Experiential Learning Essays (Examples)

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Learning With Cases Thomas v

Words: 472 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49662

" The advantages of such a curriculum is that the material stays with the student longer than mere memorization; the students experience prevails over the teachers (thus the student teaches themselves); and the information learned is customized to the needs of the individual learner. Disadvantages of such an approach is frustration on the part of the student for their being a lack of a "right and wrong answer (or instant gratification); there is immense responsibility on the individual student and therefore requires a certain level of maturity; and there is not defined start and finish to the learning process.

However, Bonoma cites numerous examples of case studies, in both administrative and health care situations, in various fields where the statistics show a higher level of learner comprehension of the subject. Bonoma then concludes his paper by laying out instruction on how to set up, implement, run and evaluate a marketing-based…… [Read More]

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Learning Theory Several Theories Are

Words: 1884 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88905473

Learning tends to be associated with specific ways of considering events and establishes a student's "explanatory style," or the components of permanence, pervasiveness, and personalization.

Permanence refers to someone believing that negative events and/or their causes are permanent, despite the fact that evidence, logic, and past experience indicate that they are instead temporary: "I'll never be good in English." Pervasiveness is generalizing, so a negative aspect of a situation is thought to extend to others as well: "I failed math, so I'll fail all my courses." Personalization deals with whether individuals attribute negative events to personal flaws or to outside circumstances or people. They tend to blame themselves for everything: "It's always my fault."

To overcome such helplessness, teachers have to incorporate means of gaining self-worth and learned optimism with activities identifying negative interpretations of events, assessing their accuracy and generating more accurate interpretations. The encouragement of gaining mastery over…… [Read More]

References

Bransford, J.D. (Ed) (2000). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Caine, R.N., & Caine, G. (1997). Education on the edge of possibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Gardner, Howard. Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: Basic,1983

Goleman, D. (2006) Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantom Books
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Learning Styles in Essence Learning

Words: 1697 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4604283



Choosing the most effective style that relates to one's individual personality is very useful in terms of increasing one's learning strengths. I have personally found that in reality most people combine a number of learning styles in developing their unique approach to learning. From my perspective I have found that a combination of both imaginative and analytical learning styles best suits my needs. The emphasis in my approach is however on the imaginative style as I am more comfortable with a learning style that explores various sources and views of reality in a discursive and open-ended way. At the same time the more considered and careful analytical approach is also useful in that it tends to 'ground' one in reality.

eferences

Durbin G. (2002) Interactive Learning in Museums of Art and Design.

etrieved February 23, 2009, at http://74.125.95.132/search?q=cache:2V3DNJpxFKkJ:www.vam.ac.uk/files/file_upload/5752_file.pdf+%22dynamic+learning+style%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=10&gl=za&client=firefox-a

Exploring Psychology. Learning Styles. etrieved February 23, 2009, at http://www.dushkin.com/connectext/psy/ch06/learnsty.mhtml www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000308203

Guild,…… [Read More]

References

Durbin G. (2002) Interactive Learning in Museums of Art and Design.

Retrieved February 23, 2009, at http://74.125.95.132/search?q=cache:2V3DNJpxFKkJ:www.vam.ac.uk/files/file_upload/5752_file.pdf+%22dynamic+learning+style%22&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=10&gl=za&client=firefox-a

Exploring Psychology. Learning Styles. Retrieved February 23, 2009, at http://www.dushkin.com/connectext/psy/ch06/learnsty.mhtml www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000308203

Guild, P. (1994, January). Making Sense of Learing Styles. School Administrator, 51, 8. Retrieved February 26, 2009, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000308203 www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002522655
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Learning Styles the Theory of Honey and

Words: 2744 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2460708

Learning Styles

The theory of Honey and Mumford, describes the styles and learning strategies. It incorporates much of the theory of Kolb's learning cycle, making it more intelligible.

It is important to discuss these strategies with students. (Marsick and atkins, p132-51) hile this allows the teacher to become aware of the need to vary their teaching because they do not exist in universal, it also allows learners to realize that everyone learns differently.

So its dominant learning strategies can influence its working methods and student personnel can then optimize them. It may also become more self-confidence. Honey and Mumford (1986) take away from Kolb (1984) the idea of an experiential learning model in four stages they call: experience, the return on experience, drawing conclusions and planning. (aring and Evans, p117-28)

According to them, each phase has specific behaviors and attitudes and is important to successfully complete the learning process itself.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lam, Y.L. Defining the effects of transformation leadership on organization learning: a cross-cultural comparison: School Leadership & Management, 2002, pp 439-52.

Marquardt, M. Action learning in action: Transforming problems and people for world- class organizational learning. Palo Alto, CA: Davies-Black Publishing, 1999, pp45-49.

Marsick, V.J., and Watkins, KE. Demonstrating the value of an organization's learning culture: The Dimensions of Learning Organizations Questionnaire, Advances in Developing Human Resources, 2003 5, pp132-151.

Evans, C. And Graff, M. "Exploring style: enhancing the capacity to learn?," Education & Training, Vol. 50, 2008, pp. 93-102.
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Learning Style Knowledge of Learning

Words: 1471 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98112955

Naturally, visual learners do not enjoy reading books as auditory learners would, as written information is mostly processed in the mind's ears rather than by visualizing the text. Finally, a Kinesthetic or Tactile learner will predominantly learn information through touch and movement. In other words, kinesthetic learners would enjoy hands on laboratory session more than a routine class lecture. They also like to simulate events to understand them better. [Marcia L. Conner, pg 47]

Advantages of Knowing the Learning Style

Now that we have seen the domination of different modalities resulting in different learning styles among students, it is pertinent to understand the implications of such differences in context of their academic performance. Several studies have attested to that fact that only 20% of students learn through their auditory modality while 80% are either visual or kinesthetic. [Donna Walker, pg 16] However, in stark contrast, most of higher education is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Marcia L. Conner, (2004) 'Learn More Now: 10 Simple steps to Learning Better, Smarter and Faster',

2) Richard M. Felder, (2005), 'Understanding Student Differences', Journal of Engineering education, 94(1) 57-72, available online at,  http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Papers/Understanding_Differences.pdf 

3) Donna Walker Tileston, (2005) 10 Best Teaching Practices: How Brain research, Learning Styles and Standards Define Teaching Competences', Published by Corwin Press.

4) Steve Garnett, (2005), 'Using Brainpower in the Classroom: Five steps to accelerate Learning', Published by Routledge
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Learning Can Be Categorized Into Three Distinct

Words: 1767 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61148239

learning can be categorized into three distinct groups: behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. Behaviorism refers to the student's interaction with the environment and focuses on the external aspects of learning and on that which encourages learning such as positive reinforcement on the one hand and punishment on the toehr. Cogntivism, on the other hand, focuses on attitudes, motivation, and ideas and refers to the brain's interaction with the academic environment and with subject taught. Finally, constructivism represents and describes the situation where the learner actively builds new ideas or constructs learning situations.

Other approaches include humanism (where the focus is placed on respecting and motivating the individual student as encouragement to learning) and social / situational (namely those situational / social constructs interact in shaping a student's motivation and classroom attitude.

Behaviorism

Behaviorism believes that external actions and manner dominate if not replace cognition. adical behaviorists believe that mind / cognition…… [Read More]

References

Brown, B. & Ryoo, K (2008). Teaching Science as a Language: A "Content-First" Approach to Science Teaching. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 45 (5): 529 -- 553.

Charles, C. (2005). Building classroom discipline. USA: Pearson Pub.

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D., & Branscombe, N.R. (2006). Social Psychology (11th Ed.). Pearson Education, Inc.

Benson, N.C. (1998). Introducing Psychology. U.K: Totem Books.
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Learning & Memory the Accuracy of Memory

Words: 1445 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87602775

Learning & Memory

The Accuracy of Memory

The research I completed for this assignment was fairly straightforward. Upstairs in my living room on a day in which I had yet to leave the house, I tried to imagine my front door. I did so without having looked at it for at least 14 hours -- since I had arrived at home the evening before. Once I was able to visualize the door, I then wrote down all of the details that I could conceive of related to its physical appearance. My annotations on this subject included the fact that the door is white and is at the base of approximately 20 steps which lead to the main unit of the domicile. In this tall foyer, the white of the door stands out against the creme color of the walls around it (I was able to see this same color on…… [Read More]

References

Baars, B. (1997). In the Theater of Consciousness: the Workspace of the Mind. San Diego: Oxford University Press.

Dehon, H., Laroi, F. "Affective valence influences participant's susceptibility to False Memories and Illusory Recollection." Emotion. 10 (5): 627-639.

Gallo, D.A. (2010). "False memories and fantastic beliefs: 15 years of DRM illusion." Memory & Cognition. 38 (7): 833-848.

Lindsay, D.F., Read, D.J. (1994). "Psychotherapy and memories of childhood sexual abuse: a cognitive perspective." Applied Cognitive Psychology. 8: 281-338.
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Prior Learning Portfolio

Words: 1604 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3659201

learning experiene. The writer demonstrates how to put together a prior learning and prior experiene portfolio for the purpose of demonstrating urrent knowledge due to that prior experiene.

A omprehensive look at the management of one's personal finanes; overs budgeting, use of and ost of redit, life and property insurane, inome and state taxation, housing, wills, trusts, estate planning, and savings and investments.

You must reall and write one or more "learning events" for eah of the key terms listed on the ourse desription you have obtained. By using Kolb's model to guide your storytelling, you will assist your faulty assessor, the person who will evaluate your PLA portfolio for redit, to loate and appreiate your learning outomes.

In short, your task in writing your PLA portfolio essay is to address all listed ourse ontent areas and to do so via speifi stories told in terms of the Kolb Model.…… [Read More]

cited in Tennant 1996) highlights, there is a need to take account of differences in cognitive and communication styles that are culturally-based. Here we need to attend to different models of selfhood - and the extent to which these may differ from the 'western' assumptions that underpin the Kolb and Fry model.

The idea of stages or steps does not sit well with the reality of thinking. There is a problem here - that of sequence. As Dewey (1933) has said in relation to reflection a number of processes can occur at once, stages can be jumped. This way of presenting things is rather too neat and is simplistic - see reflection.

Empirical support for the model is weak (Jarvis 1987; Tennant 1997). The initial research base was small, and there have only been a limited number of studies that have sought to test or explore the model (such as Jarvis 1987). Furthermore, the learning style inventory 'has no capacity to measure the degree of integration of learning styles' (Tennant 1997: 92).

The relationship of learning processes to knowledge is problematic. As Jarvis (1987) again points out, David Kolb is able to show that learning and knowledge are intimately related. However, two problems arise here. David Kolb doesn't really explore the nature of knowledge in any depth. In chapter five of Experiential Learning he discusses the structure of knowledge from what is basically a social psychology perspective. He doesn't really connect with the rich and varied debates about the nature of knowledge that raged over the centuries within philosophy and social theory. This means that I do not think he really grasps different ways of knowing. For example, Kolb focuses on processes in the individual mind, rather than seeing learning as situated. Second, for David Kolb, learning is concerned with the production of knowledge. 'Knowledge results from the combination of grasping experience and transforming it' (Kolb 1984: 41). Here we might contrast this position with Paulo Freire. His focus is upon informed, committed action (praxis).

Given these problems we have to take some care approaching David Kolb's vision of experiential learning. However, as Tennant (1997: 92) points out, 'the model provides an excellent framework for planning teaching and learning activities and it can be usefully employed as a guide for understanding learning difficulties, vocational counselling, academic advising and so on'.
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Integrating Learning Theories With Personal Philosophy

Words: 745 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30234509

Integrating Learing Theories

Integrating Learning Theories

In adult education, there are number of theories utilized to influence the tools educators are using to connect with students. To fully understand them requires looking at the different ones. This will be accomplished by focusing on simulating the ideal teaching philosophy, current research in adult theory, comparing / contrasting them and analyzing those which integrate with our personal teaching philosophy. Together, these elements will highlight the best techniques for reaching out to adult learners.

Simulate the ideal teaching philosophy

The ideal teaching philosophy is one that connects to individuals using their unique learning styles and has a way of reinforcing them. This involves having a combination of active classroom discussion, group work and hands on training. During this process, they will utilize technology to enhance their understanding of key concepts and focus on meeting important objectives in the course. When this happens, the…… [Read More]

References

Davis, D. (2011). The Adult Learner's Companion. Boston, MA: Wadsworth.

Jacobs, F. (2010). The Adult Learner's Guide. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Robert, P. (2013). Adult Education. New York, NY: Routledge.

Ross, J. (2011). Research on Adult Learners. Peer Review, 31 (1), 53- 61.
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Personal Learning Styles Learning Style After Completing

Words: 1116 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61468858

Personal Learning Styles

Learning Style

After completing the VAK questionnaire, I have learned that out of the four types of learners, I have strong tendencies for three out of the four types. I am mostly a visual and read/write learner with equal scores in both areas. Furthermore, with a score very close to the first two categories, I am also a kinesthetic learner. Lastly, with the lowest score, I am an aural learner. Compared to how I perceive my own learning styles outside of this questionnaire, I mostly agree. I think I am mostly a visual and kinesthetic learner.

I do learn by reading and writing, as well as aurally, but not as much. They are not so much my preference for learning, but I cannot deny that those aspects assist my understanding. Some people are not the best at public speaking or giving instructions, and that is why I…… [Read More]

References:

Advanology. (2012). The Visual-Spatial Learning Style. Web, Available from:  http://www.learning-styles-online.com/style/visual-spatial/ . 2012 October 02.

LangVid Language Training. (2010). Studying Style: Tactile-Kinesthetic Learners. Web, Available from: http://www.studyingstyle.com/tactile-kinesthetic-learners.html. 2012 October 02.

The Study Gurus. (2012). Study Advice for Reading and Write Learners. Web, Available from: http://www.thestudygurus.com/read-write-study-tips/. 2012 October 02.

3). Review the other learning styles: visual, aural, read/write, kinesthetic, and multimodel (listed on the VARK Questionnaire Result page). 4). Compare your preferred learning strategies to the identified srategies for your learning style. 5). Appraise how this will change your way of stuying, if any. In a paper (750-1,000 words), summarise your analysis of this exercise. include the following: 1). Provide a summary of your learning style. 2). List your preferred learning srategies. 3). Compare your preferred learning strategies to the identified strategies for your preferred learning style. 4). Appraise any changes you need to make in your study habits.
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Personal Learning Theory The Author

Words: 2003 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88212585

wilderdom.com/experiential/ExperientialWhatIs.html)."

Experiential education comes in many shapes and sizes

Experiential education is widely implemented across a range of topics and mediums - for example, outdoor education, service learning, internships, and group-based learning projects. Many educational projects are experiential, but don't refer to themselves as such (e.g., excursions, physical education, manual arts, drama, art, and so on)."

The value of experiential education is instrumental to my learning theory. I remember the first time I assisted in a classroom and saw how valuable it is when utilized correctly.

I was helping with a math lesson in a first grade classroom. The teacher had drawn an equation the board of 2 plus 3 equals 5. She had the students first discuss the equation and talk about things that could be added. The list was endless and fun and included pet dogs, cats, little sisters and brothers. It had the students laughing and paying…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Albert Bandura

http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/bandura.html

Passages by Albert Bandura (http://www.des.emory.edu/mfp/effquotes.html)

Bandura: Beliefs, Bobo, and Behavior  http://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/0701/keynote.html
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Preferences in Learning Between American

Words: 23082 Length: 65 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88878710

The trainer will then focus on the steps to be taken to develop new skills. For example, if the trainer wants to talk about motivating, leading, negotiating, selling or speaking, it is best to start with what the learners do well before showing some chart on Maslow's theory, Posner's leadership practices, or selling skills from some standard package that has been develop elsewhere. Many foreign trainers make grave errors because they do not consider the values and beliefs of the trainee's culture. Training must make a fit with the culture of those being trained, including the material being taught, as well as the methods being used (Schermerhorn, 1994).

Abu-Doleh (1996) reports that Al-Faleh (1987), in his study of the culture influences on management development, asserts that "a country's culture has a great influence on the individual and managerial climate, on organizational behaviour, and ultimately on the types of management development…… [Read More]

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Adult Learning Styles in the

Words: 7981 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98200563

For countries such as the U.S. And France, these needs can be reasonably expected to relate to the respective national cultures involved. For instance, in their book, Education in France, Corbett and Moon (1996) report, "An education system needs to justify itself constantly by reference to the values which underpin a nation's culture. In a democracy it is expected to transmit a range of intellectual, aesthetic and moral values which permeate the curriculum and approaches to teaching and learning" (p. 323).

Just as the United States has been confronted with a number of challenges in recent decades in identifying the best approach to providing educational services for an increasingly multicultural society, France has experienced its fair share of obstacles in this regard as well. According to Corbett and Moon, "In societies forced to come to terms with change, values are always challenged. French society, like others, had to adapt to…… [Read More]

References

Atkinson, R.D. (2006, May-June). Building a more-humane economy. The Futurist, 40(3), 44.

Blanchard, E. & Frasson, C. (2005). Making intelligent tutoring systems culturally aware: The use of Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Montreal, Quebec Canada: Computer Science Department, HERON Laboratory.

Bryant, S.M., Kahle, J.B. & Schafer, B.A. (2005). Distance education: A review of the contemporary literature. Issues in Accounting Education, 20(3), 255.

Calder, J. (1993). Disaffection and diversity: Overcoming barriers for adult learners. London: Falmer Press.
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Definition of learning by doing

Words: 1090 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40375147

Study Skills

The author of this report has been asked to offer a treatise on the subject of study skills. The dimensions and facets of studying skills that shall be covered include some reflection, the five learning outcomes for the model in question, the author's feelings about the matter, the evaluation of the same, an analysis of the overall progress and framework in question and an overall action plan. Study skills are often over-hyped or overly minimalized. However, to dismiss their importance or wield them improperly is a recipe for disaster when it comes to both the work and educational spheres. While incessantly drilling and covering subjects over and over can lead to burnout and wasted motion, being under-prepared is less than optimal and can lead to setbacks that are hard to recover from.

Analysis

Study skills, of course, refer to the manner by which people work from an academic…… [Read More]

References

Cottrell, S. (2013). Study Skills Handbook. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Gibbs, G. (1988). Learning by Doing: Contents. [online] gdn.glos.ac.uk. Available at: http://gdn.glos.ac.uk/gibbs/ [Accessed 20 Sep. 2016].

KCL, (2016). Using Gibbs -- ™ Reflective Cycle. [online] King's College London. Available at: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/services/disability/onlineresources/Studyguides/Using-Gibbs-Reflective-Cycle-in-Coursework.pdf [Accessed 20 Sep. 2016].

Silberman, M. (2007). The handbook of experiential learning. San Francisco: Pfeiffer.
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Adult Learning Andragogy Adult Learning as a

Words: 2887 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17218108

Adult Learning: Andragogy

Adult learning as a concept was first introduced in Europe in the 50s (QOTFC, 2007). ut it was in the 70s when American practitioner and theorist of adult education Malcolm Knowles formulated the theory and model he called andragogy. He defined andragogy as "the art and science of helping adults learn (Zmeryov, 1998 & Fidishun, 2000 as qtd in QOTFC)." It consists of assumptions on how adults learn, with emphasis on the value of the process. Andragogy approaches are problem-based and collaborative as compared with the didactic approach in younger learners. It likewise emphasizes the equality between the teacher and the learner (QOTFC).

Adult Learning Principles

Knowles developed these principles from observed characteristics of adult learners. They have special needs and requirements different from those of younger learners (Lieb, 1991). Adults are internally motivated and self-directed. They bring life experiences and knowledge into their learning experiences. They…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chen, I. (2008). Constructivism. College of Education: University of Houston. Retrieved on June 6, 2011 from http://viking.coe.uh.edu/~ichn/ebook/et-it/constr.htm

Corley M.A. (2008). Experiential learning theory. California Adult Literacy Professional

Development Project. CALPRO: California Department of Education. Retrieved on June 13, 2011 from  http://www.calpro-online.org/documents/AdultLearningTheoriesFinal.pdf 

Kolb, D.A. et al. (1999). Experiential learning theory. "Perspectives on Cognitive
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Theoretical Approaches to Learning

Words: 2498 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78319889

theoretical approaches to learning and explores possibilities of learning applications to special education. A matrix is presented and the information in the matrix is explained within a professional setting that deals with special education. The theoretical approaches to learning provide the framework for development of leaning skills and are examined in detail.

Keywords: Learning, Learning theories, Cognitive development, andura's social learning, Pavlov, Classical condition, special education, Erikson's theory, social development theory, experiential learning.

andura's Social Learning Theory

Social learning theory by andura highlights the societal processes in learning suggesting that people learn from each other using the means of observation and imitation. This means that children watch and learn behavior of adults and family members and during the process of observation they pick up skills which they imitate. The theory of social learning requires an analysis of the psychological processes of motivation, attention and memory and these three cognitive processes…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: W.H. Freeman.

Bandura, A. (1986). Social Foundations of Thought and Action. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Bandura, A. (1977). Social Learning Theory. New York: General Learning Press.

Bandura, A. (1969). Principles of Behavior Modification. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
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Bonoma T 1989 Learning With

Words: 1741 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63373449

Any potential barriers that might prevent agreement from occurring are discussed, such as strategic behavior that is displayed through hard bargaining. Wheeler defines bargaining power as the strength or weakness of one company's BATNA. He uses the example of Iranian hostage negotiations to describe how power could possibly be turned upside down in negotiations. In this example, bargaining power is the reflection of both knowledge and skill.

Finally, the article discusses the element of ethics, or what the right thing to do in each situation is. For example, candor, moral reasons and equity may be discussed in this aspect. For example, force with weapons is illegal, just as unethically tying a parties hands to something that is morally wrong should be done. Another issue that arises is the impact of the negotiation on bystanders, and how fair the negotiation process is to those directly affected by the potential agreement. One…… [Read More]

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CBT Analysis of Learning Methods and the

Words: 2414 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46975300

CBT

Analysis of Learning Methods and the Impact of Computer-Based Training (CBT) Programs

Compare and contrast the four differences in learning styles. Propose ways a trainer can help each type of learner.

The four differences in learning styles are often characterized by convergers, divergers, assimilators and accommodators (Mumford, Honey, 1992). There are significant differences between each, and the intent of this analysis is to compare and contrast them with each other. The converger learning style typifies learners who rely on conceptual learning including visualization and abstract learning, supported by active experimentation. It is comparable to the assimilator learning style in that both rely on abstract conceptualization of learning materials and concepts, in addition to a reliance on theoretical models. The converger learning style differences from the other four in its intensity of focus on taking information and intelligence and turning it into pragmatic thought (Mumford, Honey, 1992). The other learning…… [Read More]

References

Bedwell, W., & Salas, E.. (2010). Computer-based training: capitalizing on lessons learned. International Journal of Training & Development, 14(3), 239-249.

Khan, B.H. (2001). A framework for Web-based learning. In B.H. Khan (Ed.), Web-based training. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.

Alice Y Kolb, & David A Kolb. (2005). Learning Styles and Learning Spaces: Enhancing Experiential Learning in Higher Education. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 4(2), 193-212.

Lakshmanan, A., Lindsey, C., & Krishnan, H.. (2010). Practice Makes Perfect? When Does Massed Learning Improve Product Usage Proficiency? Journal of Consumer Research, 37(4), 599.
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Traditional Forms of Learning Do

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35922237

It does not happen overnight; 3) eflective practice occurs best when learners work with role models; 4) as noted by Fink, instruction needs to be learner-centered, of interest to the learners and long-lasting; 5) the institution in which the nurses learn must be supportive of reflective learning.

The PICOT is a useful format for developing a clinical research question. It helps to answer questions and decrease uncertainty and determine the appropriate choice of action. In this case, the PICOT is the following:

Nursing student population

Provide long-term knowledge to make reflective decisions

Traditional learning situations

eflective practice offers several benefits over traditional learning

Time frame (optional)

eferences cited:

Fink, L.D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Loughran, J. John (2002) "Effective reflective practice: in search of meaning in learning about teaching." Journal of Teacher Education 53(1): 33+.

Osterman, K. (1998) Using…… [Read More]

References cited:

Fink, L.D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Loughran, J. John (2002) "Effective reflective practice: in search of meaning in learning about teaching." Journal of Teacher Education 53(1): 33+.

Osterman, K. (1998) Using Constructivism and Reflective Practice to Bridge the Theory/Practice Gap. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Diego, CA, April 13-17, 1998) ED425518 ERIC

Peters, M. (2000). Does constructivist epistemology have a place in nurse education? Journal of Nursing Education, 39, 166-172
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Human Resources Working and Learning

Words: 2558 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62799238

The issue involves one institution awarding PLA credits, and when a student then transfers to a similar program at another institution or applies to a higher level program after graduating, the second institution may not recognize the PLA credits. The concern exists predominantly in the gap between program levels, for example a diploma graduate applying to a baccalaureate program, a baccalaureate graduate applying to a master's program. It is thought that if this is left unaddressed, increasing PLA practices may well lower a barrier at one educational level, while raising a barrier at the next (Advancing PLA in Alberta -- an Action Plan, 2009).

Another problem that has been associated with PLA is institutional funding for both human resources and operations. There is a concern among institutions about being required to implement or increase their PLA practices without additional government funding to support it. Most institutions currently do not have…… [Read More]

References

Advancing PLAR in Alberta -- an Action Plan. (2009). Retrieved July 22, 2010, from Web site:

 http://www.acat.gov.ab.ca/pdfs/PLARActionPlanInstitutionVisits.pdf 

Applying education and skills to real employment opportunities. (n.d). Retrieved July 22, 2010,

from State of Washington Web site:
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Style of Learning Describe the

Words: 737 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40906968



Some constructivists have gone so far as to suggest that the "collaborative character of learning" means that learning can be defined as "shared meaning making" (2.3 Learning as shared meaning making, 2004, Educational Symantic eb). Although learning is still individual in the sense that the learner learns for him or herself, "meaning making is not understood as a psychological process which takes place in individuals' minds" but as an "essentially social activity that is conducted jointly - collaboratively -- by a community, rather than by individuals who happen to be co-located" (2.3 Learning as shared meaning making, 2004, Educational Symantic eb).

Rather than viewing knowledge as the privilege of the old, disseminated to the young, constructivist theorists stress that learning in a technologically-advanced society is more of a dialogue between student and teacher. The knowledge-creation metaphor of learning focuses on innovative learning and means that "learning is seen as analogous…… [Read More]

Works Cited

2.1 Acquisition and participation metaphor of learning (2004). Educational Semantic Web.

Retrieved March 20, 2009 at http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/2004/2/allert-2004-2-disc-04.html

2.4. Concepts of learning. (2004). Educational Semantic Web. Retrieved March 20, 2009 at Retrieved March 20, 2009 at http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/2004/2/allert-2004-2-disc-03.html

Gentry, James W., John R. Dickinson, Alvin C. Burns; Lee McGinnis, & JuYoung Park. (2006).
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Adult Learning Training and Development This

Words: 1624 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94476210



The importance in training and development with regard to understanding how adult learning works provides the ability to develop effective programs for adult learners in field of employment, education and interests.

When these two articles are blended together, however, they do not have to be mutually exclusive. The tips and training ideas can be taken from Lieb's works and applied to adult learning programs while the cautions of Brookfield's can also be respected and investigated more thoroughly.

Conclusion

As adult education continues to expand through online abilities, classroom learning and on site instruction at the workplace the understanding of how adults process information will continue to be important. Using the tips provided by Lieb will allow adults to be taught new material while at the same time investigating the concerns of Brookfield can be given attention.

It will be important to determine which of the experts is correct as future…… [Read More]

References

Issues in Understanding Adult (accessed 7-3-07) Learning http://www.nl.edu/academics/cas/ace/facultypapers/StephenBrookfield_AdultLearning.cfm

Leib, Stephen (1991) Principles of Adult Learning (Accessed 7-3-07) http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/adults-2.htm

Noe, Raymond (2004) Employee Training and Development 4th Edition.
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Teaching and Technology Web-Based Learning

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32994626

actual. The sample size is so small and concentrated that it is possible that intra-respondent bias was also present. Finally, the results provide support for the Internet in general and social networking applications specifically supporting appreciative, expressive and creative abilities yet fails to actually define how these strategies can be attained based on the research. The result is a study that reflects more of a consensus across the teaching profession than a rejection or critique of rote memorization and the embracing of scaffolding as a teaching strategy. It is disappointing that the research is not more robust and focused on getting past the obvious conclusions, stating instructors need to sharpen their online teaching skills. The most critical questions of how to create effective scaffolding strategies for each student using the new tools available from Web 2.0-based technologies goes unanswered. There is also the lack of charting and analysis of the…… [Read More]

References

Josh Bernoff, Charlene Li. "Harnessing the Power of the Oh-So-Social Web. " MIT Sloan Management Review 49.3 (2008): 36-42. 1 Aug. 2008

Derrick Huang, Ravi S. Behara. "Outcome-Driven Experiential Learning with Web 2.0. " Journal of Information Systems Education 18.3 (2007): 329-336. ABI/INFORM Global. ProQuest 2 Aug. 2008.

Chin-Chih Lin, Chien-Chung Lin. "Instructional Strategies and Methods of e-Learning for Nurturing Appreciative, Expressive, and Creative Abilities." Journal of American Academy of Business, Cambridge 13.1 (2008): 199-207. ABI/INFORM Global. ProQuest.3 Aug. 2008

Mehdi Najjar. "On Scaffolding Adaptive Teaching Prompts within Virtual Labs. " International Journal of Distance Education Technologies 6.2 (2008): 35-54. ABI/INFORM Global. ProQuest. 3 Aug. 2008
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Adult Learning An Overview Brookfield

Words: 575 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32390536

As a younger student, I remember being somewhat obstinate and inflexible in that I always wanted to do things my way, even with the benefit of adult instruction. Today, I have the ability to recognize expertise in others and I respect the fact that they may know much more than I do about how to accomplish something in their area of expertise. I believe that my ability to adapt to different situations and to follow the directions of experts in the workplace will translate very well to the adult learning environment. Naturally, I also have some reservations about returning to a formal academic learning environment after so many years away from it. On the other hand, I am very hopeful that the maturity and perspective that I have developed in the meantime will more than compensate for any awkwardness or initial discomfort on my part.

Distance Learning

Finally, the author…… [Read More]

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Opportunities of a Problem-Based Learning

Words: 2989 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6887204

In addition, the classic version of problem-based learning "requires students to collaborate, formulate learning issues by determining factors that may contribute to the cause or solution of a problem, identify relevant content, and generate hypotheses. Most problem-based learning models also contain student reflection components as a means of self-evaluation" (Knowlton & Sharp, 2003, pp. 5-6).

Although the positive effects of using a problem-based learning approach have been documented in a number of studies, the findings of other studies have indicated that problem-based learning may not compare favorably with more traditional teaching methods with regards to student's knowledge base, technical skills, or the resources expended; however, Dadd (2009) suggests that the benefits of using a problem-based learning approach justify the additional resources this method requires. Moreover, Simons et al. (2004) report that students using a problem-based learning approach "tend to develop more positive attitudes toward learning than students in more traditional…… [Read More]

References

Alavi, C. (1999). Problem-based learning in a health sciences curriculum. New York:

Routledge.

Albion, P.R. (2003). PBL + IMM = PBL2: Problem-based learning and interactive multimedia development. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 11(2), 243-244.

Dadd, K.A. (2009). Using problem-based learning to bring the workplace into the classroom.
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Computer Assisted Learning Cal Once a Novel

Words: 1827 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68935532

Computer assisted learning (CAL), once a novel concept, is a staple in numerous classrooms across the country, from the primary education to the university level. Computer assisted learning offers both students and teachers a daunting and near-limitless education supplement. However, this paper will examine examples where computer assisted learning is more or less effective and why. It will be revealed that computer assisted learning programs that are most effective are the ones which place precedence on interactivity. A particularly successful program, the Interaction Multimedia Computer Assisted Instruction Theory, will be examined carefully in regards to the strategy and concepts used in order to make such a learning program as successful as possible.

Introduction

Educators and pedagogues have known for years the wealth of benefits that computer assisted learning can offer the student. Certain educational software programs equal a dissemination of difficult concepts and/or an illumination of intricate ideas. For example,…… [Read More]

References

Azer, S. (2008). Navigating problem-based learning. Marrickville: Elsevier.

Banerjee, A., Duflo, E., & Linden, L. (2004). Computer-assisted learning project with pratham in india.Poverty Action Lab, Retrieved from http://www.povertyactionlab.org/evaluation/computer-assisted-learning-project-pratham-india

Greenhalgh, T. (2001). Computer assisted learning in undergraduate medical education. British Medical Journal, 322(7277), 40-44.

Iskander, M. (2008). Innovative techniques in instruction technology, e-learning. Brooklyn:
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Expectations and Significance of Group Facilitation Learning

Words: 1085 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68822668

Expectations and Significance of Group Facilitation Learning Outcomes

Humans are notoriously difficult subjects to analyze, understand, motivate and lead, and while some group counselors appear to possess a natural ability to facilitate effective group interactions, others struggle to cope with the exigencies of a group setting. Despite the challenges that are involved, the importance of developing the requisite skills needed for effective group facilitation means that counselors must draw on the entire range of group dynamic theories and proven strategies to achieve this goal. In order to gain further insights into these areas, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature to identify relevant expectations from learning about group dynamic theories and strategies, followed by a discussed concerning various aspects of applying these concepts in real-world settings. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings are presented in the paper's conclusion.

eview and Discussion

Expectations concerning application of…… [Read More]

References

Clark, A.J. (2002). Scapegoating: Dynamics and interventions in group counseling. Journal of Counseling and Development, 80(3), 271-272.

Furr, S.R. & Barrett, B. (2000). Teaching group counseling skills: Problems and solutions.

Counselor Education and Supervision, 40(2), 94.

Zinck, K. & Littrell, J.M. (2000). Action research shows group counseling effective with at-risk adolescent girls. Professional School Counseling, 4(1), 50-52.
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Tactile Kinesthetic Learning Styles

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57998279

ADA Solutions

Human resources (H) departments today have to confront many issues that are related to an individual's learning styles and preferences. Not only does the consideration of an employee's learning style have a range of compliance issues that can be related, but it is also advantageous that organizations use this information to effectively create training and professional development programs so that employees are better equipped to handle the tasks required of them. An effective training strategy can empower an employee with new skills that can make them more effective in their daily routine. Thus overcoming any challenges to career development can significantly improve the organization as a whole.

In this specific case, John has a prominent learning style that is defined as tactile/kinesthetic. The online course that was suggested for him to take might not be the best avenue for his career development education. Furthermore, he has requested accommodation…… [Read More]

References

Kolb, A., & Kolb, D. (2005). Learning Styles and Learning Spaces: Enhancing Experiential Learning in Higher Education . Academy of Management Learning & Education, 193-212.

Lee, B. (2015). EFL Learners' Perspectives on ELT Materials Evaluation Relative to Learning Styles. RELC Journal, 147-163.

McLane, D. (2011). Connecting learning styles with training styles in learning ADA compliance. Gradworks, 75.
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Assessments of Literacy Learning in Ireland

Words: 1288 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79974675

Literacy in Secondary School in Ireland

The literacy curriculum in secondary school in Ireland is based on a strategy of language-related lesson modifications, identified by Peregoy and Boyle as good methods of ensuring that differentiation occurs in the classroom. This strategy allows for the use of "visuals, concrete objects, direct experience, and other nonverbal means to convey lesson content" alongside the main lesson taught by the teacher in the classroom (Peregoy, Boyle 86). In my area, this is consistent with what we experienced in school, and differentiation is a huge part of the cycle -- as much of what is centered on literacy is done so with direct relation to experiential learning, the use of visual aids, and the expression of ideas identified in readings via nonverbal means, such as drawings, videos or performance in the classroom. At the same time, there is a notable urgency among literacy leaders and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Department of Education and Skills Press Release. Education.ie, 2011. Web. 1 June

2016.

Gottlieb, M. Assessing English Language Learners. CA: Corwin Press, 2006. Print.

Peregoy, S., Boyle, O. Reading, Writing and Learning. MA: Pearson, 2013.
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Learning Hands-On Science Learning Has

Words: 2217 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86074387

The natural environment provides students with a calm and quiet place to unwind from the noises of the classroom. It nurtures and supports animal-life all year round. This is critical for areas where commercial and residential development is reducing most natural areas. Wildlife especially needs help during the cold and snowy months. Students can also see how it benefits the environment. It also helps connect students to the world of nature. Increasingly, because children are spending more and more times indoors, they are losing touch with nature.

Humans, because they spent their first 14,000 years in nature, have a special bond with the outdoor world. When they are taken away from this environment, through cities, lack of parks, no outdoor play, there can be psychological affects. When taking time to enjoy nature, children will feel better about themselves and the world at large.

We are also going to put a…… [Read More]

References

Besecker, I. (June 11, 2000). Greensoboro News and Record. Insanity of Testing Mania.

Bredderman, T. (1985). Laboratory programs for elementary school science: A meta- analysis of effects on learning. Science Education, 69(4), 577-591.

Carpenter, R. (1963). A Reading Method and an Activity Method in Elementary Science Instruction. Science Education, April.

Hake, R. (1992). Socratic Pedagogy in the Introductory Physics Laboratory. The Physics Teacher 30(9), 546-552
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Learner Differences in Distance Learning

Words: 625 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23520354

auditoy leanes), motivation and pesonality such as extovesion vs. intovesion, although the aticles' authos suggests that tailoing mateial to expessed leane pefeences ae not always the best ways to achieve positive outcomes. Leanes ae not always clea as to thei tue leaning oientation and leane styles ae not 'fixed' but may vay accoding to the type of media used and the subject mateial. Using a vaiety of media may be a moe effective appoach fo educatos, and thinking in tems of 'appoaches' that can change, athe than fixed student leaning styles.

One fequent fustation expessed by online instuctos is the absence of immediate feedback fom thei students. Undestanding individual students can help the teache modify instuction, even without the immediate esponse povided by eye contact in the classoom. It is essential that moments exist within the online pocess when students can communicate that they do not undestand, while in the…… [Read More]

references alone but must keep a real-world and virtual ear upon the students to shift his or her learning strategy. Understanding overall learning process required of the subject material and the need to modify the learning approaches to meet the unique demands of the instruction in its particular venue and format is essential. Simply knowing a learning 'style' of a student is not enough, and a label can be misleading. As more students must learn independently, greater knowledge of how the learner functions and the use of different settings are required, and the article calls for more extensive into how to create a more effective learning environment that uses a diversity of approaches to convey content.
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Language Teaching and Learning in

Words: 1321 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27270341



As an analytic method it varies from the syntactic syllabus in simliar way as the practical and procedure syllabi, particularly in the supposition that the learner learns best when using language to converse about something. TBLT also is different from the two other logical curricula in a lot of ways. It differs from the procedural syllabus in that it stresses the importance of carrying out a needs analysis prior to instruction.

Identifying likely bases of task complexity certainly is an essential precondition for making ethical choices regarding the grading and sequencing of functions, upon which many of the worth of the TBLT will rest. Grading and sequencing of pedagogic errands is certainly a chief test for the task-based syllabus creators.

Principles and features of task-based language teaching.

Prabhu's observations, stated at the beginning of the project, guide to the first belief of task-based interaction that "language is a basically just…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alex, J., 2001. Recognizing Task Designs. Journal of Education, 2(5), pp. 23-34.

Breen, M., 2004. Process syllabus for the language classroom.. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Breen, M., 2005. Learner contributions to task design.. Chicago: Penguin.

Candlin, C.N., 1984. Syllabus design as a critical process, ELT Documents. Cambridge: Pergamon & the British Council.
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Curriculum Design Selected Learning Theory

Words: 1149 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20001430

" How much the design of cuiculum may affect the student in tems of leaning outcomes is anothe vey impotant consideation in this humanistic theoy of Combs and Snygg.

Diffeentiation in the Peceptions of Leaning Style

Just as diffeent individuals have diffeent tastes, views and pesonalities the theoies of leaning ae diffeentiated as well. Some of the leaning styles that exist ae Leaning pefeences that exist ae based in (1) Concete leaning (2) Abstact leaning (3) Teache-stuctued leaning (4) Student stuctued leaning (5) Intepesonal leaning; and (5) Individual leaning. The diffeentiation that exists in elation to styles of leaning is that upon which the many diffeent theoies of leaning ae based in thei beliefs. Fo example concete leaning is based on a belief o a theoy that tangible, specific and pactical tasks focused on skills is the most desiable method while in the methods that suppot abstact leaning the pefeence…… [Read More]

references reflect curricular change. Medical Teacher 24(1), pp. 32-40

Richards, Ann C. Ed.D (2003) the Relationship Between Behavior and Experience: Fundamental Premise 2001 November 21. Presented at the Second National Symposium on Educator Dispositions. 21 November, 2003.

Kell, C & van Deursen, R. (2000) the fight against professional obsolescence should begin in the undergraduate curriculum, Medical Teacher, 22(2), pp. 160-163

Boeree, George C. (1998) Personality Theories: Donald Snygg & Arthur Combs. Online available at; http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/snygg&combs.html

Selected Learning Theory: Impact on Curriculum Design
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Individual Learning Plans in Community

Words: 4463 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74917892



V. Government System RARPA

The government introduced the RARPA Program which is abbreviated for the:: "Recording and Recognition of Progress and Achievement Summary of the Evaluation Report" in relation to the Pilot Projects April 2003 to March 2004 Learning and Skills Development Agency National Institute of Adult Continuing Education 2004 August. Since 2002 the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) has focused its efforts on establishing an appropriate method of recognizing and recording the progress and achievement of learners that is non-accredited in nature. Development of a model called the 'Staged Process." The RARPA consists of the application "of an explicit and common staged process to the recognition and recording of progress and achievement, together with the validation of this process through a range of judgments about its consistent and effective application." The background of the project is stated to be that LSDA and NIACE were involved in preparation of work…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

McCallum, Myra K. (1999) "Strategies and Activities to Stimulate Adequate ESOL Instruction in Content Area Courses and Increase Honest Effort and Motivation Among ESOL Students Dekalb County School System, Decatur, GA 1999 November U.S. Department of Education: #FL026093.

Your Guide 2 Skills For Life Policy and Strategy (2005) Skills and Education Network March Online available at: http://senet.lsc.gov.uk/guide2/skill sforlife/G2skillsforlifeG028.pdf

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Case Studies of Provision, Learner's Needs and Resources, National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy Online at www.nrcd.org.uk ISBN 0 95456492 Kings College London, University of Leeds, Institute of Education, University of London and Lancaster University.

Fogel, H. & Ehri, L.C. (2000). Teaching elementary students who speak Black English Vernacular to write in Standard English: effects of dialect transformation practice. Contemporary Educational Psychology, vol. 25.
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Elder Learning Service by Taking Part in

Words: 2815 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85691491

Elder Learning Service

By taking part in "Elder Learning Service," one can learn much from the experience. In fact, this is becoming a growing phenomenon both academically and within the community itself. All the research points to the positive impact of how much it empowers individuals into becoming better citizens by becoming self-aware of those that are in need. A service learning service was designed for high school students entitled, "Carrying on the Legacy of San Juan's Elders." Many conclusions arose as well as project outcomes for one to consider for any future project.

Service Learning: High School Students Engaged in their Community

The district in which I teach allowed me to do a service learning project with my high school students upon asking permission from the principal of the school. These were my goals when working with each of them. 1) Promote student and elderly intergenerational communication; 2) Improve…… [Read More]

References

Brown, L.H., & Roodin, P.A. (2001). Service-learning in gerontology: An out-of-classroom experience. Educational Gerontology, 27(1), 89-103.

Furco, A., & Root, S. (2010). Research demonstrates the value of service learning. Phi Delta

Kappan, 91(5), 16-20.

Getahun, Linde J. (2006) Reflections on service learning with the aged. Academic Exchange
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Cooperative Learning Advantages and Disadvantages

Words: 1361 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95819604



Among the last advantages of cooperative learning in the classroom is the increase in competition that every student experiences as s/he collaborates with other students/teammates in the process of accomplishing a particular task or activity. There is one caveat, however, in stating this observation about cooperative learning: increased competence is induced only in learning processes wherein information used by students are similar or identical with each other (uchs, 2004:310-1). An increase in the competitive nature of learning using the cooperative learning technique stimulates students' greater desire to perform better, and to outdo other students in accomplishing the task at hand.

While there are advantages to cooperative learning as a teaching and learning tool, there are also disadvantages that can become impediments or hindrances to the students' further learning and the teacher's role as a moderator or to serve as the students' guide to learning.

Among the enumerated disadvantages to cooperative…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bandiera, M. (2006). "Active/cooperative learning in schools." Journal of Biological Education, Vol. 40, Issue 3.

Buchs, C. (2004). "Resource interdependence, student interactions, and performance in cooperative learning." Educational Psychology, Vol. 24, Issue 3.

Coke, P. (2005). "Practicing what we preach: an argument for cooperative learning opportunities for elementary and secondary educators." Education, Vol. 126, Issue 2.

Laatsch, L. (2005). "Cooperative learning effects on teamwork attitudes in clinical laboratory science students." Clinical Laboratory Science, Vol. 18, Issue 3.
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Mobile Learning M-Learning University Use

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6177618



Mobile phones can also be used to create 'experiential' classes: "Images can be captured and uploaded to the Web through mobile weblogs (moblogs)…a team from Umea University in Sweden moblogged Jokkmokk's 399th Annual Sami Winter Market. Students applied their academic learning about the Sami to the real world, interviewing participants, conducting follow-up digital research on the fly, and uploading and expanding on commentary online" (Alexander 2004). The classroom spilled out conference, and all students in the class participated simultaneously, in a way they could not, had they traveled through the conference as a group or reported back to the classroom as individuals.

m-Learning thus has several demonstrable benefits. The first is its ease of access, where updated information and alerts can be sent immediately. It also offers options to pace a student's study so it is compatible with the student's other lifestyle demands. A student can learn while on the…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, Bryan. (2004, September/October). Going nomadic: Mobile learning in higher education. EDUCAUSE Review. 39. 5-28 -- 35. Retrieved January 19, 2010 at http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Review/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume39/GoingNomadicMobileLearninginHi/157921

The 2009 Horizon Report. (2009). Retrieved January 19, 2010 at  http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2009-Horizon-Report.pdf , pages 1-10.

Jacob, Seibu Mary & Biju Issac. (2007, June). Mobile learning culture and effects in higher

Education. IEEE Multidisciplinary Engineering Education Magazine. 2.2: 19-21
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Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory According

Words: 742 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37174595

Technical tasks are preferred over people and interpersonal details. They also enjoy experimenting, simulating, and working with practical applications.

When there are too many people with one learning type over another in the same organization, there may be a deficiency in a particular type of strength which could prove to be valuable to the organization. For instance, if the organization does not have any accommodators, but rather has several convergers, divergers, and assimilators, then the organization may be in need of an individual whom can work quickly and whom can figure something out without a given set of procedure or directions and whom perhaps can derive conclusions based upon his/her gut instinct. If an agency has a balance of learners and the agency is aware of the strengths and weaknesses within the organization, then groupings may be done so that each group has an individual representing a particular learning style.…… [Read More]

References

Osland, H., Kolb, D.A., & Rubin, I. (n.d.). Organizational Behavior (8th ed.).
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Influence of Technology on Teaching and Learning Styles

Words: 2412 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49970916

archetypal scene of the educational process is for most of us a child and a teaching sitting next to each other, their heads bowed together intently over a book. It is an island, in this high-tech world in which we live, of the low-tech: A world that depends upon communication and human interactions rather than machines and gadgets. Education seems to be one of those realms in which it is still possible to believe in and practice the humanistic arts.

But this idealized picture of the teaching process is, like so many idealized pictures, not exactly accurate - as well as being a little out of date. Education has, in fact, always made use of technology in our human attempt to pass onto each new generation what the generation before it holds to be important. Slate boards and books were high-tech in their own time - and most children now…… [Read More]

References

Baker, C. (2001). Foundations of bilingual education and bilingualism, 3rd ed. Clevedon, England: Multilingual Matters.

Blevins, D. (2002). Personal communication.

California State Code, Education Code, Section 305-306.

Florida Department of Education, http://www.firn.edu/doe
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Instructional Leaders and Organizational Learning

Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6851264

Urban Middle School Focus

Identify Unique opportunities for growth and improvement. What new emerging initiatives are likely to increase growth and deepen improvement levels within an urban middle school?

Among the more prominent opportunities for growth and improvement have occurred in urban schools where educators are focusing on literacy achievement (Frey, 2002). Literacy has always been an essential element to learning and has opened the door to avenues for growth in other areas including in math and in science.

Another important area for growth and improvement includes moving from a static educational environment to one that is more dynamic, where informal and spontaneous educational learning styles are preferred to more traditional styles (Phillips, 2003). Now, more so than ever teachers see the benefit of adopting kinesthetic learning practices that engage students as experiential learners that are diverse, culturally different, and involved in their community (Phillips, 2003). These initiatives are challenging…… [Read More]

References:

Frey, N. (2001). "We grow our own." Journal of California English, 6(4), 12-13.

Frey, Nancy (2002)." Literacy achievement in an urban middle-level professional development school: a learning community at work." Reading Improvement. Cengage Learning. FindArticles.com. 26, July 2011: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6516/is_1_39/ai_n28920111/

Haycock, K., Jerald, C., & Huang, S. (2001). "Closing the gap: Done in a decade." Thinking K-

16, 5(1), 3-20.
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Nursing Education Learning Styles

Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94737000

Student success a - endeavor. The student give 100% instructor provide students a 100%. The student responsibility prepared learn material assigned, turn assignments time, pay attention taught discussed, questions needed.

I agree that the process of education is a dialogue, not a monologue. Although an educator may have a plan about what he or she wishes to teach, the teacher must respond to student input. The students may not understand the material in the manner in which it is initially presented; they may be bored or ill-prepared; they may have probing and unexpected questions; or they may have different learning styles.

Using different approaches is particularly essential in healthcare education, given that new scientific knowledge builds upon old knowledge. emediation is successful because it ensures students have knowledge of the foundational concepts early on, before the student becomes completely left behind. Given the nursing shortage the nation is facing, finding…… [Read More]

References

Smith, A. (2010). Learning styles of registered nurses enrolled in an online nursing program.

Journal of Professional Nursing, 26(1):49-53. doi: 10.1016/j.profnurs.2009.04.006.
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Social Deprivation Language and Learning

Words: 913 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27424590

..set of critical stages for normal psychologic development." (2001) Kandel relates that prior to formal studies being conducted on material deprivation: "...a few anecdotal examples of social isolation were collected by anthropologists and clinicians. From time to time children had been discovered living in an attic or a cellar, with minimal social contact, perhaps spending only a few minutes a day with a caretaker, a nurse or a parent. Children so deprived in early childhood are often later found to be speechless and lacking in social responsiveness." (Kandel, 2001) According to the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities in the work entitled: "Issues in Learning Disabilities: Assessment and Diagnosis": Diagnosis, assessment and treatment must be in the nature of 'differential diagnosis' in making identification between varying disorders, syndromes and other factors that impact the acquisition of the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing reasoning or mathematical abilities." (National Joint Committee…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kamhi, a.G. (1984) Problem Solving in Child Language Disorders. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in School Journal. Volume 15. October 1984.

Federici, R.S. (1999) Neuropsychological Evaluation and Rehabilitation of the Post-Institutionalized Child. Presented at the Conference for Children and Residential Care, Stockholm, Sweden May 3, 1999. Neuropsychological and Family Therapy Associated.

A de Valenzuela, JA (1999) the Social Construction of Language Competence: Language Socialization in Three Bilingual Kindergarten Classrooms. University of New Mexico. Dissertation Synopsis.

Thanasoulas, Dimitrios (2001) Language and Disadvantage - Article 70 - the Weekly Column. 2001 August.
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Synchronous and Asynchronous Learning Asynchronous

Words: 845 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57770726

Some of the pedagogical methods in the Group Approach are: " team tasks and group problem solving; creative group activities (e.g. brainstorming); group case studies; group critical analyses; group role play; collective games; dialogues and debates; forum discussions and chat; joint projects and research; multipoint videoconferences. The appropriate technology and a moderator with appropriate skills and knowledge combined with enough time make the efforts of e-learning successful.

II. Teaching Methods

There must be more than a simple provision of learning materials made available in e-learning. The design of an education course or subject in distance education requires definitive goals and objectives be stated in advance. Considered as well in this learning initiative is the participant's previous knowledge and skills, as well as expectations and motivations of participants must be considered as well as the knowledge and skills which the participants seek to acquire. Further addressed should be the measures that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Teaching Methods and Communication in E-education (2005) Carnet Website http://www.carnet.hr/referalni/obrazovni/en/mkod/syncwork

The Individual Method (2005) Carnet Website http://www.carnet.hr/referalni/obrazovni/en/m kod/indiv_app?CARNetweb=9ac41897ea506cdb0e558fa028cabc02

Seltzer, Richard (2005) Evaluating synchronous/real-time platforms for distance education Online available at  http://www.samizdat.com/realtime.html .

Corsi, Sandro (1997)Improved Access to Digital Arts Instruction: Asynchronous Education (1997) Worth Pursuing Now (Distance Education is a Remote Possibility) Online Available at http://www.sanedraw.com/ED/ASYNC_ED/INDEX.HTM 1997-2000 Posted 1997-05-19. Last revised 2000-03-14
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Management Organization Learning the Efforts of a

Words: 1239 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10726407

Management

Organization Learning

The efforts of a collective group of people can often transcend that of an individual; teams have been a functional part of the business culture for over twenty years with the goal of accomplishing just this feat. While "system thinking," "mental models" and "team communication" continue to hold great importance in the synergy of multi-contributor accomplishment, it hasn't proven to be quite enough.

Working teams accumulate an almost infinite amount of experiential knowledge. At the operations level, this accomplishes the ultimate goal: people are dramatically more effective at accomplishing their collective and individual goals and achieve a greater sense of satisfaction in the accomplishment. These teams, however, operate under a much larger canopy - that of the larger collective - the organization.

The enterprise - as a whole - has been largely overlooked when regarding the distinguishing characteristics of the institution. If the ethos of the entity…… [Read More]

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Cardsmax Humanistic Theory Humanistic Learning Theory as

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80110921

Cardsmax

Humanistic Theory

Humanistic learning theory as explained by Lipscomb, & Ishmael (2009 p. 174) emphasizes feeling, experience, self-awareness, personal growth, and individual / psychic optimization. Learning, from this perspective, is positioned as both social process and psychological/intellectual endeavor. Humanism aspires to place lecturers alongside students in mutually constituted, cooperative enquiry, variously described, this form of 'peer learning community 'situates the lecturer as an authority rather than in authority. It is a form of education that, by traditional or historical standards, places novel demands upon students who are now expected to act intentionally in pursuit of learning and understanding. Humanist principles require students to join with lecturers in this endeavor, and they are implicitly expected to develop and share values concerning the importance of scholarship.

Humanistic and experiential psychotherapies coalesced around the humanistic movement that emerged in the United States and Europe in the 1950s and 1960s. A number of…… [Read More]

References

Farber, E.W. (2010). Humanistic -- existential psychotherapy competencies and the supervisory process. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 47(1), 28-34. doi:10.1037/a0018847

Friedman, H. (2008). Humanistic and Positive Psychology: The Methodological and Epistemological Divide. Humanistic Psychologist, 36(2), 113-126. doi:10.1080/08873260802111036

Lipscomb, M., & Ishmael, A. (2009). Humanistic educational theory and the socialization of preregistration mental health nursing students.International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 18(3), 173-178. doi:10.1111/j.1447-0349.2009.00603.x

Watson, J.C., Goldman, R.N., & Greenberg, L.S. (2011). Humanistic and experiential theories of psychotherapy. In J.C. Norcross, G.R. VandenBos, D.K. Freedheim, J.C. Norcross, G.R. VandenBos, D.K. Freedheim (Eds.), History of psychotherapy: Continuity and change (2nd ed.) (pp. 141-172). American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/12353-005
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Personal Traits That Contribute to Learning There

Words: 577 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5439304

Personal Traits That Contribute to Learning

Learning

There is both scientific and social research that shows that learning is possible at all stages of life, yet there are some stages where learning comes more easily and effortlessly than others. Age is one of a few qualities the paper will discuss regarding the influence of personal traits that affect learning. Certainly, it is culturally accepted common knowledge that it is easier for very young children to learn than adults. Children are more like blank slates, especially when they are very young, and they absorb information at different rates and with different forms of attention than with adults. Adults have more experiential knowledge and social intelligence than children, and therefore, experience a different kind of learning or growth than say, a three-year-old child.

Personality may be the most significant factor with respect to learning. If a person is motivated or lacks motivation,…… [Read More]

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Bruner's Constructivist Theory and the Conceptual Paradigms

Words: 3441 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3905232

Bune's constuctivist theoy and the conceptual paadigms of Kolb's Expeiential Leaning theoy dawing on the associated theoies ae Kinesthetic and Embodied Leaning. As also noted in the intoductoy chapte, the guiding eseach question fo this study was, "What ae the caee paths fo teaching atists seeking to deploy into the field of community at and development?" To develop timely and infomed answes to this eseach question, this chapte povides a eview of the elevant pee-eviewed and scholaly liteatue concening these theoetical famewoks to investigate the diffeent caee paths teaching atists seek to deploy into the field of community at and development, including ceative community building and adult community centes such as woking with Alzheime's Disease and stoke victims.

Adult Leaning Theoies

Kolb's Expeiential Leaning Theoy. Thee ae a wide aay of theoetical models that can be used to identify and bette undestand teaching and leaning pefeences by educatos and students,…… [Read More]

references to improve coaching and athletic performance: Are your players or students kinesthetic learners? The Journal of Physical

Education, Recreation & Dance, 80(3), 30-34.

Fowler, J. (2013, March). Art rescue in a troubled world. Arts & Activities, 153(2), 36-39.

Kerka, S. (2002). Somatic/embodied learning and adult education: Trends and issues alert. ERIC

Kessler, R. (2000). The soul of education: Helping students find connection, compassion, and character at school. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
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Education the Existence of the

Words: 3464 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62804019



While both gender and race are positionalities that are difficult to hide (not that one should need or want to, anyway), sexual orientation is not necessarily something that is known about a person, and its affects on the learning process can be very different. The very fact that sexual orientation can be hidden can create a situation where the learner closes off, hiding not only their sexuality but demurring away from other opportunities of expression and engagement as well. Conversely, if an individual with an alternative sexuality was open about this fact, it could very well cause discomfort in other adult learners who have a marked generational bias against many alternative sexualities and lifestyles (Cain). Both situations could provide useful grounds for personal growth in self-acceptance and self-security, for the learner of a minority sexual orientation and for the other learners in the class, respectively (Cain).

Situated Cognition v. Experiential…… [Read More]

References

Cain, M. "Theorizing the effects of class, gender, and race on adult learning in nonformal and informal settings."

Cranton, P. (2002). "Teaching for transformation." New directions for adult and continuing education 93, pp. 63-71.

Hansman, C. (2001). "Context-based adult learning." New directions for adult and continuing education 89, pp. 63-71.

Isopahkala-Bouret, U. 92008). "Transformative learning in managerial role transitions." Studies in continuing education 30(1), pp. 69-84.
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Manager the Introduction Describe -Development Important

Words: 8775 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63909353

manager." The introduction describe " -development important a manager mix a bit coaching theories ( I a coaching I techniques Kolb' learning cycle techniques fuore managers improve ), I a part body essay real life examples managers coaching techniques -development successful ( describe techniques ).

The importance of self-development in becoming a manager

Self-development is defined first and foremost as an overall holistic desire to find one's freedom and the desire to connect with one's self and own sense of worth, integrity and happiness so as to enjoy abundant happiness both at home and at work. Self-development in simpler terms is that amazing quest / journey that a person embarks on; a point of realization when all the pieces of a person's life fall together and they finally remove their own self limitations and inhibitions that hinder or stop any person more so a manager from achieving greatness. This definition…… [Read More]

References

BRUCE, H.A. 1938. Self-development: how to build self-confidence, a handbook for the ambitious, New York, Three Sirens Press.

BRUCE, H.A. 2010. Self-Development: A Handbook for the Ambitious, Whitefish, Kessinger Publishing, LLC.

BYNUM, W.F.A.P., R. (ed.) 2005. Oxford Dictionary of Scientific Quotations, London: Oxford University Press.

CLELAND, D. & IRELAND, L. 2006. Project Management: Strategic Design and Implementation, New York, McGraw-Hill.
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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CPR Class Given

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61818477

Still others must actually undergo the experience of trying to perform procedures themselves under guidance to learn effectively.

Looking back at some of my clinical experiences, I can recall instances where I took an approach to patient education that was based mainly on my convenience and preference rather than on an assessment of what teaching approach would be most beneficial to patients. More recently, I have tried to incorporate adult learning theory into patient education in connection with post-surgical follow-up self-care and wound care, among other areas. For example, I have recently begun asking patients whether they would prefer to have informational resources in printed form, or whether they would prefer to observe demonstrations. When patients indicate their desire to observe clinical procedures, I also offer them the opportunity to try the procedures under my guidance, taking advantage of the fact that some of them may learn best from experiential…… [Read More]

References

Brookfield, S. (1995). Adult learning: An overview. In The International Encyclopedia of Education (Ed. A.Tuinjman). Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Cercone, K. (2008). Characteristics of adult learners with implications for online learning design. AACE Journal, 16(2), 137 -- 159.

Clardy, A. (2005, August 1). Andragogy: Adult learning and education at its best. Online Submission, (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED492132). Retrieved

August 27, 2009, from ERIC database. (ERIC database)
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Creative Community Building

Words: 2192 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46951520

Adults, especially seniors need a place where they can learn new things and express themselves. Sometimes seniors go to a senior community arts program where they learn to paint and create things for themselves and for their loved ones. Art theory in the field of physical therapy is a very helpful and useful way of integrating varied learning and complex tasks all while promoting growth and renewal. For anything to flourish, especially a program like a senior community arts program, it needs to integrate lessons and objectives that promote the growth and learning of its participants.

Therefore, it is important to understand and analyze prior and current research that not only offers a different perspective, but also assures the teacher that what they are instructing has been proven to succeed and assists the people learning, to achieve certain pre-planned objectives. This paper is a literature review of six scholarly research…… [Read More]

References

Conlan, J., Grabowski, S., & Smith, K. (2003). Adult Learning - Emerging Perspectives on Learning, Teaching and Technology. Retrieved December 10, 2013, from  http://epltt.coe.uga.edu/index.php?title=Adult_Learning 

Dzubinski, L., Hentz, B., Davis, K.L., & Nicolaides, A. (2012). Envisioning an Adult Learning Graduate Program for the Early 21st Century A Developmental Action Inquiry Study.Adult Learning, 23(3), 103-110. doi:10.1177/1045159512452844

Edwards, C., Gaden, C., Marchant, R., Coventry, T., Dutton, P., & Scott, J.M. (2011). Delivering extension and adult learning outcomes from the Cicerone Project by comparing, measuring, learning and adopting'. Animal Production Science, 53(8), 827-840. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AN11322

Longenecker, C., & Abernathy, R. (2013). The eight imperatives of effective adult learning: Designing, implementing and assessing experiences in the modern workplace. Human Resource Management International Digest, 21(7), 30-33. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17100953&show=abstract
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Rise of the Internet Has

Words: 14838 Length: 54 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12867971

Appoximately one in six students enolled in a college o univesity, o ove 3 million individuals, paticipated in one o moe online couse in 2004. This was despite the fact that a leveling off was expected.

Anothe epot fo 2005 by Sloan showed that 850,000 moe students took distance couses in the fall this yea than 2004, an incease of nealy 40%. Once again the slowing o leveling did not come. Many seconday schools ae putting consideable esouces towad online leaning, in expectation that this appoach will be moe economical than taditional classes and also expanding thei each.

In addition, a suvey by the consulting and eseach fim Eduventues found 50% of the consumes who planned to enoll in a highe education pogam stated they would instead like to take some of thei couses online. About 80% of online students ae undegaduates, but ae nomally olde and moe apt to…… [Read More]

references when there is a contingency change. The relative response strength is changed by differential reinforcement of alternative courses of action. It is then that behaviors change. It is possible to conclude that adult students' observations about educational technology will change when the contingencies toward participation are strengthened. The clientele of higher education, its students, now enroll in college with expectations of learning about and to learn with technology (Green 1999).

How students deal with change and their ability to accept it has much to do with their observed satisfaction of the course that implements the most up-to-date technologies.

Merriam and Caffarella (1991) say that the more that is known about adult learners and the changes they go through and how these changes motivate and interact with learning, the better educators will be able to develop learning experiences that respond and stimulate development. This is an essential factor in adult learning and requires additional research regarding the implications for quality educational programs. This present research acknowledges the influence of the adult learners' attitudes and observations toward change. However, so that the emphasis remains on learning styles, no data will be collected to measure change in attitudes and perspectives.

Tools for Measuring Distance Education Courses

It is essential that there is an evaluation of educational curricula to determine what is and is not efficient in relationship to learning style. Technological courses have altered the evaluation process due to the additional factors of equipment, cost and knowledge of using technology. It is critical to keep in mind, however, that educators control technology, since technology is only one of many different tools. Technology is easy to assess; one knows immediately if an software does not work. It is necessary for instructors to spend more time considering the educational experience that they want to create and what is not working properly in terms of education results. Are students interested and engaged? Are they communicating with one another? Do they find the information challenging and productive? Are they receiving enough feedback from the instructor? Ultimately, an effective evaluation tool will help the teacher recognize if the conditions for quality learning are present or need improving and that the instructors and students feel their use of technology was considerably helpful.
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Motivation in a Highly Multicultural

Words: 5601 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62421736

... led me to suggest, as an alternative to assimilation, the value of being asimilao.

IV. eminders to Help

Kim & Lyons (2003) report that games can be successfully used to instill and enhance individuals' abilities to succeed in a multicultural firm. Game playing possesses numerous characteristics which could enhance the learning of competencies areas of skills, attitudes and beliefs, and knowledge. Games which include low-risk potential can increase a sense of safety, reduce vulnerable feelings, while also, and enhancing multicultural awareness.

For example, the use of games can balance out the inherent hierarchy between the trainees and the instructor (i.e., it levels the playing field) and potentially lead to an increased sense of safety on the part of the trainees" (Kim & Lyons, 2003). Increasing an individual's sense of safety can work tom eliminate prejudices and allow students and trainees to more readily examine their personal norms; cultural values;…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108786083

Chang, C.Y. (2003). Chapter 5 Counseling Asian-Americans. In Counseling Multicultural and Diverse Populations: Strategies for Practitioners, Vacc, N.A., Devaney, S.B., & Brendel, J.M. (Eds.) (pp. 73-92). New York: Brunner-Routledge. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=91054568

Cunningham, M.J. (2001). B2B: How to Build a Profitable E-Commerce Strategy. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000786585

Diversity or Diversion? Experts Express Their Views about the Effectiveness of Diversity Programs and Offer Suggestions on How to Improve Them. (2002, July). Black Enterprise, 32, 82+. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14677163
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Ways of Knowing

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55666574

ules & Ways of Knowing

The author of this report is asked to answer several questions as they relate to the current nursing classes that the author is taking. The first question is the role of scholarly during an APN/DNP program. The second question asks the author to discuss the interest the author has in the selected role and degree in question. A sub-section of that question is whether the role in question meets the APN consensus statement, what professional organizations offer certification in the applicable certification role and what the criteria are for any applicable industry exams. Next up will be a selection and explanation of an APN conceptual framework for practice. After that will be an explanation of the ways of knowing and how they influence the author's current practice. What will follow that is an identification and explanation of the author's preferred paradigm. Last will be a…… [Read More]

References

BCEN. (2014, June 3). Get Certified CEN ®. CEN BCEN. Retrieved June 3,

2014, from  http://www.bcencertifications.org/Get-Certified/CEN.aspx 

Duke. (2014, June 3). FAQ's. Duke School of Nursing. Retrieved June 3, 2014, from https://nursing.duke.edu/academics/programs/dnp/faqs

MUN. (2014, June 3). Conceptual Model. School of Nursing. Retrieved June 3, 2014,
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Active Process of Witnessing One's

Words: 3627 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2914175



A person working in a professional position often handles several large projects at once and supervises the activities or output of others. A working professional needs reliable time management tactics to manage time effectively for not only the quality and efficiency of work but for personal health and stress management as well. There are three steps that one can take in order to improve their time management skills.

Step 1 - One should plan each day, week and month by prioritizing tasks in order of importance and deadline. It is not possible to tackle projects competently without first evaluating the most significant tasks and the order in which they should be completed. One should separate projects that slow down their efficiency. Then, rearrange their schedule or delegate tasks to others in order to assure that they are not hung up on a project that is costing valuable hours of focus.…… [Read More]

References

Amulya, J. n.d. [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.itslifejimbutnotasweknowit.org.uk/files/whatisreflectivepractice.pdf . [Accessed 7 July 2012].

Archer, J. 2012. [ONLINE] How to Improve Time Management Skills for a Professional Role. Available at:  http://work.chron.com/improve-time-management-skills-professional-role-3009.html . [Accessed 7 July 2012].

Importance of Information Technology. 2012. [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.buzzle.com/articles/importance-of-information-technology.html . [Accessed 7 July 2012].

Reflection and Reflective Practice. 2010. [ONLINE] Available at:  http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/reflecti.htm . [Accessed 7 July 2012].
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EBP Project Will Every Two Hour Turning

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51075918

EBP Project: Will Every Two Hour Turning and Positioning Decrease Pressure Ulcers in the Eldery Bed Bound Population in Nursing Homes?

Practicum: Clinical rotations with preceptor; serving patients with acute, chronic and new medical issues.

One of the things I have discovered during my recent experiences with both academic and clinical education and an EBP project is that there are numerous and effective ways of learning, presenting, and communicating. Each method, however, has one critical thing in common -- it must be a two-way path and none are effective unless there is clear communicative understanding on the part of the receipient, patient, family or colleague. Aristotle, for instance, once commented that "For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them." Experiential learning targets certain brain chemicals and allows a more personal approach to the individual's own particular brain chemistry. Because the individual…… [Read More]

Sources

Beard, C., et.al. (2006). Experiential Learning: A Best Practice Handbook for Educators and Trainers. Kogan Press.

Hyrkas, K., et al. (2010. Leading Innovation and Change. Journal of Nursing Management. 18 (1): 1-3.

Moon, J. (2004). A Handbook of Reflective and Experiential Learning. New York: Routledge.

Tapscott, D. (1998). Growing Up Digital: The Rise of the Next Generation. New York: McGraw Hill.
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How Adults Use the Internet to Pursue Higher Education

Words: 5677 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15726576

Adult Education and the Internet

Higher Education, the Internet, and the Adult Learner

The concept of using the Internet in the pursuit of higher education is not exactly new. Indeed, the institution of "distance learning," has been in full swing since the heyday of late night Sally Struthers correspondence-school commercials. What has changed, however, is the increasing legitimacy and widespread use of the Internet in the pursuit of higher education -- from the research of traditional college students, to the complete education of students enrolled in "online universities" and courses.

Adult students face unique challenges when they utilize the Internet as part of their education in ways that mirror the issues they face within other instructional modalities.

In seeking to understand just how adults learn, these issues must be viewed collectively, for general adult learner/adult education studies must be considered as a whole along with the added factors arising out…… [Read More]

Kerka, Sandra. Distance Learning, the Internet, and the World Wide Web. http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed395214.html

Imel, Susan. Ethical Practice in Adult Education. http://www.ericfacility.net/databases/ERIC_Digests/ed338897.html

Brockett, R.G. "Ethics and the Adult Educators." In ETHICAL ISSUES IN ADULT EDUCATION, edited by R.G. Brockett. New York: Teachers College Press, 1988a.
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Application of a Pedagogic Model to the Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Words: 60754 Length: 230 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60817292

Pedagogic Model to the Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Almost thirty years ago, the American federal government passed an act mandating the availability of a free and appropriate public education for all handicapped children. In 1990, this act was updated and reformed as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which itself was reformed in 1997. At each step, the goal was to make education more equitable and more accessible to those with special educational needs. During the last presidential term, the "No Child Left Behind" Act attempted to assure that individuals with disabilities were increasingly mainstreamed and assured of high educational results. All of these legislative mandates were aimed at insuring that children with disabilities were not defrauded of the public education which has become the birthright of all American children. The latest reforms to IDEA, for example, provided sweeping reforms which not only expanded the classification of…… [Read More]

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Psychological Contract With an Introduction

Words: 752 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66419301

How do employees adjust and how might it affect their attitudes toward their jobs? Have you had this type of conversation with a supervisor, and if so, what was the outcome?

Because of the fear of not being hired, few employees (including myself) are willing to discuss initial expectations with a supervisor upon entry into a company. However, during performance reviews, provided the relationship with the supervisor is strong, the topic of opportunities regarding personal growth may be broached. There is always reluctance even then about making the discussion too 'personal.' In some instances, this discussion can be a positive experience for employees, as it can enable them to be more honest in a workplace context. Other employees, particularly if they are not a good fit with the organizational culture to begin with, or do not have warm relations with their supervisor, may feel uncomfortable with such a discussion.

Q3.…… [Read More]

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Gaming as an Instructional Strategy

Words: 10150 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29985406

Knowles stated "The richest resources for learning reside in the adult learners themselves" (p. 66). n instructional strategy like gaming may help to facilitate tapping into the adult learner's experience. Through collaboration during the play of a game, learners may discuss prior experiences to aid in discovery of the correct answer. Gaming activities also permit peer feedback to be given to students based on their previous experiences. The millennial student desires immediate feedback and integrates their experiences into their learning (Tapscott, 1998). gain, through group discussion and collaboration, learners share previous experiences with others to confirm or not the correct answer.

By not tapping into the experience of adult learners, negative effects may result (Knowles, 2005). The adult learner identifies their experiences as who they are. In other words, their experiences help to define them as a person. dult learners, who perceive their experiences as being ignored or devalued, perceive…… [Read More]

A somewhat controversial and negative environmental outcome identified from the review of literature was the competitive component to gaming. In an evaluation conducted by Gruendling et al.(1991), some learners (5%) felt threatened by competitive nature of gaming (N = 40) and stated that gaming can cause unnecessary anxiety and stress. Bloom and Trice (1994) stated that too much competition can take the fun out of the process of learning for some and perhaps discourage student participation.

Psychosocial Outcomes

Psychosocial outcomes were also identified from the review of literature. Gaming was found to have encouraged and enhanced active participation and communication-social interactions, improve peer relationships, promote teamwork and collaboration, as well as decrease participants fear, tension, stress, and feelings of intimidation (Ballantine, 2003; Bays & Hermann, 1997; Berbiglia et al., 1997; Bloom & Trice, 1994; Cowen & Tesh, 2002; Dols, 1988; Fetro & Hey, 2000; Gifford, 2001;
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Role and Importance of Effective

Words: 6404 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41028144



A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001246515

Heckman, James J. "Doing it Right: Job Training and Education." Public Interest Spring 1999: 86+.

This journal article assesses the value of offering parents choices in the education of their children. It compares the cost effectiveness and the relative value of training vs. education to the clients.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001760849

Holton Iii, Elwood F., Reid a. ates, and Sharon S. Naquin. "Large-Scale Performance-Driven Training Needs Assessment: A Case Study." Public Personnel Management 29.2 (2000): 253.

This case study covered the assessment of needs for government performance driven training programs on a large scale for annual implementation and continual availability to employees. The purpose of this paper is to report on the methodology developed and the pilot implementation.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006002281

Hornik, ryan. "Listening to Experience: 10 Steps to Successful Online Training; How Do You Reap the enefits of Online Training While Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Derail a Program? A…… [Read More]

Bibliography to show the extent of my preliminary research on this subject and have identified the sources used in the final sources cited to follow.

I have looked at feedback as a part of training and identified its role and importance. I have consulted many sources in order to documents my findings. In addition I have described the value of feedback and where and when it is important. I have also defined the various types of feedback and the difference between positive and negative feedback. I have shown that positive feedback is necessary for effecting learning.

I have also shown how positive feedback can be delivered and, in fact, insured within a training program or module. Suggestions as to how the trainer can compensate for lack of positive impressions of the trainee or a perceived lack of respect for the trainer. Ideas have been explored for modifying either the attitude of the trainer or the trainees.

The final conclusions are that feedback is absolutely critical in the effectiveness of any learning process, including training. Positive feedback has more value than negative, which can be counter-productive. It is in the delivery and acceptance where feedback becomes positive or negative, and this is based upon attitudes and perception. A positive perception of the deliverer of feedback will weight the positive factor of the feedback. Positive feedback can strengthen motivation, allow trainees to create or modify goals, and raise self-confidence. It provides a measure against which further actions can be taken. These may include modifying the program according to feedback from participants. Feedback from computers is, at best, perceived as neutral, so a human trainer to back up these responses is valuable. If positive feedback is not being delivered, changes need to be made to the perceptions of either trainer or trainee to adjust this, because positive feedback is essential to the learning process and the effectiveness of the training depends upon it as much as the three other essential factors, which are: relevance, demonstration and practice.

Annotated Bibleography
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Business Provide a Chorally Definition of Organizational

Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16173915

Business

Provide a chorally definition of organizational learners.

There are two perspectives on organizational learners. The technical view presumes that organizational learning involves learning both in and out of the organization. The social view posits that learning occurs within the context of social interaction with others and that it comes from explicit and implicit sources, form both direct and indirect learning and form a synthesis of experiences. These experiences include situated practice, observation, and socialization by both modeling and practice.

Organizational learning involves experiential learning per Dewey and Kurt Lewin as well as learning that centers on reflection. There is also informal learning and single -- as well as double-loop learning, one of which involves detection and correction of errors and the other which involves challenging the governing principles themselves (Pegasus ommunication).

Is there a difference between the notion of Organizational Learners and that of the Learning Organization?

There is…… [Read More]

Compass, Ruler, & Base. (2004). OD Principles of Practice. http://www.odnetwork.org/principlesofpractice.html

Pegasus Communication WHAT IS ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING?

http://www.pegasuscom.com/aboutol.html
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Using Call in Teaching Listening

Words: 875 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55902664

Linguistics

Space

Using CALL in Teaching Listening

In order to use computer-assisted language learning or CALL to teach listening skills, teachers should first understand what CALL actually is and that they should aim to "establish a methodology for benchmarking speech synthesis for computer-assisted language learning." (Zoe, 2009) CALL is a modern form of computer-based learning that has two features that make it distinctive from other forms of computer-based learning. The first is called bidirectional learning and the second feature is simply the idea of individualized learning. CALL as a process is good for listening skills because of the fact that just giving a speaker one's undivided attention in order to understand the speaker's point-of-view is fine but that equates to only a single directional activity. Active listening makes great listeners. Active listening is more than paying attention and it is bidirectional just like the CALL process. Because the concept of…… [Read More]

References

Kilickaya, Ferit. (2009). "The Effect of A Computer-Assisted Language Learning Course On Pre-Service English Teachers' Practice Teaching." Educational Studies (03055698). October, Vol. 35 Issue 4, p 437-448, 12p, 4 charts.

Liu, Min. (1994). "Hypermedia Assisted Instruction and Second Language Learning: A Semantic-Network-Based Approach." Computers in the Schools. Vol. 10 Issue 3/4, p 293, 20p, 2 charts, 3 diagrams.

Schwienhorst, Klaus. (2002). "Why Virtual, Why Environments? Implementing Virtual Reality Concepts In Computer-Assisted Language Learning." Simulation & Gaming. June, Vol. 33 Issue 2, p 196, 14p.

Son, Jeong-Bae (2006.) "Using Online Discussion Groups in a CALL Teacher Training Course." RELC Journal. April, Vol. 37, Issue 1, p 123-135, 13p.
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Successful Partnership This Work Has

Words: 1302 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18710944

"(1999) These principles are stated to be of the nature that are designed to "...be incorporated into our daily work and to shape how we think about our responsibilities, communicate our purposes, and interact with students. " (limling and Whitt, 1999)

Good practice in student affairs is stated to:

(1) Engages students in active learning;

(2) Helps students develop coherent values and ethical standards;

(3) Sets and communicates high expectations for student learning;

(4) Uses systematic inquiry to improve student and institutional performance;

(5) Uses resources effectively to achieve institutional missions and goals;

(6) Forges educational partnerships that advance student learning; and (7) uilds supportive and inclusive communities. ( limling and Whitt, 1999 as cited in: Pontius and Harper, 2006)

IV. Effective Partnership Principles

The work of Schuh (1999) entitled; "Guiding Principles for Evaluating Student and Academic Affairs Partnerships" states that principles that are stated as being of the nature…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Pontius, Jason L. And Harper, Shaun R. (2006) Principles for Good Practice in Graduate and Professional Student Engagement NEW DIRECTIONS for STUDENT SERVICES, no. 115, Fall 2006 © Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Online available at:

http://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1023&context=sharper

Blimling, G.S., & Whitt, E.J. (1999). Good practice in student affairs: Principles to foster student learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Schuh, John H. (1999) Guiding Principles for Evaluating Student and Academic Affairs Partnerships, New Directions for Student Services, No. 87, Fall 1999. Jossey-Bass. Online available at:
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Technological vs Traditional Approaches to

Words: 2159 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95975433

As they will fully engage in the learning experience through immersion, children learn to link goals and roles.

Technology-Based Learning Techniques

DGBL's interactive learning techniques range from an general memorization to complicated, sophisticated problem. Common benefits include, but are not limited to:

Through repetition, along with feedback, students receive valuable practice.

Students learn by doing.

Students learn from their mistakes. Sometimes, when a student makes an error, he/she must return to the start and begin again.

Students experience goal-oriented learning, which in turn, motivates them to attempt to conquer their challenges.

Students engage in discovery learning and "guided discovery," along with solving problems.

Students complete task-based learning as they solve a series of increasingly, more difficult problems or challenges.

Students are offered guidance and modeling to help them learn and improve their skills.

Students reason during question-led learning sessions.

Students engage in and role-playing activities, and reflect upon actions, a…… [Read More]

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Educational Development Is a Mix of Both

Words: 1591 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92500107

Educational development is a mix of both formal and informal learning conditions as assessment of my own educational experience has taught me. I cannot say that one is more important than the other; each segment together has taught me different elements -- made me grow -- and combined in producing the 'me' that you see today.

In his "Notes for an Obituary," Einstein once noted that the system of education was a deliberate intention on the part of the state to mislead youth. He distrusted all forms of education, and from his pre-adolescent days refused to be taught. Religious leaders, too, he felt were disillusioned and deluding society. Yet Einstein felt that the fault belonged, not to the rabbi or to the priest, but with the force behind them that disregarded liberty of thought and made education compulsory. As regards Einstein himself, he was determined that formal education would not…… [Read More]

Sources

Kolb, David (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall

Ottawa University. Retrieved on Monday, January 24, 2011 from: http://www.ottawa.edu/.

Reaching In, Reaching Out.(RIRO) (n.d.) Children's storybooks that promote resilience. Retrieved on Monday, January 24, 2011 from:  http://www.reachinginreachingout.com/documents/Guidebook%20-%20Storybooks%20that%20Promote%20Resilience.pdf 

4. Conclusion
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PSI System and Other Educational

Words: 5885 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5995460



Summary

The Keller/PSI approach to academic and professional training has been documented to improve student performance as measured by course completion rates and subject matter retention among students. On the other hand, there are considerable practical and technical problems implementing the Keller/PSI approach within traditional educational institutions. Meanwhile, there is little if any empirical evidence suggesting precisely how the Keller/PSI model benefits learning outside of the focus on the reduced deadline orientation that is the hallmark of that teaching methodology.

Substantial evidence exists to suggest that the success of the Keller/PSI approach is actually attributable to other changes typically attributable to Keller/PSI, such as the broadening of the range of media of instruction, despite the fact that those changes are natural consequences of the Keller/PSI design rather than deliberately conceived components of the approach. The empirical evidence of the increased success of CAPSI programs further bolsters that argument.

A wealth…… [Read More]

References

Abdulwahed, M. And Nagy, Z.K. "Applying Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle for Laboratory Education." Journal of Engineering Education. American Society for Engineering Education. 2009. Retrieved January 19, 2010 from HighBeam

Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1848852471.html

Burton, J.K., Moore, D.M., and Magliaro, S.G. (2004). Behaviorism and instructional technology. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, NJ.

Dunne, J.D. (1997). Behavior Analysis: No Defense Required. Wright University.
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Ipa ESL Learners' Attitudes Order

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67737727

Lam (2000) noted that the top-down implementation of technology by administration and senior staff may make teachers resent and avoid its utilization. He added that concern regarding legitimacy of the computer as an effective educational tool has an influence on teacher adoption. He suggested that language teachers are not technophobes, as some believe, but do not incorporate technology because institutions and programs fail to notice the importance of training teachers and matching their goals with the tools they wish to use. Differences in acceptance and adoption of technology also occur in students, with some being more accepting of computer-aided learning than others. According to Na (2001), male students frequently have more confidence in computer technology than females. It is also known that students have different learning styles (VanZile-Tamsen & Livingston, J.A., 1999; Sankaran et al., 2000). There is thus a need to match course formats with students' attitudes and learning…… [Read More]