Family Intervention Essays (Examples)

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Family Care Plan Nursing Family

Words: 782 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39760808



Family Interventions

-Mother can attend cancer support groups and receive advice and education through other channels regarding proper methods of providing care and improving quality of life for her husband

-Son can explore employment options as well as discuss various needs and responsibilities with his parents in order to determine his most effective utilization within the changed family dynamic

-Father can provide the levels of self-care that come easily, but should educate himself regarding his condition and ease care by allowing others to help when necessary

Nursing Interventions

-Provide educational materials/answer questions for both mother and father

-Assist son with psychological transition of increased responsibility/familial dependence

-Instruction of proper care techniques for mother and father regarding father's condition

Evaluation

Levels of comfort and competence in new family roles should be easily assessed in regular visits through brief questioning. Monitoring father's health through standard vital sign and other appropriate tests will…… [Read More]

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Family Case Study Presenting Problem

Words: 4052 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32471628

Expressive functioning is related to communication such as emotional, verbal, and nonverbal communication, problem solving and roles within the family. Beliefs within the family are also a part of expressive functioning.

For the purpose of the Calgary Family Assessment Model, a family is defined as who they say they are. It is very important that the clinician performing the assessment not assign their own beliefs upon what he or she believes a family is, and take into account what the patient feels about family as to the patient is may mean not only the people who actually live within the household but can also address past, present and future emotional attachments.

Calgary Family Intervention Model:

The immediate family is composed of Mr. Herbert Schelley (the patient), Mrs. Annette Schelley (his wife), and their son Thomas Schelley. The extended family consists of the Schelley's two married daughters, their husbands and their…… [Read More]

Reference:

Brownwald H. ed. (2003) Harrison's Textbook of Internal Medicine, 15th edition,

McGraw-Hill, New York

Clement S. (2004) Guidelines for glycemic control. Clin Cornerstone. 6(2):31-9

Echeverry D.M., Dike M.R., Washington C., Davidson M.B.. (1995). The impact of using a low-literacy patient education tool on process measures of diabetes care in a minority population J. Natl Med Assoc. (11):1074-81
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Families Society Purpose The Purpose Exercise Conduct

Words: 1650 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5948093

Families Society" PURPOSE: The purpose exercise conduct a detailed, critical evaluation research design, methods analysis a study written published a peer-reviewed journal.

Valentine, K., Thomson, C., & Antcliff, G. (2009). Early childhood services and support for vulnerable families: Lessons from the Benevolent Society's Partnerships In Early

Childhood Program. Australian Journal of Social Issues, 44(2), 195-213,120.

Yes, it is very specific.

Do subtitles, if present, provide important information regarding the research?

Yes, they bullet-point the basic components of the article although they do not label all of the conventionally-expected components of a research article like a literature review.

Are the main variables expressed in the title?

No.

Are the terms in the title easily understood by most people?

To some extent: the general subject matter is clear, although not what is meant by vulnerable families, nor is the Partnerships In Early Childhood Program (PIEC) well-known.

5) Does the title avoid any…… [Read More]

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Family Assistance Centers Role Sept 11

Words: 810 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33926722

Stress Management centers (CISM: Everly & Mitchell, 1999) are integrated and comprehensive crisis intervention approaches to catastrophic critical events. CISM approaches consist of a continuum of services from pre-crisis preparedness to post-crisis-intervention procedures that can deal with the both the physical and psychological consequences of critical incidents. The care services during catastrophic events often include individual, group, and family interventions.

The use of the traditional model of a Family Assistance Center (FAC) is an example of macro-level CISM service planning and delivery service center. FACs as used during the 911 catastrophe assisted families in times of the crisis. A FAC is a secure facility which was set up at a centralized location with the function of supplying information about missing persons who were possible victims of the disaster. During the 911 crisis FAC's functioned as gathering points where information was exchanged in order to either facilitate the body identification process…… [Read More]

References

Donahue, A.K. & Robert V.T. (2006). Homeland Security Affairs. In Lessons we don't learn: A study of the lessons of disasters, why we repeat them, and how we can learn them. Retrieved August 28, 2011, from http://www.hsaj.org.

Everly, G.S., Jr. & Mitchell, J.T. (1999). Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): A new era and standard of care in crisis intervention, (2nd Ed.). Ellicott City, MD: Chevron.

Williams, S (2008) Rethinking the nature of disaster: From failed instruments of learning to a post-social understanding. Social Forces, 87 (2), 1115-1138.
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Family and Systemic Therapies Shift From First-Order to Second Order

Words: 2684 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81794575

Shift From First-order to Second-Order Cybernetics in the Family and Systemic Therapies

The strategic family therapy model came up in the 1950s and was inspired by two primary works: the works of Milton Erickson who came up with revolutionary paradoxical interventions which took advantage of people's resistance to change to help alter psychiatric symptoms first; and the works of Gregory Bateson and the Palo Alto Group that made use of cybernetics in communication patterns of the family. The style of a therapist changes as he or she gets better as a person and as they develop professionally, and also as per what is in fashion at the time. An older person has the chance to look at what happened in their past and see what worked and what failed. This gives them a better perspective of what works and what might not work for a given situation. The path is…… [Read More]

References

Asen, E. (2004). Outcome research in family therapy. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, vol. 8, pp. 230-238

Asen, K.E., Berkowitz, R., Cooklin, A., et al. (1991). Family therapy outcome research: a trial for families, therapists and researchers. Family Process, 30, 3-20.

Baron, P. (2007). Ecosystemic psychology; first and second order cybernetics.

Baucom, D., Shoham, V., Mueser, K., et al. (1998). Empirically supported couple and family interventions for marital distress and adult mental health problems. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66, 53-88.
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Analyzing Family Relation and Substance Use Disorders

Words: 1518 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52086634

Family elation and Substance Use Disorders

Families have multiple reasons to exist. The key reason, however, is nurturing, and fulfilling the present as well as long-term wants and needs of all members. A secondary motive is contributing, as a participant and consumer, to the wider society (Peter 2015). This paper will explore important familial roles, cultural differences in family systems, and how family members can facilitate treatment of a teenage member diagnosed with substance/drug use disorder. Family interventions such as Functional Family Therapy, Brief Strategic Family Therapy, In Family Behavior Therapy, Multi-systemic Therapy and Multidimensional Family Therapy will also be discussed.

In What Way Is The Family A System Of oles?

Families have multiple reasons to exist. The key reason, however, is nurturing, and fulfilling the present as well as long-term wants and needs of all members. A secondary motive is contributing, as a participant and consumer, to the wider…… [Read More]

Reference

Marcia .C. (2011). Culture and Family Dynamics. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from http://www.dimensionsofculture.com/2010/11/culture-and-family-dynamics/

National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2014, January). Family-Based Approaches. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-adolescent-substance-use-disorder-treatment-research-based-guide/evidence-based-approaches-to-treating-adolescent-substance-use-disorders/family-based-approaches

Novella .R. (2014, January). Family-Based Approaches. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-adolescent-substance-use-disorder-treatment-research-based-guide/evidence-based-approaches-to-treating-adolescent-substance-use-disorders/family-based-approaches

Peter K. (2015, March). Use Family System Concepts to Improve Your Members' Harmony. Retrieved March 30, 2016, from http://sfhelp.org/fam/system.htm
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Analyzing Family Centred Therapy on Substance Disorder for the Aboriginal People

Words: 1340 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21317684

Family-Centred Therapy on Substance Disorder for the Aboriginal People

The health status of aboriginal people is strongly intertwined with their cultural practices. Keeping focus on cultural issues is helpful when handling policy issues that relate to the concerns of the Aboriginal people. According to their beliefs and practices, the health of an individual encapsulates the whole being. It relates to physical, emotional, spiritual and mental aspects of the individual. Consequently, assessment of the health needs of these people must be hinged to all the dimensions mentioned above. In the recent past, there has been a general acceptance of the unique identities manifested by the diverse groups of aboriginal communities. Experts, now, agree that cultural addiction strategies are the most effective when dealing with the Aborigines. Health programming strategies that are in line with appropriate cultural practices. Such health programming facilitates holistic frames for taking care of needs, strength, opportunities and…… [Read More]

References

Network of Alcohol and other Drug Agencies (NADA) (2012). WORKING WITH DIVERSITY IN ALCOHOL & OTHER DRUG SETTINGS. Retrieved 26 June 2016 from http://www.nada.org.au/media/59706/nada_working_with_diversity_sept14.pdf

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (1999). Brief interventions and brief therapies for substance abuse.

Family Mental Health and Substance Use Task Force (2015). Families at the Center: Reducing the Impact of Mental Health and Substance Use Problems on Families. Retrieved 26 June 2016 from http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/health/managing-your-health/mental-health-substance-use/child-teen-mental-health/families_at_the_centre_full_version.pdf

Rapske D. L. (n.d.). Substance Abuse Treatment for Aboriginal Youth: Should Drug and Alcohol Interventions for First Nations Youth be Subsumed Exclusively Under Harm Reduction Frameworks? A Critical Policy Review
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Families Delinquency and Crime

Words: 2311 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67603861

Families, Delinquency & Crime

The fundamental changes occurring to families in the 2st century can be classified into two different categories, depending on the internal or the external perspective that is used in the analysis. The external perspective proposes an analysis of the sociodemographic changes that have occurred to families under the impact of the external factors of the 2st century. The sociodemographic changes are characterized both by the numbers, by a quantitative reflection of families, and by the relationships that are formed within each family.

From the first perspective, the 2st century has imposed both changes in the number of families (some cultures, notably the Western ones, have encountered decreases in size because of an increased reluctance of individuals to get married) and in the formation of these family groups. As such, in many of these family groups, the norm has translated from a man-woman marriage as the basis…… [Read More]

1. Roopnarine, Jaipaul; Gielen, Uwe. 2005. Families in Global Perspective. Pearson Education.

2. Vaskovics, L.A. 1994. Family and household structures in the former GDR and the Federal Republic of Germany from 1980 to 1989 -- a comparison. Wiesbaden.

3. Aly, A.M.Y. 1999. Lectures on population, family and childhood issues. Alexandria: The Modern University Office.
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Family & Sociology of Marriage the Purpose

Words: 968 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80928457

Family & Sociology of Marriage

The purpose and social function of marriage has changed. While marriage was once a binding declaration of commitment and love to another person of the opposite gender, avowed and proclaimed in a holy ceremony, today marriage has become a catch all; a legally binding contract between two people who, for any reason, can choose to end the marriage without stigma or difficulty. Today, half of marriages end in divorce (CDC, 2010). And yet, millions of people remain happily married in America. Why? How? What is it that enables some couples to remain not just married, but happily so? Sociologists have analyzed the social, cognitive, and emotional consequences and detriments to failed marriages on the family. esults seem to indicate that successful marriages are not successful by chance, but rather, the product of hard work, compromise and mutual respect. While these criteria do not guarantee a…… [Read More]

References:

Dankin, J., Wampler, R. (2008). Money Doesn't Buy Happiness, but It Helps: Marital Satisfaction, Psychological Distress, and Demographic Differences Between Low- and Middle-Income Clinic Couples. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 36:300 -- 311.

Freeman, C., Carlson, J., & Sperry, L. (1993). Adlerian marital therapy strategies with middle income couples facing financial stress. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 21(4), 324 -- 332.

Reis, H.T., and Collins, N. (2000).Measuring relationship properties and interactions relevant to social support. In S. Cohen, L.G. Underwood, & B.H. Gottlieb (Eds.), Social support measurement and intervention: A guide for health and social scientists (pp. 136 -- 194). New York: Oxford University Press.

Rogers, S.J. (2004). Dollar, dependency, and divorce: Four perspectives on the role of wives' income. Journal of Marriage and Family, 66, 59 -- 74.
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Family Group Conference in New

Words: 4176 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76066618

Many nations do not use restorative justice as a policy, but eventually bright, progressive leaders worldwide will hopefully learn the value of restorative justice, and implement it at some level.

Youth Justice Process in New Zealand. (2005). Family Group Conference. Retrieved 29 June 2008, at http://www.justice.govtnz/youth/fgc.html.

This government-produced review of the ideologies and practical implementation of the Family Group Conference was a valuable and basic article in terms of the understanding the process and how it works well in most cases.

The Family Group Conference in New Zealand

The Family Group Conference (FGC) was established in New Zealand in 1989, with the purpose in mind of more skillfully and more fairly dealing with problems and issues of boys and girls (under the age of 14) and young people (14-16) who get in trouble with law enforcement. According to information provided by the Youth Justice Process (www.justice.govt.nz),the FGC has modernized and…… [Read More]

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Family Therapies Structural Family Approach Major Contributors

Words: 1993 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86892175

Family Therapies

Structural family approach

Major contributors of Structural family approach

Structural family approach mainly operates by considering problems within the family structure, it emphasizes on dealing with the individual symptom through examination of the whole family interaction pattern. Furthermore, this theory does not insist on the relation between family interactions and pathology but, it associates the symptoms with family's interaction. Structural family theory has three operating areas, these include; the family, the problem itself and the change process. First stage entails, the therapist knowing the kind of family he/she is dealing with, the composition and hierarchy of the family. he/she tries to fit in the family's environment so as to capture the real picture. In the second stage, the therapist identifies is specifically stopping the family from living harmoniously. he/she also finds out the function and position of the problem behavior Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 2008()

History of Structural family…… [Read More]

References

Bobrow, E., & Ray, W.A. (2004). Strategic Family Therapy in the Trenches. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 23(4), 28-38. doi: 10.1521/jsyt.23.4.28.57840

D'Angelo, S.L. (1995). The Milan approach to therapy revisited. PsycCRITIQUES, 40(4), 352-352. doi: 10.1037/003578

Goldenberg, H., & Goldenberg, I. (2008). Family Therapy: An Overview: Thomson Brooks/Cole.

Rosen, K.H. (2003). Strategic family therapy. In L.L. Hecker & J.L. Wetchler (Eds.), An introduction to marriage and family therapy. (pp. 95-121). Binghamton, NY U.S.: Haworth Clinical Practice Press.
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Families Delinquency and Crime This

Words: 1240 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99269999

He has been expelled from three school since he began his education and is currently attending junior high school after last attending a small charter school in his community. The shoplifting incident also caused his mother to ask his father to take him back into his home, he has lived with mostly his mother with infrequent visitation from his father, except for a year period where he lived with his father and stepmother and their other children, which ended at age 12 when he tried to vocalize feelings of concern about puberty to his stepmother and she perceived the conversation as deviant and asked that he be returned to his mother.

Justin's anti-social behavior began at birth but has had periods of extremes, beginning with near constant conflict with his mother over mundane requests as well as other general rejections of authority, including an incident of extreme foul language focused…… [Read More]

References

Greene, R.R. (1999). 5 Carl Rogers and the Person-Centered Approach. In Human Behavior Theory and Social Work Practice (2nd ed., pp. 145-161). New York: Aldine De Gruyter.

Loeber, R., Farrington, D.P., Stouthamer-Loeber, M., & Van Kammen, W.B. (1998). Antisocial Behavior and Mental Health Problems: Explanatory Factors in Childhood and Adolescence. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Van Lier, P.A., Vuijk, P., & Crijnen, a.A. (2005). Understanding Mechanisms of Change in the Development of Antisocial Behavior: The Impact of a Universal Intervention. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 33(5), 521.
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Family Deliquency and Crime Profile

Words: 1204 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1087477



In terms of the theories that are put forward in the book by Simon et al. (2004), Gary's profile conforms to a number of theoretical perspectives. In general however this profile tends to concur with the point made by the authors that the criminal behavior is largely a result of lax or ineffective parenting. (Simon et al., 2004, p.15) as this book states, there are numerous studies that refer to the importance of family and home environment as well as problematic parenting in the development of developmental antisocial tendencies. This also refers to larger problems when these become permanent behavior patterns and extend into later life. (Simon et al., 2004, p.15)

Furthermore, parents are seen as "primary argents of socializations" of children and therefore they play a major role in the creation of negative and "abnormal "tendencies in developing children. (Simon et al., 2004, p.16)

Theorists like Gleuck and others…… [Read More]

References

Simon R., Simon L. And Wallace L. (2004) Families, Delinquency and Crime:

Linking Society's most Basic Institution to Antisocial Behavior. Roxbury Publishing.
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Family Theory Application the Purpose

Words: 1595 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6216315

Specific recommendations for family therapists who employ parent training techniques are offered.

Summary and Conclusion

While Rogers does not completely define precisely the 'human' it is easily understood to be that of all aspects of the individual therefore, the environmental/ecological interaction theory, while not perfect is a good basis for the provision of healthcare to families by the nursing professional. Every aspect of the lives of a family illustrated through the interactions between the individuals and the community, neighborhood, place of employment, daycare institutions or school, laws, safety precautions, travel, mode of travel, mode of living, housing environment and indeed all elements expressed by the Macro, Micro, Meso, and Exo Levels effect the individuals. The individuals affect the environment and the elements contained therein as well through either actions or even inactions. These two facts clearly demonstrate the validity of the theory and the theoretical framework base described in this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sandelowski M. Troubling distinctions: a semiotics of the nursing; as cited by Joan Engebretson in Document entitled Hands-on: The Persistent Metaphor in Nursing, Holistic Nursing Practice Vol.16 No.4 07-01-2002 ISSN 09979311.

The Ecological Theory (nd) Online available at www.unt.edu/cpe/module1/blk1.htm

The Theoretical Matrix for a Rogerian Nursing Practice" by E.A.M.Barrett 2000, Theoria: Journal of Nursing Theory, 9 (4) p.3-7. Copyright 2000 by the Swedish Society for Nursing Theories in Practice, Research, and Education. Reprinted with permission. http://medweb.uwcm.ac.uk/martha/theory.htm

Meyers, S.A. An Ecological Approach to Enhancing Parenting Skills in Family Therapy "http: Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/klu/coft/1998/
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Families Delinquency and Crime According

Words: 1447 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69696194

Reclaiming Children and Youth.. Retrieved October 02, 2009 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-206794465.html Wester, K, MacDonald, C & Lewis, T. (2008). A glimpse into the lives of nine youths in a correctional facility: Insight into theories of delinquency.(Report). Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling. American Counseling Association. 2008. Retrieved October 02,

2009 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-178713105.html

Gibbs, J., Potter, G.B., DiBiase, a.M. & Devlin, R. (2008). The EQUIP program: Helping youth to see -- really see -- the other person: Youth who present anti-social behavior need powerful interventions that strengthen empathy, counter negative peer influence, and challenge thinking errors. Reclaiming Children and Youth. Retrieved October 02, 2009

from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-183982220.html

Harkwick, K. & Brannigan, a. (2008). Self-control, child effects, and informal social control: A

direct test of the primacy of sociogenic factors. Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Canadian Criminal Justice Association. Retrieved October 02, 2009

from HighBeam Research:…… [Read More]

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Family Theories

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85351756

Family

Age Students With Learning Disabilities

The impact of family motivation on college age students with learning disabilities may be a deciding factor in regard to the student's success or failure. College age students with learning disabilities obviously have more immediate needs in cooperative learning settings when compared to typical students. Educators cannot just tell the student to just sit-down and read five chapters of Freud. These students have problems like dyslexia, AD/HD, or English as a second language to name a few and they may have had additional help in the past that may not be available at an older age. When there are obvious underlying issues, the family, teachers and the students themselves have to work more closely together in order to reach the desired positive outcomes. "Teaching effectiveness is inferred from the product that was created; it is the product that is the indicator of scholarship." (Cranton,…… [Read More]

Positive feedback is a major part of the Family Systems Theory process. Feedback in this case is a process in which the family, and possibly the teaching team involved, all work together to regulate the thinking process of the college age student with learning disabilities. This process also incorporates the notion that positive self-talk by the college age student with some form of learning disability is a necessary component of educational success. Self-talk helps them monitor their own output. In other words, the human body in this case accepts feedback from both internal and external sources to promote positive goals and objectives. A good example of a positive feedback system is how an automatic pilot system is used in most commercial airplanes. The automatic pilot process provides a computer that is actually flying the plane constant feedback about required information regarding the planes speed, altitude, direction and so on. As the plane drifts off course slightly, the computer system realigns the flight path. The college age student with a learning disability also drifts off occurs from time to time and positive feedback from family members, teachers and counselors and the student themselves all help to get the student back on course. This approach continually promotes active coping efforts and attributes positive meaning to the learning situation.

Name of Theory: FAMILY STRESS & COPING THEORY

Based on Family Stress Theory, there can be many indicators of a family's adaptation to stress induced events. "One is the adaptation of individual family members, including adolescents have noted that such factors as the perceived levels of individual and family stress serve as markers of adaptation." (McCubbin, 1993) In other words, the adaptation implies that there are a large number
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Family Deliquency and Crime Explain

Words: 2523 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10118708

In summary, observational preexperience had differential effects on the timing of subsequent contingency performance of infants (p. 693)."

This research supports the potential for vicarious learning as a pre-emptor to juvenile delinquency when the family, academic, and social conditions are reflective of the elements that reflect a lack of structure, participation in community, poverty, and poor education systems that are not financed to provide the infrastructure in a child's early years.

4. Explain your understanding of Baumrind's Typology of Parenting Styles. Based on your understanding of the parenting styles described by Baumrind, which style of parenting style is most effective? Which is the least effective style of parenting? Why? Be sure to support your answer.

Diana Baumrind discussed parenting types, the authoritarian parent, the permissive parent and the authoritative parent (Grolnick, W., 2003, p. 5). Baumrind's description of the parenting styles is:

The authoritarian parent attempts to shape, control, and…… [Read More]

References http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6360952

Barron, M.L. (1954). The Juvenile in Delinquent Society (1st ed.). New York: Alfred a. Knopf. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6360952 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000504042

Brannigan, a. (1997). Self-Control, Social Control and Evolutionary Psychology: Towards an Integrated Perspective on Crime. Canadian Journal of Criminology, 39(4), 403-431. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000504042 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=110022432

Grolnick, W.S. (2003). The Psychology of Parental Control: How Well-Meant Parenting Backfires. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=110022435 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5014544319

Rook, L. (2006). An Economic Psychological Approach to Herd Behavior. Journal of Economic Issues, 40(1), 75+. Retrieved March 17, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5014544319 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001116573
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Family Practice Spec Icd Codes Much of

Words: 545 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1081451

Family Practice Spec. ICD Codes

Much of the treatment scope associated with the specialty family practice revolves around prevention. In other words the family practice provider often sees individuals when they are not ill at all but need health care access to determine normal values and a general state of health for developmental purposes in children and sometimes for school or vocational reasons in adults. Family practice often sees multiple minor injuries as well. Family Practice can also manage as a primary care provider many chronic conditions or disorders with or without intervention of a specialist, such as diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, heart diseases of various kinds and most minor infections. Below is a list of just a few diagnostic codes for some of these commonly seen disorders and/or cases seen in the family practice specialty.

outine Physicals exams for Adults

outine general medical examination at…… [Read More]

Resources

Endres, Chris "Free online searchable ICD9 Codes," retrieved November 25, 2011 at  http://icd9cm.chrisendres.com/ 

Taylor, R.B. (2002) Manual of family practice. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
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Family and Community Support and

Words: 2900 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45705115

...in the end 'the addict has to want to change' and if the addict does not want to change it does not matter what program..." that the addict is in. (National Institute of Justice, 2005) the National Institute of Justice reports that a woman "often retains legal custody of a child while in prison, and once out, may not have the child immediately returned to her by the family member caring for the child." (2005)

Sarah Samson reports in the work entitled: "Groundbreaking Study Identifies Crucial Factors for Successful Community Reintegration of Ex-Prisoners in altimore" published in 2004, that Programs that help prisoners stay connected with their families, get drug treatment, and work while in prison can increase the chances that they will successfully reintegrate back into society, according to a new study released today by the nonpartisan Urban Institute. The study breaks new ground by recording prisoners' perspectives on…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baltimore Prisoners' Experiences Returning Home," by Christy Visher, Vera Kachnowski, Nancy La Vigne, and Jeremy Travis, has been made possible by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, OSI-Baltimore, the Abell Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Maryland Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention, and the John D. And Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Community Supervision and Reentry (2008) Urban Institute Prison Reentry Portfolio. Online available at http://www.urban.org/projects/reentry-portfolio/community-supervision.cfm

Pelissier, Bernadette (2004) Gender Differences in Substance Use Treatment Entry and Retention Among Prisoner with Substance Use Histories. Research and Practice. American Journal of Public Health August 2004. Vol. 94 No. 8. Online available at http://www.ajph.org/cgi/reprint/94/8/1418.pdf

Powell, M. Anne; and Nolan, Clare (2003) California State Prisoners with Children:
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Intervention Strategy for Grief Long

Words: 2367 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63088772



Utay and Miller (2006) described a study in which researchers observed over 100 individuals with unresolved grief reactions. There were three phases of treatment employed with these individuals. The first stage of treatment involved cognitive structuring for the decision to grieve again and for procedure clarification. The second stage involved guided imagery for reliving, revising, and revisiting the scenes at which the loss occurred. The third and final stage involved future-oriented identity reconstruction. The researchers reported that the reliving of the event through guided imagery effectively changed the client's view of reality, and furthermore helped along their grief resolution (Melges & DeMaso (1980), as cited by Utay & Miller, 2006). Moreover, Guided imagery has been established as a versatile and effective intervention.

The importance in assisting the children's mother with the grief process lies in the fact that bereavement is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it…… [Read More]

References

Elliott, K. (2000). Long QT syndrome. Alberta RN, January/February.

Firth, Hurst (2005). Clinical Genetics, New York: Oxford University Press, 378-9.

Gravitz, MA. (2001). Perceptual reconstruction in the treatment of inordinate grief. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 44(1), 51-5.

Joffrion, L.P., Douglas, D. (1994). Grief resolution: faciliatating self-transcendence in the bereaved. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 32(3), 13-9.
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Interventions for ED Students Interventions

Words: 2681 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20386765



Realty therapy, which was developed by psychiatrist illiam Glasser during the 1960's, requires those working with a student with emotional disturbance to develop a positive, friendly relationship, especially with those particular students who do not want such a relationship (ong 2004). Realty therapy differs from other psychological models because it urges everyone who works with the student to enter into a counseling relationship with them, not simply the psychologist (ong 2004).

Research on the use of reality therapy for students with emotional disturbance has demonstrated a positive effect on student behavior. According to Glasser, "Counseling is just one human being helping another with a problem. This is not hard to do, if the person with the problem wants to be counseled" (ong 2004). However, students with emotional disturbance may be defensive and resistant to counseling, thus the school psychologist's job is to motivate them to participate in counseling and to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harris, Karen M. (2002, June 22). A school, family, and community collaborative program for children who have emotional disturbances. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Nelson, Ron J. (2003, September 01). Status of and trends in academic intervention research for students with emotional disturbance. Remedial and Special Education. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sabornie, Edward J. (2004, September 22). Characteristics of emotional disturbance in middle and high school students. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sugai, George. (2000, September 22). A Self-Management Functional Assessment-
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Family Visit Children -- Issue

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6273572



Sources:

Snell, L. (December 1, 2002). "Special Education Confidential" How Schools Use the "Learning Disability" Label to Cover Up Their Failures." Reason. Cited in:

http://www.nrrf.org/spec_ed_reason2-02.htm

Westwood, P. (2003). Commonsense Methods for Children With Special Needs.

Routledge Farmer.

Luis and Maria brought their family to the United States because of the chronic unemployment in Puerto Rico. They both graduated from Secondary School, although monetary and family responsibilities prohibited them from college or advanced trade school. Luis was a mechanic and bus driver in Puerto Rico, and was able to take his Class CU.S. Certification. He is a full-time driver for the city's Metro Bus Service, which is a medium income job, and because it is a City Government position, has decent benefits. Maria worked in a poor-quality "sewing" shop in Puerto Rico, but managed to find a position with a Dress Shop/Tailor catering to the Latino immigrant community. She specializes in…… [Read More]

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Family Presence During Procedures One

Words: 2374 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35819573

A study in this regard by Ainslie Nibert, entitled, Teaching clinical ethics using a case study family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, states that Critical care nurses often find themselves in the midst of challenging ethical situations that involve conflict between the needs of critically ill patients and the patients' family members and the preferences of physicians and other healthcare providers who initiate and manage resuscitation measures. Yet, many critical care nurses have reported that they received little preparation in their basic education programs to deal with these sensitive issues. (Nibert, Ainslie T. 2005)

This may constitute a moral dilemma as the study points out. "A moral conflict exists because two opposing obligations collide: an obligation to the family members who desire to be present with their loved one during CPR and an obligation to the healthcare providers who do not want patients' family members to witness resuscitation efforts." (ibid)

The…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brown, J., & Ritchie, J.A. (1990). Nurses' perceptions of parent and nurse roles in caring for hospitalized children. Children's Health Care, 19, 28-36.

Bauchner H, Waring C. And Vinci R. (1991)

Parental presence during procedures in an emergency room: results from 50 observations. Department of Pediatrics, Boston City Hospital.. Retrieved February 24, 2005, from Pediatrics. Web site: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/4/544

Desy, Pierre. (2003) Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures: practices of critical care and emergency nurses. American Journal of Critical Care, May 1.
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Interventions for Delinquent Youth Are

Words: 1119 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50766934

Competency development in the balanced approach emphasizes the need for a broader concern with maturational development, especially by means of acquiring the survival skills required for daily living (p. 485).

Interventions that emphasized the balanced approach do look at the deficits and dysfunctions of the individual, but also identify family and community strengths, to draw upon. Not only would this intervention increase competency in the delinquent youth, but also help ensure public safety. Mentoring with a parental education and community organization approach, coupled with an effective sanctioning guidelines with meaningful consequences, is one intervention that would fulfill this criteria.

This type of intervention differs significantly from the interventions commonly utilized in the current system. Most interventions are geared to address a singular facet of delinquency, and regretfully ignore the others. As an example, the Boys and Girls Clubs of America offer a wide variety of programs to help counter risk…… [Read More]

References

Education and career. (2009). Retrieved April 20, 2009, from http://www.bgca.org/programs/education.asp.

Ek, A. (Mar 2008). Cluster profiles of youths living in urban poverty: Factors affecting risk and resilience. Social Work Research, 32(1). Retrieved April 20, 2009, from CINAHL Plus database.

Leve, L. & Chamberlain, P. (Jun 2005). Association with delinquent peers: Intervention effects for youth in the juvenile justice system. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 33(3). Retrieved April 20, 2009, from PubMed Central database.

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. (Aug 1997). Balanced and restorative justice for juveniles. Retrieved April 20, 2009, from http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/framwork.pdf.
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Intervention in Child Abuse and

Words: 2291 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73057886

By the 1970s most states had mandatory child abuse reporting laws. These laws aimed at identifying abused children and setting in motion legal procedures to investigate the child's situation and either to provide services for them in their own home or to remove them from their home and place them in a safer environment (Melli, 1998).

Historically, the laws and regulations of the present are the children and grandchildren of the laws that were pioneered in the 1960s and 1970s. Certainly, experience makes any process better and smoother, but essentially, the system of three to four decades ago would have been very similar to today. hat would not have percolated down to teachers, principals and other team personnel yet would have been the knowledge of the new legal system and how to function in it. This uncertainty would have undoubtedly have slowed the intervention as wary professionals move cautiously, balancing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crosson-Tower, Cynthia. (2010). Understanding child abuse and neglect. 8th ed. Upper

Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson-Prentice Hall.

Educators' role in child abuse and neglect prevention. (2010). Retrieved 30 July 2010

from http://www.enotalone.com/article/9974.html
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Family Systems Theory A Case Study

Words: 2897 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90599096

Family Systems Theory: Vignette II

Discussion of what's going on in this family

Claudia and Margaret had suffered violence at a young age and therefore, are prone to commit acts of aggression, with the chances of developing more symptomatology like anxiety, aggression, depression and low levels of self-esteem, as compared to those who led a violence-free childhood. Being victims of, and exposed to, family violence during childhood years can make Claudia and Margaret victims or offenders. Margaret was a victim of violence when she was young and resorted to aggression as the means to resolving conflicts in her relationships; her personality structure incorporates shame, anger and guilt. Claudia, also being victimized in childhood, cannot regulate her emotions, particularly anger, and exhibits more tolerance to adult intimate abuse. As they were both victimized or exposed to abuse, they not only display aggressive behaviors, but also possess ineffective ways of coping and…… [Read More]

References

Substance abuse and dependence within the gay/lesbian community. (2008). Retrieved April 8, 2015, from http://www.hebpsy.net/articles.asp?id=1804

Beatty, D.M. (2013).Effects of Exposure to Abuse and Violence in Childhood on Adult Attachment and Domestic Violence in Women's Same-Sex Relationships (Doctoral dissertation, Seton Hall University).

Kolko, D.J., Simonich, H., & Loiterstein, A. (2014). Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: An Overview and a Case Example. In Evidence-Based Approaches for the Treatment of Maltreated Children (pp. 187-212).Springer Netherlands.

Trepper, T.S., McCollum, E.E., De Jong, P., Korman, H., Gingerich, W., & Franklin, C. (2008). Solution focused therapy treatment manual for working with individuals research committee of the solution focused brief therapy association. Retrieved July, 23, 2008.
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Obesity Ma Adolecents Family Centered

Words: 2798 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89381977

" (2008, p. 146) Flegal, Ogden & Carroll stress the need to educate lowering the fat content of the diet through nursing intervention and practice. (2004, p. S147) These nursing interventions can like this work stress the implementation of a program that exposes adolescents to healthier alternatives and builds the efficacy for obtaining them through successfully seeking family behavior changes and building awareness about healthier options and food costing that make such options obtainable.

What interventions have been successful and what interventions have NOT been successful?

It is clear that general nutrition education, in the schools or in the community has not been an effective intervention tool for children in general, especially given what some would consider the deplorable condition of the public school nutrition programs in most states. It is also clear that family focused interventions are rare, but where they have been tried they have proven most successful…… [Read More]

References

Heiss, G.L. (2008) Chapter 18: Health Promotion and Risk Reduction in the Community. In Maurer, F.A. & Smith C.M. eds. (2008) Community/Public Health Nursing Practice: Health for Families and Populations Philadelphia, PA. Saunders.

Flegal, K.M. Ogden, C.L. & Carroll, M.D. (July 2004) Prevalence and Trends in Overweight in Mexican-American Adults and Children. Nutrition Reviews 62 (7) S144-S148.

Fortmeier-Saucier, L. Savrin, C. Heinzer, M. & Hudak, C. (Third-Quarter 2008) BMI and Lipid Levels in Mexican-American Children Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes World Views on Evidenced-Based Nursing. 142-147.

Kumanyika, S. & Grier. S. (2006) "Targeting Interventions for Ethnic Minority and Low-Income Populations." The Future of Children 16 (1) 187.
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Effectiveness of Early Intervention Program EIP

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18994067

EIPs

Early Intervention Programs have been on the top of the minds of educators and educational psychologists for as long as there has been recorded and statistical student success within them. "...children enrolled in early intervention programs can expect, on average, to achieve an increase on standard tests of intelligence of approximately 8-12 IQ points in comparison to those children not receiving intervention services." (Guralnick, 1991) Ideas associated with the intellectual, psychosocial and language development of children occurring at a younger and younger age has spurned educators to track the long-term success of both early, preschool educational intervention and also standard kindergarten models of EIPs. "EI programs are, by nature, programs that deliver comprehensive services." (Dinnebeil, Hale & Rule, 1999, p. 225) Those comprehensive services are usually family focused, as the early childhood experience takes place mostly within the home.

The challenges associated with the new era of research on…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bailey, Donald B., et al. "Family outcomes in early intervention: a framework for program evaluation and efficacy research." Exceptional Children 64.3 (1998): 313+. Questia. 23 Nov. 2003 http://www.questia.com/.

Bruder, Mary Beth. "Family-Centered Early Intervention: Clarifying Our Values for the New Millennium." Topics in Early Childhood Special Education 20.2 (2000): 105. Questia. 23 Nov. 2003 http://www.questia.com/.

Dinnebeil, Laurie A., Lynette Hale, and Sarah Rule. "Early Intervention Program Practices That Support Collaboration." Topics in Early Childhood Special Education 19.4 (1999): 225. Questia. 23 Nov. 2003 http://www.questia.com/.

Dunst, Carl J., et al. "Family-oriented early intervention policies and practices: family-centered or not." Exceptional Children 58.2 (1991): 115+. Questia. 23 Nov. 2003 http://www.questia.com/.
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Calgary Family Assessment Model

Words: 1589 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90030250

Genogram Project

The author of this report has been charged with doing a family assessment project. The largest part of this report shall be the genogram and ecogram. The personal version of these two diagrams as authored and put together by the author of this report are shown in the appendix. There will be some additional supporting and complementary information as well. This will include the Calgary Family Assessment Model (CFAM) and the Calgary Family Intervention Model. Both of those models will be discussed and reviewed in this report. Also worthy of mention will be the stages of the family life cycle. The rest of the report will be important information about the family members identified in the genogram. This information will include three generations of information, each family member being identified, the family relationship involved, the current age of the person (or age at death), the martial/relationship status of…… [Read More]

References

Konradsdottir, E. & Svavarsdottir, E. (2011). How effective is a short-term educational and support intervention for families of an adolescent with type 1 diabetes?. Journal For Specialists In Pediatric Nursing, 16(4), 295-304. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6155.2011.00297.x

Sveinbjarnardottir, E., Svavarsdottir, E., & Wright, L. (2013). What are the benefits of a short therapeutic conversation intervention with acute psychiatric patients and their families? A controlled before and after study. International Journal Of Nursing Studies, 50(5), 593-602. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.10.009

West, C., Bell, J., Woodgate, R., & Moules, N. (2015). Waiting to Return to Normal: An Exploration of Family Systems Intervention in Childhood Cancer. Journal Of Family Nursing, 21(2), 261-294. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1074840715576795

Wright, L. & Leahey, M. (2012). Nurses and families.
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Family Systems and Marriage Psychology

Words: 3816 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87974286

Psychology of Marriage and Family Systems

The literal meaning of the word "psychopathology" is a mind disorder or disease. Psychological diagnosticians, while assuming that the illness is located inside a person, always use the medical model in treating or studying patients with 'mental illnesses'. In comparison with the approach they take, I present two converging and related psychopathology perspectives. The two perspectives give an analysis based on context from the family's viewpoint. The first approach, the "family systems" approach, is a conception that came up in the 1950s as a substitute to the traditional focus of psychopathology on individuals (Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 1996).

The second approach, "family risk factors" has been in existence in psychopathology but not in the foreground. It tries to identify a couple family aspects of the functioning of the family that are significant in the treatment as well as etiology of patients that have tested positive…… [Read More]

References

Ackerman, N.W. (1958). The psychodynamics of family life. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Ackerman, N.W. (1962), Family Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: The Implications of Difference. Family Process, 1: 30-43.

Ackerman, N.W. (1962). Family Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: The implications of difference. Family Process, 1(1): 30-43.

Ackerman, N.W. (1966). Treating the troubled family. New York, NY: Basic Books.
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Family - Centered Care Intervention Family-Centered

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47492395

It is felt that an important part of this process is the family since that is where the child spends the majority of their time. The family situation and the experiences that are provided to the child within this situation are critical to a child's development (Bruder, 2000).

Physical Therapy is one type of early intervention that is often used with disabled children. The idea of family-centered care brings many wonderful things to the practice of pediatric physical therapy. Physical therapy is the profession of developing, maintaining and restoring maximum movement and function to a patient. Treatments often focus on improving gross and fine motor skills, balance and coordination, strength and endurance as well as cognitive and sensory processing. For a child with a disability all of these practices are things that they need to work on and improve in order to be able to grow up and care for…… [Read More]

References

Bruder, Mary Beth. (2000). Family-Centered Early Intervention: Clarifying Our Values for the New Millennium. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. 20(2). p.105-115.

****Johnson, Beverly H. (1999). Family-Centered Care: Creating Partnerships in Health. Group Practice Journal. p. 18-21.

****- This citation needs the journal number and volume number in order to be complete…..it wasn't on the article itself and I couldn't locate it anywhere.
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Intervention Division of Department of Health Mental

Words: 1913 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22901498

Intervention, Division of Department of Health Mental Hygiene to implement NYEIS

New York Early Intervention System (NYEIS)

The topic is the NYEIS and its subsequent elimination of rank & file employee positions as the automation of the system forces economic displacement in the form of > capital, < labor. The NYEIS, according to the New York State Department of Health, is "a centralized, Web-based, state-of-the-art system that electronically manages Early Intervention Program (EIP) administrative tasks and provides for information exchanges." (NYSDOH-NYEIS, 2011)

The expectation is there will be turnover i.e. attrition due to the nature of the new system and its ability to streamline operations and reduce excess waste. The excess waste in this case, is the administrative waste or bureaucratic processes, which are eliminated from the processes chain. The elimination of the basic function within the data entry position is the expected route when engaging a new technological system.…… [Read More]

References

EBRD Retrenchment Guidance. Retrenchment and restructuring -- labour and community issues, a brief guide (2010)  http://www.ebrd.com/downloads/about/sustainability/retrenchment.pdf 

McNamara C. Basic Guidelines for Reorganizing a Current Organization. (2011) http://managementhelp.org/orgnzing/basics.htm

New York State Department of Health. Implementation Status. (2011) http://www.health.state.ny.us/community/infants_children/early_intervention/system/implementation_status.htm

New York State Department of Health. New York Early Intervention System (NYEIS). (2011) http://www.health.state.ny.us/community/infants_children/early_intervention/system/
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Intervention Nursing Research Using the Cope Intervention

Words: 569 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70400760

Intervention

Nursing esearch

Using the COPE Intervention for Family Caregivers to Improve Symptoms of Hospice Homecare Patients: A Clinical Trial

This study was designed to test an intervention for hospice caregivers in order to help them better manage symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. The authors maintain that research indicates caregivers are unable to accurately assess and report the intensity of symptoms and overall quality of life (QOL) of patients with cancer and patients in hospice care.

Three symptoms, pain, dyspnea, and constipation, are commonly are seen in patients with advanced cancer. However, the author's site research that asserts that these symptoms are assessed inadequately and managed poorly in many patients. Pain and dyspnea have been found to create symptom distress, significantly affecting patient QOL.

The authors claim that caregivers must develop the skills needed to function effectively as part of the healthcare team. Building the knowledge base and teaching…… [Read More]

References

McMillan, S.C. & Small, B.J. (2007, March). Using the COPE intervention for family caregivers to improve symptoms of hospice homecare patients: A clinical trial. Oncology nursing forum, Vol. 34, Issue 2, 313-321. Retrieved January 20, 2012, from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=3&hid=14&sid=b3e07ee7-388a-4d19-97ef-163b481297fd%40sessionmgr15
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Family of International Classifications the International Classification

Words: 676 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97015162

Family of International Classifications

The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a system of disease classification adopted by orld Health Organization members. The ICD, now in its tenth revision, was adopted in 1967. The HO Nomenclature Regulations require the use of ICD in its most current revision to report mortality and morbidity statistics by all Member States (orld Health Organization, 2011).

The ICD is the international standard diagnostic classification for all general epidemiological use; it is also used for many health management purposes as well as clinical use. These uses include the analysis of the general health situation of population groups along with the monitoring of the incidence and prevalence of diseases and other health problems, as they relate to other variables including the characteristics and circumstances of the individuals affected, resource allocation and so forth (orld Health Organization, 2011).

The ICD is used to classify diseases and other health…… [Read More]

Works Cited

World Health Organization. (2011). ICD-10 Version: 2010. Retrieved December 8, 2011 from:  http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/2010/en#/X 

World Health Organization. (2011). International classification of diseases (ICD). Retrieved December 8, 2011 from:  http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/en/ 

World Health Organization. (2011). International classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF). Retrieved December 8, 2011 from:  http://www.who.int/classifications/icf/en/ 

World Health Organization. (2011). International classification of health interventions (ICHI). Retrieved December 8, 2011 from:  http://www.who.int/classifications/ichi/en/
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Intervention the Notion of 'Intervention' Has the

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5840526

Intervention

The notion of 'intervention' has the literal, Oxford English Dictionary meaning of "stepping in or interfering in any affair, so as to affect its course or issue." But its connotative meaning within contemporary culture is more resonant and multivalent in nature. The television show Intervention exemplifies the positive, pop psychology notion of an 'intervention,' in which an individual is saved from an addiction by group of outsiders (usually friends, family, and treatment staff). But many 'interventions' have a negative resonance: more traditional notions of intervention raise questions of sovereignty and legitimacy. At the heart of the conflict between 'good' and 'bad' notions of intervention is the question of autonomy. When is it acceptable and appropriate to impinge upon the autonomy of a human being or of the state? Is it ever moral to not intervene?

Awareness of injustice has increased in the era of Internet-based social networking and communication.…… [Read More]

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Family Home Ownership

Words: 6651 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49971107

The National Housing Act indirectly promoted the idea of lenders offering much longer-term mortgages with the currently accepted concept of monthly payments with the dual interest and principal payment scale. Amortized real estate mortgages opened the door for an average person to purchase and own a single family home.

As a result of the National Housing Act, the United States government inadvertently committed itself along with private lenders to insure long-term mortgages that could be held for as long as twenty or more years at an interest rate that was affordable. Although the process at first was bogged down by paperwork and bureaucracy it eventually caught on.

Part of the reason the process took hold was because in addition to guaranteeing the loans, the National Housing Act through the formation of the Federal Housing Administration also investigated properties and neighborhoods which added an extra measure of security and guaranteed real-estate…… [Read More]

Works Cited continued

Housing: The Key to Economic Recovery. Ed. NAHB. Natioanal Association of Home Builders. 5 Nov. 2004 http://www.nahb.org/fileUpload_details.aspx?contentTypeID=7&contentID=46.

Longman, Phillip. "The Mortgaged Generation: Why the Young Can't Afford a House." Washington Monthly, Vol. 18 April 1986.

Meyerson, Martin, Barbara Terrett, and William L.C. Wheaton. Housing, People and Cities. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1962.

Peterson, James R. "Housing Plays Politics to Keep Growth Strong." ABA Banking Journal Vol. 92 (2000).
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Family Power and Authority Influences Introduce Topic

Words: 814 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99376532

FAMILY POWER AND AUTHORITY INFLUENCES Introduce topic Introduce speakers DEE What affirmative views topic Brad make opposing views. Declares debate open AFFIRMATIVE VIEW OPPOSING VIEW Give equal time members opposing team Facilitate discussion Dee rebuttal Dan ( affirmative rebuttal) Dan rebuttal Dee ( Negative rebuttal) Dee summary (restate proposition significant argument favor change) Dan summary (restate proposition significant argument favor change) (PLS ADDRESS ONLY THE DEE PORTION AND INTRODUCTION -- the AFFIRMATIVE AND REBUTTAL PORTION OF DEE BASED ON SCENERIO BELOWAND MORE IF YOU COULD ADD SPICE TO IT, THANKS)…THE TOPIC IS ABOUT ISLAMIC OR MUSLIM FAMILY WITH CULTURAL DILEMMA.

Dee:

Ladies and Gentlemen,

We live in a world that is nowadays prone to injustice, social inequality, and cultural discrepancies. Today's debate deals precisely with this type of reality: the reality of a family that was defined by a particular cultural background and has been shaped by another cultural environment.…… [Read More]

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Intervention Minors or Children Under

Words: 2896 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47675269

On the whole, the Academy calls for the abolition of exemption laws and endorses initiatives to educate the public about the medical needs of children (Committee on ioethics)..

While AAP recognizes the importance of religion to people's lives, it also warns physicians and other health care professionals should put the health and welfare of children over religious considerations (Committee on ioethics 1997). It encourages pediatricians to respect parents' decision but not when their religious convictions interfere with medical care necessary to prevent harm, suffering or death. When this happens, pediatricians should seek the authorization of the court to override parental authority. If the threat to a child's life is imminent, the health care practitioner should intervene over parental objections. Securing court authorization should, however, be the last course of action. The health care practitioner should cooperate with the family in applying appropriate palliative care. Even when the securing of court…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bender, Denise G. Do Fourteenth Amendment Considerations Outweigh a Potential State

Interest in Mandating Cochlear Implantation for Deaf Children. Journal of Deaf

Studies and Deaf Education: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 2004

Committee on Bioethics. Religious Objections to Medical Care. Volume 9 number 2
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Interventions for Cases of Spousal Abuse Estimates

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86187884

interventions for cases of spousal abuse, estimates place yearly cases of women beaten by husband at nearly 2 million (Rue, 1996). Improved records on such incidents have documented the connection between domestic violence and cases severe enough to cause an arrest for either assault of homicide in recent years. y some reports, cases of domestic assault or homicide followed police calls to the address for reports of spousal abuse in 85% of the cases. In addition, in 50% of the cases, threats of violence were made before the incidents (Egan, 2001).

Although a small number of cases of spousal abuse are wife against husband (Rue, 1996), the great majority involves the wife as victim. Experts on spousal abuse believe that in such marriages, the relationship begins as a loving relationship but that gradually the definition of "love" is distorted and includes emotions of jealousy and suspicion. As the marriage progresses,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Accessed via the Internet 11/17/02.  http://www.lib.jjay.cuny.edu/research/spouse.html 

Rue, Tom. 1996. "Exploring options for victims of spouse abuse." The River Reporter. Accessed via the Internet 11/17/02. http://www.riverreporter.com/news/rue/860320.htm
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Intervention Programs for Military Family

Words: 1995 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33835459

Creech, S., Hadley, W., & orsari, . (2014, December). The Impact of Military Deployment and Reintegration on Children and Parenting: A Systematic Review. Retrieved from NCI: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383395/

Gewirtz, A., Erbes, C., Polusny, M., Forgatch, M., & DeGamo, D. (2011, February). Helping military families through the deployment process: Strategies to support parenting. Retrieved from NCI: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3155511/

(2) Article summary

The Impact of Military Deployment and Reintegration on Children and Parenting: A Systematic Review

More than a thousand children have had one parent take part in the Iraq military operations, including Operation New Dawn (OND) or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) as well as Afghanistan's Operation Enduring Freedom (AOEF); but there is little information about the effect of deployment on the relationship between the children and their parents. This article analyzes the findings from three different areas, which includes the separation of the parents and children and their health, behavioral, and emotional outcome…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Atuel, H., Gilreath, T., Astor, R., Cederbaum, J., Benbenishty, R., & Pineda, D. (2014). Perceived Discriminatory Bullying Among Military-Connected Students Attending Public Schools. Military Behavioral Health, 147-152.

Barker LH, Berry KD. Developmental issues impacting military families with young children during single and multiple deployments. Military Medicine. 2009;174:1033-1040

Creech, S., Hadley, W., & Borsari, B. (2014, December). The Impact of Military Deployment and Reintegration on Children and Parenting: A Systematic Review. Retrieved from NCBI: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383395/

Chandra A, Lara-Cinisomo S, Jaycox LH, Tanielian T, Burns RM, Ruder T, et al. Children on the homefront: The experience of children from military families. Pediatrics. 2010;125:16.
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Intervention and Prevention Strategies

Words: 1735 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23857459

Teen Pregnancy

Description

Teenage pregnancy is described as being pregnant or being a mother below 20 years of age in most of the conducted researches. Only two researches considered had an age limit of 20 years, while another one had a limit of 21 years (Noll, Shenk, & Putnam, 2009).

The rate of teenage child birth differs by a 10 factor in case of first world nations. Netherlands on one hand has a negligible rate of 12 infants per 1,000 teenagers each year while Russia on the other hand has a rate of 100 infants per 1000 teenagers. During the 1990's United States of America spiked with teenage pregnancies which was the same in 1980's as well. Japan and European nations have controlled pregnancy rates (40 infants per 1,000). England peaks the European bloc with teenage pregnancy. One research in 2000 concluded that annually in England, around 90,000 child births…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Amoran, O. (2012). A comparative analysis of predictors of teenage pregnancy and its prevention in a rural town in Western Nigeria. Amoran International Journal for Equity in Health, 2-7.

Dickins, T., Johns, S., & Chipman, A. (2012). Teenage Pregnancy In The United Kingdom: A Behavioral Ecological Perspective. Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 344-359.

Fonseca, L., Araujo, H., & Santos, S. (2012). Sexualities, teenage pregnancy and educational life histories in Portugal: experiencing sexual citizenship? Gender and Education, 647-664.

Hoggart, L. (2012). I'm Pregnant...what am I going to do? An examination of value judgments and moral frameworks in teenage pregnancy decision making. Health, Risk and Society, 533-549.
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Family Social Work and Therapy

Words: 1530 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13799151

Vingnettes

Psychology of marriage and family systems

Vignette Three

Considering the text reading assignments, what do you see going on with Phillip and his family?

Given that Phillip was born to a mother who abused alcohol in the past, it is possible that there are physical issues which are affecting his performance in school. Phillip should be screened for learning disabilities and other issues which could inhibit his progress. Phillip is also struggling with issues which make him 'different' from his peers, including the poverty of his household, the fact that he is being shipped from one home to another as the result of his parents' divorce, and the fact that he might receive negative attention because of his mother's LBGT status as well as the fact he is a Native American.

If Phillip is being sexually molested, however, this could be another source of his withdrawal and anxiety, given…… [Read More]

References

Lubell K.M., Lofton T, Singer H.H. (2008). Promoting healthy parenting practices across cultural groups: A CDC Research Brief. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2008.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/images/DVP/Healthy_Parenting_RIB_a.pdf

Lucero, S. (2007). Working with Indian families and child substance abuse challenges. NRC4

Tribes. Retrieved from:  http://www.nrc4tribes.org/files/Urban%20Indian%20guide.pdf
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Family Nurse Practitioners in Pediatrics With Patients Who Are Terminally Ill

Words: 2783 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37110296

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner in the Care of Terminally Ill Children

Pediatric nurse practitioners provide a valuable contribution to the care of chronically and terminally ill children. This position is essentially a subtype of advanced practice nurse, whose function is to provide the best possible patient care for ill children. This position functions within a pediatric hospital setting, in which the goal is to provide cost-effective patient care that meets and exceeds the needs of patients and their families. Although the pediatric nurse practitioner may work with children that present with acute or chronic illnesses, there is a critical need for nursing practitioners that are motivated to work with terminally ill children. Terminally ill children and their families present unique needs and situations that require knowledge, expertise, and intervention skills beyond what conventional nurses can offer. This population requires specialized care that can be fulfilled by a trained pediatric nurse practitioner.…… [Read More]

References

Knight, J. (1990). The Betty Neuman Systems Model applied to practice: A client with multiple sclerosis. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 15, 447-55.

McAtee, P. & Silver, H. (1974). Nurse practitioners for children: Past and future. Pediatrics, 54(5), 578-82.

De Moutigny, F. (1995). Family nursing interventions during hospitalization. Canadian Nurse, 91(10), 38-42.

Teicher, S., Crawford, K., Williams, B., Nelson, B., Andrews, C. (2001). Emerging role of the pediatric nurse practitioner in acute care. Pediatric Nursing, 27(4), 387-91.
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Families With Children With Autism

Words: 363 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 183664

They deal with the same types of problems in addition to the autism. The way that the family works as a whole is usually strongly affected by having an autistic child because these children must be treated much differently than other children. It can be difficult and stressful, and the authors also found that other children in the family can experience that stress in the form of anxiety or depression or other behaviors. In addition, these children can feel as though they are not as loved because they do not often get as much attention - their autistic brother or sister takes most of that attention away. This can make the autistic child feel poorly, too, and feel as though he or she is a large burden for the family. It can be hard to discourage an autistic child from feeling this way because of the difficulties in communication, and…… [Read More]

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Interventions for Young Children With Developmental Disorders

Words: 1662 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72721288

Education -- Special Education

YOUNG CHILDREN ITH DISABILITIES AND IMPLEMENTING APPROPRIATE INTERVENTIONS

Developmental delays in young children occur in several areas encompassing the gamut of human functions. A young child may experience delays in one or more of the areas of cognitive functioning, social-emotional functioning and adaptive behavior. Through decades of shared research and experience, trained professionals can observe delays in relatively impaired development of the skills humans use to understand and act in their world. Fortunately, experts have also developed intervention strategies for dealing with those delays and providing the child with enhanced skills, experiences and opportunities.

Body

Characteristics of young children with delays in the following developmental areas:

a. Cognitive functioning

Delays in cognitive functioning of young children can run the gamut from mild deficiencies in one or more areas to extreme intellectual impairments with marginal functioning. These mental processes that empower a person to amass knowledge and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carter, A. S., Briggs-Gowan, M. J., & Davis, N. O. (2004). Assessment of young children's social-emotional development and psychopathology: Recent advances and recommendations for practice. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45(1), 109-134.

Case-Smith, J. (1996, January). Fine motor outcomes in preschool children who receive occupational therapy services. Retrieved from ajot.aota.org: http://ajot.aota.org/Article.aspx?articleid=1862312

Horn, E. M., & Kang, J. (2012, February). Supporting Young Children With Multiple Disabilities: What Do We Know and What Do We Still Need To Learn? Retrieved from www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3932659/

Maccow, G. (2011). Assessing adaptive behavior in young children. Retrieved from images.pearsonassessments.com: http://images.pearsonassessments.com/Images/PDF/webinar/Assessing_Adaptive_Behavior_Handout.pdf
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Intervention to Help Kids Fight Obesity

Words: 309 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29592923

PICOT

As Karnik and Kanekar (2012) show, there are many interventions available to health care providers for childhood obesity, which has fast become a "global public health crisis" in the world (p. 1). These interventions include the promotion of family bonding, education, and pharmacology.

The specific aim of this project is to improve outcomes with regard to children's health. By measuring the impact of one intervention against another, primary care providers can better understand which intervention may be more effective in helping to reduce the rate of childhood obesity for their patients.

This study will measure the weight, dietary and physical exercise habits of children and adolescent patients at a primary care facility over the duration of 6 months time. During that time, the patients will be exposed to two separate interventions -- a pharmacological intervention and a health literacy intervention.

The PICOT is as follows:…… [Read More]

References

Karnik, S., Kanekar, A. (2012). Childhood obesity: A global public health crisis.

International Journal of Preventive Medicine, 3(1): 1-7.
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Interventions and Their Impact on Stakeholders

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92743461

Future esearch

Implications for practice (i.e. what practitioners can learn from these findings in order to enhance their practice)

The findings from the research are showing that there are a number of effects which are directly related to interventions. However, the reality is that certain amounts of flexibility must be applied throughout the process. To achieve these larger objectives a number of different areas are recommended. The most notable include:

Interventions are important by identifying the significance of major transformations and how they can be introduced. This helps someone to learn how to understand the individual and the best ways to encourage them to change. These practices can be utilized in a professional or educational environment.

The data is showing that these programs help the person to grow and become more involved in work / school.

Interactions are formed with faculty and mentors forging a strong bond.

Analyzing the program…… [Read More]

References

Newman, P. (2012). Bracketing Qualitative Research. Qualitative Social Work, 11 (1), 80-96.

Wiles, R. (2011). Innovation in Qualitative Research Methods. Qualitative Research. 1 (14), 41-60.
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Intervention for Depression Among Young Mothers With Disabled Children

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65786496

Depression for Young Mothers With a Disabled Child

One of the most common psychiatric illnesses that have become prevalent in the recent past across the world is depression, which is the second most incapacitating condition among psychological and physical disorders. The prevalence of this disorder and its severe impacts on patients has contributed to numerous studies that have focused on different issues regarding the condition. An example of a study that has been carried out on this issue is a research on levels of depression among mothers with children with disabilities by Seyed Hadi Motamedi, eza Seyednour, Morteza Noorikhajavi, and Susan Afghah. This study was not only carried out to examine the depression levels among mothers with disabled children but was also geared towards examine the need to support these parents and improve treatment for their children. The study found that depression levels for this population is equal to 3-5…… [Read More]

Reference

Motamedi et. al. (2007). A Study in Depression Levels among Mothers of Disabled Children. Iranian Rehabilitation Journal, 5(5,6), 3-7.
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Origin of Family

Words: 3639 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40208413

Family of Origin

The origin of the family describes the family in which one is grown up, inter-family interactions and relations between one's parents', siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles and grandparents. The current study examines the origin of a family and determines the systematic research based on the behavior and relation of members and provides evidence-based practices in order to address the relational gap found among the family members.

Systematic Analysis

Family Hierarchy

Family Subsystem

Attachment Styles in Family

Family Boundaries

Family Adaptability

Thematic esearch

Early Marriage and Divorce

Evidence-Based esearch and Intervention

Genogram

The family in which one is grown up with the collaboration of adult's economic contribution and influence from parents, siblings and grandparents collectively describes one's family of origin. The origin of one's family tends to effect the systems that are being followed in the family and describes the degree to which they can be adaptive in nature.…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bramlett, M.D., & Mosher, W.D. (2001).First marriage dissolution, divorce, and remarriage.In National Center for Health Statistics.

Carr, A. (1999). Evidence-based practice in psychotherapy and counseling. Journal of the Irish Association of Counseling and Therapy, 2(9), 15-34.

Dattilio, F.M. (2005). Introduction to the special section: The role of cognitive -- behavioral interventions in couple and family therapy. Journal of marital and family therapy, 31(1), 7-13.

Engels, F. (1942).The origin of the family.Current Book Distributors.
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How Chaotic Families Can Be Restructured

Words: 2510 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68510102

Family Systems Theory; Application of Family Therapy Theories

The concept of family therapy has over the years has been developed into different approaches that have definite characteristics. These theories have been used to bring forth solutions to different family issues that are experienced on regular basis. It is not easy to understand the structure of a family since there are no universal structures that the family problems or challenges take, this means that even in the application of the family systems theories in bringing solutions to families, the application purely depend on individual unique family challenges and not on a universal template. These unique characteristics that each family challenge takes makes it hard to apply one system theory and have full confidence that it will work, hence the frequent overlapping of the theories, and in this case the strategic family therapy and the structural family therapy will be applied to…… [Read More]

Reference

Nichols M.P., (2009). Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods.
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Treating Mental Illness With a Family Oriented Approach

Words: 1782 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91979540

Family Therapy Treatment of Mental Illness

There has been a growing movement towards the use of family therapy methods for the treatment of mental illness in recent years. To determine the facts about this trend, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature concerning family therapy treatment of mental illness in three sections. In Section 1, a discussion concerning the views of O'Hanlon and owan's (2003) and Zeig and Munion (1999) for working with clients with chronic or severe mental illness is followed by an analysis of the extent to which they succeed in making a strong case for "brief therapy" with intensive clients. An assessment concerning the contribution of Milton Erickson to the assessment and treatment of different mental health diagnoses is followed by an analysis of their respective approaches and the corresponding benefits and limitations of each of these models. Section II provides a discussion concerning the…… [Read More]

References

Daroff, R. B. (2005, Fall). Solution-oriented therapy for chronic and severe mental illness. Journal of Psychotherapy Practice Research, 8(4), 318.

Gurman, A. S. & Messer, S. B. (2003). Essential psychotherapies: Theory and practice. New York: Guilford Press.

McFarlane, W. R., Dixon, L., Lukens, E., & Lucksted, A. (2003): A review of the literature about psychoeducation and schizophrenia. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 29(2), 223-227.

Simoneau, T., & Miklowitz, D. (2001): The sights and sounds of schizophrenia.
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Final Project Family

Words: 1431 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78711032

Family Project

The Jacques family seems to have functioned very well until the husband began abusing drugs and alcohol. This was a problem before, but things have stabilized when the appropriate help was obtained. The relapse occurred directly after the wife and children left for a visit to the wife's family. Hence, it might reasonably be assumed that the presence of the family has a positive effect upon the maintenance of the treatment regime. Because Jean (the husband) functioned at a very high level before his relapse into the cycle of abuse and the abandonment of the treatment regime, it might be assumed that he will once again respond to intervention. Because there is as yet no physical danger to the family, the treatment and intervention program will be administered under strict official supervision, with regular monitoring sessions. However, while the aim is to keep the family together, a contingency…… [Read More]

References

Brown, J. (2010, Oct.). Psychotherapy Integration: Systems Theory and Self-Psychology. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy. Retrieved from: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3658/is_201010/ai_n56230129/

DePfanfilis, D. (2006). Child Neglect: A Guide for Prevention, Assessment, and Intervention. U.S. Dept. Of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from: http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanuals/neglect/neglect.pdf

Moore, B.C. (2005). Empirically Supported Family and Peer Interventions for Dual Disorders. Research on Social Work Practice. Vo. 15. Retrieved from: http://www.reachoflouisville.com/meath/meath/Empirically%20Supported%20Family%20and%20Peer%20Interventions%20for%20Dual%20Disorders.pdf
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IEP Family Assistance

Words: 1609 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80951798

Family Involvement Brochure 2143139

How can you ensure the involvement of family members into your plan for servicing your special education population?

The need for a collective effort is obvious when dealing with young children in special education enrollment in their respective schools or place of learning. Teachers need to ensure that parents stay involved in their' child's education, or that child becomes at serious risk at becoming "lost in the system" and permanently damaged due to this abuse and neglect. It is important that we treat those in our society who appear to have less with dignity and respect and contribute to their quality of life.

The family is where the child learns to act and behave in society and many of the initial traits and behaviors within the child's life is learned from the family source. This may be helpful or not helpful depending on the relationship and…… [Read More]

References

Duchnowski, A.J., Kutash, K., Green, A.L., Ferron, J.M., Wagner, M., & Vengrofski, B. (2012). Parent support services for families of children with emotional disturbances served in elementary school special education settings: Examination of data from the Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 1044207312460889.

Henrich, C.C. (2013). Commentary on the Special Issue on Parent Involvement/Engagement in Early Childhood Education.

Peters, M.J. (2012). Parental Involvement: How Much Is Enough and What Can Schools Do to Encourage It? (Doctoral dissertation, William Paterson University of New Jersey).

Sheridan, S.M., Kim, E.M., Coutts, M.J., Sjuts, T.M., Holmes, S.R., Ransom, K.A., & Garbacz, S.A. (2012, November). Clarifying parent involvement and family-school partnership intervention research: A preliminary synthesis. In Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.
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Brice Family Systems Napier and Whitaker Exemplify

Words: 844 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33281320

Brice Family

SYSTEMS

Napier and Whitaker exemplify systems therapy with their presentation of the Brice family case. It is necessary to identify the origins of the systems approach in order to fully appreciate its value in the context of family therapy. It approaches the family unit as a system and therefore borrows heavily from systems theory. Systems theory is a general theory applies across many disciplines and looks at systems that have the ability to self-regulate. The theory applies to biological systems, climate, environment, and the family unit.

Systems approach recognizes the interdependencies that exist in the family as a system. The family unit consists of individuals related to one another forming a complex web that should act in congruence. Therefore, although a part of a system is essential, it is the relationship of the part to the whole that is paramount. The family as a system is dynamic since…… [Read More]

References

Napier, A.Y., & Whitaker, C. (1978). The family crucible: The intense experience of therapy. New York: HarperCollins.
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Spousal Abuse on Family Members

Words: 1739 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41288979

Sexual jealousy may be the main factor for couples aged 18 to 30, but couples in their 50s have established hitting and getting hit as habits, their way of dealing with stress and problems, their bond itself. People wonder and ask why the victim does not leave the abusive relationship. Experts say that it is never easy to do so because leaving costs a lot of money and the victim, often the woman, has no money of her own and has never worked. She does not feel she has much choice until she reaches the brink (The Daily).

ibliography

Alksnis, C. And Taylor, J. (2003). Aggressive ehavior by Witnesses and/or Victims in Adulthood. Correctional Service of Canada. http://www.csc-scs.ca/text/pblct/fv/fv04/fv04/fv04e04_e.shtml

Cwik, MS. (1996). Why Does Wife Abuse Occur? MSA Review. http://users.aol.com/agunah/review.htm

Daily, The (2002). Impacts and Consequences of Spousal Violence. Statistics Canada. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020626/d02060.htm

Focus on the Family. (2004). The Impact of Family…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alksnis, C. And Taylor, J. (2003). Aggressive Behavior by Witnesses and/or Victims in Adulthood. Correctional Service of Canada. http://www.csc-scs.ca/text/pblct/fv/fv04/fv04/fv04e04_e.shtml

Cwik, MS. (1996). Why Does Wife Abuse Occur? MSA Review. http://users.aol.com/agunah/review.htm

Daily, The (2002). Impacts and Consequences of Spousal Violence. Statistics Canada. http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/020626/d02060.htm

Focus on the Family. (2004). The Impact of Family Violence on Children. Focus Ministries, Inc. http://www.family.org/fmedia/misc/a0034023.cfm
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Efft and Stepfamilies Blended Families or Step

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70741191

EFFT and Stepfamilies

Blended families or "step families" have one parent who is not the biological parent of the children in the family. These families will often face unique challenges due to their makeup. Furrow and Palmer (2007) discuss Emotionally Focused Family Therapy (EFFT) for stepfamilies. Furrow and Palmer identify four basic challenges that stepfamilies face:

(1).The past experiences of the different families join compete with the new family's ability to consolidate newer relational commitments.

Typical family boundaries are clouded in stepfamilies (e.g., who disciplines which child, who is the real parent of whom, etc.).

There is an "inheritance of loss" that occurs through remarriage that can affect the parents and the children of both original families. This can interfere with the development of the new stepfamily.

(4). There are different developmental needs in stepfamilies compared to other families.

These four specific challenges can make working with stepfamilies particularly difficult.…… [Read More]

References

Furrow, J. & Palmer, G. (2007). EFFT and blended families: Building bonds from the inside out. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 26(4), 44-58.
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Teen Pregnancy High-Risk Family Health Promotion Teen

Words: 1252 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39651989

Teen Pregnancy

High-isk Family Health Promotion: Teen Pregnancy

Teen pregnancy is a problem in the United States which has enormous consequences for both the individuals who are immediately concerned with the pregnancy and the public at large. The role of family nursing in assisting young mothers cannot be understated, but prevention and education are the primary goals of family nursing. Nurses must realize the adverse consequences that can occur when a teen becomes pregnant, understand how to advocate for the teen and have the personal skills to positively affect the patient.

The United States continues to have an epidemic of teen pregnancies. The United States leads the world in all categories of teen pregnancy. In 2006 more than 750,000 women below the age of 2o became pregnant (Gutmacher Instittute, 2010, 2). This is actually a low number as the birth rate per 1,000 representative women was only 71.5. However, this…… [Read More]

References

Friedman, M., Bowden, V., & Jones, E. (2003). Family nursing: Research, theory, and practice (5th ed.). Connecticut: Prentice Hall Inc.

Guttmacher Institute. (2010). U.S. teenage pregnancies, births and abortions: National and state trends by race and ethnicity. Retrieved November 13, 2010 from http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf

Healthy People. (2010). Healthy people 2010. Retrieved November 15, 2010 from http://www.healthypeople.gov/About/hpfactsheet.pdf

Pregnant Teen Help. (2010). Teen pregnancy consequences. Retrieved November 23, 2010 from  http://www.pregnantteenhelp.org/facts/teen-pregnancy-consequences/
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Ordinary People Intervention Family Dynamics

Words: 4439 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57218799

They have grandparents who visit them during the holidays. However, for the most part family members deal with their problems as individuals, not as a family unit.

Information provided by the family is an important source of information about the family. However, one cannot ignore outside sources of information as well. For instance, the worker may contact the school, neighbors, or others who are involved with the family to examine factors that may influence the current situation. The assessment plan will involve contacting the school to find out about Conrad's performance in terms of grades, attendance and overall performance.

Systemic Goals

The case of the Jarretts is complex, with many individual goals that must be completed on the way to resolution of the systemic problems. In this case, the identified patient is Conrad, as he was the one who tried to commit suicide. The goal of family therapy is the…… [Read More]

References

Bowen Center for the Study of the Family. (2010). Bowen Theory. Retrieved April 13, 2010

from http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/theory.html

Missouri Department of Social Services. (2007). Child Welfare Manual. Retrieved April 13,

2010 from http://www.dss.mo.gov/cd/info/cwmanual/section7/ch1_33/sec7ch25.htm
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Response to Intervention Program

Words: 1350 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92716737

Intervention Programs

The value, characteristics, and purpose of an RTI program to a professional educational environment.

hat are the advantages of an RTI ("Response to Intervention") program for an inner city school environment? A peer-reviewed article in Learning Disabilities Research & Practice explains that first of all, RTI refers to a "school-wide prevention framework" that provides a way for school staff to make the right decisions for students when students need help academically and behaviorally (Prewett, et al., 2012). Typically the RTI strategy will use accumulated data and other resources so that instructors can make well-educated decisions about which interventions are working, which are not effective, and which ones are needed in particular student situations.

Basically, teachers and administrators and of course counselors use certain interventions to "maximize student achievement" and "reduce behavior problems" (Prewett, 136). Then there must be a response to those interventions to see how helpful they…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carswell, S.B., Hanlon, T.E., O'Grady, K.E., Watts, A.M., and Pothong, P. (2009). A

Preventative Intervention Program for Urban African-American Youth Attending an Alternative Education Program: Background, Implementation, and Feasibility. Education and Treatment of Children, 32(3), 445-469.

Finch, M.E.H. (2012). Special Considerations With Response to Intervention and Instruction

For Students With Diverse Backgrounds. Psychology in the Schools, 49(3), 285-295.