Foreign Aid Essays (Examples)

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Foreign Relations of the U S

Words: 3375 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80732255



A second lesson was found in Kennedy's management of the crisis. The basic lesson learned was that, in the midst of such a crisis, leaders need time away from the glare of the media to resolve their own thinking and communications, and they need the self-confidence to limit their objectives to only what is needed to resolve the crisis, not "win" it.

It is believed that the Soviet's lesson was that you can't mess with nuclear weapons. In other words, when it gets to the point that you know you might destroy millions of innocent people, that is the depth of fear that leaders must realize, confront, and not back away from. What they must do is back away from the unnecessary and catastrophic events their pride might trigger.

The lessons learned by European leaders were probably not good ones. Kennedy did not consult with them during this crisis. They…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barnett, R.J. "America in Vietnam: The Four Interventions (excerpted from the book: Intervention and Revolution)." 1968. thirdworldtraveler.com. 28 JUly 2009 .

Brenner, P. "The Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962: Turning History on its Head." 2002. George Washington University. 29 July 2009 .

U.S. Dept. Of State. "Kennan and Containment, 1947." n.d. U.S. Department of State. 28 JUly 2009 .

"What ended the cold war?" 8 August 2003. Everything2.com. 28 July 2009 .
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Challenging the Beijing Consensus China Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Words: 24240 Length: 60 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17194104

Foreign Policy of China (Beijing consensus)

Structure of Chinese Foreign Policy

The "Chinese Model" of Investment

The "Beijing Consensus" as a Competing Framework

Operational Views

The U.S.-China (Beijing consensus) Trade Agreement and Beijing Consensus

Trading with the Enemy Act

Export Control Act.

Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act

Category B

Category C

The 1974 Trade Act.

The Operational Consequences of Chinese Foreign Policy

The World Views and China (Beijing consensus)

Expatriates

The Managerial Practices

Self Sufficiency of China (Beijing consensus)

China and western world: A comparison

The China (Beijing consensus)'s Policy of Trading Specialized Goods

Chapter 5

The versions of China (Beijing consensus)'s trade development

The China (Beijing consensus) Theory of Power Transition

eferences

Foreign Policy of China (Beijing consensus)

Chapter 1

Abbreviations

ACD arms control and disarmament

ACDA Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

ADB Asian Development Bank

ADF Asian Development Fund

APEC Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation

AF ASEAN [Association of Southeast…… [Read More]

References

Barnett, A.D. (1977). China (Beijing consensus) and the Major Powers in East Asia. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=34158088

Boorman, H.L., Eckstein, A., Mosely, P.E., & Schwartz, B. (1957). Moscow-Peking Axis: Strengths and Strains (1st ed.). New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=53424557

Sardesai, D.R. (1974). Chapter 6 India: A Balancer Power?. In Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power, Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.) (pp. 94-104). New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691923

Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.). (1974). Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power. New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691822
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American Foreign Policy

Words: 605 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27793751

Foreign Relations

Summary of chapter on "Alternative Futures:

The United States as an Ordinary State"

In this chapter, the author argues that (despite appearances to the contrary), there are always choices as to the future direction of any state. America seems to be committed to a war on "terror" by the events of September 11th and the subsequent conquests in the Middle East. This author argues that no such commitment exists, but that America still has the freedom of action to allow any number of future policy directions to exist. The United States, the reader is asked to remember, has not always had an expansionist perspective or sought to save the world.

It is important, the author claims, that as America considers going to war that we also consider the "victor's strategy," which is the way in which the world will be ordered after the war. Many of the greatest…… [Read More]

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Aid to Dependent Corporations the Government of

Words: 948 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18014298

Aid to Dependent Corporations

The government of United States is incurring heavy revenue loss on account of the corporate sector subsidies and other special rebates. The friendly policies of the government aimed at promoting a positive business climate are sadly being exploited. In their interests to evade tax, businesses today are taking undue advantage of the favorable federal policies. In this regard I feel that our governments tax policies and corporate procedures need to be reexamined in order to eliminate the loopholes in them and at the same time support the common welfare schemes. Let us analyze the scenario in a little detail so that we can better appreciate the situation.

One by one our leading business corporations are reeling under accounting scams. I need not mention how well such a giant corporation like 'Enron' managed to disguise its financial information from the government and the stockholders. In the prevailing…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chuck Collins, "Dollars & Sense," 'Aid to dependent corporations: exposing federal handouts to the wealthy', May-June 1995, pg 15
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Foreign Monetary System

Words: 1423 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85828963

Foreign Monetary System

A monetary system is any structure initiated by the government and mandated to issue currency, acknowledged as the medium of exchange by its citizens and governments of other nations. The central bank manages the monetary system of a country; this same bank has the responsibility of printing money and controlling the economy. Since the colonial period, coins from the European colonies had circulated in all the colonies. The Spanish coins gained dominance due to the scarcity of coins, during this time; the main form of trade was barter trade. The trade-involved items such as rice, tobacco, or animal skins, which took the form of money paper and notes, had varying rates of discount in different colonies rendering them of very low value (onald & Wright, 2006).

The high population in the U.S. called for increased trade and commerce. This forced the United States government to look for…… [Read More]

References

Ronald, M. & Wright, R.E. (2006). Development of the U.S. Monetary Union. Journal of Financial History Review, 13(1), 19-41.

Anonymous, (2011). Challenges and risks of the International Monetary System. Journal of Economic Review, 22(5), 768.

Eichengreen, B.J. (2008). Globalizing capital: A history of the international monetary system.

Princeton: Princeton University Press.
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Foreign Language Learning Strategies

Words: 2081 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86895418

Foreign Language Learning trategies

This is a paper that outlines the strategies that can be used in the classroom by learners in learning foreign language. It has 6 sources.

Implementation of a foreign language learning strategy may be employed by students independently, and these strategies need to be ones that focus on principles such as motivation, gender, age group, etc., in order to have the effect intended.

Learning a second language is an interesting practice for those who are keen and interested in it. Those who indulge in language learning when they do not really need to often find it easier to do so, and this is because of the fact that they are not pressurized to get things right. They may find the process of error and correction more fun than those who feel compelled to learn a language. This is true for most foreign students who settle in…… [Read More]

Sources:

Spencer, Shelley. Five-Minute Lesson Fillers. The Internet TESL Journal. 2003.   http://iteslj.org/ Techniques/Spencer-5MinuteFillers.html 

Van der Werff, Joep. Using Pictures from Magazines. The Internet TESL Journal. 2003.
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Foreign Banks India Foreign Banks in India

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31292855

Foreign Banks India

Foreign Banks in India

It was recently announced that foreign banks, for the first time in decades, will be allowed to enter into the Indian banking industry and "set up 'wholly owned subsidiaries' in India." ("India Eases ules for Foreign Banks") Since the nation obtained independence in the late 1940's, the Indian banking system has undergone radical changes, none more so than in the late 1960's when then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi began to nationalize the entire banking system. The effort was an attempt to change the focus of Indian banks from institutions of profit to ones that could aid in the economic transformation of the Indian economy, primarily the development of rural areas. This system of government direction for the banking system kept Indian banks somewhat isolated from the international banking industry. In 2008, when the collapse of the American banking giant Lehman Brothers precipitated a…… [Read More]

References

Bandyopadhyay, Tamal. (11 Sept. 2013). "How India's Banking Sector Weathered the Global Storm." The Live Mint and the Wall Street Journal. Retrieved from http://www.livemint.com/Specials/Jz0STkDuhEehFlOb6kVfoM/How-Indias-banking-sector-weathered-the-global-storm.html

Big Banking Reforms Coming Soon: Raghuram Rajan." (13 Oct. 2013). The Hindu.

Retrieved from http://www.thehindu.com/business/Economy/big-banking-sector-reforms-coming-soon-raghuram-rajan/article5231410.ece

"India Eases Rules for Foreign Banks." (13 Nov. 2013). BBC News: Business. Retrieved from  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-24846760
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Foreign Policy of President Reagan

Words: 5099 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83090795

Foreign Policy of President eagan

Before the disastrous Vietnam War, the U.S. held an undisputed dominant position worldwide, recognized locally as well as by other nations. The nation's historic actions towards defending freedom, by restraining the fascist faction during the Second World War, followed by organizing a large free-state coalition for combating communism, were supported by profound and sweeping domestic consensus. This consensus was destroyed by America's decision to wage war on Vietnam. Despite the rationale being the protection of free peoples battling communism, the Vietnam War resulted in caustic doubt and destabilizing discord among Americans. This suspicion and discord incited and guided by people opposed to the war, rather than the enemy's weaponry and zeal, explains America's failure, above every other factor. The U.S. had to battle internal resistance more than resistance from the Vietnamese adversary, and resulted in a self-inflicted defeat (Brenes 2015; LAISON 2013). Extremely serious repercussions…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Martin. 1990. Revolution: The Reagan Legacy, Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press.

Armstrong, Scott and Peter Grier. 1986. Strategic Defense Initiative: Splendid Defense or Pipe Dream, New York: Foreign Policy Association.

Arquilla, John. 2006. The Reagan Imprint: Ideas in American Foreign Policy from the Collapse of Communism to the War on Terror, Chicago: Ivan R. Dee.

Baucom, Donald R. 1992. The Origins of SDI, 1944-1983, Lawrence, Kans.: University Press of Kansas.
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American Foreign Policy as it

Words: 4630 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27092534

Again, the press is not aware of all that goes on in the White House behind closed doors. Just because the matter was not publicly mentioned again in a direct fashion, does not mean that it was dropped. My team and I have continually discussed the best course of action for fostering trade with Tunisia and setting a much stronger precedent in the Middle East. The WSJ has actually zeroed in on the connection between this injection of fiscal support to Tunisia and our intentions to foster free trade with the entire Middle East.

The WSJ thinks that we should strike a trade deal with Tunisia and to also designate as a strategic economic nation. I and the entire White House is flattered that the Wall Street Journal would give us such obvious and prosaic advice on plans that we've already come up with ourselves. Of course the U.S. is…… [Read More]

References

Bonime-Blanc, a., 2011. The Fight Against Corruption Goes Global. Foreign Affairs, pp. 44-49.

Caldwell, W., 2009 . Learning to Leverage New Media. Military Review, May, pp. 256-260.

Carafano, J., 2011. Mastering the Art of Wiki. Joint Force Quarterly, pp. 266-271.

Clinton, H., 2010. Leading through Civilian Power. Foreign Affairs, pp. 199-209.
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U S Foreign Policy Pre and

Words: 4171 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95331019

A long passage is quoted here by way of showing what all these various writers are concerned about: (Kane, 2003)May 2002 brought the odd spectacle of ex-President Jimmy Carter standing shoulder to shoulder in Havana with one of the U.S. government's oldest enemies, Cuban president Fidel Castro. Carter, on a mission to convey a message of friendship to the Cuban people and to seek some common ground between Cuba and the United States, made a point of meeting and encouraging local democratic, religious, and human rights activists. In a televised address, he endorsed the rights of dissidents and urged democracy on the island nation (Sullivan 2002). He also advocated an end to the U.S. embargo on Cuba (a call immediately echoed at home by 20 Democratic and 20 epublican representatives in Congress).

President George W. Bush's administration responded angrily to Carter's latest adventure as international arbiter. A senior state department…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000729437

Beard, J.M. (2002). America's New War on Terror: The Case for Self-Defense under International Law. Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, 25(2), 559+. Retrieved May 9, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Buchanan, P.J. (1999) a Republic, Not an Empire: Reclaiming America's Destiny, Regenary, 1999, Washington, D.C.

Bryd, R.C. Senator, (2004) Losing America: Confronting a Reckless and Arrogant Presidency. W.W. Norton, New York http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001205015
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Globalization Daniel Yergin's Giving Aid to World

Words: 326 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95548302

Globalization: Daniel Yergin's "Giving Aid to orld Trade" and Helena Norberg-Hodge's "The March of the Monoculture"

In their respective articles about the effects of western influence on developing nations and areas of the world, Daniel Yergin, in "Giving Aid to orld Trade" and Helena Norberg-Hodge, in "The March of the Monoculture," express very different viewpoints on the benefits (or lack thereof) of western foreign presence in these places. Yergin is more sanguine about such presence overall. Norberg-Hodge is less so. hile Yergin writes from a purely economic perspective, Norberg-Hodge writes from a cultural one, which perhaps explains the differences in their viewpoints on this issue.

As Yergin suggests in "Giving Aid to orld Trade," for example, foreign aid may "improve health, education and national infrastructure . . . build legal and lending institutions . . . Such improvements can attract long-term foreign investment that creates jobs and encourages transfers of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Norberg-Hodge, Helena. "The March of the Monoculture." Retrieved May 26,

2005, from: .

Yergin, Daniel. "Giving Aid to World Trade. Policy Matters, Vol. 2, Issue 34 (July

2002). Retrieved May 26, 2005, from: .
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American Foreign Security Policies What

Words: 1788 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36781574

But the U.S. must also set an example to the world on human rights, and that begins with a rejection of the kind of abuses that were carried out at Abu Ghraib in Iraq during the U.S. occupation of that sovereign nation.

orks Cited

Biden, Joseph. (2009). Biden Lays Out U.S. Foreign Policy Goals, Approaches. America.gov.

Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://www.america.gov.

Blanton, Shannon Lindsey. (2005). Foreign Policy in Transition? Human Rights, Democracy,

and U.S. Arms Exports. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 49, 647-667.

Butler, Desmond. (2010). Lawmakers stretching out Russia nuke pact debate. The Seattle

Times. Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://seattletimes.nwsource.com.

Cardenas, Sonia. (2009). Human Rights in Latin America: A Politics of Terror and Hope.

Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Hamid, Shadi, and Brooke, Steven. (2010). Promoting Democracy to Stop Terror, Revisited,

Policy Review, No. 59, 45-58.

McCain, John. (2010). National History and Universal Values: Prioritizing Human Rights…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Biden, Joseph. (2009). Biden Lays Out U.S. Foreign Policy Goals, Approaches. America.gov.

Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://www.america.gov.

Blanton, Shannon Lindsey. (2005). Foreign Policy in Transition? Human Rights, Democracy,

and U.S. Arms Exports. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 49, 647-667.
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US Aid to Afghanistan the Issue of

Words: 1412 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 759177

US Aid to Afghanistan

The issue of United States' aid to Afghanistan is a topic of interesting consideration given the current U.S. budget deficit and ongoing economic uncertainty. Over the years the United States has spent billions providing money and food aid to help build strength and confidence in Afghanistan's rising new government. Unfortunately, the results of this have not been entirely positive nor have they been driven by the purest of motives; there is some level of profiteering occurring using aid money, and there is also a practical U.S. interest in the stability and viability of the Afghan nation and people. If the United States were providing purely humanitarian aid without military or political involvement and requirements, the situation would be quite different. As it is, U.S. aid in the country is a complex and controversial issue.

Since Afghanistan was taken over by the Taliban, the country has been…… [Read More]

References

Agnieszka, Flak. "INTERVIEW-Afghanistan Food Aid at Risk as Donors Trim Support |

Agricultural Commodities | Reuters." Reuters.com. 24 Dec. 2011. Web. 04 Feb. 2012.


pageNumber=2
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International Humanitarian Aid

Words: 3377 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38177141

International Humanitarian Aid: Aims vs. Outcome

Humanitarian aid represents a commitment to support vulnerable host populations that have experienced a sudden emergency, requiring ongoing assistance to maintain or improve their quality of life.[1] Over the past 15 years the number of humanitarian agencies, private organizations, governments (taxpayers), corporations, individuals and other stakeholders have grown enormously.[2][3] This group of diverse donors have differing mandates, values, goals, strategies, actors and activities, but most function under one universal humanitarian principle: to protect the vulnerable by decreasing morbidity and mortality, alleviate suffering and enhance well-being, human dignity, and quality of life. However, many stakeholders believe that humanitarian aid has been unsuccessful in delivering on these promises through lack of coordination and duplication of services. This results in a failure to meet the needs of those meant to benefit. Indeed humanitarian aid with its diverse mandates, roles, people, time lines and funding, as well as…… [Read More]

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National Interest as a Key Determinants in Foreign Policy Internationally

Words: 3533 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52453083

National Interest as a key determinant in Foreign Policy

National Interest and Foreign Policy

National Interest Defined:

The national interest is, very simply, the objectives of a country ranging from the macro goals i.e. economy, military to the micro goals like social use cyber space. National interest is an integral part of international relations as it is a concept based out of the realist school of though. This will be discussed in more detail in the paper.

Foreign Policy Defined:

Foreign policy, very simply, is the strategy that guides all international dealings and associations of a country

When dealing with national interest, one has to wonder about the degree to which domestic politics is vital for the comprehension of that country's foreign policy. Domestic politics is not of immense significance; this has been depicted by an eminent assumption related to structural realism, global association. The systemic vigour of the global…… [Read More]

References

Bond, J.R., and R. Fleisher. 1990. The President in the legislative arena. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Clarke, K.A. 2001. Testing nonnested models of international relations: Reevaluating realism. American Journal of Political Science 45(3): 724 -- 744.

Clarke, K.A. 2003. Nonparametric model discrimination in international relations. Journal of Conict Resolution 47(1): 72 -- 93.

Fearon, J.D. 1998. Domestic politics, foreign policy, and theories of international relations. Annual Review of Political Science 1: 289 -- 313.
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Ronald Reagan foreign Policy

Words: 2217 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95776619

Ronald Reagan Foreign Policy: Annotated Bibliography

ucker, Robert W. 1989. "REAGAN'S FOREIGN POLICY." Foreign Affairs 68, no. 1: 1-27.

he author of this article maintains that Ronald Reagan assumed the Presidential role rebuking the 70s' arms control attempts. As a majority of Reagan's fellow politicians were highly suspicious of any arms control pacts with Russia, the general belief was that the newly sworn-in President shared the same view. he cold-war agreement with respect to foreign policy remains consistently idealized since Vietnam. Rarely did it function with the now-envisaged efficacy and smoothness. his re-formation's key feature was, evidently, the restitution of a prevalent public opinion that perceived the exercising of U.S. power without guilt or distrust, once again. herefore, the chief Reagan foreign-policy legacy might well be that: the 40th President of the United States altered the inclination not to suffer for USA's global position into something of a firm resolve…… [Read More]

This article is an analysis of the cognitive style of Reagan as manifested through his statement on the U.S. and the USSR and the nature of the 1964-1972 international conflict. The analysis shows the black-and-white dichotomy thinking and the rigid perception. However, the authr argues that Reagan was able to modify his notion on winning or losing in war through the reorganization that the U.S. and the USSR had some common interests in the war, for example, constraining the nuclear arms race.

Fischer, B.A., 2000. The Reagan reversal: Foreign policy and the end of the Cold War. University of Missouri Press.

Even though there is the assumption that Reagan was reactive in bringing to conclusion the cold war, this book shows that the president had actually began seeking for rapprochement with the USSR earlier than Gorbachev took office. The author demonstrates how Reagan began calling for dialogue, understanding and cooperation between the superpowers. In general the book shows that Reagan was at time the driving force for the U.S.-USSR policy of his administration.
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Aid Strategies or Trade Agreements More Likely

Words: 3163 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79499828

Aid strategies or Trade Agreements more likely to relieve poverty in Sun-Saharan Africa?

Please a postgraduate essay. GUIDELINE FO THE ESSAY LINE. In assessing coursework, criteria: • elevance question • Sound ordering structuring material • Quality clarity written expression • Effective evidence • Appropriate theory • Demonstration sound understanding topic • Adequacy research analysis • Identification major themes arguments • Critical evaluation judgement • ange sources • Consistent referencing AND page numbers • Insight originality • Grammar language Please aware questions require critical analysis consideration: A] The nature continuity change global politics B] An analysis historical, politico-economic geo-political context C] Use case studies.

The development of African countries has been for decades now one of the most discussed subjects in the international arena, especially in the area of international development. There have been numerous attempts to find the proper solutions to be implemented in countries on the Black continent; however,…… [Read More]

References

CNN "Gem-of-a-deal spares Botswana from blood diamonds," in World, 15 decembrie 2006, available at  http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/africa/12/11/koinange.botswana/index.html 

CNN. "Your world today (transcript)" in Your World Today, 12 decembrie 2006, available at http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0612/12/ywt.01.html

Horvath, Ronald J. "A Definition of Colonialism." Current Anthropology, Vol. 13, No. 1, (Feb., 1972), pp. 45-57

Ministry of Education in Botswana. "The Revised National Policy On Education" in Government Paper No. 2, 1994, available at http://www.moe.gov.bw/headquarters/rnpe/RNPE%20Pages/rnpeone.htm
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Aid the United States Has Been One

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66752717

Aid

The United States has been one of the most affluent countries of the world. Because of this fact, the country has established a history of providing aid and comfort to other groups around the world who are suffering because of economic, agricultural, or other turmoil for whatever reason, whether it be failure of government, war, or natural disaster. Some advocate that this is the rightful position of more wealthy countries and populations, to provide assistance to those who are less fortunate. This is certainly true to some extent. However, when a nation is in times of difficulty itself, like the United States is currently embroiled in, it is more important that the government provide aid to its own citizens than looking at what it can do outside the nation's borders. On an individual level, it would certainly be nice for wealthy persons to assist their fellow men and women…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Narveson, Jan. "We Don't Owe Them a Thing." The Monist. 86:3. 419-433. Print.

Singer, Peter. "Famine, Affluence, and Morality." Philosophy and Public Affairs. 1:1. 1972. 229-

243. Print.
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Aid President George W Bush in Policy

Words: 5641 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99905017

aid President George W. ush in policy formulation. It is an all-inclusive paper dealing with a wide range of issues such as the American economy in general- discussing issues such as budget deficits, tax cuts, medical assistance and benefits for retired people, the weakening American dollar, allocations for the military, intelligence and homeland security, job growth and the regime and policies of free trade. With regards to security, it features the recent American initiate on the war on terrorism. The issue of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and nuclear proliferation are discussed quite at length.

Another aspect listed in the paper is the 'future', as it was viewed from the era of the Vietnam War. The relevance of the cold war is also outlined as a great American victory. Compelling issues such as the role of oil, OPEC, the Middle East and the socio-political and economic situation after the incidents…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bush's tax cut' Retrieved from;

http://amateurpundit.hypermart.net/features107_bushtaxing.htm Accessed on March 5, 2004

Economy: Job Creation' Retrieved from;

http://ipsnews.net/africa/interna.asp?idnews=22469 Accessed on March 5, 2004
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Foreign Object Damage Fod and

Words: 1716 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31748124



eferences

Amalberti, ane & -Sarter, N.B. (eds.). (2000). Cognitive engineering in the aviation domain. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Bennis, W. & Biederman, P.W. (1997). Organizing genius: The secrets of creative collaboration. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books.

Boeing. (1994). Maintenance error decision aid. In Amalberti & Sarter (2000).

Butzgy, M. (2003). LSET team to visit 23rd FG. Pope Air Force Base, N.C. Available: http://www.carolinaflyer.com/11Nov/111403/111403_13.shtml.

Clark, G.. (1990). Words of the Vietnam war: The slang, jargon, abbreviations, acronyms, nomenclature, nicknames, pseudonyms, slogans, specs, euphemisms, double-talk, chants, and names and places of the era of United States involvement in Vietnam. Jefferson: McFarland & Co.

Davis, W.A. (1993, October). Human factors in the global marketplace. Keynote address presented at the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society, annual meeting, Seattle. In Amalberti & Sarter (2000).

Graeber, .C. (1996, May). The value of human factors awareness for airline management. Paper presented at the oyal Aeronautical Society conference…… [Read More]

References

Amalberti, Rane & -Sarter, N.B. (eds.). (2000). Cognitive engineering in the aviation domain. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Bennis, W. & Biederman, P.W. (1997). Organizing genius: The secrets of creative collaboration. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books.

Boeing. (1994). Maintenance error decision aid. In Amalberti & Sarter (2000).

Butzgy, M. (2003). LSET team to visit 23rd FG. Pope Air Force Base, N.C. Available: http://www.carolinaflyer.com/11Nov/111403/111403_13.shtml.
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Foreign Students in Higher Education

Words: 2665 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83790039

Globalization and Education

Globalization involves a number of different elements, including economic integration, freedom of capital movements, and the increasing "transfer of knowledge, cultural stability" and an increase in cultural interactions (Al-odhan, 2006). The process of globalization has been fostered by industrial-age improvements in transportation, communication and through political and economic liberalization. One of the antecedents of the era of globalization was the creation of the European Common Market. When this was extended to not only allow for goods and capital to move more easily across borders but labor as well, this ushered in a new era of mass migration. Today, many of the world's leading cities have incredibly diverse populations, as people from all over the world are drawn by the economic promise of major urban hubs. One of the areas where this trend can be seen is with education. For decades, education has been trumpeted as a pathway…… [Read More]

References

Al-Rodhan, N. (2006). Definitions of globalization. Geneva Centre for Security Policy. Retrieved November 17, 2015 from http://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/30929642/Definitions_of_Globalization_-_A_Comprehensive_Overview_and_a_Proposed_Definition.pdf?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJ56TQJRTWSMTNPEA&Expires=1447724149&Signature=KHFcmax%2BQD8oIUr9BWJZz%2BFEzb4%3D&response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DDefinitions_of_Globalization_A_Comprehen.pdf

Grootaert, C. (1994). Education, poverty and structural change in Africa: Lessons from Cote d'Ivoire. International Journal of Educational Development. Vol. 14 (2) 131-142.

Kwiek, M. (2001). Globalization and higher education. Higher Education in Europe. Vol. 16 (1) 27-38.

Vaira, M. (2004). Globalization and higher education organizational change: A framework for analysis. Higher Education. Vol. 48 (2004) 483-510.
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U S Foreign Policy and the

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42976300

8 billion. The Occupation authorities also helped the Japanese government overcome postwar economic chaos, especially rampant inflation, by balancing the government budget, raising taxes and imposing price and wage freezes, and resuming limited foreign trade" (Kesselman et al., 203). The U.S. aid not only helped to rebuild the country, but also ensured that Japan was stable enough so that renegade seedlings of Communism or comparable institutions didn't suddenly flourish. The United States should sue this wise historical strategy that it deftly employed to help the economies of poorer nations in the Middle East. hen people are living in poverty, this makes them ripe breeding grounds for terrorism to build and people to be brainwashed by doctrines which vilify the est. Furthermore the United States should invest money in developing educational programs in the Middle East, so that the citizens there can actually envision a real future for themselves, without having…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bryne, P.J. The Chinese Revolution: The Triumph of Communism. Minneapolis: Compass Point

Books, 2007.

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. And Joseph, W. Introduction to Comparative Politics. Boston:

Wadsworth Learnign, 2013.
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U S Foreign Policies and Actions

Words: 1576 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64140012

S.

Therefore, it is fairly evident that U.S. foreign policy certainly aided in worsening the political situations in much of Latin America during the Cold War. It did so by serving as a source of enmity for many nationalist groups that arose to oppose its domination in the area, by attempting to undermine the reform measures of governments erected in place of those that it favored, and by formally supplying weaponry, funding and training to opposing factions that represented U.S. interest. The effect of all of these measures was that they led to greater and greater reactionary measures among the groups that were infringed upon. This fact is particularly true of Central American involvement in the Cold War, the regimes that were erected and dealt with insurrections and counter insurrections in El Salvador and Guatemala were among some of the bloodiest in the Cold War, excluding those in Vietnam. Yet…… [Read More]

References

Brand, Hal. Latin America's Cold War. Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. 2004. Print.
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Federal Student Aid Funding Department

Words: 2728 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65926229

Despite increased student fees, the UC still encountered a $500 million shortfall or $2,500 per student. It has been undergoing severe pressure from the impact of the cuts. The quality of education at the U.S. has remained high, but there have been disturbing signs of erosion, nevertheless. The widening gap between the UC and the best private university has been alarming because the UC competes for the top teachers and students with these private universities. This widening gap should be a critical concern to the state and the federal governments because even excellent private universities are too small to meet California's or the nation's needs for a well-educated workforce in the future, to come up with innovations needed to fuel the economy and to generate jobs, and to introduce medical advances for the use and care of the sick and disabled. In the past decade, California's private research universities, Stanford,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Clinton, P. (2002). The student aid conundrum. University Business: 4 pages.

Professional Media Group LLC

Darling, B.B. (2005). Hearing testimony. 5 pages. California Senate Subcommittee on Higher Education. Retrieved January 26, 2007 at http://www.ucop.edu/uersvp/speeches/Speier_Hearing_Nov_9_2005.pdf

Dervarics, C. (2006). Congress approves cuts to student loan programs. 1 page. Diverse Issues on Higher Education: Cox, Matthews and Associates
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U S Foreign Policy in Southern

Words: 2383 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16355948

" Regan was able to discourage Congress' previous prohibitions for aid to UNITA and instead launched into the covert plan to leverage American weight on the side fighting the Marxist supporters. The Soviet Union reacted quickly; Cuban expeditionary forces were sent to the region in their satellite guerilla's aid and, in the bloody fight between ethnic groups in Angola, the larger Soviet-American conflict played out.

In 1987, the struggle came to a head. The United States assumed its supportive role for UNITA as reason preside over the tripartite negotiation that would end the civil war. At the bargaining table were also Cuban and South African forces, reaffirming the battle as one led by other issues more than directed by the cause of Angolan success. Cuba agreed to leave Angola, ultimately, but South Africa also agreed to relinquish its control over Namibia. Twenty years earlier, Marxist South-West Africa eople's Organization launched…… [Read More]

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U S Foreign Affairs Since 1898

Words: 3090 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8617183

President Johnson became even more fearful of a communist take-over.

In 1964, when two American ships were attacked by the North Vietnamese in the Gulf of Tonkin "the American Senate gave Johnson the power to give armed support to assist any country requesting help in defense of its freedom," effectively beginning the Vietnam War without a formal declaration of war (BBC 2009). The wide-scale bombing of the North in 'Operation olling Thunder' began in February 1965. By March 1965, the first American ground troops had landed in South Vietnam and by December 1965, there were 150,000 servicemen stationed in the country (BBC 2009).

ichard Nixon was elected to the presidency in 1968, promising a policy of Vietnamization or the taking-over of the war against the North by native Vietnamese troops. However, it would be four more years before substantial withdrawals of American servicemen occurred. Nixon also supported dictators in Laos…… [Read More]

References

An overview of the crisis. (1997). The Cuban Missile Crisis. Crisis Center. Thinkquest.

Retrieved January 1, 2009 at http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/days/index.html

The Berlin Airlift. (2010). Cold War Museum. Retrieved January 1, 2009 at  http://www.coldwar.org/articles/40s/berlin_airlift.asp 

Chang, Laurence & Peter Kornbluh. (1998). A national security archive documents reader.
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Popularity of Foreign Restaurant Consumer Attitude and

Words: 7176 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90727544

popularity of foreign restaurant: consumer attitude and behavior toward foreign cuisines in Bangkok

Thailand as a tourist destination

Thailand has become a tourist destination hotspot for its scenic beauty, the humble nature of their people, and the relative value of foreign currencies relative to the baht. According to EIU ViewsWire (2003), "Growth in the tourism industry in recent years was the result of the depreciation of the baht against non-Asian currencies (which improved competitiveness relative to destinations outside the region), aggressive marketing campaigns and an increase in the number of airlines offering flights to Thailand." (EIU ViewsWire, 2003)

Additionally, according to EIU ViewsWire (2003), "Tourist arrivals rose by 5.8% to just over 10m in 2001, despote the global economic downturn and the September 11 terrorist attacks in the U.S., bringing in Bt 295bn (U.S. $6.6 bn) in revenue. Thailand benefited from its reputation as a safe and stable society and…… [Read More]

References

"A century of certification," 2003, Health and Hygiene, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 12-12-13.

Anne-Mette Hjalager & Magda, A.C. 2000, "Food for tourists -- determinants of an image," The International Journal of Tourism Research, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 281-281.

Asia's Biggest Sourcing Event for Foods and Beverages Ever Kicks Off This Week 2011,, PR Newswire Association LLC, United States, New York.

Chen, M. 2009, "Attitude toward organic foods among Taiwanese as related to health consciousness, environmental attitudes, and the mediating effects of a healthy lifestyle," British Food Journal, vol. 111, no. 2, pp. 165-165-178.
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Vietnam and Foreign Policy International

Words: 1283 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69728085

In addition the United States has provided many new products to be used for agricultural production so that the war torn fields can again become fruitful and prosperous (Adamson, 2002).

The infrastructure assistance provides the roadways so that the agricultural products can be transported into needed areas and crops can be transported out for sale and for export.

While helping the nation rebuild the roads and highways and bridges that were destroyed during the conflict the United States also has devoted time and funding to the development of the nation's communication system. Engineers, technical training and technical instruments have all been provided by the U.S. To Vietnam in the attempt to use the international strategy of development for the purpose of defining and carrying out the United States foreign policy toward Vietnam (Adamson, 2002).

DIPLOMATIC ELATIONS

The second international strategy being used by the United States for the purpose of…… [Read More]

References

Ambassadorial roles and foreign policy: Elbridge Durbrow, Frederick Nolting, and the U.S. commitment to Diem's Vietnam, 1957-61. (Articles). Presidential Studies Quarterly; 6/1/2002; Adamson, Michael R.

S., Vietnam develop military ties By David Lamb LOS ANGELES TIMES

 http://peacecorpsonline.org/messages/messages/2629/2020778.html 

DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS
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Reagan Foreign Policy Regan Foreign

Words: 2610 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18820949

S. has unilaterally imposed sanctions to punish ran for its support of these activities. To address the shortages from this embargo, the ranian government has been working on developing nuclear power. They claim that this will help to tackle the nation's current and future energy needs. (Khan, 2010, pp. 77 -- 110)

This has led to the UN imposing another embargo against the slamic Republic for their continuing incompliance with international law. At the heart of the issue, are concerns that ran is using their nuclear energy program as a cover for developing an atomic bomb. The fear is that the ranians will pass on nuclear related materials to terrorist groups or they will use these weapons to attack the U.S. To prevent this from happening, America is leading an international effort to further isolate ran. n response, ran has been defiantly working on their program. This has caused the…… [Read More]

In the case of Iran, they are at the far end of the spectrum by wanting to destroy the U.S. And everything that it stands for. This has increased the amount of covert actions that are taken against the Islamic Republic. At the same time, this helps the U.S. To push its trading partners to isolate Iran (which is causing their economic situation to become even worse). This is showing how America's approach can be used as way to reward or punish a country for their activities. (Sutter, 2012, pp. 37 -- 59)

In the case of China, the fact that they were willing to work with the U.S. And implement many of the economic reforms led to improved relations between both countries. This is when China received favored trading status and was provided with tremendous amounts of foreign direct investment capital (which helped to increase economic development). These changes were occurring despite China's terrible human rights record and lack of political changes. This is showing how efforts to implement at least some of the reforms led to more support in the future from the U.S. (Sutter, 2012, pp. 37 -- 59)

These different approaches are illustrating how the U.S. is rewarding those countries that are in support of international standards with various forms of economic and military aid. While nations that are unwilling to do this, will face the possibility of isolation. This is designed to put pressure on
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U S History and Foreign Policy

Words: 3087 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44277503

The events leading to the Vietnam conflict were determined by the administration in place at that time (VIETNAM CONFLICT (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War).

Initially it was decided that Vietnam would be occupied by Chinese and British troops and that they would supervise the surrender of Japan.

In 1960 Hanoi instructed the southern communists to establish an organization called the national liberation front. The purpose of this organization was to overthrow the government of the south. The organization was made up of two groups. The intellectuals of the South and who opposed the foundation of the government of South Viet Nam and the communists who had remained in the south after the partition.

The Di-m government was initially able to cope with the insurgency with the aid of U.S. advisers, and by 1962 seemed to be winning. Senior U.S. military leaders were receiving positive reports from the U.S. commander, Gen. Paul D. Harkins of…… [Read More]

References

CONTAINMENT of SOVIET UNION

http://www.foreignaffairs.org/19870301faessay7847/george-f-kennan/containment-40-years-later-containment-then-and-now.html

An Outline of American History (1994) http://www.let.rug.nl/~usa/H/1994/ch11_p5.htm

CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS
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Federal Grants in Aid Programs

Words: 3570 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6816817

These steps have been reiterated within the effectual conditions in the market. The marketing techniques used normally relate to the essential features of reflecting the best approaches of work within the government. This happens as done in the United States of America and many other nations that strive to live within a sound mechanism of growth and development in the field. As a way reflecting the best forms of performance, it has become a common feature to analyze the consequences of the Federal grants in aid programs under the legal frameworks and other humanitarian theories. These are theories that try to bring the best forms of growth and development in the field (Araral et al., 2001).

The policy problems that can be reflected in such a way are those related to the equality to access and make use of the grants as offered by the government. The mechanisms of performance…… [Read More]

References

Araral, E, et al. (2001). Routledge Handbook of the Policy Process. New York: Routledge

Dervarics, C. (2009). Financial Aid Program Changes Take Effect. Diverse Issues in Higher

Education, Volume 26, Issue 11, p. 8-16

Edwin B.J. (2007). George W. Bush's Federal Aid Legacy. Publius, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp.
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U S Foreign Affairs Since 1898

Words: 1021 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21852841

Proctor does not merely repeat of make empty allegations that horrific violations are occurring in Cuba upon the natives at the hands of the Spaniards. He has witnessed these abuses with is own eyes on an observational visit, where he went as a skeptic, with, in his own words, "a strong conviction that the picture had been overdrawn," regarding the terrible conditions of the Cuban populace. (Proctor, 1898)

Proctor came back to the United States convinced that, more so than the destruction of the Maine, the barbarities inflicted by the Spanish forces cry out for United States intervention. ("March 17, 1898: Senator Proctor's Visit to Cuba," 1999, Crucible of Empire: PBS Online) In his words, "if our people could see a small fraction of the need, they would pour more 'freely from their liberal store' than ever before for any cause." (Proctor, 1998)

The call of the advocates of intervention…… [Read More]

Works Cited

March 17, 1898: Senator Proctor's Visit to Cuba." (1999) Crucible of Empire: PBS

Online. Retrieved 2 Sept 2006 at  http://www.pbs.org/crucible/tl11.html 

Paterson, Thomas. (1998) U.S. Intervention in Cuba, 1898:Interpreting the Spanish

American-Cuban-Filipino War." OAH Magazine of History. Spring 1998.
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Country China and Foreign Policy With Reference

Words: 2535 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83583773

Country

China and Foreign Policy

With reference to any ONE country you have studied, how far does interdependence shape its foreign policy and in what ways

A Brief History of Chinese Foreign Affairs

China eforms

Current Foreign Policy

Foreign elations and Interdependency

China is an emerging force in the world, and it seems only to be natural, as the Chinese civilization is one of the ancient civilizations of the world. In fact theorists seem to question the reasons for its downfall, as it is the largest and has historically been the cultural and educational center for the world.

As far as its foreign policy is concerned, the Chinese government deals with it in a unique way, where the foreign affairs are the business of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which falls under the ambit of a department called the "Foreign Affairs Leading Small Group of the Communist Party of China."…… [Read More]

References

Barboza, D. 2011. Entrepreneur's Rival in China: The State. New York Times .

Chen, J. 1979. China and the West . Hutchinson.

China. n.d. [Online] Available at: (26 January 2012)

China's Foreign Affairs and International Relations. 2012. . [Online] Available at: (26 January 2012)
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US Foreign Policy

Words: 1320 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63245547

U.S. Foreign Policy

American foreign policy occupies a unique place in the world. American foreign policy regarding interacting with other nations is a non-homogeneous mixture of politics, economics, and the unique American culture which believes that both the success of political and economic agenda's cannot be separated from the ways which a country treats it's people. To be specific, American has a difficult time forming positive relationships with nations that oppress, imprison, or otherwise trample their people's basic human rights to life, liberty and the individual pursuit of happiness. As he stated during his administration, President Jimmy Carter described the connection between human rights and American foreign policy this way.

Human rights is the soul of our foreign policy, because human rights is the very soul of our sense of nationhood."

American foreign policy is also seen as a function of the president, and the president must take the lead…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Allen, M., and P.P. Pan. Bush touts U.S. values to Chinese. Washington Post, 2002, February 22, p. A01.

Carter, J. Openings to Cuba: We must find common ground. Washington Post. 2002, May 24, p. A35.

Kane, John. American Values or Human Rights? U.S. Foreign Policy and the Fractured Myth of Virtuous Power Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 33. 2003

Sullivan, K. Carter urges democracy for Cuba. Washington Post, 2002, May 15, p. A14.
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U S Foreign Policy US Middle

Words: 2218 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2746112

The international community can obviously respond by seeking to marginalize the Taliban and similar movements as extremists. However, it has become clear following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that western governments have not been effective in infiltrating terrorist networks and pre-empting attacks. It has also become clear that there will be no shortage of people in the Islamic world who are willing to martyr themselves for as long as there are legitimate grievances against the U.S. And other countries. It is therefore in the interest of the Americans that actions are taken by its government that seek to address both the legitimate concerns of moderate elements within the Islamic world and American's own relative ignorance as to what is happening in the world beyond the U.S. (Marsden, 2002 pp. 153-155).

The Afghanistan military action of the U.S. wherein the Taliban regime was overthrown is…… [Read More]

References

Marsden, P. (2002) the Taliban, War and Religion in Afghanistan. London: Zed Books Ltd.

Rashid, a. (2000) Taliban: Militant Islam, Oil and Fundamentalism in Central Asia. New Haven CT: Yale University Press.

Roy, O. (1986) Islam and Resistance in Afghanistan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rosenthal, J. (1991) Righteous Realists: Political Realism, Responsible Power and American Culture in Nuclear Age. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University.
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Bismarck's Impact on Foreign Policy in Germany

Words: 2861 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61220622

ismarck's Impact On Foreign Policy In Germany And On The alance Of Power In Europe

Otto von ismarck (1815-98) is unquestionably one of the dominant figures of modern German, and European, history. Much of his fame as a statesman has always rested on his handling of foreign policy and diplomacy. His consistent policy was to position Germany as a unified and dominant power in continental Europe, consolidating her territorially and diplomatically to the point where she was, to use his own term, "satiated."

ismarck pursued an aggressive policy, involving Germany in three localized wars, seeking to isolate France and build alliances with Austria, and maintaining a suspicious distance from Great ritain, but did not seek war or territorial expansion when he believed such activity would threaten German stability. His achievement was to leave Germany stable, peaceful, and at the heart of the European states system; to integrate a dynamic and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Stefan Berger, 'Historians and nation-building in Germany since reunification', Past and Present, no. 148 (August 1995), pp. 187-222.

F.R. Bridge and Roger Bullen, The Great Powers and the European States System, 1815-1914 (London: Longman, 1980).

Gordon A. Craig, Germany 1866-1945 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1978).

George O. Kent, Bismarck and his Times (Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1978).
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U S Domestic and Foreign Policies

Words: 705 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15064334

Far from being contrite, Southerners more emphatically held to the perceived, innate superiority of their race and breeding, comparing themselves to Biblical patriarchs as a means of validating these perceptions and justifying slavery (432). If Perry's journey had demonstrated Northern hubris, Stowe's novel generated its Southern equivalent.

Then, there was an ironic unification of the British and the Americans in the development of Samuel Colt's revolver in these years. hile the new gun was proving remarkably effective in aiding American conquest of Native American territories, it meant more than this; it was evidence of Anglo-Saxon superiority, which inspired the British as well (424). Old animosities, it seems, were lost in the greater commonality of a shared idea of racial superiority. On the strictly American front, this belief in Protestant and white superiority was also fueled by challenges coming from other nations. Long before the great tide of European immigration at…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Maier, P., & Keyssar, A. Inventing America, 2nd Ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2006.

Print.
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Democratic Procedures an Aid or

Words: 2118 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85112739

The Democrats took over Congress in the 2006 mid-term elections, and while the party wished to have the administration adopt a policy to either "get out now" of Iraq, or "stabilize, then withdraw."

Those suggestions were met with patriotic, even nationalistic opposition from Bush and his very vocal vice president, Dick Cheney (Hartung, 44-45). "However reasonable the merits" were of Congress cutting off funding for the war in Iraq, Hartung continues, Cheney and others supporting the administration held a hammer over their heads in the form of jingoistic phrases like, if you vote to cut off funds you are "voting against the troops" (Hartung, 44). Leaving American troops hanging out there in Iraq would be unthinkable, it was argued from the Bush point-of-view.

Meanwhile, author Lewis B. Smith points out that arguing against the Bush invasion of Iraq was pointless for Congress, due to the sense of patriotism in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennet, Douglas J. (1978). Congress in Foreign Policy: Who Needs It? Foreign Affairs, 57(1),

40-50.

Delaney, Kate. (2006). What's New? Don't Forget Capitol Hill. The Journal of American

History, 93(2), 437-440.
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U S Foreign Policy and the

Words: 3110 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52890666

They however fail to see the strategic linkage in the U.S. foreign policy. Israel is the most trusted ally of United States in the region. It has the same strategic interest as the United States and has a firm foundation of democratic support.

The Arab governments on the other hand are unpopular, non-democratic and are in power due to the western interest in maintaining the status quo. Overthrow of the Shah of Iran, a most trusted ally of United States shows that the governments maintained in power by western support without the popular support could not be relied upon for maintaining U.S. strategic interests in the region.

Saddam Hussein of Iraq is another example of a government following pro-U.S. policy and then working against its strategic interests in the region. Dictator Saddam Hussein was a virtual proxy in the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) and protector of the pro-American dynastic regimes. His…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aruri, N., The U.S. And the Arabs: a woeful history - U.S. Middle East policy, Arab Studies Quarterly (ASQ), 1997

Nakhoul, S., Arabs Seethe with Anger at U.S. Mideast Policy, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs. Volume: 21. Issue: 9. Publication Date: December 2002.

Nixon's State of the World Message, The New York Times, 4 November 1969

Prestowitz, C., Rogue Nation: American Unilateralism and the Failure of Good Intentions, 2003, Cited by Pasquini, E., Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Volume 22, Issue 8, October 2003.
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Australia's Domestic and Foreign Policy

Words: 4433 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96813761

S. resident George W. Bush. Thus, when the blast in Bali, at the
southern point of Indonesia, directed the fury of 9/11 at a popular
attraction to Australian holiday-makers, Australia became a nation
motivated in foreign policy by the apparent threat of global terrorism.
This would be demonstrated by its unwavering willingness to follow the
United States even into its poorly-informed and ill-advised invasion of
Iraq, providing combat troops and civilian military aid. During the lead-
up to this war, in fact, John Howard would perhaps have been noted as only
second to Britain's rime Minister Tony Blair in the ranking of Iraq War
cheerleaders, appearing frequently in the media in order to endorse the
alleged provocations made by the U.S. and later proved false. Howard
echoed well the terms which Bush used to prompt war, remarking in a
February 2002 appearance that the Australian government was firm in
"backing…… [Read More]

Proportionate Response to the Terrorist Threat? Studies in Conflict &
Terrorism, 28(4), 321 - 339.

Wesley, Michael & Allan Gyngell. (2007). Making Australian Foreign
Policy. Cambridge University Press.
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U S Foreign Policy on Terrorism

Words: 2230 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 572844

International Terrorism

Discussion Questions on International Terrorism

Explain the origins and evolution of long-term separatists and ethnic and nationalistic terrorism. Also, provide group names and their respective parts of the world.

Ethno- separatist/nationalist terrorism is not specifically a modern phenomenon. Historically, two Jewish movements in Judaea that desired to provoke the local population to rise against the oman occupiers used ethno-racial terrorism. However, it was only in 60s and 70s that terrorism came to be associated with ethnic- separatist/nationalist movements (Conser, Paynich & Gingerich, 2013). During that time, terrorism was seen as paying off on the reasons for effective, aggressive campaigns launched and won. The Palestine Liberation Organization's terrorist movement between 1968 and 1980 confirmed to other nationalist groups that internationalizing their cause could be valuable. The variety of ethnic-national/separatist terrorist movements effective worldwide, therefore, increased from three in 1968 to 30 in 1978 (Cassara, 2006).

Psychologists argue that the…… [Read More]

References

Conser, J.A., Paynich, R., & Gingerich, T. (2013). Law enforcement in the United States. Burlington, Mass: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Cassara, J.A. (2006). Hide and seek: Intelligence, law enforcement, and the stalled war on terrorist finance. Washington, DC: Potomac Books.

Dintino, J.J., & Martens, F.T. (2003). Police intelligence systems in crime control: Maintaining a delicate balance in a liberal democracy. Springfield, Ill: C.C. Thomas.

Fijnaut, C., & Paoli, L. (2004). Organized crime in Europe: Concepts, patterns, and control policies in the European Union and beyond. The Netherlands: Springer.
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Domestic & Foreign Extremist Groups

Words: 2494 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35258067

However, a recent study did not find 'members of the Irish epublican Army (IA) to be emotionally disturbed' (eich, p. 26).

As with the KKK, the IA trains its members in several types of terrorist actions. Ambush tactics are taught to IA recruits; they learn how to stalk and attack targets and how to rapidly flee unnoticed. IA members are trained in the use of a wide range of weaponry and explosives. Similar to the KKK, they are trained in para-military operations. On the training agenda of IA members is the construction of napalm bombs. Trainees are instructed on the art of torture and are able to practice such skills on prisoners.

Since its inception, the IA called on the community at large for its support. This synchronization was integral to the organization's cause: the reunification of Ireland and freedom of oman Catholics. Thus, religion was the common denominator in…… [Read More]

References

Anti-Defamation League (2005). Ku Klux Klan. Law Enforcement Agency Resource Network.

Retrieved September 21, 2005. Web site:

www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/KKK.asp.

Arthur, Paul (1998). The IRA & Sinn Fein. Public Broadcasting System (PBS) Online.
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Bush v Obama Foreign Policies

Words: 3671 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74573903

The administration's disregard for international norms led to the excesses at Abu Ghraib Prison in Iraq, and attempts to circumvent congressional oversight over the activities of the Administration backfired. Faced with increasing criticism at home and the inability to stabilize Iraq, the Bush Administration began to temper its approach with realism. The Administration agreed to a bipartisan Iraq Study Group, led by former Secretary of State James Baker and Democratic Congressman Lee Hamilton (Baker & Hamilton, 2006). The report prepared by the group was quite critical of the Bush Administration's policies in Iraq, and though many of those criticisms were rejected, the Administrated still took the criticism seriously, and a year later began to pursue a new approach, which eventually helped to decrease the level of violence in Iraq.

The Obama Administration's approach to Iraq War reflects the liberal views of Obama who warned in 2002 that "a U.S. occupation…… [Read More]

References

Ahmad, I. (2010). The U.S. Af-Pak Strategy: Challenges and Opportunities for Pakistan. Asian Affairs: An American Review, 37(4), 191-209.

Bacevich, a. (2010) Washington Rules: America's Path to Permanent War. New York: Metropolitan Books.

Bacevich, a., (November 6, 2005) the Realist Persuasion. The Boston Globe, retrieved on March 13, 2011, from  http://rempost.blogspot.com/2006/04/realist-persuasion.html 

Baker, J.A., & Hamilton, L.H. (2006) the Iraq Study Group Report: The Way Forward -- a New Approach. New York: Vintage Books.
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Chinese as a Foreign Language

Words: 4930 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68701269

The pogam pimaily suppots the local Chinese communities to maintain younge geneation's heitage backgound, and speading Chinese cultue in the U.S. The classes ae nomally held two to thee hous on weekends with Chinese language lessons and othe taditional cultual and at activities. Most students have high levels of oal poficiency in Chinese, but needed to enhance skills in liteacy. Chinese heitage schools ae mainly suppoted by two goups: the National Council of Associations of Chinese Language Schools (NCACLS) which is founded by Taiwan o Hong Kong immigant and heitage communities, and the Chinese School Association in the United States (CSAUS) that is connected with immigant and heitage communities fom mainland China. Accoding to Scott McGinnis's (2005) compiled statistics, the combined enollment of NCACLS and CSAUS was aound 150,000 in 2003. The numbe of students in the heitage schools is lage than in othe CFL pogams acoss the U.S.

Many…… [Read More]

references for the researchers and educators that may lead to some recommendations in developing a better learning environment in future foreign language education. The data collected from the surveys will be treated as confidential by me, and all the collected data will be anonymous. The data will be only applied directly to this study and not in other use, nor is it available for other parties. A letter of consent form will be sent to all participants to be aware to the purpose and the use of this study from the collected data. All collected data will be protected by the researcher during the study.

Instrumentation/Materials

A survey developed by the researcher of this study includes two sections of questions which relate to the foreign language learning. The first part of the questions is based on the participants' background and their children's background relating to their cultural and language background. The second section includes questions about the reason of sending their child to CFL program; what level do they want their child to complete Chinese language learning, and what area do they want their child to apply the language. The participants choose from the options provided that applies to them the best. There are three open ended questions, allowing for free comments. (See appendix a).

Research design

The research is a qualitative research design that investigates the similarities and differences between parental motivations towards CFL learning between diverse ethnicities by using an online survey to explore the two essential questions in this research.
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China's Economy and Foreign Policy

Words: 3282 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99523028

China's Economy And Foreign Policy

There have been radical changes in the internal political and economic scenario of China during the last two decades. (Lampton, 2001) The growing economic stability and control has increased the status of china to a great extent among its trading counterparts. Further, it has become obligatory on the part of the Chinese Government to make it certain that the economic development to restructure the political discipline whose ideology had a severe jolt with the fall of Soviet Union. (Part Two - Chinese Foreign Policy) Ever since the inception of economic reforms in China during 1978 there is a considerable enhancement in the Gross Domestic Product to the tune of 9.5% per annum on average. It is pertinent to probe on the factors responsible for such a great success. The success is attributed to the adoption of institutions and policies by the Chinese Government that could…… [Read More]

References

Burns, Robert (1997) "Gore, Gingrich set missions to woo China" The Associated Press.

Carr, Earl. (February 19, 2004) "U.S. Diplomacy Needs Chinese Characteristics" Asia Times. pp: 5-7

Chinese Foreign Policy. Program for Contemporary Silk Road Studies. Retrieved from http://www.silkroadstudies.org/china.htm Accessed on 18 March, 2005

Chow, Gregory. (2000) China's Economic Reform and Policies at the Beginning of the 21st Century. Perspectives. Vol: 2; No: 1; pp: 47-53
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National Character and Foreign Policy

Words: 1646 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6075632

September 11, 2001 changed everything. We hear sentiments such as this one often; what do they really mean? Other than the obvious -- stricter security at airports, increased demand for Middle East experts -- what really changed? Are Americans fundamentally different people than we were on September 10? Perhaps as a nation our priorities changed, but has our personality been altered? The 9/11 Commission Report emphasizes national unity: "remember how we all felt on September 11...not only the unspeakable horror but how we came together as a nation -- one nation. Unity of purpose and unity of effort are how we will defeat this enemy." (National Commission 2004, executive summary 34)

The raw freshness of the attacks on September 11 inspires amnesia regarding other national security crises: the attacks on Pearl Harbor, the Vietnam War, the Cuban Missile Crisis. America has never been without military involvement in the world, at…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Spanier, John and Steven Hook. American Foreign Policy Since World War II. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2004.

National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the U.S., The 9/11 Commission Report. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2004,
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Globalization the Impact of Foreign

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1103083

It also meant greater access to foreign products. Once the American consumer got the taste of the foreign products, the demand for these items exponentially increased. Ultimately, foreign imports allowed for economic growth based on consumption. The sustainability of such a system in questionable and even condemned, but fact remains that it was a real effect of globalization.

Another impact of lifting the trade barriers was felt by the American manufacturers. In this instance, much of the foreign production was sold at prices lower than those of the American manufactured items. Being then unable to compete with the significantly lower prices, some U.S. producers had to declare bankrupt. Consequently, the manufacturing sector of the American economy was damaged. What is even more surprising about this is the fact that the U.S. representatives signed international treaties to allow these negative effects to still occur. A most relevant in this instance is…… [Read More]

References

Eckes, a.E., Zeiler, T.W., Globalization and the American Century, Cambridge University Press, 2003

Rodrik, D., Has Globalization Gone Too Far? Peterson Institute, 1997

Scheve, K.F., Slaughter, M.J., Globalization and the Perceptions of American Workers, Peterson Institute, 2001

Van Meter Fishback, P., Higgs, R., North, D.C., Libecap, G.D., Government and the American Economy: A New History, University of Chicago Press, 2007
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Analyzing American Foreign Policy

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96480983

American Foreign Policy

The Policy of Containment post World War II

According to Bernstein (2002), in the post-World War era until the disintegration of Soviet Union in 1989-91, formulation of the foreign policy of U.S. was based on the plan of containment. United States continued following the policy of containment even in the 21st century to deal with countries with communist governments like Cuba, North Korea and China. Generally, containment means American endeavours to curtail spread of communism in the world through military, political and economic channels. Furthermore, this concept emerged after Second World War dynamics of global power and the concerns of U.S. leadership to avoid going into one more global war.

. In the view of Schoon (2011), primarily the concept of containment gained strategic importance and momentum after the author of the doctrine, George F. Kennan, a dominant foreign service officer in 1947 and further a regarded…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bernstein, B. J. (2002). Containment. 2nd ed. Vol. 1.New York, 345-364.Retrieved December 13, 2015, from World History in Context: http://ic.galegroup.com

Pieper, M. A. (2012). Containment and the Cold War: Reexaming the Doctrine of Containment as a Grand Strategy Driving U.S. Cold War Interventions. Retrieved December 13, 2015, from Student Pulse4(08): http://www.studentpulse.com

Schoon, S. (2011, July 26). Cold War Containment: the role of the military. Retrieved December 13, 2015, from E-International Relations: www.e-ir.info
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Evolution of U S Foreign Policy

Words: 400 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39888462

Evolution of U.S. oreign Policy under Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon towards the Soviet Union

oreign Policy towards the Soviet Union under Presidents Truman through to Nixon (1945-1974) was characterized by the "Cold War" -- a period of heightened tension between the two 'super powers' of the world. Even while being constrained by the compulsions of the 'Cold War,' the relations between the two countries gradually evolved into a less hostile association under successive U.S. Presidents in this period.

Harry Truman who became the U.S. President towards the end of World War II was the architect of the policy of containment of the Communism, led by the Soviet Union, around the world enshrined in the 'Truman Doctrine.' He was also instrumental in establishing a strong Western alliance called NATO in Europe that checked Soviet designs beyond Eastern Europe. Eisenhower continued with his predecessors' policy of "containment" without direct…… [Read More]

Foreign Policy towards the Soviet Union under Presidents Truman through to Nixon (1945-1974) was characterized by the "Cold War" -- a period of heightened tension between the two 'super powers' of the world. Even while being constrained by the compulsions of the 'Cold War,' the relations between the two countries gradually evolved into a less hostile association under successive U.S. Presidents in this period.

Harry Truman who became the U.S. President towards the end of World War II was the architect of the policy of containment of the Communism, led by the Soviet Union, around the world enshrined in the 'Truman Doctrine.' He was also instrumental in establishing a strong Western alliance called NATO in Europe that checked Soviet designs beyond Eastern Europe. Eisenhower continued with his predecessors' policy of "containment" without direct confrontation with the Soviet Union. While he extended U.S. aid and protection to South Vietnam to prevent it from being over-run by the Communists, he did not intervene when the U.S.S.R. crushed an uprising in Hungary in 1956 to avoid a nuclear confrontation. President Kennedy displayed great courage to force the Soviet Union from deploying nuclear weapons in Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1961 but later signed a limited nuclear test ban treaty with the U.S.S.R., which cooled down the Cold War temperature somewhat. President Johnson, though bogged down by the escalating Vietnam War, sought to improve relations with the Soviet Union and managed to attain its co-operation in containing the 1967 Arab-Israeli War. Finally, Nixon pursued a policy of detente (based on "realist" rather than "moral" principles) in the 1970s and developed more cordial relations with the Soviet Union. This resulted in signing of important anti-ballistic missile (ABM) and SALT treaties between the two super-powers and lowered the Cold War tensions.

As we saw in this essay, the relations between the U.S. And the U.S.S.R. were by no means static in the post World War II period until the mid-seventies. Although involved in an intense ideological struggle during the Cold War, they managed to avoid direct confrontation and even improved their relations. This was owed in no small measure to the wise foreign policy of the U.S. presidents from Truman down to Nixon.