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Employee Relation Essays (Examples)

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Employee Feedback Programs Are Programs
Words: 2835 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85578747
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However, it has been a struggle to make employees view that these employee feedback programs are not just a tool for the companies to comply with has been a losing battle eports 12.

The good news of the matter is that these employee feedback programs provide duly needed positive and negative feedback which helps the management re-strategize their decision making process.

Organizational culture and employee feedback programs

The culture of the organization must at the same time reflect these employee feedback programs Gupta, Govindarajan and Malhotra 206.

Organizational culture is the personality that is exhibited by an organization through its employees. Members of the organization slowly come to sense this culture and try their best to express it in their actions in various situations. There are several effects of an organization's culture. These include influencing the technologies applied, image of the organization to the public, strategies, services and products of…

References

Bogardus, A. Phr / Sphr Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2009. Print.

Earl, Joanne, Melissa Dunn Lampe, and Andrew Buksin. "What to Do with Employee Survey Results." Gallup Management Journal (2008). Print.

Gomez-Mejia, L.R., D.B. Balkin, and R.L. Cardy. Managing Human Resources. London: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2009. Print.

Gupta, Anil K., Vijay Govindarajan, and Ayesha Malhotra. "Feedback-Seeking Behavior within Multinational Corporations." Strategic Management Journal 20.3 (1999): 205-22. Print.

Employee Satisfaction With a Company's Review Process
Words: 7400 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74633360
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Employee Satisfaction with a Company's Review Process

The following research examines the reason for a decline in employee satisfaction regarding the review process at XYZ, Inc. The results of the survey revealed that sample biases may have confounded the results and that the survey will have to be re-administered to reflect the true attitudes and results of the preliminary research leading up to the current survey. The result showed a high degree of satisfaction with the quality and quantity of management feedback. The results of this survey are inconclusive and further research will need to be conducted to eliminate the possible effects of sample bias.

Delimitations (See Leedy)

Premise

Hypothesis

Research question(s)

Evaluation Objective

Development Objectives

Participants

Researcher

Survey Group(s)

Assistants

Site contact

Timeline

Chapter II

A. Literature Review

B. Introduction

C. General Management Issues

D. Project Related Issues

E. Conclusions

F. Definition of Terms

G. References

H. Project Submission…

Employee Privacy Torts
Words: 7119 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 96826900
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Employee Privacy Torts

Issues relating to employee privacy have been at the forefront of businesses for many years. This has been fuelled by the dynamic workplace which changes constantly and also by employees and employers being more litigation-conscious. Technology has also spurred on employee privacy issues with e-mail and the internet being related to heightened concerns about vulnerability of employers to litigation. Many employers have thus exacerbated their concerns relating to employee privacy and especially monitoring of employee behavior. Employee privacy is respected in many of the large corporations. However, there still exist some breaches in employee privacy. Small business owners are at most risk as a result of their increased monitoring practices and close employer-employee interaction.

Historical background

oberson v. ochester Folding Box Company

One of the major cases that brought employee privacy to the limelight was oberson v. ochester Folding Box Company

Franklin Mills Co. decided to appeal…

References

Anderson v. City of Philadelphia, 845 F. 2d 1216 (1988).

Borse v. Piece Goods Shop, 963 F.2d 611 (1991).

Burlington Industries, Inc. v. Ellerth, 524 U.S. 742 (1988).

City of Ontario v. Quon, 130 S.Ct. 2619, 560 U.S. (2010).

Employee Customer Service Training New Employee Customer
Words: 1621 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41521495
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Employee Customer Service Training

New Employee Customer Service Training Plan

Justify the use of a needs assessment of your company's proposed employee customer service training, stressing five (5) ways in which such an assessment would expose any existing performance deficiencies.

The employees of an organization act like the 'driving force' which can either lead the organization towards success or can turn out to be the cause of its failure. A company's progress not only depends on an employee's individual performance but the way these employees communicate with the customers has its own significance. Thus, in order to run a successful organization, it is quite essential to monitor the correlation between the outcomes and the employees' input on a regular basis. To ensure employees' effectiveness, organizations usually remain concerned about training their employees.

Training means a methodical intentional process of changing behavior of organizational members in a direction which contributes to…

Bibliography

Eisenberger, R., Rhoades, L. & Cameron, J. (1999). Does pay for performance increase or decrease perceived self-determination and intrinsic motivation? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77, 1026-1040.

Gerow, J.R. (1997). Psychology -- An Introduction. 5th Edition. New York: Longman.

Hinrichs, J.R. (1976). Personnel training. In M. Dunnette (Ed.), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology. Skokie, IL: Rand MsNally.

Miller & Osinski (1996). Training Needs Assessment. Retrieved November 18,

Employee Orientation Situational Overview a
Words: 1097 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98119044
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On the other hand, the comparative value of the real-time presentation must be considered in relation to the potential technical issues involved. Specifically, whereas pre-recorded presentations and self-directed learning online training programs can be tested and perfected in advance to ensure there are no technical problems with delivery, that is not necessarily the case with real-time presentations, especially those involving two-way communications. No matter how much preparation and troubleshooting is conducted in advance, live two-way presentations are notoriously susceptible to technical problems that can interfere with planning and lesson delivery. Moreover, the more computer terminals and office locations involved, the greater that potential for difficulties in execution.

Anticipated Problems

Beyond technical delivery-of-training issues, other anticipated potential problems associated with online employee training include lower levels of individual engagement and reduced opportunity for meaningful interpersonal exchanges. In that regard, even the best corporate instructors cannot implement all of the same teaching…

References

Leader-Chivee, L., Booz Allen, H., and Cowan, E. "Networking the Way to Success: Online Social Networks for Workplace and Competitive Advantage." Journal of People & Strategy. Vol. 31, No. 3 (2008): 27 -- 45.

Robbins, S.P. And Judge, T.A. (2009). Organizational Behavior. Upper Saddle River,

NJ: Prentice Hall.

Stevens, B. "Corporate Ethical Codes: Effective Instruments for Influencing Behavior."

Employee Representation a Labor Union Refers to
Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 79335944
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Employee Representation

A labor union refers to an association of employees that have come together in pursuit of common goals, such as better pay. Labor relations are wider in scope; they refer to the interactions between the labor unions (employees' representatives) and employers - and usually deal with the maintenance of collective bargaining agreements.

Labor relations date way back to the formation of the very first significant unions: the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor (AFL), and the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The Knights of Labor, however, failed to achieve its objectives due to its large membership. AFL, unlike the other two, initially restricted its membership to skilled tradesmen. However, with the 1935 formation of CIO, which incorporated both skilled and unskilled laborers, conflicts resulted and the two unions later merged.

Question Three

Enacted in 1926 and later on expanded to rope in the airline industry, the…

Employee Concerns I Am Taking a Course
Words: 322 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 37328176
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Employee Concerns

I am taking a course in employer and labor relations and feel I may be able to help you out in the stated situation. Employment laws do not specifically state anything against employee dissention or workplace politics. Employers have limited rights in these situations unless here is a written policy setting limits on workplace politics. If you feel that Sue Mee is engaging in activities which are threaten productivity and creating a hostile working environment, it is important to confront her and open channels of communication with the staff.

I am afraid, Sue Mee is right when she states that without employment contracts management has increased powers to fire an employee. Employment contracts limit an employer's power over termination of employees but they need not always be in written form. If you feel that there exists an unwritten employment contract in the firm, you can convince the employees…

Employee Recruitment When Setting Up and Maintaining
Words: 587 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47065124
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Employee ecruitment

When setting up and maintaining the human resource files, confidentiality and privacy are always significant at workplace. Today most organizations are taking different steps of ensuring that the information within the organization remains confidential and private, however employees on the other hand are seen not to be concerned of this, therefore it is the work of the top managers to make their employees understand the importance of keeping files such as the human resource files as confidential. The human resources professionals should prevent misuse of personal information by safely storing them to avoid unauthorized access. Maintaining confidentiality of information in organization does not only protect the company from the legal hassles, but it improves the productivity of the employee while providing them with a safer working environment and security (Dogra, 2012).

Maintaining privacy and confidentiality for human resource files is important for varied reasons this is because, it…

References

Dogra, A. (2012). Confidentiality in the Workplace. Buzzle. Retrieved December 7, 2012, from  http://www.buzzle.com/articles/confidentiality-in-the-workplace.html 

ACAS (2012). Recruitment and selection Promoting employment relations and HR excellence Retrieved December 7, 2012, from  http://www.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=746

Life Balance in Effective Employee Management Importance
Words: 2011 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9476963
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Life Balance in Effective Employee Management

Importance of Work-Life Balance

The purpose of this paper is to explain the importance of work-life balance in an effective management of employees in contemporary organizations. The paper constitutes a brief introduction to the concept and a comprehensive discussion on how a good work-life balance of employees increases their morale, motivation, and commitment which ultimately contribute towards their superior workplace performance and higher organizational productivity.

Work-life balance means how employees are able to split their time and energy to manage their personal and professional lives in such a fashion that neither of them is negatively affected by the other (Eikhof, Warhurst, & Haunschild 2007). Work-life balance allows them to give time to their family commitments, personal care, community participation, and other personal life activities along with fulfilling the demands of their professional life (Saxena 2009). It is the responsibility of employers to formulate policies…

Resources, 49 (3): 285-307.

Moore, T., Johns, R. & Johnson, C. 2006, "Work-Life Balance Experiences of Women in the Construction Industry," International Employment Relations Review, 12 (2): 67-78.

Pedersen, V. & Lewis, S. 2012, "Flexible friends? Flexible working time arrangements, blurred work-life boundaries and friendship," Work, Employment & Society, 26 (3): 464-480.

Robbins, S. & Coulter, M. 2006, Management. 8th Edition. U.S.: Prentice Hall

Saxena, P. 2009, Principles of Management: A Modern Approach, 1st Edition. India: Global India Publications

Relationship With Employees Keeping High
Words: 842 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 11637310
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four financial services organizations have approached the work-life balance agenda and examines the fit between the organizational intentions for work-life policy and actual outcomes for both organizations and employees and found that what managers were being asked to achieve in the business was often incompatible with formal work-life policies (Wise & ond, 2003).

Interview

A human resources professional was interview from a local firm that employed a wide range of different employees that were performing organizational functions at different levels. The manager was responsible for a large number of employees and has a significant amount of experience with work-life initiatives. The human resource manager had somewhat mixed emotions about implanting such policies with many employees. He had both good experiences with a work-life program as well as a number of negative experiences. He seemed to think that the positive ones were about equal to the negative ones.

The problems with…

Bibliography

Akdere, M. (2006). Improving Quality of Work-Life: Implications for Human Resources. The Business Review, 173-177.

Al-Qutop, Mohi-Adden, Y., & Harrim, H. (2011). Quality of Worklife Human Well-being Linkage: Integrated Conceptual Framework. International Journal of Business and Management, 193-205.

MacDermid, S., & Wittenborn, a. (2007). Lessons From Work-Life Research for Developing Human Resources. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 556-568.

Perry-Smith, J., & Blum, T. (2000). Work-family human resource bundles and perceived organizational performance. Academy of Management Journal, 1107-1117.

Function of Public Relations
Words: 845 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89664477
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Functions of Public Relations

The line between organizational and societal functions of public relations is increasingly becoming blurred. For the purposes of this assignment, marketing communications and employee relations have been grouped into the organizational function while social responsibility and community relations have been grouped into the societal function. These segmentations have been derived primarily be examining direct links to profits and how much a company has focused on either inward or outward activities. However, companies that seek better profits are now realizing that they are tied to what they can do for the welfare of the members of society. Along with this realization comes a tighter linkage between organizational and society functions of public relations to achieve a new business vision called corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Marketing communications is more aligned with organizational functions because it helps meet the internal needs of promotion to advance sales of products and…

Bibliography

Global Alliance For Public Relations And Communications Management. Retrieved August 13, 2005 from Web site: http://www.globalpr.org/news/features/csr_statement_280604.asp

Pantelleva, M. Public relations and public responsibility. Retrieved August, 13, 2005 from Web site: http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:fwlnzBXEQdAJ:www.eprn.org/EuropeanPRNews2/Milena_Panteleeva.pdf+%22public+relations%22+%22social+responsibility%22& hl=en

Public relations FAQ. Retrieved August 13, 2005 from Web site:  http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/a/m/amm17/pr.html 

Riesterer, T. Accountability marketing. Retrieved August 13, 2005 from Web site:  http://www.marcommwise.com/articlecat.phtml?c=Marcomm%20Measurement

Supervising a Problem Employee
Words: 2245 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39718850
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Employee

Supervising a Problem Employee

An Employee elations Case Study

Supervising a Problem Employee: An Employee elations Case Study

SCENAIO: John Jones is a long-term employee of the Lackawanna Police Department. During his first ten years on the force, John was enthusiastic about his job and was promoted quickly. Within the last year, however, John's performance has deteriorated. He is constantly agitated and is frequently late for work in the morning. His paperwork has gotten shoddy and he often turns in reports well past their due date. John's immediate supervisor, Betty Brown wants to salvage her employee, John. She has known him for many years and she feels that something must be seriously wrong and it is directly affecting his employment with the Lackawanna Police Department.

Unfortunately, situations like John's are all too common in today's workforce. As employers continue to use more human resources generalists and fewer specialists in…

References

Ackerman, Spencer (2000, October 12). Rutgers University police officers complain of racism in department. Daily Targum (University Wire).

Aminuddin, Maimunah (1998, January). Building harmonious employee relations. New Straits Times.

Gill, Lucy (1999). How to Work With Just About Anyone. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.

Shilling, Dana (2002). The Complete Guide to Human Resources and the Law: 2002 Supplement (Rev. ed.). Paramus, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Labor Relation in Public Sector
Words: 1505 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 12441409
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Labor Relations in Public Sector

Collective bargaining in the public sector organizations will be quite different from that of the private sector organizations. The factors that drive the collective bargaining process in the private sector might not be present in the public sector. Private sector organizations are more concerned on the profit maximization philosophy whereas the public sector firms are more focused on serving general public therefore their priorities would be totally different and management approaches to collective bargaining would also be different. Moreover, private sector firms project for long-term budget forecasting, whereas in the public sector it is managed through third party legislature depending on the voters. These create challenges for the public sector to formulate a policy document that looks after the labor relations.

The Public Employees Fair Employment Act, commonly known as the Taylor Law, is a labor relations ruling policy document that covers public employees in…

International Employment Relations Globalization Is
Words: 2780 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46935853
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At the same time, this strategy undermined the ability of workers to gain collective power.

All these factors resulted in increased insecurity in terms of the job market and in terms of the relationship between employers and employees. Auer (2005: 6) addresses Kalleberg's point in this regard with an assertion that the common assumption is that the twin factors of globalization and technological advance would fundamentally change the employment relationship and its expectation of longevity.

Auer's view is somewhat less gloomy than that of Kalleberg in terms of the possibility of flexible, non-standard jobs not only supplementing the more standard, full-time variety, but also becoming standard themselves. In addition to providing greater employee satisfaction, standard, long-term jobs also influence the desire of employees to begin families, which in turn has a significant impact upon the economy. Individuals with greater certainty regarding the future of their income tend to be better…

References

Auer, P. (2005). Protected Mobility for Employment and Decent Work: Labour market security in a globalised world. International Labour Office. Retrieved from  http://ilo-mirror.library.cornell.edu/public/english/employment/strat/download/esp2005-1.pdf 

Dickens, L. (2003). Changing Contours of the Employment Relationship and New Modes of Labour Regulation. Retrieved from http://www.oit.org/public/english/iira/pdf/congresses/world_13/track_2_dickens.pdf

Frenkel, S. And Kuruvilla, S. (2002). Logics of Action, Globalization, and Employment Relations Change in China, India, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Retrieved from  http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1003&context=cbpubs 

Kalleberg, A.L. (2009, Feb). Precarious Work, Insecure Workers: Employment Relations in Transition. American Sociological Review. Vo. 74. Retrieved from  http://www.soc.washington.edu/users/brines/kalleberg.pdf

Functions of Public Relations PR
Words: 1191 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79467869
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Therefore the pubic relations specialist has to be conscious and fully aware of his or her role as intermediary between the organization and the public. This is particularly true of P specialists who work for government and organizations affecting health and the environment.

An example of social responsible P marketing is marketing that;

Identifies areas where the firm can make a positive difference.

Makes sure local media are aware.

Informs and involve employees.

Invests in advertising and public relations to highlight the firm's efforts.

Public elations, egulations and Sponsorship Programs)

In terms of the external responsibilities and functions of the P officer in an organization, media relations often take priority. The P specialist is trained to communicate and to enable the media to write and present the organization in a light that is conducive to the good image of the company.

In order to achieve these functions the public relations…

References

Public Relations Specialists. Retrieved 18 February, 2007, at  http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos086.htm 

Public Relations, Regulations and Sponsorship Programs. Retrieved 18 February, 2007, at  http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:eLqM0aWlAxgJ:www.cob.sjsu.edu/vitale_r/clowch13Selected.ppt+social+function+of+Public+relations&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=35&gl=za 

Virtual Communities - Social Implications of Public Relations. Retrieved 18 February, 2007, at  http://wiki.media-culture.org.au/index.php/Virtual_Communities_in_Public_Relations_-_Social_Implications

Reward System and Employee Needs Assessment
Words: 1598 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51218219
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eward System and Employee Needs Assessment

Employee values and expectations vary from individual to individual, though there are some universal values and expectations that might be generalized to employees across most industries. Among these more generalized expectations include the desire for good pay and benefits, job security and work life balance opportunities.

When developing a reward system it is vital that the organization incorporate these universal employee values and expectations into the reward system so that the outcome of the system is beneficial for the employees involved. It is also in the best interests of organizational planners to assess individual employee values and motivations in order to devise a reward and recognition program that focuses on independent employee needs rather than lumping all employees into the same category. These ideas and more are explored in greater detail below.

Good employee relations and subsequent reward systems are contingent on the ability…

References:

Champion-Hughes, R. "Totally integrated employee benefits." Public Personnel

Management, 30(3), 2001: 287.

Denton, K. "Recruitment, retention and employee relations: Field tested strategies for the 90's." Westport: Quorum Books: 1992

Moses, B. "6 degrees of motivation." Black Enterprise, 31(4), 2001: 155

System Literate Employees
Words: 673 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 75773461
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system-literate employees in the IT workforce. Specifically, it will answer the questions: As more computer- and information system-literate employees move into executive positions, will executive support systems be needed? Why or why not? What special knowledge, other than that found in a course catalog, is needed to advise students about course and degree requirements in a university? Is it explicit or implicit knowledge? Could this knowledge be made available through a knowledge management system? Why or why not?

System-Literate Employees

System-literate employees do not always make good managers, for a number of reasons. Many IT systems employees are focused at a detailed and narrow level of interest, and do not deal nearly as much with people as they do with machines and systems processes. Thus, as they move up from IT oriented positions into executive positions, they may indeed need more executive support systems in place if they are to…

Bibliography

Davis, Philip. "What computer skills do employees expect from recent college graduates?" THE Journal (Technological Horizons In Education) 25.2 (1997): 74+.

Earl, Michael J., ed. Information Management: The Organizational Dimension. Oxford: Oxford University, 1998.

Termination of Employees for Economic
Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74328526
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(Berkowitz; Muller-Bonanni; American Bar Association; Section of International Law, 2007) Employers must ensure that payments and other benefits that are due are given to the dismissed employees. In countries like France, these payments and benefits may include severance indemnities which differ according to the positions and seniority of the employee, and any paid vacation that is due to the employee but has not been availed of. Some payments may also have to be made in cases of "contractual non-competition clauses." The total payment amount depends upon the individual job contract and the relevant collective agreement, the minimum being set by appropriate legislation. (American Bar Association; Committee on Negotiated Acquisitions, 2006)

The severance indemnity paid to the dismissed employee is calculated on the basis of a certain percentage of the employee's monthly income multiplied by the number of years worked by the employee in that company. In some countries like France,…

References

American Bar Association; Committee on Negotiated Acquisitions. (2006) "International

stock purchase acquisitions" American Bar Association.

Berkowitz, Philip M; Muller-Bonanni, Thomas; American Bar Association; Section of International Law. (2007) "International labor and employment law" American Bar Association.

Leat, Mike. (2007) "Exploring Employee Relations"

Employment and Labor Relations
Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89402269
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mployment and Labor Relations

Key Legislation

The National Labor Relations Act of 1935 (or Wagner Act) protects the rights of most workers in the private sector of the United States to organize unions, to engage in collective bargaining over wages, hours, and terms and conditions of employment, and to take part in strikes and other forms of concerted activity in support of their demands. The Act does not, on the other hand, cover those workers who are covered by the Railway Labor Act, agricultural employees, domestic employees, supervisors, independent contractors and some close relatives of individual employers.

The Wagner Act established a federal agency, the National Labor Relations Board, with the power to investigate and decide unfair labor practice charges and to conduct elections in which workers were given the opportunity to decide whether they wanted to be represented by a union. The NLRB was given more extensive powers than…

Effective Communication of Laws, Regulations and Organizational Policies

An employee handbook (or employee manual) details guidelines, expectations and procedures of a business or company to its employees. Employee handbooks are given to employees on one of the first days of his or her job, in order to acquaint them with their new company and its policies. While it often varies from business to business, specific areas that an employee handbook may address include a welcome statement, which may also briefly describe the company's history, reasons for its success and how the employee can contribute to future successes. It may also include a mission statement, or a statement about a business' goals and objectives.

Orientation procedures usually involves providing a human resources manager or other designated employee completed income tax withholding forms, providing proof of identity and eligibility for employment (in accordance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986), proof of a completed drug test (by a designated medical center) and other required forms. An area devoted to definitions of full- and part-time employment, and benefits classification also describes timekeeping procedures, such as defining a "work week." This area may also include information about daily breaks, for

Requiring Ethnics Training to Employees Is Simply a Dog and Pony Show Why or Why
Words: 2443 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77662360
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Ethics Training for Employees

"ecently we have become aware of massive fraud and abuses that are tolerated and even encouraged by executives in large and formerly reputable organizations" (Lee, 2004). The Enron scandal sent ricochets through corporate America, causing literally thousands of people to lose their jobs and sending a major city into a deeper recession than that experienced by the rest of the country. Even seemingly minor corporate scandals have had a tremendous impact on both corporate America and on consumer confidence in corporations. One need only look at the recent media fury surrounding Martha Stewart's recent release from prison to realize that corporate misbehavior is the hot-button issue of the day. As evidenced by the abundance of "Free Martha" t-shirts, the negative impacts of corporate ethical issues are not always apparent on the surface. However, the fact is that abusive and illegal practices that have been permitted, and…

References

Joseph, J., Wan Veer, L., and McFadden, A. (2004). Ethics in the Workplace. Retrieved 12 Mar. 2005 from Executive Update Online

Web site:  http://www.gwsae.org/executiveupdate/2000/october/ethics.htm 

Lee, W. (2004). Ethics: Compliance vs. Commitment. Retrieved 12 Mar. 2005, from Society for Human Resource Management

Web site:  http://shrm.org/hrresources/whitepapers_published/CMS_011027.pdf

Recruiting and Retention Strategies of Office Temporary Employees
Words: 3169 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2125832
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ecruiting and etention Strategies of Office Temporary Employees

An in-depth analysis of the temporary office employee industry as it pertains to recruiting and retention of those employees.

This paper presents a detailed proposal for the recruiting and retention of temporary office workers. The writer is employed as a full time on site recruiter of temporary office workers at one of Wall Street's top financial firms. The majority of the temporary help the writer recruits are administrative assistants and other entry level finance positions. The positions range from a couple of days to several months in time. The writer is charged with recruiting and retaining temporary workers who have the necessary skill sets and experience to perform the jobs. The writer analyzes the industry, the company history regarding temporary employees and future trends to propose methods for the purpose of recruiting and retention of those workers.

FLOW OF INFOMATION

Abstract

Introduction…

REFERENCES

Workforce, July 2002, pp. 74-77 -- Subscribe Now!

 http://www.staffingtoday.net/memberserv/1199ss/story24.htm 

Offering Insurance Is the Key To Healthy Profits and Retention

Three Ways to Build Recruiter Relationships

E-Mail Monitoring Affects Employee Stress
Words: 5744 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 34773416
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Often companies find that when they first install filtering software or routers, the sites and communications employees need to do their jobs cannot be done. What is needed then is a gradual move to include those sites and types of communications with outside suppliers, buyers, customers, resellers, services organizations and other key constituents. The use of monitoring however is prevalent, according to the American Management Associated; fully 76% of companies from their 2005 survey on this subject actively monitor the use of websites and filter them based on content (American Management Association 2005). The momentum in businesses t measure, monitor and modify their Acceptable Use Policies is now in full-swing, and the development of these policies must be governed by the broader strategic needs of the company on the one hand and the need to ensure an acceptable environment for employees to work in on the other (Pauli, 2001).

Method…

Incentives for Employees HR Solutions
Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45721616
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H Solutions

The service provided by the H component to the employer is to provide a go-between for employers and employees, relaying information, needs and assistance in a two-way flow so that both parties achieve desired aims. The strategic advantage the H component provides to an employer in the hiring and retaining of qualified employees is that the H allows the cultivation of the organizational culture to be properly facilitated and maintained with the addition of appropriate employees.

Three current practices used by the employer that can be improved are the incentives program, the pay rate for specialized jobs, and the job descriptions (which need to be updated.

Best practices that can be exercised to improve the benefits/incentives program within the firm is a restructuring of the type of medical/dental options made available to employees after 90 days. Currently, the only two options available to employees are 1) employee-only options…

References

Feloni, R. (2016). The T-Mobile CEO who calls his competition 'dumb and dumber' explains how he doubled customers in 4 years, and how a group of employees made him cry. Business Insider. Retrieved from  http://www.businessinsider.com/t-mobile-ceo-john-legere-interview-2016-10 

Schyns, B., Schilling, J. (2013). How bad are the effects of bad leaders? A meta-analysis of destructive leadership and its outcomes. The Leadership Quarterly, 24: 138-158.

Meeting to Dismiss an Employee
Words: 2069 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39114560
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Dismissal Meetings

Ways managers deal with negative effects of employee layoff

Firing employees or letting them go creates a lot of discomfort to managers (as well as to the person being 'let go'. Psychologists observe a universal tendency of managers to aim to minimize this discomfort by use of distancing and avoidance behaviors (Grunberg, Moore & Greenberg, 2006). Listed below are a few ways by which managers can take care of negative emotions that accompany employee layoff.

Treat the employee with respect. Everyone has heard of the awful tales of laidoff- individuals arriving for work, only to find their desk laden with boxes and security personnel standing nearby, or employees trying to enter their office, only to find out that locks have been replaced; or job termination through an email. Managers must treat all employees with respect, protecting each individual's dignity. Despite the fact that layoffs affect several employees, managers…

References

Brown, J. (2013, August 30). 9 Steps for Conducting an Employee Termination Meeting. Retrieved May 10, 2015, from  http://peopletactics.com/9-steps-for-conducting-an-employee-termination-meeting/ 

Grunberg, L., Moore, S., & Greenberg, E.S. 2006. Managers' reactions to implementing layoffs: Relationship to health problems and withdrawal behaviors. Human Resource Management, 45(2), 159-178.

HRMA. 2012. The Impact of Forced Layoffs: How to avoid the negative consequences of laying off staff. Retrieved 10 May 2015 from:  http://www.hrma.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/rb-forcedlayoffs.pdf 

"Managers Communicating Lay-offs" (2009) Retrieved 10 May 2015 from  http://hr.ucdavis.edu/asap/layoff.pdf

How to Develop as a Professional in Human Relations
Words: 1861 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48859951
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4DEP of CIPD

The HR Professional Map consists of 2 core professional areas (Leading HR and Insights, Strategy and Solutions) and 8 other profession areas: Organization Design, Organization Development, Resourcing and Talent Planning, Learning and Development, Performance and Reward, Employee Engagement, Employee Relations, and Service Delivery and Information.

The 8 behaviors of the HR Professional Map include: Curious, Decisive Thinker, Skilled Influencer, Personally Credible, Collaborative, Driven to Deliver, Courage to Challenge, and Role Model.

The 4 Bands consist of Band 1, which is viewed as the start of a career and its professional focus is on learning and development as well as on performance and reward. This band delivers support to co-workers via administrative processes and works to give effective management of information. It is a Band that is geared towards helping customers (HR Professional Map: Band One, 2015).

Band 2 gives advice to and even serves to manage the…

Employees Use the 360 Degree
Words: 3428 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42868307
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A very important point is that online learning can be done individually or in groups (for example video conferences).

6. In general, in order to make a career choice one should be informed about the world of professions. Information about the profession that appears the most interesting and appropriate should be gathered. If possible, it would be important to read interviews or talk to people with similar jobs for a more accurate and realistic image. Another important part in a career choice is to assess individual strengths and weaknesses. Several personality tests are available for such a purpose (for example CPI - California Psychological Inventory, SDS - the Self-Directed Search questionnaire). For the persons in search for a career it is important to identify the skills they have and they most enjoy using. The career identified should be compatible with the interests and skills identified. In conclusion, a person who…

References

Drewes, G., Runde, B. (2002). Performance Appraisal, in Psychological Management of Individual Performance. Sonnentag, S. (Ed.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Fletcher, C. (2002). Appraisal: An Individual Psychological Perspective, in Psychological Management of Individual Performance. Sonnentag, S. (Ed.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

K.J. Kennedy (2005). Evolution of Employee Benefits as Provided through the Internal Revenue Code, Retrieved from www.taxreformpanel.gov/meetings/docs/KennedyPresentation_fina_2.ppt

Hesketh, B., Ivancic, K., (2002). Enhancing Performance through Training in Psychological Management of Individual Performance. Sonnentag, S. (Ed.) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Employee Handbook Addressing the Issue of Workplace
Words: 1099 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99595088
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employee handbook addressing the issue of workplace equity and nondiscrimination in a health care organization. The essay includes various issues related to the non-discrimination laws and the benefits of implementation of anti-discrimination laws.

An employee handbook is a manual for employees and works as a staff handbook which is drafted by the employer. Employee handbook contains policies and procedures for the employees. It has all the terms and conditions of employment. The main purpose of an employee handbook is to communicate to the employees the fair and just policies of an organization. An employee handbook of different organizations will have different details because of the varying nature of the business carried out by the organization however the main purpose of the handbook will remain the same. An employee handbook for a health care organization will have their own set of policies and procedures.

An employee handbook for a health care…

References:

Papa, Michael J.; Tom D. Daniels, Barry K. Spiker (2007). Organizational Communication: Perspectives and Trends (5 ed.). SAGE

Trentham, Susan; Laurie Larwood (1998). "Gender Discrimination and the Workplace: An Examination of Rational Bias Theory." Sex Roles 38 (112) [HIDDEN]

Wadhwa, Vivek (6 June 2006). "The True Cost of Discrimination." BusinessWeek Online.

The Economics of Discrimination, Robert P. Murphy, Library of Economics, AUGUST 2, 2010

Employee Compensation Plans
Words: 1429 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 601933
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Human esources Pay Package

Employee Compensation Plan

Target Job: egistered Nurse (N) in a Hospital

Hillcrest Hospital is a 496 bed hospital located in Mayfield Heights, a Cleveland Ohio Suburb. Hillcrest is ranked in the nation's top 100 in cardiac care. It is part of the Cleveland Clinic system. The mission of the hospital is to provide nationally ranked healthcare to the surrounding community. It holds clinical excellence, safety, ethics, integrity, individual responsibility, respect for diversity and caring for others as key tenets (Hillcrest Hospital, 2012a). Its vision is to service as an example of state-of-the-art medical facility in every department that delivers consistent high quality service to Northeast Ohio (Hillcrest Hospital, 2012b). The Cleveland Clinic system is one of the best renowned systems in the nations in a number of specialties in which they operate.

Hillcrest Hospital strives to put their patients first and looks for enthusiasm in employees.…

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-2011Edition. Registered Nurses. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos083.htm 

Hillcrest Hospital (2012a). Mission. Retrieved from  http://www.hillcresthospital.org/AboutHillcrestHospital/Mission/tabid/574/Default.aspx 

Hillcrest Hospital (2012b). Vision. Retrieved from  http://www.hillcresthospital.org/AboutHillcrestHospital/Vision/tabid/575/Default.aspx 

Hillcrest Hospital (2012c). Hillcrest-Hospital-Jobs. Retrieved from  http://www.clevelandclinic-jobs.com/go/Hillcrest-Hospital-Jobs/28206/

Employees' Turnover on Human Resource
Words: 1953 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41947941
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In this context, a question is being posed relative to the measures which could be taken in order to increase employees' on the job satisfaction and reduce the high turnover rates. The following strategies could be implemented in both Hong Kong vehicle companies, as well as within all companies facing the challenges of high employee turnover rates. Yet, what should be remembered is that the following suggestions are merely theoretical and that they should be customized to fit the specific particularities of each separate entity. These being said, the suggestions to improving employee retention are as follows:

Increasing salaries; higher wages will generally determine people to be more committed to the job and to the employer

Offering other financial incentives, such as premiums and bonuses; these should be offered based on performances, but also based on efforts

Offering various non-financial incentives, such as flexible working schedules or the organization of…

References:

Boyd, C., 2003, Human resource management and occupational health and safety, Routledge, ISBN 0415265908

Droege, S.B., Hoobler, J.M., 2003, Employee turnover and tacit knowledge diffusion: a network perspective, Journal of Managerial Issues, Vol. 15, Issue 1

Han, P., 2008, Survey: Employers in China face worst staff turnover rate in Asia, Embassy of People's Republic of China in the United States of America,  http://www.china-embassy.org/eng/xw/t401165.htm  last accessed on February 23, 2010

Relation of Human Factors and Interior Space Design
Words: 895 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 75077869
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Human Factors and Interior Space Design

The objective of this work in writing is to summarize the article entitled "The Relation of Human Factors and Interior Space Design." This article begins by noting the importance of the human having tools that fit them well and that this was realized early in the development of the human species. Specifically, this article notes that Australopithecus Prometheus "selected pebble tools and made scoops from antelope bones in a clear display of selecting/creating objects to make tasks easier to accomplish." (p.3) Over the centuries there was improvement in the effectiveness of the tools as discovered by anthropologists and archaeologists including tools such as hammers, plows and axes. During the Industrial Revolution, more advanced machines were developed that assisted man with his work including such as the spinning Jenny and the rolling mills.

The methodology utilized in the study under review is reported to have…

Employee Management and Research in Healthcare
Words: 965 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67256292
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size is an important consideration with regards to data collection for statistical analysis in a study. Sample size plays an important role in a research process since the identification of a suitable sample size for statistical analysis is crucial towards generating accurate results. Actually, the determination of sample size is closely linked to statistical estimation or determination. The significance of sample size is partly attributable to its relation to confidence intervals. The link between sample size and confidence intervals is that confidence intervals provide the probable range of a sample mean or proportion from the actual mean/proportion found in the study population. This allows the researcher to estimate the accuracy of findings or results generated from the sample in comparison with the true population. Moreover, sample size affects the margin of error or confidence levels though the actual size of the population does not influence margin of error (Johnson &…

References

Clark, P.F. & Clark, D.A. (2006). Union Strategies for Improving Patient Care: The Key to Nurse Unionism. Labor Studies Journal, 31(1), 51-70.

Heathfield, S.M. (2011). Performance Appraisals Don't Work. Retrieved February 13, 2016, from  http://humanresources.about.com/od/performanceevals/a/perf_appraisal.htm 

Johnson, R. & Kuby, P. (2012). STAT 2 (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Employee Safety in the Workplace
Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67644531
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Organizational Behavior

"World of work"

Drawing from chapter 9 of the class reading, there is no equality in work, and it will never be. Male have dominated top leadership positions while women are left to do care taking jobs in the society, such as taking care of the elderly. These are mere wage jobs that need less time. This chapter also presents the issue of interest as many young women have not realized that being in a career such as engineering, can also be a "helping" occupation. As such, the society has not only lost talented women from the world of work. It has also lost talented men in the domestic world. Men have the potential to be excellent caregivers as studies indicate the significance of fathering four children (O'Brien, 2007).

Based on the equal right to employment code, the right to "equal treatment pertaining employment" defends women in all…

Reference

O'Brien, G. (2007, fall). Understanding Ourselves: Gender Differences in the Brain. Retrieved from The Columbia Consultancy: http://www.columbiaconsult.com/pubs/v52_fall07.html

Employees Training and Development Plan
Words: 1900 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58547120
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Training and Development Plan / Employees' Training and Development Plan

Justify the use of a needs assessment of your company's proposed employee customer service training, stressing five (5) ways in which such an assessment would expose any existing performance deficiencies

Develop a customer service training implementation plan and determine the method of training (i.e., presentation, discussion, case study, discovery, role play, simulation, modeling, or on-the-job training).

Justify why you selected the training method that you did

Propose two (2) ways to motivate an employee who has no interest in attending a training class

Develop a survey to collect feedback from the employees who attend the training

eferences

Justify the use of a needs assessment of your company's proposed employee customer service training, stressing five (5) ways in which such an assessment would expose any existing performance deficiencies

In many businesses, particularly in the retail industry, one of the ways one…

References

Barbazette, J. (2006). Training Needs Assessment: Methods, Tools, and Techniques. Volume 1. USA: John Wiley & Sons.

Hooker, B.J. (2015). Retail Customer Service Training: Ready-made Step-by-Step Lessons Made Easy For You. Australia: Australian eBook Publisher.

Lauby, S.J. (2005). Motivating Employees. USA: American Society for Training and Development.

Richason, O.W. (2015). How to Implement Customer Service Training With Employees. The Hearst Newspapers LLC. Retrieved from  http://smallbusiness.chron.com/implement-customer-service-training-employees-1119.html  on 19th November, 2015.

Employee Motivations for Police Officers
Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91003333
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If the economic/machine and affective/affiliation models are combined then the result would resemble the growth-open system theory of motivation (Cordner, 2013). The term 'open' in this model is meant to imply employees are influenced by their environment, including the environmental factors existing outside the workplace. The term 'growth' indicates that individuals will transition through several levels of need fulfillment depending on whether more basic needs have been met. This 'needs' hierarchy is based on the work of the psychologist Maslow, who proposed the first needs that must be fulfilled are the most basic, such as food, clothing, and shelter. If these needs are being met then an individual will next seek to protect themselves from threats to their physical and psychological health. The subsequent levels, according to Maslow, would be social needs, feeling valued and personal fulfillment, in that order. Since most police officers earn enough to meet their basic…

References

Cordner, G.W. (2013). Police Administration (8th ed.). New York: Anderson Publishing.

Case Study on Employee Layoff
Words: 704 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 3612361
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Employee Layoff

A friend in California has just lost his job in a layoff together with 98 other employees in the same private sector company. The company's administrators have told him that he was included in the recent layoff because of his refusal to take a lie detector test regarding some drugs that were found in his company locker. He also declined to take a drug test since he was afraid that a positive result would make the state child protection agency to take away custody of his children. This situation is an example of a scenario with legal ramifications on the basis of several regulations such as Polygraph Protection Act, Worker Adjustment and etraining Notification Act, Privacy laws, Drug Testing laws, and OSHA.

Generally, the use of lie detector tests in the workplace is not geared towards determining whether an employee is telling the truth but to examine whether…

References:

"Employees' Rights in the Workplace." (1999). The Maryland State Bar Association, Inc.

Retrieved May 9, 2014, from  http://www.msba.org/departments/commpubl/publications/brochures/workplace.asp 

"Lie Detector Tests." (2008). Can My Boss Do That? Retrieved May 9, 2014, from  http://www.canmybossdothat.com/category.php?id=269

4 Steps to Implement a Successful Employee Wellness Program
Words: 2532 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2608356
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Employee Wellness Program

Company Background

Benefits of the Employee Wellness Program

Employee Needs Assessment

Components of the Program

Marketing of the Program

Implementation of the Plan

Evaluation of the Plan

This paper aims at developing an employee wellness program for the organization so as to ensure that the due attention is paid to the health and wellness issues that are being confronted by the employees. The paper would also propose strategies for the effective marketing and evaluation of the developed employee wellness program.

Employee Wellness Program

Company Background

The organization under consideration has been in the business since last 10 years. The organization is a manufacturing concern that is indulged in the development and sales of beverages, including fresh juices and gerbil teas. The organization operates in 3 different regions of the United States of America and employs a total of 500 people. The organization has a healthy business and…

References

Forbes Magazine, (2012). 4 Steps To Implement A Successful Employee Wellness Program. Forbes. Retrieved 17 July 2014, from  http://www.forbes.com/sites/theyec/2012/11/28/4-steps-to-implement-a-successful-employee-wellness-program/ 

McClintick, K. (2009). WSU Employee Wellness Needs Assessment and Programming Implementation (1st ed., pp. 1-35). Winona: Winona State University. Retrieved from  http://www.winona.edu/asf/media/wsu_employee_wellness-mcclintick.pdf 

Staff Members of the International Public Management for Human Resources, (2013). Employee Wellness Benefit Guide (1st ed., pp. 2-14). Alexandria: International Public Management for Human Resources. Retrieved from  http://ipma-hr.org/sites/default/files/pdf/EmployeeWellness_Plantation.pdf 

Staff Members of the Texas Municipal League Multistate Intergovernmental Employee Benefits Pool and Deer Oaks Employee Assistance Program, (2010). The City of Somewhere's Wellness Program (1st ed., pp. 1-4). Austin: Texas Municipal League Multistate Intergovernmental Employee Benefits Pool and Deer Oaks Employee Assistance Program. Retrieved from https://www.tmlmultistateiebp.org/documents/Sample%20Wellness%20Program.pdf

Ethics and Social Responsibilities
Words: 3234 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 25820183
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Employees as Benefactors of Corporate Philanthropy

Corporate Social esponsibility

The Case for Employees as Benefactors of Corporate Philanthropy

The Case for Employees as Benefactors of Corporate Philanthropy

A United Auto Workers unionization vote recently made the news, in part because the vote was taking place in the Southeastern United States where conservative state legislators have historically treated organized labor with hostility, but what seemed to be most newsworthy about this event was that the corporation, Volkswagen, decided to take a neutral position (Paresh, 2014). The vote took place last week and workers at the Chattanooga, Tennessee plant decided to reject union membership by a narrow margin. The national news media also took note when several conservative Tennessee politicians remained true to their anti-union ideology by threatening to end subsidies for Volkswagen and to push production of a new vehicle to Mexico. Experts in labor law believed these threats were coercive…

References

"2012 Corporate Responsibility Report." (2013). Retrieved 22 Feb. 2014 from  https://corporate.target.com/_media/TargetCorp/csr/pdf/2012-corporate-responsibility-report.pdf .

Barnett, M.L. (2007). Stakeholder influence capacity and the variability of financial returns to corporate social responsibility. Academy of Management Review, 32(3), 794-816.

Dennis, W.J. Jr. (2000). Wages, health insurance and pension plans: The relationship between employee compensation and small business owner income. Small Business Economics, 15(4), 247-63.

Fassin, Y., Van Rossem, A., & Buelens, M. (2010). Small-business owner-managers' perceptions of business ethics and CSR-related concepts. Journal of Business Ethics, 98, 425-53.

Employment Relations Management Discretion in
Words: 1659 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35142487
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However, the management did not have the utmost power. The unions took up the cases with the authorities. Their decision was scrutinized by Fair Work Australia and was, consequently, terminated. This is a show of the lack of control that the managers have in the operations. In any case, the regulations in the country favor the employees and managers have to conform to regulations from the legal bodies.

Conclusion

The work places in the country reflect a real indication of the limited control that the managers have on the employees. The actions that they can undertake to impose their force on the employees have a limitation from the authorities. The Fair Work Australia Act is the most specific on the nature of the work place. It regulates the minimum wages for the employees. This means that the managers have no control over the remunerations that the employees get. Termination of…

References

Australian Fair Work Act: With regulations and rules. (2010). Sydney: CCH Australia.

CCH Australia. (2010). Australian master fair work guide. North Ryde, N.S.W: CCH Australia.

CCH Editors. (2010). Understanding the Fair Work Act. Sydney: CCH Australia.

Hor, J., & Keats, L. (2009). Fair Work faqs. Sydney: CCH Australia.

Leadership Capability Relation Accepted Model Leadership Management
Words: 2025 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13210304
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leadership capability relation accepted model leadership management. Part 1. 'Situational leadership redundant a task .' As a future leader teams, present arguments statement.

Situational leadership

The internal environment within economic agents is suffering dramatic changes within the modern day society and this is the result of numerous pressures from the internal and external environments, such as technology, competition or increasing demands from the various categories of stakeholders. In such a setting, the role of the leaders and managers gradually increases, as these come to portray the link between executives and employees, and they are more essential in ensuring that the firms attain their overall objectives.

As the role of leaders and managers increases, the emphasis placed on the formation of the leaders and managers must also increase. In such a setting then, the current project sets out to discuss the situational leadership model through the lenses of its applicability within…

References:

Haydon, G., 2007, Values for educational leadership, SAGE

Humphreys, J., Zhao, D., Ingram, K., Gladstone, J., Basham, L., 2010, Situational narcissism and charismatic leadership: a conceptual framework, Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management, Vol. 11, No. 2

Ireh, M., Bailey, J., 1999, A study of superintendent's change leadership styles using the situational leadership model, American Secondary Education, Vol. 27, No. 4

2012, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Online,  http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/feedback  last accessed on May 22, 2012

Technology in Training of Employees in What
Words: 2516 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75393622
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Technology in Training of Employees

In what ways has technology impacted the way(s) we train employees?

The changing nature of the workplace environment brings with it a vast field of challenges in the organization. The aspect of the change being rapid makes the situation require adverse and quick reaction from organizations to ensure they remain on course towards their objectives. Thus, rapid change in the workplace brings with it the necessity for skilled and knowledgeable workforce, encompassing employees who are adaptive, flexible and focused on the future of their careers and the organization (Wentland, 2007). Among the most, significant duties of the manager in the workplace are the development of the staff. The manager has the mandate to facilitate employee growth and development if the organization is to achieve maximum gains from its ventures and transactions.

The concept of learning management incorporates the management of employee training. Traditional approach to…

References

Jehanzeb, K., Rasheed, A., & Rasheed, M.F. (2013). Organizational commitment and turnover intentions: Impact of employee's training in private sector of saudi arabia. International Journal of Business and Management, 8(8), 79-90. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/1362611096?accountid=458 

Noe, R.A., & Winkler, C. (2009). Employee training and development: For Australia and New

Zealand. North Ryde, N.S.W: McGraw-Hill.

Noe, R.A. (2010). Employee training and development. New York: McGraw-Hill Irwin.

Functions of Public Relations Public
Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5704541
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he function of marketing communications is also the integral part of any new product introduction process in a company as well. In fact, oshiba America, known for their laptop computers, has the product launch and introduction managed as a project inside marketing communications to provide for greater coordination and synchronizing with other departments. Marketing communications acts in many companies as the activity hub for all strategies, as this department is often serving the sales force, product management, product marketing, service, finance, and very often the executive managers who are the spokespeople for strategies and products.

Societal functions of Public Relations

In a sense government agencies and their constituents, the citizens of a given region or nation, are "customers" of the services of the societal institutions and governments. he only difference is of course that to shop between governments is to have to move, while consumers can choose between organizations by…

Two functions that define the societal role of public relations are consumer relations and community relations.

Perhaps no other set of nations in the world has a more thorough set of laws to protect its citizens from shoddy and unsafe merchandise, services schemes that defraud them or foods that don't pass certain health criteria than the United States and several other westernized nations. The reason is that the laws surrounding products, services, foods, drugs and even transportation have been created to protect the consumer. In the context of public relations, the societal function that influences the most amounts of people is consumer relations.

From a societal context, consumer relations fulfills the role of both coordinator of information flow between manufacturers, the government, and the consumer, ultimately looking out for what's best for the consumer and their well-being. This is a critical step in many countries as the function can expose risks to consumers of unsafe products. During the 19th century for example, Upton Sinclair (2002) and his classic book, the Jungle, showed the many practices in the meat processing and packing industry that needed overhauling to

ROI From Employee Education the Notion That
Words: 3025 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59961749
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OI from Employee Education

The notion that employee education and training leads to higher levels of employee productivity is not a new concept in business management. However, for many businesses, the cost of employee education is still regarded as an optional business expense instead of an essential business investment. This prevailing attitude is primarily due to the fact that there appears to be no clear connection between employee education and the bottom line. It is the objective of this paper to demonstrate that there is a OI from employee education, as it: increases the level of employee productivity; is of strategic importance to businesses building competitive advantages; improves employee morale and retention; and reduces the costs of recruitment.

KEY WODS AND PHASES: employee education; training and development; productivity; investment; OI; competitive advantage; employee recruitment; employee retention; employee morale; life-long education; skills; knowledge; learning; human resource management; human resource development; intellectual…

References

Ariss, S.S., & Timmins, S.A. (1989). Employee Education and Job Performance: Does

Education Matter? Public Personnel Management. Vol. 18: 1, p. 1+.

Davis, B. D, & Muir, C. (2002). In This Issue: Upgrading Business Literacy and Information

Skills. Business Communication Quarterly. Vol. 65: 3. p. 99+.

Motivational Theories for Various Employee Groups the
Words: 1149 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2527108
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Motivational Theories for Various Employee Groups

The force that initiates certain behavior in a person is also called motivation. Motivational theories have been developed by researchers using various mechanisms like state of mind, basic needs, desires and goals of a person.

Two-Factor Theory (Herzberg)

The two-factor theory was published in 1959 by Herzberg after doing a research on the job attitudes for five years. Two different factors affect job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction, as the theory states. Thus, dissatisfaction and satisfaction should not be measured using the same continuum. The two motivating factors of the theory are motivation and hygiene factors. Motivation factors produce positive satisfaction to an employee, they are mainly intrinsic conditions e.g. responsibility, recognition, challenging work and achievement. Hygiene factors are extrinsic job conditions and absence of these results in job dissatisfaction e.g. working conditions, company policies, pay, supervision, job security, status and fringe benefits Sutaria, 1980()…

References

Gagne, M., & Deci, E.L. (2005). Self-Determination Theory and Work Motivation. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 26(4), 331-362.

Gratton, L.C. (1980). Analysis of Maslow's Need Hierarchy with Three Social Class Groups. Social Indicators Research, 7(1/4), 463-476.

Shore, T., Sy, T., & Strauss, J. (2006). Leader Responsiveness, Equity Sensitivity, and Employee Attitudes and Behavior. Journal of Business and Psychology, 21(2), 227-241.

Sutaria, R. (1980). Personality, Needs and Two-Factor Theory of Work Motivation. Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, 16(2), 219-232.

Invesco Company an Employee's Experience Within the
Words: 1239 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50956936
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Invesco Company

An employee's experience within the company

Invesco is a global investment company dedicated to offering great ideas to investors around the world. The company began its operations with a vision of serving the global market for investment management. It has ever since grown into a strong team with discrete perspectives and operating under a philosophy of high investment discipline and strong risk oversight. An employee at Invesco Company operates under principles that define the culture of the company. An employee gains best practices such as integrity and ethical responsibility. Employees learn to work responsibly under minimal supervision and develop talents and abilities in the workplace.

The company provides motivation to both management and non-management team through offering equal opportunities in trainings and rewards. The management recognizes all employees' efforts when they do a good a job and provide sufficient resources for personal development. The company believes in a…

References

Phillips, P.P. (2002). In action: Retaining your best employees. Alexandria, Va: ASTD.

Baysinger, B.D., & Butler, H.N. (1985). Corporate governance and the board of directors:

Performance effects of changes in board composition. Journal of Law, Economics, & Organization, 1 (1), 101-124.

Deci, E.L. (1972). The effects of contingent and noncontingent rewards and controls on intrinsic motivation. Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 8 (2), 217-229.

NLRB Labor Relations National Labor
Words: 1018 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 12665777
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However, in recent history, the NLB has not always been a 'friend' to nurses. Precisely who constitutes a supervisor and an employee is of critical importance in determining who has the right to engage in collective bargaining under the law. In 2006, the National Labor elations Board (NLB) "dealt a severe blow to nurses' and other workers' rights to join unions and bargain collectively….the board ruled that many charge nurses were supervisors, and therefore excluded from the protections under the National Labor elations Act" (NLB, 2006, AFSCME). The relative ease of defining certain employees as supervisors has been used to limit the ability of nurses to strike. According to the current terms of the National Labor elations Act, a supervisor is "any individual having the authority, in the interest of the employer, to hire, transfer, suspend, lay off, recall, promote, discharge, assign, reward, or discipline other employees, or responsibly to…

References

Employee rights. . (2011). National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). Retrieved February 22,

2011 at http://www.nlrb.gov/rights-we-protect/employee-rights

FAQ. (2011). National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). Retrieved February 22, 2011 at http://www.nlrb.gov/faq/nlrb

National Labor Relations Act. (2011). National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). Retrieved