development costs are unbelievably high and this results in pharmaceutical companies being slow to develop drugs.

Forbes eport

According to a report published by 'Forbes' there is "one factor, as much as anything else, determines how many medicines are invented, what diseases they treat, and, to an extent, what price patients must pay for them: the cost of inventing and developing a new drug, a cost driven by the uncomfortable fact than 95% of the experimental medicines that are studied in humans fail to be both effective and safe." (Herper, 2013, p. 1) Forbes reports that in an analysis conducted that findings show that "A company hoping to…… [Read More]

References

Adams, C. And Brantner, VV (2006) Estimating the Cost of new Drug Development: Is it Really $802 Million? Health Affairs. Retrieved from: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/25/2/420.full.html

Hard Pills to Swallow: The New Drug War (2014) The Economist. Retrieved from: http://www.economist.com/news/international/21592655-drug-firms-have-new-medicines-and-patients-are-desperate-them-arguments-over

Herper, M. (2013) The Cost of Creating A New Drug Now $5 Billion, Pushing Big Pharma to Change. Forbes. 11 Aug 2013. Retrieved from: http://www.forbes.com/sites/matthewherper/2013/08/11/how-the-staggering-cost-of-inventing-new-drugs-is-shaping-the-future-of-medicine/
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Criminal Justice Scare Tactics and

Words: 2376 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34950674

S.A., there is bound to be more problems relating to criminality as well as social problems. For instance legalization of drugs will lead to even more violence across the U.S. Mexico border with each cartel trying to control as much of the market as possible. It will be a magnification of what is currently experienced in the drug deals.

Factually, criminals will not stop being criminals because a drug has been legalized and start be law abiding citizens, paying their taxes and upholding moral standards within the society. This is in light of the fact that the drug dealers don't deal in drugs due to the challenge of making a proper sale but because that is what makes them more money and they will not change just because it is now legal.

Apparently the legalization of drugs will lead to more organized gang crimes like those in Mexico. These are…… [Read More]

References

Denis C., (1999). Zero-tolerance policies lack flexibility. U.S. Today. Retrieved May 30, 2013 from  http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/educate/ednews3.htm 

Drug Enforcement Administration, (2013). Speaking out Against Drug Legalization. Retrieved May 30, 2013 from http://www.justice.gov/dea/pr/multimedia-library/publications/speaking_out.pdf

Drug Policy Alliance, (2013). Zero Tolerance Drug Policies. Retrieved May 30, 2013 from  http://www.drugpolicy.org/zero-tolerance-drug-policies 

Holemberg J., 2009). Narcoterrorism. Retrieved May 30, 2013 from http://traccc.gmu.edu/pdfs/student_research/HolmbergNarcoterrorism.pdf
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Narcoterrorism and the Future

Words: 18088 Length: 70 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91167730

Mexico faces an array of drug-related problems ranging from production and transshipment of illicit drugs to corruption, violence, and increased internal drug abuse. Powerful and well-organized Mexican organizations control drug production and trafficking in and through Mexico, as well as the laundering of drug proceeds. These organizations also have made a concerted effort to corrupt and intimidate Mexican law enforcement and public officials. In addition, the geographic proximity of Mexico to the United States and the voluminous cross-border traffic between the countries provide ample opportunities for drug smugglers to deliver their illicit products to U.S. markets. The purpose of this study was to develop informed and timely answers to the following research questions: (a) How serious is the trade in illicit drugs between Mexico and the United States today and what have been recent trends? (b) How does drug trafficking fund terrorist organizations in general and trade between Mexico and…… [Read More]

References

Delaware fact sheet. (2014). Friends of Narconon, International. Retrieved from http://www.friendsof narconon.org/drug_distribution_in_the_united_states/delaware_drug_facts/delaware_fact

sheet/.

Drug threats in Wilmington. (2014). Drug Enforcement Edu.org. Retrieved from http://www.

drugenforcementedu.org/delaware/wilmington/.
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Legalization of Marijuana in the

Words: 1053 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6288426

" Moreover, instead of spending billions of dollars on fighting the war, the Mexican government could channel this money -- which is significant for the Mexican economy -- into meeting the population's social needs, thus decreasing the incentives for Mexico's youth to resort to crime.

Prohibition of marijuana, one might even argue, is the lead cause of violence in Mexico. It is the prohibition that drives the drug market to the underground. In the underground world, the disputes between buyers and sellers cannot be resolved through legal means such as lawsuits and arbitration. So, they are often resolved through violence. hen the United States banned alcohol during Prohibition in 1930s, the level of violence increased but as soon as the ban was lifted, the level of crime and violence dropped to the pre-Prohibition levels. As Miron points out, [v]iolence is the norm in illicit gambling but not in legal ones.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Camin, Hector Aguilar and Jorge G. Castenada. "California's Prop 19, on Legalizing Marijuana, Could End Mexico's Drug War." Washington Post. 5 September 2010. Web. 3 May 2011.

Forsyth, Jim. "U.S. Should Legalize Drugs, Says Former Mexican President Fox." Reuters. 3 May 2011. Web. 3 May 2011.

Johnson, Gary. "Legalize Marijuana to Stop the Drug Cartels." Huffington Post. 26 August, 2010. Web. 3 May 2011.

Miron, Jeffrey, a. "Commentary: Legalize Drugs to Stop Violence." CNN Online. 24 March 2009. Web. 3 May 2011.
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Opium Consumption and Trade the

Words: 2838 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70148264

The author mentioned that rather than only tying the drug consumption with unemployment, urban drug culture, and other factors, one needs to view the drug pervasiveness issues in light of distribution channels as well. The author mentioned that South East Asia's Golden Triangle was the hub of opium trade to the world. Thai-Burma border was used by the Yunnan province drug lords to change opium into marijuana and heroin. The long trail from Golden Triangle to New York was managed by Yunnan merchants and they exported the illicit drugs to Thai -- Burma border. After refinement into heroin, the drugs were then carried by the Chiu Chau Chinese drug traders. They transported these drugs to Bangkok, South Asia, America and Europe. ith loose organizational structures, these Chinese networks of drug trade were closely knit clans and fiercely ruthless in their trade practices as were the gangs of Versailles.

Davenport observed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chabat, Jorge. "Mexico's war on drugs: No margin for maneuver." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 582.1 (2002): 134-148.

Grayson, George W. Mexico: Narco-violence and a failed state? Transaction Books, 2011.
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California Recently Voted Down a

Words: 1815 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59540476

" This is money that should be spent on (a) preventing and healing drug addiction and related issues; (b) more effective, and smarter, law enforcement. Legalizing marijuana would also generate much-needed tax revenues that can be spent on precisely those two things. From an economic or financial perspective, the legalization of marijuana will also help grow small businesses and thus can alleviate the problems associated with the current economic crisis. Low start-up costs for a marijuana grow operation also mean that low-income families and entrepreneurs can earn extra income in a legitimate way. Marijuana should be made legal because Americans value personal freedoms, too. It makes no sense for alcohol and Xanax to be legal but not marijuana. Marijuana, when made legal, can be regulated in the same way that alcohol and prescription drugs are. Police will not be wasting their time busting people for possessing a plant. Instead, pharmacists…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Armentano, Paul. "DEA Moves to Ban 'Fake Marijuana' Products." NORML. 24 Nov 2010. Retrieved Nov 25, 2010 from  http://norml.org/ 

Cooper, Charles and McCullagh, Declan. "America's Love-Hate History with Pot." CBS News. 13 July 2009. Retrieved Nov 25, 2010: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/07/13/national/main5154550.shtml

Drug Policy Alliance. Economic consequences of the war on drugs. Retrieved 25 Nov, 2010: http://www.drugpolicy.org/library/factsheets/economiccons/fact_economic.cfm

"Legalization of Marijuana." LegalizationOfMarijuana.com. Retrieved Nov 25, 2010 from  http://legalizationofmarijuana.com/
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Narcotics Distribution Manufacturing and Abuse

Words: 2567 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59270786



Law enforcement and narcotics trafficking

In fact, one of the things that many Americans may fail to understand is that there is a relationship between the domestic narcotics industry and international terrorism. Illegal drug trafficking is an international crime problem, and it is rarer that criminal enterprises limit themselves to a single illegal activity. Many criminal enterprises involved in narcotics distribution are also involved in the trafficking of humans and weapons. Furthermore, much of America's narcotic supply comes from Afghanistan, where its production and distribution can provide revenue for terrorist organizations. "The specific dynamics of the linkage between narcotics and conflict remain poorly understood. Evolving theory on the link between organized crime and terrorism enhances and supplements the debate on economic incentives in civil war, proposing mechanisms whereby insurgent groups interact with narcotics production -- a crime -- rebellion nexus" (Cornell, 2007). This nexus is not yet fully understood and…… [Read More]

References

Cornell, S. (2007). Narcotics and armed conflict: Interactions and implications. Studies in Conflict & Terrorism, 30(3), 207-227.

Gorvin, I. (2008, May). Targeting blacks: drug law enforcement and race in the United States.

New York: Human Rights Watch Organization.

Hartney, E. (2012, February 6). How to prevent addiction in your kids. Retrieved February 22,
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Sociology Whether or Not to

Words: 847 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65440825



everal authors like ullivan (2001) point out the hypocrisy in drawing arbitary lines around certain classes of drugs. In fact, all drugs are potentially harmful. Even caffeine is bad for health when abused. Legally acquired pharmaceutical drugs can be lethal, whereas marijuana has no known cases of overdose. The discrepancy in laws and sentencing policies should be eradicated in order to create a more just society. As Walsh & Hemmens (2008) point out in the chapter on "Law and ocial Change," the prohibition on drugs is no different than the prohibition on alcohol. Both have caused the proliferation of organized crime and neither solved the underlying issues related to mental and physical health. One of the main reasons to legalize drugs is to reduce the market power of organized crime syndicates. Prohibition of alcohol "literally kick-started organized crime in the United tates, and ushered in a decade of gang wars…… [Read More]

Sullivan, a. (2001). The Distinction betwen legal and illegal drugs is arbitrary. In Rolleff, Tamara L. 2004. The War of Drugs: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego: Greenhaven Press.

Walsh, a. & Hemmens, C. (2008). Law and Social Change. Walsh & Hemmens.

Wisher, R. (2001) Illegal Drugs Should Not Be Legalized. In Rolleff, Tamara L. 2004. The War of Drugs: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego: Greenhaven Press.
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Military Forces in Mexico American

Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32678018

Particularly, many democrats and republicans expressed their dismay about the fact that the ush administration did not notify or seek congressional input while the policy was being developed. However, as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs, Roberta Jacobson, who actually drafted the 'Merida initiative' says, "Although it [Merida] was proposed by a Republican administration, it was passed by a Democratic [party-controlled] Congress." [Jim Fischer, 2009]

Some policy analysts from Mexico have expressed their concern that controlling drug trafficking in Mexico would be better achieved if the U.S. takes active measures to control the arms trafficking from across its borders into Mexico. Gen. Javier del Real Magallanes, who is in command of the northeastern states such as Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, and San Luis Potosi says, "If there are no weapons, there's no violence. These arms aren't from Mexico; they're from the other side." [Laura Starr, 2007]. Sharing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Colleen W. Cook, Oct 2007, 'CRS Report for Congress: Mexico's Drug Cartels', retrieved Apr 22nd, 2010, from,  http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL34215.pdf 

2) Bernd Debussman, 'Latin America: Mexico Drug War Update', retrieved Apr 22nd 2010, from, http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/604/mexico_drug_war_update

3) Manuel Roig-Franzia, 'U.S. Guns Behind Cartel Killings In Mexico', retrieved Apr 22nd 2010, from,  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/28/AR2007102801654.html 

4) Inside USA, 'Mexico's Drug', retrieved Apr 22nd 2010, from, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyDHNeJxazU
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The 2000 Film Traffic Addresses

Words: 1272 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82003284

For much of the movie, Robert akefield is the main antagonist. akefield represents the American government's complicity in perpetuating an outmoded political policy. Thus, Traffic portrays the American government's ar on Drugs as being antithetical to American values. akefield is initially blind to his daughter's plight, and is depicted as being too career-driven and closed-minded to notice that the ar on Drugs is a war on his family and his country. However, akefield does wake up. At the end of the movie he perceives the connection between his actions as Drug Czar and the supply chain his daughter has access to. akefield's awakening is Soderbergh's call to America to end the ar on Drugs policy.

Traffic ends on a note of optimism while also leaving the ar on Drugs unresolved. Soderbergh seems aware that United States drug policy will not change any time soon. The film also offers a scathing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cafferty, J. (2009). Commentary: War on drugs is insane. Retrieved April 12, 2009 from  http://www.cnn.com /2009/POLITICS/03/31/cafferty.legal.drugs/index.html

Drug Policy Alliance Network. What's Wrong With the Drug War? Retrieved April 12, 2009 from http://www.drugpolicy.org/drugwar/

Greer, M. (2009). Drug War Clock. Retrieved April 12, 2009 from http://www.drugsense.org/wodclock.htm

"Timeline: America's War on Drugs." NPR. April 2, 2007. Retrieved April 12, 2009 from  http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=9252490
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Traffic Film Analysis Traffic Is a 2000

Words: 1368 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31668412

Traffic Film Analysis

Traffic is a 2000 film directed by Steven Soderbergh that focuses on the drug trade between the United States and Mexico, the factors that encourage individuals to promote the drug trade, and what steps are being taken to curb the drug trade. The film relays a very realistic interpretation of the proverbial war on drugs and demonstrates that drug culture has becomes so ingrained in society that it may be impossible to completely stop the drug trade between the United States and Mexico, or the United States with any other country.

Traffic seeks to investigate the ideologies of those that attempt to stop the trafficking of drugs between the United States and Mexico and those individuals and/or groups who promote drug trafficking either out of necessity or because they want to expand territorial claims. In the film, ideologies can be divided based on nationality and further divided…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gaghan, Stephen. Traffic. Screenplays For You. Web. 7 October 2012.

Grillo, Ioan. "Top 10 Notorious Drug Lords." Time Specials. 22 June 2011. Web. 7 October

2012.

Just, Sara. "Nightline: Traffic -- The Reality Behind the Movie." ABC Nightline. 19 March. Web.
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Putting it All Together Collectively

Words: 3022 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79376177

United States is in the middle of a war on drugs, and has been for several decades. Yet, many believe that we are losing this war, often because of the impractical approach legislation has taken in response to curb growing rates of addiction in the United States; however, drug addiction continues to be a major social problem in the United States. esearch shows that there is a direct correlation between increased incidences of domestic violence and use of drugs. This makes it incredibly imperative for local advocacy groups and law enforcement to find viable solutions to the growing drug problem surrounding the use of illegal substances in The United States.

The United States is in the middle of a war on drugs, and has been for several decades. Yet, many believe that we are losing this war, often because of the impractical approach legislation has taken in response to curb…… [Read More]

References

Babbie, E. (2007). The practice of social research. CA: Wadsworth. Smith, M.J. (1988). Contemporary Communication Research Methods. CA: Wadsworth.

Dealing With Drug Abuse -- Summary and Recommendations. 2012. Dealing With Drug Abuse - Summary and Recommendations. [ONLINE] Available at:

http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/studies/dwda/dwdsum.htm. [Accessed 28 April 2012].

FBI -- A Model for Success in the Drug War. 2012. FBI -- A Model for Success in the Drug War.
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Adolescent Substance Use Screening Instruments 10-Year Critical

Words: 14685 Length: 53 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28105173

Adolescent Substance Use Screening Instruments: 10-Year Critical eview of the esearch Literature

Over ten million teenagers in the United States admit in a national survey that they drink alcohol, although it is illegal under the age of 21 in all states. In some studies, nearly one-quarter of school-age children both smoked cigarettes and drank alcohol. Over four thousand adolescents every day try marijuana for the first time. The dangers of use, abuse and dependency on each of these substances have been established. When we also consider that these three substances are considered gateway drugs, that is, drugs whose use is likely to lead to experimentation with "hard" drugs, the potential problem of such widespread use is even more severe. Additionally, use of these substances is known to co-occur with a number of other psychiatric conditions as well as health issues such as the incidence of sexually-transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies and…… [Read More]

References

Aarons, Gregory A.; Brown, Sandra A.; Hough, Richard L.; Garland, Ann F.; Wood, Patricia A. Prevalence of Adolescent Substance Use Disorders Across Five Sectors of Care (Statistical Data Included). Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, April 2001 v40 i4 p419

Adger, Hoover Jr.; Werner, Mark J. The pediatrician (role in treatment of alcohol-related disorders). Alcohol Health and Research World, Spring 1994 v18 n2 p121 (6)

Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Symptoms of Adolescents. National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence of the San Fernando Valley, Inc. [Online]. Retrieved January 20, 2003 from http:/ / www.ncadd-sfv.org/symptoms/teen_symptoms.html

Alcohol use and abuse: a pediatric concern (American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Abuse). Pediatrics, March 1995 v95 n3 p439 (4)
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International Criminal Organizations

Words: 2566 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57505316

International Criminal Organizations

Over time, Mexico has experienced significant growth in crime levels -- something that has led to an increase in criminal activity not only in Mexico but also across the entire region as well. In this text, I concern myself with the rise of international criminal organizations in Mexico. In so doing, I will amongst other things explain the role poverty and/or corruption has played in the creation of fertile ground for organized gangs and how the Mexican government has responded to the rise in criminal activity. Further, in addition to evaluating the effect of the said criminal organizations on the stability of the nation as a whole, I will also speculate over what the situation in Mexico means to the United States from a national security perspective. ecommendations with regard to how the government of Mexico should respond to the situation will be offered at the end…… [Read More]

References

Barkan, S. & Bryjak, G. (2011). Fundamentals of Criminal Justice: A Sociological View (2nd ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett.

Center for International Cooperation -- CIC (2013). Organized Crime. Retrieved from http://cic.nyu.edu/content/organized-crime

CNN Library. (2013). Mexico Drug War Fast Facts. CNN. Retrieved from  http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/02/world/americas/mexico-drug-war-fast-facts/ 

Edmonds-Poli, E. & Shirk, D.A. (2012). Contemporary Mexican Politics (2nd ed.). Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield.
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Immigration and Crime in the

Words: 1336 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11295087

To put a price tag on the problem for reader, Indiana University economist Eric Rasmusen claims in figures from a 2005 GAO report on foreigners that were incarcerated in Federal and state prisons calculated that illegal immigrants commit 21% of crime in America. This cost America more than $84 billion (Kingsbury).

Claim Three:

Illegal immigration from Mexico is a major funnel for terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda. This is stated in the groups own words. In a 2009 video, an al Qaeda recruiter threatened to smuggle a biological weapon into the United States. He claimed that the organization would do this via tunnels under the Mexico border. The video aired on Al Jazeera and was later posted to several web sites. These show Kuwaiti dissident Abdullah al-Nafisi telling supporters in Bahrain that terrorists in al Qaeda were observing the U.S. border with Mexico to figure out how to send terrorists…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Al Qaeda eyes bio attack from Mexico." Washington Times 3 June 2009: Web.

24 Oct 2010. .

"Al-Qaida Operative Nabbed Near Mexican Border." News Max.com. News Max.com,

20 Nov. 2005. Web. 24 Oct 2010. .
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North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement

Words: 999 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58061342

Americans who want to open businesses in Mexico's cities would be able to do so easily, which would stimulate Mexico's economy as well as America's. Mexicans who want to live and work in the United States could do so without risking their lives and leaving their families. Quality of life would vastly improve in Mexico, and the improved economy would mean less strain on health care and other social services. During the current economic recession, unifying the two countries makes more sense than it ever has.

One of the best reasons to have a union between the United States and Mexico is to reduce rates of crime. Border towns are violent places, and law enforcement officials are often killed in skirmishes that involve organized crime. The United States and Mexico are both at fault for fueling organized crime. According to Donnison, "More than 6,000 people died last year in Mexico…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Donnison, John. "Mexico Says U.S. Fuels Gun Crime." BBC News. 12 April 2009. Retrieved Nov 14, 2009 from  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7996196.stm 

"Mexico Environment." Retrieved Nov 14, 2009 from  http://www.questconnect.org/mexico_environment.htm 

States News Service. "U.S.-Mexico Border 2012." Retrieved Nov 14, 2009 from http://www.epa.gov/Border2012/
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Legaliztain of Marijuana in 2009

Words: 2375 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85882007

President Richard Nixon chose to ignore and through the whole report into the garbage. Instead, he had the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) created and were given authority enter homes without knocking and to use wiretaps and gather intelligence virtually on anyone Milestones. In the 1980's President Ronald Reagan continued the war by advocated his own war and it was estimated that due to these wars, someone was arrested on a violation of a marijuana law every 38 seconds.

Thankfully, these wars have become more focused on the real drug problems that are primarily synthetic or man made or used in ways never imagined. But heroin and methamphitamines are clearly not health regimens. They kill people every day, cause real crimes and ruin families, lives and destroys entire groups.

The first step in changing the view of marijuana began with the legalization for medical usage. The compassions for the ill allowed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"42.0 Milestones in the History of Marijuana." N.p., 9 May 2010. Web. <rainz.org/420- milestones-history-marijuana/>.

Buchanan, Wyatt. "State's Voters to Decide on Legalizing Pot." San Fransisco Chronicle, n.d. Web. 9 May 2010. .

"Campaigns That Matter - Legalizing Marijuana in California." Campaigns That Matter - California Politics, California Political News, California Legislative News, Public Policy Information, California State Elections, California Political Campaigns, California Propositions. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 May 2010. .

Gray, Jim. Judgejimgray.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 May 2010. .
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Narcotic Trade in Mexico

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22421974

Narcotic Trade in Mexico

Mexico's War on Drugs: Legitimate Efforts, Ineffective Results

Advocates on the war on drugs claim that the Government of Mexico is well on its way to victory since Vicente Fox-Quesada assumed the presidency in December 2000. After taking office, President Fox launched a national assault against drug trafficking and organized crime, developed the 2001-2006 National Drug Control Plan, and made the trafficking of drugs to be a national security issue. Under the Fox Administration, Mexican authorities have arrested key members of the major cartels and have dramatically increased information sharing between the United States and Mexican Governments. However, a never ending supply and corruption fueled by enormous profits appear to be rendering the legitimate efforts of Fox ineffective. In fact, policies encouraged by the United Stated and executed by Fox may hold the potential for the future destabilization of Mexico.

During the stepped up efforts of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Carpenter, Ted. "Is Mexico the Next Colombia?" 20 Mar. 2003. CATO Institute. 5 Sept. 2004. http://www.cato.org/dailys/03-20-02.html.

Country Profile for 2003." U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. 5 Sept. 2004. http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/pubs/intel/03047/.

Ereli, Adam. "2003 Drug Cultivation Estimates for Mexico." 6 Apr. 2004. U.S. Department of State. 5 Sept. 2004. http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2004/31185.htm.

Mexico Anti-Drug Force to be Scrapped." 17 Jan. 2003. BBC News. 5 Sept. 2004.  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/2670291.stm .
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Homeland Security Issue of Immigration

Words: 2233 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96169092

Workplace enforcement includes the scrutiny of the I-9 form and the attached documents, in an attempt to discover identity fraud, fraudulent documents, and illegal workplace activities.

Illegal firearms.

Another aspect of illegal immigration is weapons. Illegal immigrants bring guns and other weapons across the border, but there is also a growing trade in illegal firearms, obtained in the United States, traveling back into Mexico and being used in criminal activities there, especially by powerful drug cartels. The annual report states, "ICE launched Operation Armas Cruzadas in FY08 to provide a targeted law enforcement focus on arms smuggling between the United States and Mexico" (Torres, 2009). The problem has gotten so bad that the U.S. issued warnings to travelers to stay away from the country during the recent spring break season. The agency has had some success with stopping cross-border smuggling activities, but they have not had as much success as…… [Read More]

References

Cox, A.B., & Posner, E.A. (2007). The second-order structure of immigration law. Stanford Law Review, 59(4), 809+.

Dillin, J. (2006). How Eisenhower solved illegal border crossings from Mexico. Christian Science Monitor.

Green, T.C., & Ciobanu, I.M. (2006). Deputizing - and then prosecuting - America's businesses in the fight against illegal immigration. American Criminal Law Review, 43(3), 1203+.

Headley, B. (2006). Giving critical context to the deportee phenomenon. Social Justice, 33(1), 40+.
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Narco Terrorism You Live in

Words: 2557 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84301956

Davids purports that the MNF would operate under U.N. jurisdiction, with the Organization of American States as its head. (Saskiewicz, 2006) in his review of Davids' book, Saskiewicz (2006) notes that Davids " does not address the difficulties associated with sharing intelligence with foreign nations, nor does he prescribe a means by which this could be accomplished." In turn, he leaves the impression, based on interpersonal relationships and camaraderie, allied MNF members would merely cooperate and share intelligence. This potential "dream," Saskiewicz (2006) proposes would cause nightmares for personnel assigned to any special-security office.

In addition, Davids' assertion the MNF would ultimately fight narco-trafficking organizations, along with political considerations, coupled with logistical and manpower constraints, would most likely dissuade the majority of Latin American militaries from contributing forces to the MNF. MNF financing would also likely serve as an astronomical block to Davids' and/or similar proposed wars against narco terrorism.…… [Read More]

References

Chouvy, Pierre-arnaud. "Narco-Terrorism in Afghanistan." Terrorism Monitor, Volume 2, Issue 6 (March 25, 2004). Retrieved June 30, 2008, at http://www.jamestown.org/terrorism/news/article.php?articleid=23648.

Hutchinson, Asa. Narco-Terror: The International Connection Between Drugs and Terror= (Speech). Institute for International Studies. Washington, DC., April 2, 2002. Retrieved June 30, 2008, at http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/speeches/s040202.html.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106764405

Manwaring, M.G. (2005). Street Gangs: The New Urban Insurgency. Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute.
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Anti-Legalization of Marijuana

Words: 1485 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77852572

Legalizing Marijuana

Recent ballot initiatives in states like California and Oregon asking for the decriminalization of marijuana use reveals a growing public acceptance of marijuana. The perception that marijuana is not dangerous has made drug enforcement even more difficult. Indeed, the debate over marijuana goes beyond health concerns, and touches issues such as crime and privacy as well.

This paper examines the debate to legalize marijuana. The first part of the paper examines the arguments of the pro-marijuana side, focusing on those who argue that the drug can have medicinal purposes. The next part then examines the potential dangers of legalized marijuana use, both to the individual and to public health in general. In the conclusion, the paper argues that marijuana use is not a "victimless" crime. The potential dangers that marijuana present to individual and public health are best upheld by keeping marijuana illegal.

Pro-legalization arguments

Prohibitions against the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Glasser, Ira. "Spotlight: Why Marijuana Law Should Matter to You." Marijuana. Louise I. Gerdes, ed. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002.

Gottfried, Ted Should Drug Use Be Legalized? Connecticut: Twenty-First Century Books, 2000.

"Marijuana as Medicine: A Subtle Syllogism." The Economist. August 16, 1997. ProQuest Database.

Marshall, Donnie. "Drug Prohibition is Effective." Drug Legalization. Scott Barbour, ed. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2000.
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Research on Terrorism

Words: 1641 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32040451

Terrorist Threat to California through Mexican Drug Trafficking

The immigration challenges across all the United tates borders often invoke varied responses from both the average citizens and the law enforcement agencies. The cross border migration that has been of greatest concern is the Mexico to UA migration due to the myriad challenges this migration presents to the U..A. The Mexican population residing to the outh of the U.. has had a strained relationship with its northern neighbor over a long period of time owing to the inconsistency of its immigration policies, the distinctly lower socioeconomic status afforded to Mexicans on both sides of the border and the ravages afflicted upon both sides of the border by the U.. sponsored War on Drugs. Though all of these aforementioned factors are relevant, it is the war on drugs that forms the central concern of this research proposal since it has proven persistent…… [Read More]

Sources:

Astorga, L. (2003). Drug Trafficking in Mexico: A First General Assessment. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. Online at  http://www.unesco.org/most/astorga.htm 

DeMelo, D. (2005). Merton's Strain Theory. Criminological Theory. Online at < http://home.comcast.net/~ddemelo/crime/mert_strain.html>

Imperial Valley News (IVN). (2008). Mexican Drug-Trafficking Organization Members Indicted in Operation Money Train. Imperial Valley News.

Jeffrey, T.P. (2009). Drug Cartels Control Crossings. The Washington Times.
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Poppy Production in Afghanistan

Words: 2669 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37582050

Target ecommendations

The current opium irradiation program in Afghanistan is failing to address the long-term challenges impacting the country (i.e. poverty, a lack of economic opportunities and corruption). This is resulting in the Taliban and organized crime utilizing it as an avenue to create greater amounts of instability. In the ten years, seizures of opium and heroin have declined by 57 and 77% respectively. This is problematic, as it is making it difficult for the country to move forward beyond the decades of civil war. (Ackerman, 2014)

To address these issues, a new approach must be used that are showing the way forward. This will be accomplished by providing policy recommendations and suggesting a future course of action which can reverse key trends. Together, these insights will enhance stability and decrease the influence of the Taliban / organized crime elements.

Policy ecommendations

The opium trade and poverty are directly related…… [Read More]

References

Drug War? American Troops are Protecting Afghan Opium. (2014) Global Research. Retrieved from:http://www.globalresearch.ca/drug-war-american-troops-are-protecting-afghan- opium-u-s-occupation-leads-to-all-time-high-heroin-production/5358053

The Most Addictive Drugs. (2014). Rehabs. Retrieved from:  http://luxury.rehabs.com/drug-addiction/most-addictive/ 

National Drug Policy. (2001). Canadian Parliament. Retrieved from:  http://www.parl.gc.ca/content/sen/committee/371/ille/library/dolin1-e.htm#3 .

Ackerman, S. (2014). Afghan Opium Production Explodes. The Guardian. Retrieved from: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/30/afghan-opium-production-explodes- billions-spent-us-report
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Immigration -- the Challenge Illegal

Words: 1132 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48972794

Scores of illegal Latin Americans work in the hospitality industry, construction, meatpacking, agriculture, and landscaping sectors. In fact, in some of the states it is said that almost half of the construction workers are from Latin America. There are arguments that if all these illegal immigrants were removed these jobs would improve the unemployment situation for the American citizens. It is also generally argued that the pay scale for low skilled jobs would also increase. Also, most of the illegal aliens utilize healthcare, education and other services without paying taxes causing significant drain for the government.

The above points are clearly valid but there are both positive and negative effects of illegal immigration. Economists feel that totally eliminating illegal workers would only marginally improve the pay scale for high school dropouts and would not have any significant impact for workers with higher qualifications. Furthermore, illegal immigration contributes positively as Americans…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Michael Barone, 'Living with Illegals', U.S. News and World Report, April 3rd 2006.
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The Evolution of Organized Crime

Words: 2207 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78718392

History Of Organized Crime

More than a century of motion pictures and more than a half-century of television productions have created a somewhat romanticized version of organized crime as typified in "The Godfather" series. Indeed, there is even a National Museum of Organized Crime and Law Enforcement, commonly known as "The Mob Museum" in Las Vegas which is a popular tourist destination (Green, 2013). The reality of organized crime, however, contrasts sharply with any romanticized depiction and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) emphasizes that organized crime is not only prevalent in the United States, it has become far more complex and broader in scope compared to the past. To determine the facts about the history of organized crime, this paper provides a background and overview followed by an analysis of some of the main sources of revenues for these criminal organizations. Finally, the paper concludes with an analysis of…… [Read More]

References

Calderon, F. (2015, Summer). Drug trafficking and organized crime: Connected but different. Harvard International Review, 36(4), 52-55.

Drug trafficking. (2016). United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. Retrieved from https:// www.unodc.org/unodc/en/drug-trafficking/.

Green, M. (2013, October 1). How the Mob (Museum) was won: Building a history of organized crime in the U.S. UNLV Gaming Research & Review Journal, 17(2), 101-104.

Kelly, R. J. & Chin, K. L. (1999). Handbook of organized crime in the United States. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
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Predominantly Latino Gangs Mara Salvatrucha

Words: 17380 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44825476



Government

Since gang-related crimes fall within the jurisdiction of state, this research will give an insight on the need to find solutions that increasingly include all levels of government. Congress needs to pass legislation that will change immigration enforcement laws and make more aliens deportable. In addition, the federal government should take a more active participation in helping local and state jurisdictions develop anti-gang responses. The local, state and federal governments must take a stand, and combine forces to combat the immigration problem that continue to plague this country into the next generation.

Importance of the Study

The die has been cast, there is no turning the clock back now and the Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street Gang have established themselves in the United States and far beyond. The origins of the current situation with MS-13 and the 18th Street Gang date back to the late 1980s and early 1990s…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, W. (2009, February 16). 'Sanctuary cities' protect murderous illegal aliens. Human Events, 64(37), 8.

Bansal, M. (2006) Chertoff: Street Gangs a Threat to National. Retrieved November 12,

2006 from  http://www.CNSNews.com .

Barber, B. (1996). Jihad vs. McWorld: How Globalism and Tribalism are Reshaping the World. New York: Ballantine Book.
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Personal Agency The Importance of

Words: 2482 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24222691

Bernie Krisher of American Assistance for Cambodia set her up in Phnom Penh twice more, but each time she ran away after a few days, desperate to get back to her meth supply" (Kristof and uDonn, p.39). hile I have not returned to Mexico and the carefree lifestyle I led there, I cannot deny having the desire to do so, on occasion. hile I know that the life I lived there was not the right life for me, I still long to return to it on occasion.

Of course, the differences in countries and cultures are, in many ways, becoming less apparent as the world becomes more global. This globalization has challenged the existing social structures in many countries, including those countries with castes or caste-like socioeconomic divisions. Discussing India, Kapur stated that, "ancient social structures are collapsing under the weight of new money. Bonds of caste and religion and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barber, Benjamin. "Jihad vs. McWorld." The Atlantic. N.p. 1 Mar. 1992. Web. 6 May 2013.

Kapur, Akash. "How India became America." The New York Times. 1-2. 9 Mar. 2012. Web.

6 May 2013.

Kristof, Nicholas and Sheryl WuDunn. "Microcredit: The Financial Revolution." Half the Sky:
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Transnational Criminals and Organizations

Words: 2305 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85726178

Narcotics Intelligence

Transnational criminals and organization are active in many parts of the U.S. and they make use of illicit cross-border tunnels, parcel services and other means to unlawfully smuggle and distribute drugs and narcotic substances among the communities.

In addition to causing personal harm to individuals consuming drugs, the activities of the transnational drug cartels often lead to significant amount of violence and crime. These are aspects that are associated with drug trafficking and such consequences have the potential to affect the well-being of citizens as well as the fabric of institutions that govern the country.

There are several strategies to combat this menace and all the strategies depend on intelligence gathering, sharing and effective understanding of the information to execute effective actions.

Some of the strategies that are useful in combating the foreign drug cartels and their impact in the U.S. society include maximizing Federal support for drug…… [Read More]

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Operation Fast and Furious Has

Words: 3442 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92513346

Over the course of about a year, it appears that "in total, some 1,725 weapons appear to have been involved," with weapons subsequently showing up in both the United States and Mexico (Cochran 2011).

Operation Fast and Furious first raised the interest and ire of the public in June 2010, when a document showed that the ATF had lets at least 309 guns walk before subsequently losing track of them (Cochran 2011). The practice of allowing straw purchasers to complete their purchase in order to track the gun had been done before, but the lack of oversight and communication seen in Operation Fast and Furious meant that the process of tracking these weapons suffered a fatal breakdown, so that they were ultimately lost until they showed up again at the scenes of crimes. It was this scenario that ultimately ignited the firestorm of controversy now surrounding the program, because in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chu, Vivian, and William Krouse. Gun Trafficking and the Southwest Border. Washington DC:

Congressional Research Service, 2009.

Cochran, Sylvia. "Timeline of Ill-Fated Gun Smuggling 'Operation Fast and Furious'." Yahoo

News. Yahoo, 27 Oct 2011. Web. 22 Nov 2011. .
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Joshua's Goldstein Book 5th Edition

Words: 7033 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98881068

history of events in the twentieth century, one might surmise that the twenty-first may not be all that different. Why? ecause human nature and the pursuit of self-interest has not changed from one century to the next. To explain what drives international relations, Joshua Goldstein provides a brief history of the world, in addition to information about the geographical features and the consequences of different nation's economies. (Goldstein, 2003) The beginning of the twentieth century was marked by relative peace in the world. The Franco-Prussian wars were at least three decades into the past. Nobody would envision that the worst horrors of a global scale wars were in the near future. In as much as Goldstein avers that the First World War was wholly unnecessary and it was, at least in its inception, a macho exercise (p. 37), one can believe that war is part of human nature.

After the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Goldstein, J.S. International Relations. 5th ed. New York: Longman, 2003.

Tacitus, C., and Birley, A.R. Agricola; and Germany. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
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Human Population in El Paso Population Explosion

Words: 1533 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10120818

Human Population in El Paso

Population Explosion in El Paso and Juarez

Globalization is well in full force. The increasing population explosions in El Paso and Juarez Mexico show that international business and economic developments are encouraging people from the interior of Mexico to flood into border towns and eventually into the United States. What has resulted, however, is chaos partly because the two towns do not have proper legislation or budgeting to deal collaboratively on this shared population problem.

The population of both towns is exceeding their capabilities. According to the research, "The Juarez-El Paso population of 2 million makes up the largest border community anywhere in the world, expanding more than 5% a year," (Padgett 2001 p 1). This growth is unmatched in other American and Mexican cities. The two cities together had a population of two million in 2000 (Casey 2006). That number is estimated to explode…… [Read More]

References

Associated Press. (2011). Cuidad Juarez residents flee Mexico's 'dying city.' Fox News. Web. http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/01/02/ciudad-juarez-residents-flee-mexicos-dying-city/

Casey, Maureen. (2006). Juarez / El Paso selected facts. Labor-Religion Coalition. Web. http://www.labor-religion.org/ip-elpaso-juarez-facts.htm

Cave, Damien. (2011). Bridging a gap between fear and peace. New York Times. Web.  http://www.nytimes.com /2011/02/15/world/americas/15juarez.html

Padgett, Tim. (2001). Two countries, one city: El Paso and Juarez only seem separate. TIME Magazine. Web.
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Operation Fast and Furious The

Words: 703 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94497211

This course has enabled me to understand the actual description and meaning of public policy and its significant concepts. Generally, public policy is an action taken by the government through its executive branches in response to a specific public issue. Government agencies and organizations develop and implement public policy with the intention of protecting the society and providing benefits to the populations. Notably, such actions are taken based on the provisions in the Constitution and institutional traditions.

The most significant concepts learned in this course are the instrumentation, tools, and modes of operation of public policy. The significance of public policy instrumentation has been emphasized throughout the course because it shows the theoretical relationship between governing and the population. Secondly, knowledge regarding the tools and modes of operation of public policy has provided information on how every instrument comprise of strong knowledge regarding social control and various ways of implementing…… [Read More]

References:

Kimery, A. (2012, July 12). 'Fast and Furious' Ignored Pleas to Track Guns with Technology,

Some Insiders Say. Retrieved August 7, 2013, from http://www.hstoday.us/blogs/the-kimery-report/blog/fast-and-furious-ignored-pleas-to-track-guns-with-technology-some-insiders-say/f115959a222459b18b7a28cc5af44040.html

Lascoumes, P. & Le Gales, P. (2007, January). Introduction: Understanding Public Policy

through Its Instruments -- From the Nature of Instruments to the Sociology of Public Policy Instrumentation. Governance: An International Journal of Policy, Administration, and Institutions, 20(1), 1-21. Retrieved from http://graduateinstitute.ch/files/live/sites/iheid/files/sites/developpement/shared/developpement/cours/Atelier_Politiques_Publiques/PP%20legales-Lascoumes.pdf
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Middle America

Words: 1675 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83035955

Crime and Violence in Mexico

Introduction recent study by the orld Bank reveals that Mexico has become one of the most violent and crime-ridden regions in the world (Hart). After a slight decrease in the 1960's, the report shows that the murder rate has increased again in the 1990's to more than 16,000 murders per year (p. 111-113). The country's homicide rate was double that of the United States, with 18 killings for every 100,000 people.

Over the past few decades, Mexico's population has increased and urban poverty levels have risen. As a result of these two factors, Mexico has seen a significant increase in crime and violence. Residents have resorted to illegal means of making money, including drug rings and street crime, as the country struggled to incorporate a capitalist system.

A recent study from the Citizen's Institute for the Study of Insecurity reveals that 4.2 million Mexicans were…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Babb, Satrah. Managing Mexico: Economists from Nationalism to Neoliberalism. Princeton University Press, 2001.

Carl, Tracy. Rudy To The Rescue. The Associated Press. Oct. 10, 2002.

Hart, John. Empire and Revolution: The Americans in Mexico since the Civil War.

University of California Press, 2002.
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Foreign business environment of Columbia

Words: 824 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32743220

Foreign business environment: Columbia

A. What events (political, economic, and technological) are the most important in recent years that might have impacted the business culture in Colombia?

Individuals who perceive Colombia as still being paralyzed by crime networks and drug cartels are skeptical and bewildered by the notion of a confederation of politicians, business leaders, and academicians visiting the nation. However, in reality, the situation in Colombia is far different from what it was a mere ten years ago.

Colombia’s infamous cruel and powerful drug cartels emerged during the latter part of the seventies era and developed in the subsequent two decades. Specifically, the Cali Cartel and Pablo Escobar’s Medellín Cartel were politically, socially and economically influential in the nation in this period. During the last two decades of the twentieth century, the world regarded the nation as being well on its way to becoming a failure as a state.…… [Read More]

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ACME Mexico City Analysis Acme New Mexico

Words: 4301 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12988853

ACME Mexico City Analysis

Acme New Mexico

The author of this report is asked to conduct an analysis and issue a report for the ongoing operations of Acme New Mexico. First, there will be a focus on two data-collection techniques, those being sustainable supply chain management and decision support systems. The purpose of each technique chosen will be explained in addition to why each choice benefits the company. However, the limitations of each option will be explored and discussed as well. The costs and training of each technique will be mentioned. The problem, opportunity or challenge of Acme Mexico City will be mentioned as well as the roadblocks associated with achieving the necessary metrics and outcomes.

eport Details

The reasoning behind the two techniques selected is not hard to decipher or justify. Sustainability is often dismissed a sham or unrealistic, even when it comes to supply chain topics. While petroleum…… [Read More]

References

AP. (1999, August 22). Hurricane Bret Nears Texas, Mexico. Los Angeles Times.

Retrieved February 3, 2014, from  http://articles.latimes.com/1999/aug/22/news/mn-2698 

CareerBuilder. (2014, February 3). Greater Efficiency by Working Remotely.

CareerBuilder.com. Retrieved February 3, 2014, from http://www.careerbuilder.com/jobposter/small-business/article.aspx?articleid=ATL_0117TELECOMMUTE