Effective Treatment Essays (Examples)

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Treatments for Rosacea

Words: 740 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36655106

Treatments for Rosacea

Rosacea is a medical condition characterized by reddening of the skin. The face primarily will turn red in hue. Sores may appear on the skin as well. The face may also swell to some degree. It is an unfortunate condition where patients not only have to deal with the illness itself, but also with psychological ramifications from feeling unattractive due to the skin pigments or lesions. Although there is currently no cure for Rosacea, scientists have researched various treatments to help patients suffering from the condition.

In the article, "Treatment of Rosacea with Intense Pulsed Light," researchers Papageorgiou et. al consider how ultra violet and pulsed light might positively treat skin conditions like Rosacea. During this particular experiment, the researchers tested 34 patients who were given treatments every three weeks for a total of twelve weeks. More than 70% of patients experienced at least a 50% reduction…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lee, DH, Li, K.K., & Suh, DH "Pimecrolimus 1% Cream for the Treatment of Steroid-

Induced Rosacea: an 8-week Split-Face Clinical Trial." British Journal of Dermatology. (158:5). 2008. 1069-76. Print.

Papageorgiou, P.P., Clayton, W.W., Norwood, S.S., Chopra, S.S., & Rustin, M.M. "Treatment of Rosacea with Intense Pulsed Light: Significant Improvement and Long-Lasting Results." British Journal of Dermatology. (159:3). 2008. 628-32. Print.

Sharquie, K.E., Najim, R.A., & Al-Salman, H.N. "Oral Zinc Sulfate in the Treatment of Rosacea: a Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study." International Journal of Dermatology. (45:7). 2006. 857-61. Print.
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Treatment of Sex Offenders the

Words: 1625 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9504329

When one looks at the occurrence of recidivism in offenders who have partaken in treatment programs varying from organic programs to those geared to more social and emotional support programs, it becomes clear that recidivism of sexual re-offense is relatively low, compared to those who undergo no treatment program. However, there is still an issue with non-sexual re-offense. In addition, there is evidence that the contributing factors for adult and juvenile offenders are different.

As such, it is suggested that not all offenders should receive the same treatment. Correctional literature indicates that high-risk offender require the greatest use of resource, while lower risk offenders require the lowest level of resources (Andrews & Bonta, 2003).

As such, blanket policies that deem all offenders as 'high risk' are neither effective nor efficient. In addition, it may take away resources from those who truly need it, such as juvenile offenders who require longterm…… [Read More]

References

Abracen, J., Looman, J., DiFazio, R., Kelly, T., & Stirpe, T. (Mar 2006). Patterns of attachment and alcohol abuse in sexual and violent non-sexual offenders. Journal of Sexual Aggression, 12(1). Retrieved December 17, 2007, from Academic Search Premier database.

Andrews, D. & Bonta, J. (2003). The psychology of criminal conduct. Cincinnati, OH: Anderson Publishing.

Bates, a., Saunders, R., & Wilson, C. (Spring 2007). Doing something about it: A follow-up study of sex offenders participating in Thames Valley Circles of Support and Accountability. British Journal of Community Justice, 5(1). Retrieved December 17, 2007, from SocINDEX database.

Calley, N. (Spring 2007). Integrating theory and research: The development of a research-based treatment program for juvenile male sex offenders. Counseling & Development, 85(2). Retrieved December 17, 2007, from Academic Search Premier database.
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Treatments an Analysis of the Effectiveness of

Words: 879 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9428534

Treatments

An Analysis of the Effectiveness of Psychological and Critical Incident Stress Debriefings

The world in which we live today is an ever-changing, precarious environment. Many individuals, for these very reasons, experience stressful, life-altering incidents much more often than in the past. These experiences, transmitted more rapidly than ever thanks to newly discovered technologies, can harm an individual greatly, especially if hidden from expert analysis, and can provoke long-lasting psychological, emotional and even physical damage to an individual. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), for instance, is an umbrella term given to those individuals who have experienced traumatic or stress-inducing incidents, be they from military experiences or simply from a death in the family through some traumatic means. PTSD has been diagnosed as a disorder only recently, however, and many of the treatments that have been suggested as a means through which to deal with PTSD are still being tested. The…… [Read More]

References

1. Foa, E. & Keane, T.M. & Friedman, M.J. & Cohen, J.A. (2008). Effective treatments for PTSD: Practice guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. New York: The Guilford Press.

2. Davis, L.L. & Frazier, E.C. & Williford, R .B. & Newell, J.M. (2006). Long-Term Pharmacotherapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. CNS Drugs, 20(6). Pp. 465-476.
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Treatments for PTSD Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress

Words: 1633 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21309840

Treatments for PTSD

Treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients has varied from one context to the other depending on the nature of the disorder. However, over the years, an increased number of research studies have been conducted to establish the best treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder patients. A number of findings have been made public as further research takes place. This study will critically evaluate three articles whilst comparing group treatment and CBT in the tackling of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This evaluation is valuable considering the increased number of victims of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the society today.

Sloan, Bovin, and Schnurr (2012) support the idea of using group treatment for PTSD as the best option given to patients. In the article, they advance the value of treating patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder as a group. The article gives an overview picture of the benefits accompanied…… [Read More]

References

Gilman, R., Schumm, J.A., & Chard, K.M. (2012). Hope as a Change Mechanism in the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Journal of Psychological Trauma, vol. 4(3):

270-277

Mulick, P.S., Landes, S.J., & Kanter, J.W. (2012). Contextual Behavior Therapies in the Treatment of PTSD: A Review. International Journal of Behavioral Consultation & Therapy, vol. 7(1): 23-31

Sloan, D.M., Bovin, M.J. & Schnurr, P.P. (2012). Review of group treatment for PTSD.
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Treatment Efficacy Do Treatments and

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55595769

Alcohol and drug abuse is not limited to any socioeconomic category, race, religion, or gender. Finding the right drug, the right type of support group, and the right type of intervention can be a long and difficult process. For example, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offers special resources for recently-deployed combat officers, teens, and even obese individuals, all of which are tailored to meet the different challenges that life circumstances, age of life, or biology can pose that predispose an individual to addictive behaviors or affect an addict's treatment plan.

However, improving opportunities for jobs and treating communities as well as individuals seems essential to aiding those who are disproportionately affected by addiction. All addicts feel the effects of tolerance and physiological and psychological dependency to some degree, depending on the nature of the drug and their biology (Oakley & Ksir, 2003, pp45-46). But while social…… [Read More]

References

Adrian, Manuella. (2001). Do treatments and other interventions work? Some critical issues.

Substance Use & Misuse, 36 (13): 1759-1780

NIAAA. Alcoholism. Getting the Facts. Retrieved October 8. 2010 at  http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/ 

Oakley S. Ray & Charles Ksir. (2003). Drugs, society, and human behavior. New York:
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Treatment of Women Offenders The

Words: 3904 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52229761

CAEFS takes the position that women with mental health problems do not belong in prisons and that the treatment, support and assistance they need should be provided to them in the community, rather than in prison.

Recommendation #2)

The above statement clearly outlines central problem areas that should be the focus of investigation. As this study and others emphasize, women who enter prison with mental issues and problems require intensive support. However, this is at present not the case and many women prisoners who suffer from mental problems are not afforded the necessary support and adequate intensive therapy. Some critics also suggest that alternatives be investigated for women with mental issues. "... The public need for the appearance of retribution may deter government from considering alternatives to sentencing persons with mental disabilities to imprisonment." www.elizabethfry.ca/submissn/dawn/17.htm" (ibid)

Another factor which relates to mental and psychological issues is that women experience stress…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bilchik, Shay, Cyntha Seymour, and Kristen Kreisher. "Parents in Prison." Corrections Today Dec. 2001: 108+. Questia. 17 Feb. 2005 http://www.questia.com/.

Bjorhus, Jennifer. "Getting into Prison." Columbia Journalism Review July-Aug. 1994: 14+. Questia. 17 Feb. 2005 http://www.questia.com/.

Brown, Sammie. "Are Prison Classification Systems Addressing the Diverse Inmate Population." Corrections Today June 2002: 104+. Questia. 17 Feb. 2005 http://www.questia.com/.

Chesney-Lind, Meda. "Women in Prison: From Partial Justice to Vengeful Equity." Corrections Today Dec. 1998: 66+.
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Treatment and Management of Cancer Diagnosis Obligations

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16892447

Treatment and Management of Cancer

Cancer Diagnosis

Obligations of community health nurse in providing healthcare

Cancer Diagnosis

The high demand for healthcare services, especially to those managing dreadful illnesses such as cancer, there is a dire need to understand the health promotion strategies and also ensure quality lives. Here, is a discussion assisting to analyze how best to improve health and better management of dreaded conditions like diseases such as cancer. Those affected will learn to adopt the right measures that will help to improve functional abilities, and what to practice in case self-care is not an option. The mandate of community health nurses will be scrutinized, to help acquire general knowledge on efficient management of diseases.

Cancer is a disease, which has characteristics of growths that cannot be controlled, and also the abnormality of how rapidly the cells are spread to other organs. Cancers vary in their areas of…… [Read More]

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Treatment of Alcoholics in Low-Income Areas

Words: 2687 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31166019

S. Census Bureau) It is clear after having reviewed this information that this area is quite needy in provision of alcoholism treatment and intervention.

VI. Treatment Program Community Marketing Process

In the initiative of reaching the community both through media and public relations as tools to raise awareness the organization will be enabled to alert members of the community about the services available. Promotions, marketing, public relations and media advocacy are all critical specifically as these are all integrated with the business sector and as well adapted by nonprofit organizations. In the attempt to market or advertise to the community the available services all venues of the media should be sought and the mass media in the form of newspaper and magazines and other printed material as well as media through television and radio broadcast communications and finally through the Internet's provision of electronic media. Communication with the media should…… [Read More]

References

Ervin, N.E. (2002). Advanced community health nursing practice: Population-focused care. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall. ISBN# 0-8053-7364-0.

Bensley, R.J., & Brookins-Fisher, J. (EDs). (2003). Community health education method: a practitioners guide. (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett. ISBN# 0-7637-1801-7

Andreasen, A.R. (1995). Marketing social change: Changing behavior to promote health, social development, and the environment. San Francisco CA: Jossey-Bass. ISBN# 0-7879-0137-7

Medicaid EPSDT and AOD Treatment Services Policy Brief entitled Resources for Recovery: State Practices that Expand Treatment Opportunities" Medicaid EPSDT and AOD Treatment Services" (O'Brien, et al., 2005) National Program Office, Technical Assistance Collaborative, Inc. Online located at: www.resourcesforrecovery.org
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Treatment History of Cystic Fibrosis

Words: 1699 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91316181

Treatment History Of Cystic Fibrosis

The field of pediatric nursing is a particularly large one in which its members may find themselves having to counsel both young patients and their families suffering from a myriad of diseases. Cystic fibrosis (CF), in particular, is a debilitating disease that strikes many young people. In the first years following its discovery, many children could not expect to make it to their teen years. Today, with advances in the management and care of this disease, patients are living into their 40s. It is even possible that there will one day be a cure.

This paper will look at CF from a historical perspective. The timeline of its discovery and research will be briefly presented, as will a few of the significant "milestones" in the history of the treatment of CF and what these mean for people battling this disease.

References to cystic fibrosis were…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Author not available. (1994). Genetic Therapy Possible Cure for Several Diseases. Morning Edition (NPR).

Baroni, M.A., Anderson, Y.E., and Mischler, E. (1997). Cystic fibrosis newborn screening: Impact of early screening results on parenting stress. Pediatric Nursing. 23, 143(9).

Hopkin, Karen. (1998). Understanding Cystic Fibrosis. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

Orenstein, David M. (1997). Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for Patient and Family. 2nd ed., Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott-Raven.
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Enforcement of Psychology Treatment for the Mentally Ill

Words: 8451 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95839705

Psychology Treatment

For most of U.S. history up to the time of the Community Mental Health Act of 1963, the mentally ill were generally warehoused in state and local mental institutions on a long-term basis. Most had been involuntarily committed by orders from courts or physicians, and the discharge rate was very low. Before the 1950s and 1960s, there were few effective treatments for mental illnesses like depression, anxiety disorders and schizophrenia, which were commonly considered incurable. Only with the psycho-pharmacological revolution in recent decades and new anti-depressant and anti-psychotic medications has it been possible for the severely mentally ill to be treated on an outpatient basis through community mental health centers. Of course, as the old state hospitals have emptied many of the mentally ill have ended up homeless, since they are unable to hold maintain regular employment or continue on a medication regimen without supervision. According to present-day…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bacon. H. "Book Review: Jonathan Willows, Moving On after Childhood Sexual Abuse: Understanding the Effects and Preparing for Therapy in Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. (15)1 January 2010, pp. 141-42.

Bartels, S.J., A.D. van Citters and T. Crenshaw (2010). "Older Adults" in Levin, B.L., J. Petrila and K. Hennessy Mental Health Services: A Public Health Perspective. Oxford University Presss: 261-82.

Behar, E.S. And T.D. Borkovec. (2003). "Psychotherapy Outcome Research" in I.B. Weiner et al., eds. Handbook of Psychology: Research Methods in Psychology. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Carron, V.G. And K. Hull. (2009). "Treatment Manual for Trauma-Exposed Youth: Case Studies." Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry 15(1) 13 November 2009, pp. 27-38.
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PTSD Treatment Effective PTSD Treatment

Words: 979 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26672199

The other principal difference between the sources reviewed is that the first included narratives authored by different clinicians and experts and incorporated their anecdotal professional experiences as well as their description of the manner in which their treatment approaches relies on empirical research in each of their different areas of clinical expertise. As a result, that work is an appropriate reference for the available treatment options for PTSD and for the optimal combination of different approaches in specific types of cases.

By contrast, the second source consists only of a literature review of previous research without any narrative contribution from experts apart from the conclusions in each of the studies reviewed. More importantly, this source does not address or consider any non-pharmacological PTSD interventions, much less any combinations of multiple modalities concurrently. In fact, the authors expressly reference the apparent absence in the available literature of any studies specifically investigating…… [Read More]

References

Davis L.L., Frazier E.C., Williford R .B., and Newell J.M. "Long-Term

Pharmacotherapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder." CNS Drugs, Vol. 20, No.

6 (2006): 465-476.

Foa E., Keane T.M., Friedman M.J., and Cohen J.A. (2008). Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress
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Prozac Non-Drug or Supplement Treatments

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73897579



Relevant Chapters

Textbook chapters most relevant to this particular component on the relevancy of cost utility and cost effectiveness as it relates to non-pharmacological or supplement treatment effectiveness in comparison to Prozac, will highlight in a balanced manner, the cost benefit of both interventions as evidenced by empirical study. Moreover, the side effects of flouxetine such as nausea, anxiety, insomnia, drowsiness, headaches, and loss of appetite should be taken into consideration when discussing the cost benefit to the client. In addition, any balanced discussion on the subject should include discourse with regard to the propensity for antidepressants to cause increased risk of suicidal ideations as compared to intervention via therapy such as rational emotive or cognitive behavioral therapy (Prigatano & Plinskin, 2003).

Summary

Flouxetine, or Prozac continues to be one of the most prescribed antidepressants for those clinically diagnosed with depression. Since its introduction some 20 years ago, Prozac has…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). APA practice guidelines for major depressive disorder (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Antonuccio, D., Danton, W., & DeNelsky, G. (1995). Psychotherapy vs. medication for Depression: Challenging the conventional wisdom with data. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 6, 574-585.

Barrett, B., Byford, S., & Knapp, M. (2005). Evidence of cost-effective treatments for depression: The McSad utility measure for depression health states. Journal of Affective disordersI, 84, 1-13.

Chambless, D., & Hollon, S. (1988). Defining empirically supported therapies. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66, 7-18.
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Signs of Autism Causes Treatment

Words: 1074 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7726491

Treatments include "a wide range of skill development including academics, language, social skills, self-help skills, behavioral issues, and leisure skills" (Editors), and most professionals agree that communication between the educator and the parents is essential to developing the most effective treatment for each autistic child. However, while there are many common treatments, in general, most treatment really boils down to education and teaching in the special education environment.

Including an autistic child in the classroom can be challenging. Studies show that inclusion rates for autistic children in the general education classroom are quite low ("fewer than one-third of autistic children spend their time in the general education classroom") (Turnbull et al. 292). Therefore, it seems the most effective learning environment may be the special education classroom. Including these children in the classroom and helping them develop relationships and assimilate with their peers is not impossible. Some effective ways of including…… [Read More]

References

Editors. "About Autism." Autism Society of America. 2005. 7 June 2005. http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=allaboutautism&JServSessionIdr004=pv4v7my6s1.app27a

Siegel, Bryna. Helping Children with Autism Learn: Treatment Approaches for Parents and Professionals. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Turnbull, Rud, Ann Turnbull, Marilyn Shank & Sean J. Smith. Exceptional Lives 4th Edition.
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Theory of Using Vitamin a As Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorders

Words: 1547 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67763224

Vitamin a for Autism Spectrum Disorder

The Theory of Using Vitamin a as Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorders

There is widespread linkage of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Oxytoxin. There are reports that any decrease in the pathway of Oxytocin, is a possible causative factor to the development of autistic situation (Munese-et-al., 2008). Decrease in Oxytocin comes about because of mutations in its receptors, which lead to a reduction on the amount of Oxytocin released to the body posing possible chances for the development of autistic conditions (Lerer et-al., 2008). There is partial dependency of Oxytocin secretion to a protein found, in the cellular membranes of certain red blood cells. The scientific reference of these proteins is CD38, and whenever they mutate there develops a risk of Autism. Mice engineered without the oxytocin receptor gene have been shown to display socially anomalous behavior such as a deficiency of maternal behavior…… [Read More]

References

Andari-et-al. (2009). Promoting social behavior with oxytocin in high functioning autism spectrum disorders Department of Psychiatry 1-6

Ebstein R., Mankuta D. Yirmiya N., Maravasi F. (2011). Are retonoids potential therapeutic agents in disorders of social cognitions including Autism. EEBS letters: journal homepage. 1529-1536

Campbell et-al. (2010). Association of oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variants with multiple phenotype domains of autism spectrum disorder J. Neurodevelop Disord 101-112

Higashida H., Kikuchi M., Yokoyama S., Munesue T. (2012). CD38 and its role in Oxytocin secretion and social behavior Hormones and behavior journal homepage 351-358
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Capalaba Treatment Plant Redland Water Treatment

Words: 1431 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27647838

edland Wastewater Treatment Plant

edland Water is the department of the edland City council that oversees the collection, treatment, and disposal of waste water in edland City. esidential households and commercial premises such as shopping centers, cafes, commercial laundries, butchers, car-washing centers, and restaurants are the main sources of waste water in edland City. Once collected, waste water is stored temporarily in abattoirs, before being released for treatment in one of the seven treatment plants located in Point Lookout, Dunwich, Mount Cotton, Victoria Point, Thorneside, Cleveland, and Capalaba (edland City Council, 2012). The author paid the Capalaba Treatment Plant a visit, and found that the plant had just upgraded to a new waste water treatment technique referred to as the Vetiver Grass System, herein referred to as the VS. The Vetiver system, "a green and environmentally-friendly waste water technology as well as natural recycling method," had just been approved by…… [Read More]

Reference List

AMPC, 2005. Waste Water. AMPC [online] Available at  http://www.ampc.com.au/site/assets/media/reports/Resources/Wastewater-enviromental-best-practice-manual.pdf 

Ash, R. And Truong, P., n.d.The Use of Vetiver Grass Wetlands for Sewerage Treatment in Australia. Dokuz Eylul University Library [online] Available at  http://web.deu.edu.tr/atiksu/ana58/new80.pdf 

Piemonte, V., De Falco, M. And Basile, A. Eds., 2013. Sustainable Development in Chemical Engineering: Innovative Technologies. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons

Redland City Council, 2010. Waste Water. Redland City Council [online] Available at  http://www.redland.qld.gov.au/EnvironmentWaste/Water/Pages/Wastewater.aspx
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Mandatory Treatment for Mentally Ill

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51610737

Thus, an individual suffering from mental illness should be given treatment. Perhaps most important of all, the community should first make clear how the treatment can help improve the individual's condition -- that is, allow the individual to accept the fact that s/he suffers from a mental illness. Removing the stigma from the patient himself/herself, as well as from the community, is the first step towards effective treatment for mentally ill patients, which is a healthcare service that they deserve and should be provided to them (LaFleur-Sayler, 2003).

Lastly, treatment for mentally ill individuals is mandatory because as members of the community, we want to avoid the decline of physical faculties that are directly affected when an individual is mentally incapable to commit the 'correct' behavior and action. Treatment often involves prevention programs that require the individual to undergo chemical therapy (i.e., intake of drugs that alleviate the occurrence of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

LaFleur-Sayler, S. (2003). "The Paul Wellstone Mental Health Equitable Treatment Act: Can he accomplish in death what he couldn't in life?" Available at http://www.usd.edu/elderlaw/student_papers_f2003/paul_wellstone_mental_health_equitable.htm.

Overview of Prevention." (2006). U.S. Public Health Service Web site. Available at http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/mentalhealth/chapter2/sec5.html.

Torrey, E. And M. Zdanowicz. (1998). "We need to ask again: Why do severely mentally ill go untreated?" Treatment Advocacy Center Web site. Available at http://www.psychlaws.org/GeneralResources/Article3.htm.
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Exist on Kleptomania They May Include Treatment

Words: 2765 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64686264

exist on kleptomania. They may include treatment options, background on the disorders, or even how to identify a person suffering from kleptomania. New research however, has begun linking the disorder to others in hopes of better understanding what causes kleptomania and how to effectively treat it. Kleptomania has been linked to compulsive buying and binge-eating disorder. omen are known to suffer more from these disorders than men. This suggests these three disorders may have more in common than initially believed.

Prevalence

Kleptomania is a rare disorder found in both men and women with women producing higher occurrences than men. Shoplifting although similar to kleptomania, is not habitual nor does it produce the same effects that someone suffering from kleptomania would. The disorder is commonly characterized by a need to steal things, sometimes trivial things, in order to feel better or feel in control. Normally people who show symptoms of kleptomania…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chong, S.A., and B.L. Iow. "Treatment of kleptomania with fluvoxamine." Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 93.4 (1996): 314-315. Print.

Grant, Jon, Brian Odlaug, Liana Schrieber, Samuel Chamberlain, and Suck Won. "Memantine reduces stealing behavior and impulsivity in kleptomania: a pilot study." International Clinical Psychopharmacology 28.2 (2013): 106-111. Print.

Grant, Jon E., and Suck Won Kim. "An Open-Label Study of Naltrexone in the Treatment of Kleptomania." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 63.4 (2002): 349-356. Print.

Grant, Jon E., and Marc N. Potenza. The Oxford handbook of impulse control disorders. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Print.
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How to Assess Whether Outpatient Treatment Is Successful

Words: 2989 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97856247

gathered using a number of key word searches and combinations of terms, such as "adolescent," "substance abuse," "treatment," "drug," "outcome," "drug abuse, "juvenile drug abusers," juvenile drug use," "juvenile drug treatment," "adolescent drug treatment," and "adolescent drug use." These key word searches were conducted in online databases such as PsychInfo, PubMed, NCBI, JSTO, National Institute of Mental Health, National Criminal Justice eference Service, and Google Scholar. These searches resulted in a number of studies that appeared useful for this analysis. The five chosen were chosen because of common key words and their relevance to this study's focus on if adolescent males with substance disorder are given inpatient treatment instead of outpatient treatment whether they will have a greater chance of maintaining their sobriety.

Description and Technique

Article

Branson, Clemmey, and Mukherjee (2013). This study is a sample size 48 adolescents with roughly half Latino and half African-American, male and female.…… [Read More]

References

Branson, C., Clemmey, P., Mukherjee, P. (2013). Text message reminders to improve outpatient therapy attendance among adolescents: a pilot study. Psychol Serv, 10(3): 298-303.

Esposito-Smythers, C., Spirito, A., Kahler, C., Hunt, J., Monti, P. (2011). Treatment of Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Suicidality among Adolescents: A Randomized Trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79(6): 728-739.

Friedman, A, Terras, A., Ali, A. (1998). Differences in characteristics of adolescent drug abuse clients that predict to improvement: for inpatient treatment versus outpatient treatment. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, 7(3): 97-119.

Waldron, H., Slesnick, N., Brody, J. (2001). Treatment outcomes for adolescent substance abuse at 4 and 7-month assessments. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69(5): 802-813.
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Prevention and Intervention Treatment Programs

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15397920

Juvenile ehabilitation Programs

Prevention and Intervention Treatment Programs

ehabilitation of juveniles: Four critical factors

Two of the universal characteristics of successful juvenile rehabilitation programs include beginning early (i.e., offering services while the child is still young and has only committed his or her first offense) and dealing with multiple settings and systems (i.e., incorporating the family and school instead of merely focusing on the individual) (Bartol & Bartol 2010: 153-156). This is the aim of one evolving approach to counseling juveniles which focuses on giving juveniles important communication skills. This enables them to better cope with life stressors and is an important part of rehabilitation. According to Sanger & Spilker (2006), social skills training (SST) is an important part of any rehabilitation program and may encompass story-telling, guided conversation, and instruction in how to use language effectively.

Learning these skills can also enhance teens' future vocational prospects and enable them…… [Read More]

References

Bartol, Curt & Bartol, Anne. (2010). Criminal Behavior: A Psychological approach. Prentice Hall.

Sanger, D., Maag, J.W., & Spilker, A. (2006). Communication and behavioral considerations in planning programs for female juvenile delinquents. Journal of Correctional Education, 57(2), 108-125.
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Aromatherapy in Addiction Treatment for

Words: 5849 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23652968

S ome aromas even affect us physiologically" (p. 38). esearchers exploring human olfaction have determined that:

faint trace of lemon significantly increases people's perception of their own health.

Lavender incense contributes to a pleasant mood -- but it lowers volunteers' mathematical abilities.

A whiff of lavender and eucalyptus increases people's respiratory rate and alertness.

The scent of phenethyl alcohol (a constituent of rose oil) reduces blood pressure.

These findings have contributed to the explosive growth in the aromatherapy industry; according to Furlow (1996), "Aromatherapists point to scientific findings that smell can dramatically affect our moods as evidence that therapy with aromatic oils can help buyers manage their emotional lives" (p. 38). According to Ornstein and Sobel, one recent experiment to determine the effect, if any, of fragrances on mind/body involved subjects being wired to physiological monitoring equipment, and then being interrogated with stress-provoking questions, such as "What kind of person…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.J., Manheimer, E. & Stein, M.D. (2003). Use and Assessment of Complementary and Alternative Therapies by Intravenous Drug Users. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 29(2), 401.

Aromatherapy Therapy Chart of Essential Oils by Therapeutic Effect. (2004). MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart. Available:  http://www.moondragon.org/aromatherapy/aromatherapychart.html .

Ba, T.R.D.N. (Ed). (2003). An Introduction to Complementary Medicine. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Battista, J.R., Chinen, A.B. & Scotton, B.W. (1996). Textbook of transpersonal psychiatry and psychology.
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Studies on Adjunctive Treatments for Bipolar I Disorder

Words: 2417 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43056474

Nursing -- Group Therapy

Peer-reviewed literature regarding effective treatments of bipolar I disorder reveals that patients are significantly helped by family-focused or "family skills" therapy, particularly when dealing with depressive symptoms. However, studies also reveal that family therapy is less effective when dealing with manic episodes than are some other adjunctive treatments. Furthermore, quite a bit is as yet unknown about the relationship between family therapy and effective treatment of bipolar I disorder. Researchers lack evidence linking mania or hypomania factors to specific burdens on caregivers. In addition, families of bipolar patients undergo considerable stress and must struggle with limited and too often inaccessible avenues for their effective involvement. Finally, considerable additional study and focus is required so the health care industry can effectively incorporate relatives' thoughts, beliefs, attitudes, cultural identities and worldviews in operational structures and policy plans for the effective treatment of bipolar I disorder.

2. Body: Scholarly…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beentjes, T. A., Goossens, P. J., & Poslawsky, I. E. (2012). Caregiver burden in bipolar hypomania and mania: A systematic review. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 48(4), 187-197.

Britta, B., Schaub, A., Kummler, P., Dittmann, S., Severus, E., Seemuller, F., . . . Grunze, H. (2006). Impact of cognitive-psychoeducational interventions in bipolar patients and their relatives. European Psychiatry, 21(2), 81-86.

Chatzidamianos, G., Lobban, F., & Jones, S. (2015). A qualitative analysis of relatives, health professionals and service users views on the involvement in care of relatives in bipolar disorder. BMC Psychiatry, (15).

George, E. L., Taylor, D. O., Goldstein, B. I., & Miklowitz, D. J. (2011). Family focused therapy for bipolar adolescents: Lessons from a difficult treatment case. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 18(3), 384-393.
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PTSD Treatment Modalities Evidence-Based Recommendations

Words: 4461 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17783376

Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatment

Clinical Presentation of Trauma-elated Disorders and ecommended Treatments

On January 13, 2015, Andrew Brannan, a 66-year-old Vietnam veteran was executed in Georgia for killing police officer Kyle Dinkheller in 1998 (Hoffman, 2015). At the time, Brannan had been living in a bunker on his mother's property without water or electricity and had stopped taking his medications. According to the Veterans Administration (VA), he was 100% disabled due to combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He also suffered from bipolar disorder, had lost two brothers to a military plane crash and suicide, and lost a father to cancer. Veterans groups, death penalty critics, and mental health advocates, all petitioned the Georgia Supreme Court for a stay of execution unsuccessfully. The veterans groups were particularly interested in preventing the death of yet another veteran who developed severe psychiatric problems while serving his or her country.

Trauma in general…… [Read More]

References

APA (American Psychiatric Association). (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association.

Cook, J.M., Dinnen, S., Simiola, V., Bernardy, N., Rosenheck, R., & Hoff, R. (2014). Residential treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in the Department of Veterans Affairs: A national perspective on perceived effective ingredients. Traumatology, 20(1), 43-9.

Dursa, E.K., Reinhard, M.J., Barth, S.K., & Schneiderman, A.I. (2014). Prevalence of a positive screen for PTSD among OEF/OIF and OEF/OIF-era veterans in a large population-based cohort. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 542-549.

Ehring, T., Welboren, R., Morina, N., Wicherts, J.M., Freitag, J., & Emmelkamp, P.M. (2014). Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse. Clinical Psychology Review, 34(8), 645-57.
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Interstitial Cystitis IC treatment using CAM Modalities

Words: 6757 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54434974

Abstract
The prevalence of interstitial cystitis (IC) has seen different treatment methods that have been aimed at reducing the level of pain and ensuring that the patients are comfortable. However, the continued failure of most of the conventional methods to treat the condition has necessitated physicians to recommend complementary and alternative methods of managing the condition. An analysis of the complementary and alternative methods (CAM) modalities is therefore, critical in understanding the different conceptual attributes that are significant in addressing the problem. IC is a condition that is characterized by chronic pain or discomfort in the bladder and the surrounding pelvic region. It differs depending on the pain, frequency or both pain and frequency. The condition affects the patient and in some cases may lead to stress since it impacts the work-life, family and sexual enjoyment for the women. In most cases there are different methods of managing the condition…… [Read More]

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Interstitial Cystitis IC treatment using CAM Modalities

Words: 6757 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54434974

Abstract
The prevalence of interstitial cystitis (IC) has seen different treatment methods that have been aimed at reducing the level of pain and ensuring that the patients are comfortable. However, the continued failure of most of the conventional methods to treat the condition has necessitated physicians to recommend complementary and alternative methods of managing the condition. An analysis of the complementary and alternative methods (CAM) modalities is therefore, critical in understanding the different conceptual attributes that are significant in addressing the problem. IC is a condition that is characterized by chronic pain or discomfort in the bladder and the surrounding pelvic region. It differs depending on the pain, frequency or both pain and frequency. The condition affects the patient and in some cases may lead to stress since it impacts the work-life, family and sexual enjoyment for the women. In most cases there are different methods of managing the condition…… [Read More]

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PTSD and the Need for Treatment

Words: 1686 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64865529

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a commonly occurring mental health problem facing military personnel and veterans. The constant problems that plague those with PTSD can cause them to lead a lower quality of life with potential development of depression and anxiety commonly prevalent in those with the mental disorder. This qualitative study aims to research ways to provide positive pathways to care for members of the UK Armed Forces receiving treatment for PTSD by examining United States PTSD programs and studies performed on efficacy of these programs. This study will show what has worked in American PTSD programs under the Department of Veterans Affairs and what can be applied for the UK Armed Forces.

esearch Hypothesis

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has various programs available to help military personnel and veterans cope with PTSD. Information collected from studies assessing these programs' effectiveness will be used to provide more effective…… [Read More]

References

Khusid, M. A., & Vythilingam, M. (2016). The Emerging Role of Mindfulness Meditation as Effective Self-Management Strategy, Part 1: Clinical Implications for Depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Anxiety. Military Medicine, 181(9), 961-968. doi:10.7205/milmed-d-14-00677

Murphy, D., Hunt, E., Luzon, O., & Greenberg, N. (2014). Exploring positive pathways to care for members of the UK Armed Forces receiving treatment for PTSD: a qualitative study. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 5(1), 21759. doi:10.3402/ejpt.v5.21759

Petticrew, M., & Roberts, H. (2009). Systematic reviews in the social sciences: A practical guide. Malden, Mass. [etc.: Blackwell Publishing.

Saini, M., & Shlonsky, A. (2012). Systematic synthesis of qualitative research. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
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Substance Abuse Treatment Program for

Words: 2284 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86961027



During the assessment the participant will be asked to disclose how often and how many incidences of substance abuse he or she has participated in during the last week. He or she will also be asked to disclose what substances have been used in that time frame.

In addition the participant will participate in an interview in which he or she will provide a life history and a description of when they first began using and why and how much they currently spend on drugs or alcohol.

One element of the assessment will be specifically to ascertain what type of support system the participant has at home and at work if he or she holds a job.

When the assessment is completed the counselor will make a recommendation for treatment depending on the assessment outcome.

The recommendation will be for inpatient, intensive outpatient or low outpatient services depending on the…… [Read More]

References

Evaluating substance abuse treatment process models: I. changes on proximal outcome variables during 12-step and cognitive-behavioral treatment.

From: Journal of Studies on Alcohol | Date: July 1, 1998 | Author: Moos, Rudolf H. | More results for: substance abuse treatment

Predictors of participation in aftercare sessions and self-help groups following completion of intensive outpatient treatment for substance abuse.

From: Journal of Studies on Alcohol | Date: March 1, 1998 | Author: O'Brien, Charles P. | More results for: substance abuse treatment
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Cultural Sensitivity and Patient Treatment

Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77334362

Coining

One of the most difficult situations a physician may face is one in which a parent is doing actual harm to her child even though she has the best of intentions. In this instance, the mother is engaging in the practice of 'coining' or using coins to administer oils. The boy appears to be in pain as a result of the bruises sustained by this treatment. Unfortunately, it is not unheard of for many children to suffer damage as a result of well-intentioned parental actions. Another example is that of Christian Scientist parents who refuse all medical treatment for their children or Jehovah's Witnesses who may refuse blood transfusions.

A physician's ultimate responsibility is to help the child. While it is possible to argue that some medical procedures do cause some pain and discomfort when initially administered, they do so with the purpose of ultimately reversing the course of…… [Read More]

References

Orr, R., Novotny, W., & Perkin, R. (2003). Faith-based decisions: Parents who refuse appropriate care for their children. Virtual Mentor, 5 (8). Retrieved from:

http://journalofethics.ama-assn.org/2003/08/ccas1-0308.html

Tan, A.L. & Mallika, P.S. (2011). Coining: An ancient treatment widely practiced among Asians

Malaysian Family Physician, 6(2-3): 97-98. Retrieved from:
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Treatment Modalities for Conduct Disordered Adolescent Males

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72411573

treatment modalities for conduct disordered adolescent males has primarily been focused on comorbidity. Adolescent males with conduct disorder typically receive individual and family therapy, but when overt behaviors are extreme, pharmacotherapy may supplant insight-based therapy. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and social skills training are complementary approaches to intervention. Using an experimental approach, this study examines the impact of combined intervention approaches on perceived and observed improvement in the expression of problem behavior and life change strategies of adolescent males with conduct disorder.

Adolescents, across the board, experience a range of emotions. Negative impacts of these emotions include struggling with acceptance, self-esteem, isolation, confusion, anxiety, and depression, which can also be a result of instability at home (earight, et al., 2001). In addition to these social effects, many adolescents experience a distorted perception of reality (earight, et al., 2001). On occasion, this distortion may cause them to make poor choices, which demonstrates…… [Read More]

Subjects were adolescent males previously diagnosed as having conduct disorder (CD) and new to the family therapy milieu. The subjects were randomly divided into two experimental groups and one control group. The treatment and control groups were as follows: (A) CBT in family therapy plus Social Skills Training (SST) plus a placebo (B) Administration of Fluoxetine; (C) CBT in family therapy plus Social Skills Training (SST) (Control Group). A total of 9 subjects were included in the study. All treatment took place in clinical settings and was configured to be individual or family therapy rather than peer-group treatment.

Instrumentation

The unit of analysis is the behavioral and cognitive processing performance changes in individual subjects (patients). Changes in the expression of problem behavior are noted by clinicians. Self-perception scores of the changes in cognitive processing were recorded on the surveys and two CBT instruments. The level of measurement is ordinal as dictated by the scales used in the formal CBT tools, and on the Likert scale used for the structured surveys. The Cognitive Therapy Awareness Scale (CTAS) and the Cognitive Behavior Therapy Supervision Checklist (CBTSC) will be used to measure the effectiveness of the treatment groups (Sudak, et al., 2001; Sudak,
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Treatment for Experienced Act Fair

Words: 2211 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22538081



There are also challenges that will emerge from the provision of the Fair Treatment for Experienced Act due to its impact on the Aviation safety standards and guideline principles. These impacts include stricter measures regarding safety standards which comprises giving more firm limitations for pilots that are in the age of 60 and above and this will cause more dilemmas for other senior pilots who are responsible for guiding next generation of pilots (Brazy, 2008). There are some claims that the credibility of the Fair Treatment for Experienced Act has been degraded because of its consideration of age sensitive requirements particularly with the operating pilots.

The degree of discriminatory actions was considered as a violation and as a challenge for the reason that there is a segregation of particular groups known to be prohibited by the Federal law of the United States. Political pressure can also be a challenge because…… [Read More]

Reference

Aviation Online Magazine (2007). Fair Treatment of Experienced Pilots Act (the age of 65 law). Claimed from:  http://avstop.com/legal/fair_treatment_of_experienced_pilots_act.htm .

Brazy, Douglas (2009). Group Chairman's Factual safety Board. Accessed:  http://www.exosphere3d.com/pubwww/pdf/flight_1549/ntsb_docket/420526.pdf .

FAA (Federal Aviation Authority (2008). Fair Treatment and Experienced Act. Available:  http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/airline_safety/info/all_infos/media/age65_qa.pdf .

Fritzpatrick, Robert (2011). Recent Developments in D.C. Labor and Employment Law. Retrieved from:  http://www.robertbfitzpatrick.com/papers/2011-05-04-DCBarPaperRevised.pdf .
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Treatment to Patients the Main Objective of

Words: 4516 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23316992

Treatment to Patients

The main objective of providing treatment to patients is to relieve symptoms along with decreasing the progression of the disease as well as the mortality or morbidity. However, in some cases, this objective is not fully achieved, especially in the case of the patients who are admitted to the ICU with some serious and almost always a terminal stage of the disease. For example, when old patients are admitted in the ICU, their immunity is extremely low and this is the perfect time for the opportunistic infections to make matters worse for these patients. There are many infections that are specifically associated with patients admitted in the hospitals. Pseudomonas Aurigeonosa is a micro-organism that is well documented to cause bacterial pneumonia and bacteremia in the patients who are terminally ill and are receiving treatment in the hospital setting. Since most of the patients in the ICU are…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Beekmann, SE;Diekema, DJ; Chapin, KC;Doern, GV (2003) Effects of rapid detection of bloodstream infections on length of hospitalization and hospital charges.J ClinMicrobiol, 41:3119-3125.

Boussekey, N, Leroy, O, Georges, H, Devos, P, d'Escrivan, T, Guery, B (2005).Diagnostic and prognostic values of admission procalcitonin levels in community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit.Infection, 33:257-263.

Charles, PE, Dalle, F, Aho, S, Quenot, JP, Doise, JM, Aube, H, Olsson, NO, Blettery, B: Serum procalcitonin measurement contribution to the early diagnosis of candidemia in critically ill patients. Intensive Care Med, 32:1577-1583.

Digiovine, B; Chenoweth, C; Watts, C; Higgins, M (1999)The attributable mortality and costs of primary nosocomial bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit. Am J. RespirCrit Care Med, 160:976-981.
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Treatment of Democratic Principles and Individual Action

Words: 737 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86162748

Treatment of Democratic Principles and Individual Action

George Orwell's legacy in literature can be reflected in his great novels Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm, two political satire novels that criticized the basic foundations of political systems prevalent during his time (mid-20th century), specifically, Stalinism/socialist-communist leadership that 'governed' the Soviet Union during this period of modernization. While he was known for the political nature of his novels, he has also written essay that provoked analytical thought through his deconstructive narrative of topics that seemed to be non-political. In these essays, Orwell was able to "politicize" these topics, critically exploring their nature and dynamics and contextualize his analysis in the overall political environment from which these topics emerged and prevailed. Examples of these seemingly 'apolitical' topics are sports and "good bad books," and insightfully, writing. For the discussion that follows, each topics that were given analytical treatment are represented through the following…… [Read More]

References

Orwell, G. (1995). E-text of "Good Bad Books." Accessed 19 May 2011. Available at:  http://orwell.ru/library/reviews/books/english/e_books 

____. (1995). E-text of "The Sporting Spirit." Accessed 19 May 2011. Available at:  http://orwell.ru/library/articles/spirit/english/e_spirit 

____. (2003). E-text of "Writers and the Leviathan." Accessed 19 May 2011. Available at:  http://www.george-orwell.org/Writers_and_the_Leviathan/0.html
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Treatment Methods for Presbyopia

Words: 3060 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37476713

Presbyopia is a disorder, where the lens of the eye loses its capacity to focus. This incapacity makes it hard to see items up close. Some scholars have suggested that presbyopia means "age of sight." Presbyopia is not similar to farsightedness because it involves the loss of accommodation and ability for the eye to correct to enhance clarity at various distances. In this context, the young eye requires to change its interval or shape to focus on close objects. The capability of the lens to change shape gives the lens elasticity, which when lost results to presbyopia. When people grow old, they tend to lose this elasticity, and this explains why the eye gradually loses its capacity to focus on close objects (ennett, 2008).

How Presbyopia Occurs

Presbyopia happens when the cornea and lens refract light so that the light appears behind the retina



People realize they have this condition…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adnan, A.A. et al. (2013). Prevalence of refractive errors of the eye among adults in Iraq. Journal of natural sciences research, 3(4), pp. 117-124.

Bennett, M.Q. (2008). New thoughts on the correction of presbyopia drivers.Diving and hyperbaric medicine, 38(3), pp. 163-164.

Brahma, A., & McGhee, C.N. (2000).Surgical Correction of refractive errors (Review).J Royal

Soc Medicine, 93 (3):118-23
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Treatment Approach for Cancer

Words: 1278 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60685405

Care of cancer can be a complex process and always needs the engagement of several specialists because treating cancer is multifaceted. The multifaceted and complex nature of approach to care of cancer is attributed to that fact that this process not only revolves around treating the condition itself but also focuses on dealing with non-cancer issues. Some of these non-cancer issues to address during treatment and care of cancer include the patient's coexistent illnesses, health behaviors, and preventive care initiatives. Moreover, the approach to care requires coordinated efforts from various healthcare providers such as oncologists, surgeons, and radiation oncologists. However, the identification a suitable approach to care of cancer requires examining diagnosis and staging of cancer, probable complications, side effects of treatment, and measures to reduce physical and psychological impacts.

Diagnosis and Staging of Cancer

The treatment of cancer begins with diagnosis, which involves a physical examination and medical history…… [Read More]

References

"Cancer Staging." (n.d.). Diagnosis and Staging. Retrieved from National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health website: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/diagnosis-staging/staging/staging-fact-sheet

"Complications." (2014, January 20). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved May 13, 2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/basics/complications/con-20032378

Davis, C.P. & Balentine, J.R. (2014, December 22). Cancer. Retrieved May 13, 2015, from http://www.medicinenet.com/cancer/page6.htm

"Physical Side Effects." (n.d.). American Cancer Society. Retrieved May 13, 2015, from http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/physicalsideeffects/physical-side-effects-landing
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Effective Strategies for Integrating Ethical Use of Technology Into the K-12 Curriculum

Words: 1922 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98713218

integrating ethical use of technology into the K-12 curriculum

Integrating Technology in the Classroom

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 aims to close the achievement gap between disadvantaged and struggling students and their peers. The message is that every child can learn, and that schools are accountable for a child's progress.

At the federal level, there is to be more money for at-risk children in low-income communities. The government will invest in teacher training and innovative education practices that improve student performance.

While this new law defines a destination, it is up to the states and school districts to define the paths for getting there. Best practice begins with ensuring that all the components for successful integration of technology are in place. The primary ethical concerns of access, attitude, training, and support must be addressed before moving on to the more popular topic of integrating instructional technology into…… [Read More]

References

Dede, C. (1996) Emerging technologies and distributed learning. American Journal of Distance Education, 10, 2, 4-36.

Linn, M.C. (1997) Learning and Instruction in Science Education: Taking Advantage of Technology. Handbook of Science Education.

Salpeter, J. (1998) Taking stock: What's the research saying? Technology and Learning, 18(9) 24-25, 28-30, 32, 34, 36, 40.

Wenglinsky, W. (1998) Does it compute? The Relationship Between Educational Technology and Student Achievement in Mathematics. Princeton, N.J.
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Effective Regionalization

Words: 1633 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35297966

Regionalization

Effective Regionalization

Globalization has become a ubiquitously word in the last few decades. Much of the globalization trend is driven by the fact that many organizations operate internationally and supply chains have become sophisticated, complex, and spans the entire globe. Globalization trends are starting to become more widespread and ever easier to implement due to advancement in information technology. Globalization and its effects have paved the way for increased free trade agreements and comparative advantages in various goods between different countries and nations. As a result of globalization, markets attempt to proactively create a level of homogenization and standardization of resources and labor. However, globalization and standardization are ill-equipped to handle all goods and services that are desired by the public.

Some industries, such as healthcare and education, are not easily fit into a standardized model. Such industries require flexibility to adapt to specific challenges that may only apply…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chandrakant, S. (2003). Public Health and Preventive Medicine in Canada. Saunders.

Collier, R. (2010). Different Routes to Regionalization. Canadian Medical Association, 330-331.

Dash, P., Llewellyn, C., & Richardson, B. (2009, July). Developing a regional health system strategy. Retrieved from McKinnsey & Company: http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/health_systems_and_services/developing_a_regional_health_system_strategy

Department of Health and Community Services. (N.d.). Services in your Region. Retrieved from Department of Health and Community Services:  http://www.health.gov.nl.ca/health/findhealthservices/in_your_community.html
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Treatment of Traumatic Injuries and

Words: 2501 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80812246

As cellular phone usage has increased the emergency response systems in rural areas has found itself being jammed with over use while the traditional wired trunk lines go unused. Unfortunately, balancing the cost of adding new wireless trunks line in order to meet the new demand has to be balanced against the cost of maintaining the old wired trunk lines. Due to the fact that cell phone coverage is not universally available in rural areas, traditional wired phone access is still needed so rural areas must still adequately meet the needs of both technologies, the old and the new. (Kurtis)

The new E-911 system is an enhanced version of the old 911 system. The advance of wireless technology has allowed the transmission of more information in a much more efficient manner. Under the E-911 system, the 911 operator can easily identify the telephone number of the person calling and any…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chapman, S. a. (1998). Emergency Use of Cellular (mobile) telephones.

Federal Communications Commission. (2010). Wireless 911 Services. Washington D.C.: FCC.

Habib, I.M. (20007). Wireless technologies advances for emergency and rural communications. Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing .

Kurtis, M. (2004). Deploying E-911 Phase II in Rural America. Business Source Complete .
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Treatment of War Two Different

Words: 1156 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49139201

There is hardly anything good to say about the Nazis and their reign of terror during World War II. The Nazis were effective and efficient killing machines, and it did not matter if the victim was young or old, rich or poor, Jew or Gentile, if they were in the way of the Nazis, they were eliminated. Most literature depicts the Nazis as exceptionally cruel and heartless, and this poem is no exception. Who kills a child simply for laughing? A Nazi, that's who. In fact, in most literature, there is hardly anything good to say about war. There is a long tradition of writing about the causes and effects of war, and most of the literature is graphic and horrific in nature. It depicts the worst parts of war, and depicts it graphically because writers what their readers to share in the feelings and desires of their characters. Even…… [Read More]

References libero, de libero. "german september." Twentieth Century Italian Poetry. l.r. lind, ed. New York, the Library of Liberal Arts, 1974.
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Effective Training

Words: 2679 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62006165

Training

Knowledge, Skill and attitude:

The objectives of training include enhancement of knowledge, skills and attitude. Knowledge is the body of facts and principles accumulated my mankind in course of time. It is a complex of several related ideas. According to a working definition, knowledge is the matrix of impressions within which the individual situates newly acquired information (Clarke, 2001). From a business perspective, knowledge supports people to analyze situations, make judgments and take decisions, in the process telling what is to done, why, how, where, when and who should perform the actions towards achieving organizational goals. Skill is the ability to transform knowledge into action; it refers to the ability of people to use knowledge effectively and readily to perform desired actions and specific tasks. Skill is also defined as the ability to do something well from talent, training or practice.

The essential difference is that knowledge is to…… [Read More]

References

Bertram, S and Gibson, B - Training Needs Analysis, II Edition, Aldershot: Gower, 1997

Clarke, R - 'Knowledge', 2001, retrieved from www.anu.edu/au/people/Roger.Clarke/SOS/Know.html. Accessed on 03/04/2004

Hamel, G and Prahalad, C.K - 'Competing for the Future: Breakthrough Strategies for Seizing Control of your Industry and Creating the Markets of Tomorrow, Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1994

Lassey, P - 'Developing a Learning Organization', Kogan Page: London, 1998
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Effective Nursing Handoffs in Nursing Practice

Words: 4601 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77275375

Nursing Handoff Communication esearch

Nursing handoffs are important components in the modern health care setting given their role in transfer of the responsibility and authority of care from one practitioner to another during shifts. Generally, nurses work in different shifts when providing patient care in order to reduce their work burdens and potential stressful moments. Therefore, nursing handoffs help ensure continuity of care during a patient's stay in the health care facility. Despite the significance of nursing handoff in continuity of care, this process has been characterized by numerous communication problems. In most cases, nursing handoffs are substandard and contribute to several challenges in enhancing patient outcomes and satisfaction. This study seeks to examine communication problems in nursing handoffs with a view of identifying effective strategies towards enhancing this process. This issue is important in current nursing practice with regards to enhancing patient outcomes and satisfaction. Effective nursing handoffs are…… [Read More]

References

Abraham et al. (2011, October 22). Falling through the Cracks: Information Breakdowns in Critical Care Handoff Communication. AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, 28-37. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3243259/

Blouin, A.S. (2011, April - June). Improving Hand-Off Communications: New Solutions for Nurses. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 26(2), 97-100.

Delrue, K.S. (2013, April). An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Nursing Handover Process for Emergency Department Admissions. Retrieved from Grand Valley State University website: http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1009&context=dissertations

Farhan, M., Brown, R., Woloshynowych, M. & Vincent, C. (2012). The ABC of Handover: A Qualitative Study to Develop a New Tool for Handover in the Emergency Department. Emergency Medicine Journal, 1-6.
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Treatment for the Homeless

Words: 5851 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27753025

Homeless Mental Health

Mental health is an issue that is deemed to be very under-treated and very under-diagnosed within the United States. Beyond that, there are populations that are much more at risk than others. A good example would be the prison population where drug use and mental health issues are both rampant. However, there is another group that is highly stricken and very vexing and difficult to treat and that would be the homeless. Indeed, many people that are homeless are in that position due to mental health issues. Mental health is often not the only issue involved as comorbidity can exist with substance abuse. However, mental health will be the focus of this report. Facets of the homeless with mental health that will be focused upon within this report will include issues like diversity, ethics, values, social justice, diagnosing of patients, initiation/termination of care, aftercare, and the broader…… [Read More]

References

Belcher, J. R. (1988). Rights vs. Needs of Homeless Mentally Ill Persons. Social Work, 33(5), 398.

Chambers, C., Chiu, S., Scott, A., Tolomiczenko, G., Redelmeier, D., Levinson, W., & Hwang,

S. (2014). Factors Associated with Poor Mental Health Status Among Homeless Women

With and Without Dependent Children. Community Mental Health Journal, 50(5), 553-
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Treatment Options for Alzheimer S

Words: 1577 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37342892

Functional Assessment eport

Summarization of Case

Luther, 80 years of age, was admitted to a nursing hospital due to Alzheimer's disease complications. As a farmer, Luther spent most of his life moving freely unlike what he was experiencing in the nursing home. However, he had to adapt to the new life. Despite his impairment memory problem, Luther was psychically fit as he managed to walk around the nursing premises. Later, he started experienced a problem in that he walked alone. For safety reasons, he was not allowed to go outside alone. Despite the warnings, he managed to walk go outside alone, even during cold periods without a coat. Each time he went out, the nursing staff had to bring him back. The architecture of the nursing home depicts one main door at the station, another one near the business office, and three fire doors at the sides and back of…… [Read More]

References

Cooper, J. O., Heron, T. E., & Heward, W. L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (second Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall. ISBN: 9780131421134.

Lu, L. & Bludau, J. (2011). Alzheimer's Disease. New York: ABC-CLIO

Miltenberger, R. G. (2015). Behavior Modification: Principles and Procedures (Sixth Ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. ISBN: 9781305109391.
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Effective Communication in a Hospital Scenario

Words: 664 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42160536

Health Literacy and Patient Safety

Indirect Care Experience

Numerous environmental factors are likely to affect children's health. This section will focus on providing basic information on how contaminated or polluted water can affect children's health and how caregivers and parents can protect children. Children often take more water compared to adults. In addition, their immune systems are still in the process of developing. Children can acquire infectious disease through contaminated water. Some of these diseases include Paratyphoid Fever, Cholera, Typhoid, Malaria, Amoebiasis and Dysentery. Based on these aspects, it is extremely important for parents to ensure that their water supply is safe. If using a private water system, families must ensure the water is regularly tested. Measures must be adopted to prevent contaminating water supply. For those receiving water from a public system, it is necessary to understand the source of that water and its treatment process. Public water systems…… [Read More]

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Planning for Diagnosis and Treatment

Words: 1945 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12197589

Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

Contemporary Approaches Used for Assessment and Diagnosis

The Center for Quality Assessment and Improvement in Mental Health relates screening tools used for screening for bipolar disorder to include the 'Mood Disorder Questionnaire' (MDQ); the 'Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) ipolar Disorder Screening Scale'; Differential Diagnosis of ipolar Disorder I & II vs. Major Depressive Disorders; and Obtaining a Family History Through the Use of a Genogram. The MDQ is designed for use as a tool to aid in screening for present and past incidences of mania and hypomania and includes 13 questions related to the symptoms of bipolar disorder in addition to items that assess the clustering of symptoms as well as any functional impairment. (CQAIMH, 2014, paraphrased) The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) ipolar Disorder Screening Scale' can be used to make accurate identification of "both threshold and sub-threshold bipolar disorder." (CQAIMH, 2014, p. 1)…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bipolar Disorder (2014) Mayo clinic. Diseases. Retrieved from: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bipolar-disorder/basics/tests-diagnosis/con-20027544

Bipolar Disorder (2014) University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved from:  http://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/bipolar-disorder 

Bipolar Disorder Screening (2014) Center for Quality Assessment and Improvement in Mental Health (CQAIHM). Retrieved from:  http://www.cqaimh.org/tool_bipolar.html 

Bipolar Disorder Treatment (2014) NHS. Retrieved from:  http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Bipolar-disorder/Pages/Treatment.aspx
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Depression Psychology and Treatment for Depression There

Words: 1768 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58370583

Depression

Psychology and Treatment for Depression

There are many different views on depression, what causes it, and how it should be treated. The two most common options for depression treatment are medication and therapy (Lambert, 2006). These have been used for some time, mostly because they seem to have the highest rates of success. However, some people think that coupling them is the best choice while others feel that only one at a time is what is going to work. There are two points-of-view: that therapy works to "fix" depression, and that medication is what is required to correct depression problems in the population. Both of these are valid points-of-view, and both have their merits. However, whether only one is correct, one has more merit than the other, or a different (or combined) approach should be taken still has to be addressed in order to ensure that depression treatments are…… [Read More]

References

Lambert, K.G. (2006). Rising rates of depression in today's society: Consideration of the roles of effort-based rewards and enhanced resilience in day-to-day functioning. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 30(4): 497 -- 510.

Sharp, L.K., & Lipsky, M.S. (2002). Screening for depression across the lifespan: a review of measures for use in primary care settings. American Family Physician, 66(6): 1001 -- 1008.

Walker, S. (1997). A Dose of Sanity: Mind, Medicine, and Misdiagnosis. NY: John Wiley & Sons.
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Personalized Induction Is Effective In Order to Discuss

Words: 1543 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66680902

personalized induction is effective.In order to discuss the effectiveness of personalizing a given induction, it is crucial that we first of all explore as well as defined the concept of personal induction. After that has been done, we then proceed with the analysis of the concepts that are part of the process. The rest of this work deals with the arguments in favor of the concept of personalized inductions as well as the ones against it prior to the drawing of a conclusion.

Every human being is unique and complex in different ways. Each and everyone have their likes and dislikes and we own these to our entirely different upbringings. This view was shared by various world leaders such as Pope John Paul II when he pointed out that every human being is single, unique as well as unrepeatable (Chang,2006).

Personalization of screed means to effectively tailor it so that…… [Read More]

References

Banyan, C.D., & G.F. Kein (2001). Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy: Basic To Advanced Techniques for the Professional. St. Paul, MN: Abbot Publishing House

Bandler, R, and Grinder, J (1975). The Structure of Magic. Volume 1. Palo Alto, Cal-if., Science and Behavior Books,

Brockopp, DY (1983).What Is NLP -- the American Journal of Nursing, Vol 83 (7) .pp. 1012-1014

Dementia Care Australia (2011). Understanding & Communicating
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Rosacea Treatments Rosacea Causes Symptoms

Words: 752 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90611491

Those who suffer from it become red in the face, with their skin extremely agitated. Moreover, "they may have flushing of the face, when they are hot, drink alcohol or hot drinks, or eat spicy foods. This flushing causes the face to appear red" (AZ Network, 2013). Blood vessels under the skin often become visible along with the flush of redness experienced by rosacea sufferers. These symptoms tend to get worse with time, with multiple cyclical outbreaks.

A number of treatments exist to try to counter act the effects of rosacea. Here, the research suggests that "you can help keep rosacea under control by keeping a record of things that cause it to flare up. Try to avoid or limit these triggers as much as you can" (AZ Network, 2013). Understanding what triggers a flare up can be crucial in helping to avoid them. Yet, medical treatments also prove effective,…… [Read More]

References

AZ Network. (2013). Rosacea: Facial redness. News Medical Net. Web.  http://www.news-medical.net/health/Rosacea-Facial-Redness.aspx 

Clinical Reference Systems. (2004). Rosacea. Columbia University. Web. http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/student/health/pdf/R-S/Rosacea.pdf

Cole, Gary W. & Stoppler, Melissa Conrad. (2012). Rosacea. EMedicine Health. Web. http://www.emedicinehealth.com/rosacea/article_em.htm

MacKenzie, Debora. (2012). Rosacea mat be caused by mite feces in your pores. New Scientist. Web. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22227-rosacea-may-be-caused-by-mite-faeces-in-your-pores.htmlt
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Adolescent Treatment Interventions and Youth

Words: 1358 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81074068

This research considered this by looking at a key constituent of low self-control which is the risk seeking tendency in order to decide its constancy and change throughout early childhood, its influences on changes in criminal behavior, and its receptiveness to a complete delinquency lessening program. These matters were looked at with information from the Children at isk (CA) program, an arbitrarily allocated interference that looked at early youth. The examination exposed considerable reliability in risk seeking, but there was proof of change as well, and these alterations were connected with contemporary alterations in delinquency. isk seeking alterations were not a consequence of contribution in the CA program, in spite of that program's achievement at dropping some appearance of delinquency (Hay, Meldrum, Forrest and Ciaravolo, 2010).

Part II: Assessment of the main strengths of the reading with particular emphasis on its utility for understanding adolescent development or social work intervention.…… [Read More]

References

Arthur, Michael W., Hawkins, J. David, Brown, Eric C, Briney, John S., Oesterle, Sabrina and Abbott, Robert D. (2010). Implementation of the Communities that Care Prevention

System by Coalitions in the Community Youth Development Study. Journal of Community Psychology, 38(2), p. 245 -- 258.

Hay, Carter, Meldrum, Ryan, Forrest, Walter and Ciaravolo, Emily. (2010). Stability and Change

in Risk Seeking: Investigating the Effects of an Intervention Program. Retrieved December 6, 2010, from  http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/8/2/91
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Modifying a Treatment Plan

Words: 1164 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47802475

Treatment Plan Diagnoses, Goals, and Objective for Eliza: A Review

Examine the case and propose why the changes occurred

It is important that the systematic progress of maintaining Eliza's recovery process is not affected in any way. The case from the school is genuine enough. In case a new strategy is instituted, the initial plan and its progress together with the results so far will be of no importance. The changes were necessary on three main grounds: protection of the integrity of the medical process, protection of Eliza, and ultimate protection of the need for her to recover as intended and through the recommended process. She needs to undergo a completion of a procedure that will result in the complete transformation into a better state of health. The integrity of the treatment facility has to be protected since it has its systematic mechanisms of addressing individual patient issues, and hence…… [Read More]

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Radioimmunotherapy for the Treatment of

Words: 6684 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44678591

This has been the traditionally used mode of treatment for non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas, but the fact remains that there have not been many clinical trials conducted that would reveal the benefits of CHOP in comparison to various other chemotherapy options for the treatment of CLL, which is a very slowly growing form of cancer and is therefore conversely very difficult to treat and cure because of the fact that all the traditional methods of treatment, whether chemotherapy or radiation, are meant to quickly and rapidly destroy the fast growing cancerous cells. (Cancer Treatment and Prevention)

Curing a patient with the CLL or SLL forms of cancer is considered to be highly unusual, but it is true that these patients will b able to lead productive lives even after 6 to 10 years after the cancer have been diagnosed for them. A patient when he is making the choice of treatment for…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bischof, Delaloye a. (2003) "The role of nuclear medicine in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)" Leuk Lymphoma. Volume: 44 Suppl 4; pp: S29-36

Cancer Treatment and Prevention" Retrieved at http://patient.cancerconsultants.com/treatment.aspx?id=782Accessed on 26 December, 2004

CHOP - complementary considerations. Lymphoma-tion" (2 October, 2004) Retrieved at  http://www.lymphomation.org/chemo-CHOP.htm . Accessed on 26 December, 2004

CHOP Patient Information Sheet" Newcastle General Hospital, Northern Center for Cancer treatment. (June, 2005) Retrieved at http://www.newcastle-hospitals.org.uk/v2/PDF/patientleaflets/NCCT/Standard/CHOP.PDFAccessed on 26 December, 2004
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Sunil in Treatment Sunil Intake

Words: 782 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73950405

Sunil's willingness to return indicates that this approach was effective. As a therapist, I would not judge Sunil and would allow him to direct the initial phases of the process. ather than immediately delving into the loss he had experienced after his wife's demise, for example, I would allow Sunil to talk about what might seem like rather petty grievances attached to his immediate living situation. Sometimes talking about external, mundane circumstances are a conduit to exploring to deeper issues; moreover, it is not my place as a therapist to judge what is 'most significant' or insignificant.

ESSAY 4: Bronfenbrenner's (1976, 1988) description

On the microsystem of Sunil's immediate psychological conflict, through talk therapy and perhaps the use in the future of some antidepressants (depending on Sunil's feelings about the use of medication), Sunil's mood disorder may be treated. The mesosystem of dealing with family conflicts may require equipping Sunil…… [Read More]

References

Brief explanation of Axis V diagnosis. Retrieved:

 http://www.dhs.state.or.us/caf/safety_model/procedure_manual/appendices/ch4-app/4-5.pdf 

Sunil: Episode 1. (2010). In Treatment.
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Self-Harm Treatment Self-Harm Classification and

Words: 1467 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27672759

' A cognitive behavioral therapist might ask, what will harming yourself do to improve your grades on the test? Cognitive therapies in general have been shown to be more effective than traditional supportive talk therapies when treating anxiety conditions because they offer concrete steps for self-improvement on a continuing basis (Reeves 2003, p1.). Patients are also asked to identify things they would like to do in which current behavior patterns prevent them from engaging, such as wearing short-sleeved shirts.

Cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy shows a higher success rate in anxiety disorders and OCD than traditional psychotherapy, likely because of its behavioral component. The fact that many DSH patients are diagnosed with BPD may complicate treatment, but BPT responds well in some instances to these therapies, too. BPT patients manifest disordered patterns of relationships, thinking, behavior, and coping mechanisms that contribute to unstable life patterns as well as contribute to the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bland, Ann R., Georgina Tudor & Deborah McNeil Whitehouse (2007, October). Nursing care of inpatients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

Perspectives in Psychiatric Care.

Retrieved from FindArticles.com on February 16, 2009 http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3804/is_200710/ai_n21099913?tag=content;col1

Mangnall, Jacqueline & Eleanor Yurkovich. (2008). A literature review of deliberate self-harm.
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Fetal Treatment in Perusing the

Words: 828 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4459830



Other key elements of the website included additional information on other congenital birth defects that the FTC also specialized in. These diseases included; Congenital Cystic Adnomatoid Malformation, ulmonary Sequestration, Gastroschisis and even Urinary Tract Obstruction.

The website included information on numerous other defects suffered by infants and in utero babies. Helpful information contained on the website could also be found on the other pages of the website that are conducive to those individuals who are familiar with the methods of traversing such websites. That information included an easy method for ascertaining and then contacting the correct physician for any particular fetal defect. If an individual, or concerned couple, did not know of what particular defect affected their yet-to-be born child, or just wished to have a physician contact them with further information, the website allowed them to do that as well. The website listed over 900 physicians available for consultation…… [Read More]

Perhaps most importantly, the website seemed to provide a modicum of hope to those people whose circumstances may have seem the most hopeless. With the information provided by the website, people who may have been facing the possibility of a death of a newborn, even before it had been born, could now have some degree of comfort and strength. This seemed to be the strongest point of the website, and perhaps because the website was so straightforward in its approach the comforting derived from the website may have been even stronger than if it had attempted to sugarcoat the reality of the situation.

One of the most interesting aspects of the website was the video that can be watched just by clicking on the link. Many of the attributes of the website, including the video, are copyrighted by Kids 'n' Moms 2006, which could be why the video was so well done. Many of the professional notes included on the website are attributed to Dr. Robert Ball, Perinotologist, FTC, UCSF and Dr. Kerilyn Nobahara, FTC, UCSF.

The website seems to be a perfect mixture of professionalism and down to earth stories, and should be accessible and effective for many individuals.
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Conventional Methods of Waste Water Treatment

Words: 731 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44993840

Waste Water Treatment

Inadequately treated waste water poses hazards such as water-borne diseases and water-body pollution. People generate wastewater (sewage) in numerous ways, including laundry and toilet use. To prevent pollution and ensure public health, waste water ought to be treated adequately. Today, waste water is not so much a problem as it was in earlier centuries, a trend that is attributable to the development of efficient sewer lines and treatment plants, otherwise referred to as centralized wastewater collection and treatment facilities. Not long ago, however, these were not as effective as they are today, and worse still, were not available to a majority of the population. People used the conventional decentralized waste systems to take care of, among others, the black waters, and still managed to lead hygienic lives.

Septic Systems: these consisted of a "septic tank, the drain field, and the soil beneath the drain field" (NCSU, 2013).…… [Read More]

References

NCSU. (2013). Septic Systems and their Maintenance. North Carolina State University. Retrieved 2 May 2014 from  http://www.soil.ncsu.edu/publications/Soilfacts/AG-439-13/ 

Rapaport, D. (1995). Sewage Pollution in Pacific Island Countries and how to Prevent It. Center for Clean Development.

UNL. (2011). A Place in the Country: the Acreage Owner's Guide. University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Retrieved 2 May 2014 from  http://lancaster.unl.edu/acreageguide/waste.shtml
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Homeopathic Treatment for Pediatrics

Words: 858 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57804749

A study recently published in Global Pediatric Health by van Haselen et al. (2016) investigated the use of a homeopathic remedy as an add on therapy for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) in paediatrics. This paper provides an overview of that research, including his methodology and results, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the paper.

The aim of the research was to determine whether or not the addition of a homeopathic remedy; Influid, would improve the outcome for paediatrics presenting with upper respiratory tract infections if added to an existing treatment of paracetamol, known as acetaminophen in the United States (van Haselen et al., 2016). The researchers note that homeopathy is increasing the accepted in Germany, including use the treatment of colds and flu, or flulike infections. The aim is to assess a homeopathic remedy which is specifically designed for the treatment of flulike infections…… [Read More]

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Sustained Treatment Can Have on

Words: 553 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74436933



The main values that are apparent in this article are first, an empirical adherence and promotion of objectivity in dealing with a topic that is highly fraught with many emotions, and secondly a true desire to bring about the betterment of society and the individuals within it. The authors stress at one point that it is understood that sex offenders can never be "cured' of their impulses, and that an acceptance of this fact is precisely what allows them to be able to learn how to control these impulses and desires in order to refrain from being a danger to society or anyone else in it. That is, it is through bringing objectivity to bear on the issue that the issue can actually be successfully addressed, and the research that is presented in this article certainly backs this perspective up. Objectivity and empirical examination, in other words, are some of…… [Read More]

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References for Culturally-Sensitive Treatment of PTSD

Words: 1730 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99781959

Culturally Competent Trauma Care

Allen, B., Wilson, K., & Armstrong, N. (2014). Changing clinicians' beliefs about treatment for children experiencing trauma: the impact of intensive training in evidence-based, trauma-focused treatment. Psychological Trauma: Theory, esearch, Practice, and Policy, 6(4), 384-389.

Despite a recent push towards more structured treatment protocols, many clinicians have taken an unstructured approach to the treatment of trauma in children, based upon a belief that children may be unable to verbalize or otherwise express their feelings about a trauma. This study focuses on whether training can change a clinician's approach in practice and suggests that intensive training can influence clinicians in their choice of therapeutic approach and guide them to use evidence-based therapies (EBT) that are highly structured. This research fails to discuss the impact that cultural upbringing may have on the willingness or ability of children to discuss trauma early in the treatment process. As a result,…… [Read More]

References

Allen, B., Wilson, K., & Armstrong, N. (2014). Changing clinicians' beliefs about treatment for children experiencing trauma: the impact of intensive training in evidence-based, trauma-focused treatment. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 6(4), 384-389.

Bernal, G., Jimenez-Chafey, M. & Domenech Rodriguez, M. (2009). Cultural adaptations of treatments: a resource for considering culture in evidence-based practice. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(4), 361-368.

Brady, K. & Back, S. (2012). Childhood trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and alcohol dependence. Alcohol Research: Current Reviews, 34(4), 408-413.

Couineau, A. & Forbes, D. (2011). Using predictive models of behavior change to promote evidence-based treatment for PTSD. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 3(3), 266-275.
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Pharmacologic Treatment of Fear and

Words: 4199 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2973543

e., they became helpless). Furthermore, other behaviors of the dogs were adversely affected (e.g., the dogs appeared apathetic and had poor appetites) (Hitzemann, 2000). In his essay, "Animal Models of Psychiatric Disorders and Their elevance to Alcoholism," Hitzemann (2000) reports that, "Both fear and anxiety are alerting signals that warn the individual against impending danger and enable the individual to take defensive measures. For animals, the distinctions between fear and anxiety are vague" (p. 149). The distinctions between fear and anxiety are clearly irrelevant for humans who encounter such stressed animals, though.

According to Hodge and Stull (2000), dog bites cause an average of 17 human deaths, 6,000 hospitalizations, and 330,000 emergency room visits every year in the Untied States and a like number of people probably do not seek treatment or report the incident, but may nevertheless experience psychological trauma, anxiety, and missed work or school. Furthermore, dog bites…… [Read More]

References

Becker, M.G., Chew, G.L., Correa, J.C., Hoepner, L.A., Jusino, C.M., Kinney, P.L., Miller, R.L., & Perzanowski, M.S. (2003). Distribution and determinants of mouse allergen exposure in low-income New York City apartments. Environmental Health Perspectives, 111(10), 1348.

Boone, J.S., & Tyler, J.W. (2001). Transferable residues from dog fur and plasma cholinesterase inhibition in dogs treated with a flea control dip containing chlorpyrifos. Environmental Health Perspectives, 109(11), 1109.

Chang, Y., Cohen, J.H., Hennon, D.L., LaPorte, R.E., & McMahon, J.E. (1997). Dog bite incidence in the City of Pittsburgh: A capture-recapture approach. American Journal of Public Health, 87(10), 1703-5.

Duke, M.L., & Swain, J.L. (2001). Recommendations for research on ethics in public policy from a public administration perspective: Barking dogs and more. International Journal of Public Administration, 24(1), 125.