Foster Care Essays (Examples)

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Foster Children

Words: 8637 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87113745

Foster Children/Foster Care

Issues of a Foster Child

Child Abuse

Families and Children Served through Foster Care

The Policy Framework

This thesis reviews foster care in the United States: the reasons why children fall into the category of children who need to be taken out of their families and placed in care, the numerous emotional and psychological responses of children in foster care, and the psychological and emotional care that is given to children that are placed in foster care. The numerous laws covering foster care institutions and the policies they implement regarding the treatment of children in their care are also discussed. An extensive list of references is also given at the end of the thesis.

Introduction

Everyday more children are born into this world. Yet everyday there is a mother or a father who child is placed in a foster care facility, for many different reasons. Children are…… [Read More]

References

Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997. PL. 105-89.

Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980. P.L. 96-272.

Alan Guttmacher Institute. (1994). Sex and America's teenager. New York: Author.

American Academy of Pediatrics. (1999). Planning for children whose parents are dying
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Foster Children History of Foster

Words: 1328 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31558143

One explanation is the fact that mental health services are generally allocated based on the presence of a psychiatric diagnosis, and older children are more likely to meet criteria for specific disorders. Although younger children may exhibit certain symptoms, they are less likely to meet the full criteria for a classified disorder (Fisher 2005). Moreover, the behavior of older foster children may appear to pose more of an immediate threat, either to themselves or to others (Fisher 2005). Even in the general population, risks for violence, juvenile delinquency and other behavioral problems, increase with age, thus in high-risk populations (as defined by factors such as poverty and violence), the risk gradient associated with age increases, therefore the need for services may be the greatest in the short-term among older foster children (Fisher 2005).

In a study published in the January 2005 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fisher, Philip A. (2005 April 01). Developmental, cognitive, and neuropsychological functioning in preschool-aged foster children: associations with prior maltreatment and placement history. Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. Retrieved June 30, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Fostering and Foster Care. The Adoption History Project. Retrieved June 30, 2006 at  http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~adoption/topics/fostering.htm 

History of Foster Care. Retrieved June 30, 2006 at http://www.sacbee.com/static/archive/news/projects/foster/timeline.html

Pfeiffer, Steven I. (1997 May 01). Effectiveness of treatment foster care with children and adolescents: a review of outcome studies. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Retrieved June 30, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.
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Healthcare for Runaway Adolescents Teenagers

Words: 2119 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35760527

sufficient health care for runaway teenagers is a topic of grave concern to most in the medical and social professions, both nationally and in the state of California. With limited treatment options, higher risks of STD's, HIV, and other diseases, improper prenatal care, and a lack of community care options, runaway teens receive grossly inadequate health care. This paper will address those concerns, specifically in the state of California, as well as offering possible solutions to the problem, and will examine the role of the registered nurse in the solutions presented.

It is important to note that the life of a runaway teenager is filled with health risks and danger. Marie and Cheri are just one example. They were 13 when they ran away from home in an attempt to escape a drug addicted father who sexually abused them. With only $200 between them, their food supply and housing was…… [Read More]

References

Advanced Practice Registered Nurses Council. (2004). Information on APRNs. APRNs. Retrieved from Advanced Practice Registered Nurses Council on March 03, 2003. Web site: http://www.scnurses.org/A_P_Council/aprns.asp

American Civil Liberties Union. (May 14, 2003). Letter to the House Urging Opposition to the Musgrave Amendment to HR 1925, the Runaway, Homeless, and Missing Children Protection Act. Retrieved from American Civil Liberties Union website on March 3, 2004. Web Site: http://www.aclu.org/news/NewsPrint.cfm?ID=12643&c=225

California Board of Registered Nurses. (Fall, 2003). What is the RN Scope of Practice? The BRN Report, 15(2), 7-9.

California Office of the Attorney General. (2002). 2002 Reports of Missing Children by County. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Justice.
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Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer The Foster

Words: 3354 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93925946

Lost Boy by Dave Pelzer:

The foster care system in the United States has long been a subject of much negative attention. In many ways, individuals who were part of this system were regarded in a negative way, and were placed upon a great deal of stigma. The Lost Boy, a book that discusses this subject from a highly personal perspective, aims to explain both the internal and external aspects of the system and how it can affect those within it, referring not just to the children who must be part of the system, but also to the adults that knowingly involve themselves within it. The Lost Boy, just as any great book written on a little known subject thus has a great impact on the individuals who read it and on the society in affects. This novel discusses a journey, seen from the eyes of a child and from…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Craft, C. (2012). Dave Pelzer Is a Famous Foster Kid. About.com. Retrieved January 17, 2012, from .

Naar-King, S. & Ellis, D.A. & Frey, M.A. (2004). Assessing children's well-being: a handbook of measures. Wayne State University. Retrieved January 17, 2012, from .

No Author. (2012). David Pelzer Book Review. Retrieved January 17, 2012, from .

Pelzer, D. (1997). The Lost Boy. Library of Congress Publication.
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Gay Foster Children

Words: 2982 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61783854

homeless and runaway young people is viewed by many authorities as a human rights condition that grows out of poverty and victimization, often right in their family settings, and later, in the street (Farrow 1992) where they are further exposed to violence and other forms of dysfunction..

The International Perspective on the Health Needs of Homeless Youth uses the terms "street children" to refer to those below 18 years old who live through various ways in the streets. The United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund or UNICEF estimated that there were between 30 and 170 million street children and youth in the world (Farrow 1992). The UNICEF divided these young people broadly into a larger group and a smaller group, the larger one, consisting of youngsters who engaged in some economic activity in the streets and often returned to their families at night. The smaller group consisted of young people…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Farrow, J.A., ed, et al. (1992). Homeless and Runaway Youth Health and Health Needs. A position paper for the Society of Adolescent Medicine. Journal of Adolescent Health. http://www.adolescenthealth.org/html/homeless.html

Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund. (2004). Youth in the Margins. Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund publications. http://www.lambdalegal.org/cgi-bin/icon/documents/record=899

2002). Getting Down to Basics About LGBT Youth in Foster Care. Mediapolis, Inc. http://www.lambdalegal.org/cgi-bin/iowa/documents/record?record=1027

Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. (2003). Fact Sheet on the Proposed Ban on Gay Foster Care in Texas. http://lgrl.org/familycoalition/lib194brochure.pdf
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Lost Boy A Foster Child's Search for

Words: 671 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74302031

Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family

David J. Pelzer is a child-abuse survivor who has shared his experiences as a public speaker and an author. He tells his own story in a series of three books. Pelzer is the son of an alcoholic and extremely abusive mother and he lived his life moving frequently in and out of foster homes. Pelzer is a strong advocate against child abuse and his personal accounts help to bring awareness to many. Pelzer was married and had one child. He is divorced from his first wife, but has remarried.

Pelzer's second book, The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family, covers Pelzer's turmoil during his teen years and is the sequel to the first of a trilogy titled, A Child Called It. It is the true story of a child who suffered abuse…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Pelzer, David. The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family. Health Communications, 1997.
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Conflict When Christians Foster Children

Words: 3030 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57214345

" By telling stories, allows for a certain level of openness or vulnerability on the part of the parent and makes them human to the child. Stories give children a captivating medium in which to explore their emotions but really stories give them something to believe.

Jesus was the original storyteller. Reynolds Price discusses Jesus' involvement with establishing how stories promote the act of good works among His followers with, "Leviticus 19:18: 'you shall love neighbor as yourself.' This provides an insistence that no human relation can proceed with any pretense of moral foundation" unless of course, one moves away from God's love.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of this proposal is to act as a vision in which groundbreaking research can be facilitated. This research will focus on religion as a catalyst for conflict among people who share a parent-child relationship within the foster care framework. Specifically, the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fowler, James, W. 1981. Stages of Faith. San Francisco: Harper.

Gardner, H. 1995. Leading Minds: An Anatomy of Leadership. New York:

BasicBooks Harper Collins.

Hepperman, Christine, M. 2004. Barbara O'Connor: Taking Care of Moses. The Horn
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Leadership Foster Parents 'Realism-Quality' Approaches to Leadership

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54114614

Leadership

Foster parents:

'ealism-quality' approaches to leadership in the real world of social services

I have described myself as a 'realism-quality' leader who believes on the need to be task specific. I try to set realistic goals that are achievable and conceivable for my subordinates. This type of leadership is very useful when dealing with some of the challenges that arise in the context of a nonprofit organization that focuses on children in foster care. Very often, parents are initially not prepared for the difficulties that may arise when coping with a child with severe behavioral, emotional, or psychological issues.

One example of a 'realistic' approach that I had to take was when a foster mother assumed the care of a child but was not able to take full control over the situation and left the child's care for part of the day to her adult daughter, who frequently arrived…… [Read More]

References

Gelfand, Michelle J., Lisa M. Leslie, Kirsten Keller, & Carsten K.W. Dedreu. (2008). Cultures of conflict.

Tsasis, Peter. (2009). The social processes of interorganizational collaboration and conflict in nonprofit organizations. Nonprofit Management and Leadership. 20 (1).
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How a Foster Parent Conforms to a Biblical Worldview

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90386623

Biblical Worldview: How Genesis 1:26-27 Affects My Choice of Professions

A belief that is foundational to the Christian faith is that people are made in the image of God as explicated in Genesis 1:26-27. Given this centrality, it is reasonable to posit that this biblical worldview also affects Christians' choices of professions in varying degrees. To gain some fresh insights into this issue, this paper provides an explanation concerning how this belief affects my relation to people in my chosen vocation of foster parent and group home director, followed by a summary of the research and important findings concerning this biblical worldview in the conclusion.

The unique status of humankind is clearly established early on in the Old Testament in the Genesis 1 account. For instance, the New International Version (NIV) of Genesis 1:26 states that:

Then God said, "Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so…… [Read More]

References

Blatt, Susan Mcnair. A Guidebook for Raising Foster Children. Westport, CT: Bergin and Garvey, 2000.

Peterson, Anna L. Being Human: Ethics, Environment, and Our Place in the World. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001.
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Care Needs Concerns and Treatment

Words: 4512 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58816657



Furthermore, one of the pillars of collaborative care that will need to be firmly established is the fostering of clear dialogue and a means for strong communication within the care management planning. For instance, there needs to be a clear decision and communication of all tests ordered and when the test results will be available. One of the most important aspects of this collaborative care will be the nursing interventions which can have significant impact on the patient's health and stabilization (Allen, 2010). In fact, strategic nursing care can even minimize readmission rates of Margaret and other patients with comparable conditions (Chen et al., 2012).

Prioritize the Nursing Care Needs of Margaret

The prioritization of nursing interventions is essential, and the way in which a nurse determines this priority is going to be something unique and distinct. "Trials reviewed demonstrated a beneficial impact of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in…… [Read More]

References

Adler, H.M. (n.d.). Toward a biopsychosocial understanding of the patient -- physician relationship: An emerging dialogue. (2007). J Gen Intern Med,22(2), 280 -- 285.

Afilala, J. (n.d.). Frailty in patients with cardiovascular disease: Why, when, and how to measure. (2011). Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep, 5(5), 467 -- 472.

Allen, J.K. (2010). Randomized trials of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure: Systematic review.

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing,25(3), 207-220.
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Health Care Industry Has Undergone Fundamental Change

Words: 1286 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29443620

health care industry has undergone fundamental change over the last decade. Most of the changes have occurred within the underlying business operation of the healthcare industry. These changes will ultimately effect healthcare agency administration as it continues to evolve and innovate. Legislation in particular has had a profound impact on the health care industry and the agencies which govern it. First, due to the Affordable Care Act of 2010, the healthcare profession is undergoing a fundamental shift in regards to the patient experience. The U.S. health care system is now shifting the focus from acute and specialty care to that of primary care which requires a shift in business operations. Also, due primarily to that aging of the baby boomer generation, the need for primary car overall is shifting and will be needed heavily in the future. The last 10 years in particular has seen an increasing influx of retiring…… [Read More]

References:

1) Draper, Elaine, Joseph LaDou, and Dan J. Tennenhouse. 2011. "Occupational Health Nursing and the Quest for Professional Authority," New Solutions 21, 47 -- 81

2) Levsey, K.R., Campbell, D., & Green, A. (2007). Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow; Challenges in Securing Federal Support for Graduate Nurses. Journal of Nursing Education, 46(4), 176-183

3) Creating a sampling frame for population-based veteran research: Representativeness and overlap of VA and department of defense databases. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development Volume 47, Issue 8, June 2002 pp. 763-772
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US Health Care Reforms

Words: 1204 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14554047

U.S. Health Care Reforms

Objectives of reform of the health care system should align to improve quality, access and cost in health care. The intricacy of the health care system necessitates balancing the three variables while considering the individual's viewpoint. To achieve this equilibrium, health care programs ought to satisfy safety, actuarial and economic principles that should be under proper application and management for successful reforms. Evidently, there exist various problems within the system. These include poor price controls, over-insurance, lack of transparencies in health care cost and delivery, inappropriate actuarial risk classifications and improper safety net structures. This explication highlights health care reform principles and discusses incremental solutions for quandaries in the American health care system.

Economic Principles

Health care reforms ought to strive to encourage the fundamental economic principle of demand and supply. Over-insurance, increase of mandated benefits, control of prices, increased malpractice costs and dependence on third…… [Read More]

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Clinical Integration Healthcare

Words: 3527 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71289994

Healthcare: Clinical Integration

Item Page

What is clinical integration

History of clinical integration

Goals of clinical integration

Importance of clinical integration

Health reform

New payment models

IT advancement

Barriers to clinical integration

Legal barriers

Lack of practitioner alignment

Lack of interoperability

How to achieve success in clinical integration

Incentive alignment

Knowledge alignment

Behavioral alignment

The future of health care systems

Physician acquisitions vs. clinical integration

HIEs -- solution to clinical integration?

Policy makers are beginning to appreciate the fact that only systemic change can effectively change, for the better, the manner of health care delivery in the U.S.; and that anything less would only alter the system's edges - with little or no substantial effect on cost-control, innovation-promotion, effectiveness of reward incentive schemes, coordination and coverage (AHA, 2010). Clinical integration has been found to be crucial to the change needed for the achievement of the aforementioned goals (AHA, 2010). Despite…… [Read More]

References

AHA. Clinical Integration -- the Key to Real Reform. Trend Watch. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Athena Health. (2014). History of the Clinical Integration Model. Athena Health. Retrieved from https://www.athenahealth.com/knowledge-hub/clinical-integration/clinical-integration-model.php

eHealth Initiative. (2012). The Rise of the Private Health Information Exchange and Changing Role of Public Exchanges. eHealth Initiative. Retrieved from [HIDDEN]

Fridsma, D. (2013). Interoperability Vs Health Information Exchange: Setting the Record Straight. Health IT Buzz. Retrieved from  http://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/meaningful-use/interoperability-health-information-exchange-setting-record-straight/
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Barriers to Healthcare

Words: 1845 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68181691

Primary Care

Beard, C., Weisberg, .B., & Primack, J. (2012). Socially anxious primary care patients' attitudes toward cognitive bias modification (CBM): a qualitative study. Behavioural and cognitive psychotherapy, 40(05), 618-633.

This study shows how traditional methods of approaching patients with information can cause confusion and thus create barriers to accessing patient knowledge in primary care settings. The study focused on working with primary care patients suffering from anxiety and how they reacted to cognitive bias modification (CBM) for that anxiety. Upon initial discussion of the treatment, most participants showed that they understood. However, it was clear by the end of the treatment that the program was not clarified enough to patients prior to treatment and that created a knowledge barrier that caused the treatment not to work as successfully as previously tested. Better methods for communicating the treatment within the primary care setting must be developed to bring down these…… [Read More]

References

Beard, C., Weisberg, R.B., & Primack, J. (2012). Socially anxious primary care patients' attitudes toward cognitive bias modification (CBM): a qualitative study. Behavioural and cognitive psychotherapy, 40(05), 618-633.

Beckman, H.B., Wendland, M., Mooney, C., Krasner, M.S., Quill, T.E., Suchman, A.L., & Epstein, R.M. (2012). The impact of a program in mindful communication on primary care physicians. Academic Medicine, 87(6), 815-819.

Cheung, P.T., Wiler, J.L., Lowe, R.A., & Ginde, A.A. (2012). National study of barriers to timely primary care and emergency department utilization among Medicaid beneficiaries. Annals of emergency medicine, 60(1), 4-10.

Crabtree, B.F., Nutting, P.A., Miller, W.L., McDaniel, R.R., Stange, K.C., Jaen, C.R., & Stewart, E. (2011). Primary care practice transformation is hard work: insights from a 15-year developmental program of research. Medical care, 49(Suppl), S28.
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Legislations in the Healthcare Sector

Words: 1643 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38291972

Healthcare Management (discussion Questions)

Healthcare Management: Compliance and egulation

Various regulatory and compliance issues that dictate how health care professionals conduct themselves standardize the healthcare industry. According to Goodman and Norbeck (2013), the healthcare sector is turning into an industry focused on regulatory compliance, as opposed to patient care. Some of the top issues that may keep me worrying relates to compliance with employment laws. Employment laws bring about two main issues. The first entails work shifts and compensations while the second one revolves around occupation health and safety among the employees.

The issue of work shifts is a sensitive area that must be handled with utmost care since working in the health care sector incorporates working at night. As such, employers should manage night and shift to conform to legislation as well as prevent fatigue and any illnesses that may arise among employees (Health & Safety Authority, 2012). There…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, M., et al. (2008). Occupational Safety and Health Law Handbook. Lanham: The Scarecrow Press, Inc.

Goodman, L. & Norbeck, T. (2013). "Healthcare Is Turning Into An Industry Focused On Compliance, Regulation Rather Than Patient Care." Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/sites/physiciansfoundation/2013/11/05/healthcare-is-turing-into-an-industry-focused-on-compliance-regulation-rather-than-patient-care/

Health and Safety Authority. (2012). "Guidance for Employers and Employees on Night and Shift Work." The Health Safety Authority.

Kwon, J. & Johnson, M. (2013). "Security practices and regulatory compliance in the healthcare industry." Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. 20(1): 44-51.
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Management of Healthcare

Words: 1899 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80433693

Healthcare Management -- Discussion Questions

Communication strategies are very important when it comes to promoting the practice of healthcare delivery and ensuring that customer service is offered at the highest level. If a person does not communicate well it can harm him or her both personally and professionally. However, that is still a rather isolated issue that is generally considered to be self-limiting in nature. With companies, and especially with healthcare companies, the issue of poor communication is much larger and more significant. As a healthcare worker, a person has to be able to communicate information to patients, families, and other healthcare workers (Nutbeam, 2000). When a person is a manager in a healthcare setting, though, there is much more pressure to make sure that everyone gets the information they need in a timely manner and that the communication preferences as addressed in such a way that each and every…… [Read More]

References

Arora, V.M., Manjarrez, E., Dressler, D.D., Basaviah, P., Halasyamani, L., & Kripalani, S. (2009). Hospitalist handoffs: A systematic review and task force recommendations. Journal of Hospital Medicine, 4(7): 433- 440. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3575739/ 

Mercuri, R.T. (2004). The HIPAA-potamus in health care data security. Security Watch. Communications of the ACM, 47(7): 25-28. Retrieved from  http://www.notable-software.com/Papers/HIPAA.pdf 

Moskop, J.C., Marco, C.A., Larkin, G.L., Geiderman, J.M., & Derse, A.R. (2005). From Hippocrates to HIPAA: Privacy and confidentiality in emergency medicine -- Part I: Conceptual, moral, and legal foundations. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 45(1): 53-59. Retrieved from https://www3.acep.org/assets/0/16/898/904/2196/2280/C798499F-59F2-42A3-A23A-A575767D4234.pdf

Nutbeam, D. (2000). Health literacy as a public health goal: A challenge for contemporary health education and communication strategies into the 21st century. Health Promotion International, 15(3): 259-267. Retrieved from  http://heapro.oxfordjournals.org/content/15/3/259.long
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Impact of Healthcare Reform Quality on Nursing Care

Words: 1386 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32284682

Unintended Consequences of Health Care Reform

Consequences of Health Care Reform

My discussion is related to the individual mandate of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010.

The policy problems addressed by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 are the high cost of health insurance that is untenable for low and middle income earners and the discretionary criteria for enrollment and coverage exercised by medical and health insurance carriers. The PPACA is an excellent policy solution to these issues in the United States and, absent socialized medicine, is a robust response to what has been an intractable and escalating problem in the U.S. Many people who have unable to obtain medical insurance are now able to do so.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was designed to significantly reduce the number of people who are uninsured through the provision of a continuum…… [Read More]

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Christian Worldview Nursing Health Care in the

Words: 924 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24246419

Christian Worldview Nursing

Health care in the West and worldwide has undergone very extreme changes over the past decades. However, the basic principles of nursing like caring for the sick and elderly have remained consistent. While technology has changed radically since the days of Florence Nightingale, Christian caring in the nursing profession is still a foundational principle. It is this foundational principle that I seek to express in my ministering to my patients.

Christian Worldview and the Integration of Beliefs, Values, Ethics and Service

The definition of nursing for me symbolizes a set of beliefs, values, ethics and service. Nursing is after all a calling and a vocation, not just a job. In Judith Anne Shelly's book Called to Care, she defines nursing as distinct from medicine, even though the two occupy domains that are close together.

She defines it in a way that I find very familiar and similar…… [Read More]

References

Salt and light. (2012). Journal of Christian Nursing, 29(2), 74.

Shelly, J.A., & Miller, A.B. (2006). Called to care: A christian worldview for nursing. (2nd ed.).

Downer's Grove, IL: Intervarsity Press.
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Gbmc Healthcare Hospital The Main Issue Relates

Words: 835 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60308834

GBMC Healthcare Hospital. The main issue relates to privacy and confidentiality issues considered essential components of fostering trust between healthcare consumers and providers. The issue arose the GBMC hospital did not strictly follow the rules of privacy and confidentiality. Because of its lack of complete control on the privacy issues, many pieces of private information of patients were stolen and compromised.

Although GBMC hospital has been committed for 75 years to ensuring patient healthcare information is used to fulfill appropriate needs as provided by consent or law, but with the advent of the electronic health record and the transfer of an individual's health information through electronic media, including the Internet, the need for privacy and confidentiality protection takes on new meanings and challenges for the GBMC.

As medical science and technology continue to mature, and new data is being created that, when accessed, could be used to discriminate against an…… [Read More]

References

Courtney S. Campbell, The Crumbling Foundations of Medical Ethics, Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, Volume 19, Issue 2, April 1998, Pages 143-152

Roberto, M. And Flynn, E.P., Issues in Medical Ethics, Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, Volume 1, Issue 2, 1997, Pages 188-189
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Boundaries Between Care and Cure

Words: 1458 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22123748



The study was reported as qualitative and to have been conducted by the 'Australian National Health and Medical Research Council' research study. It is stated as follows of the study: "The nursing insights indicate that an understanding of end-of-life care in hematology needs to be set in a trilogy of overlapping models (labeled functional, evolving, and refractory) that address the complexity of issues associated with professional and hospital culture." (McGrath, 2007)

Findings include the development of a working model focused on enabling the "integration of palliative care into adult hematology. The model is accredited the development of a new language for understanding and fostering the integration of palliative care and hematology." (McGrath, 2007)

One reason that palliative care is so important for hematology patients are necessary provisions of informed consent and other end-of-life issues. That is because many of these issues have to do with factors related to survival and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Finlay, Ilora (2001) UK Strategies for Palliative Care. JR Soc Med 2001;94. Online available at: http://jrsm.rsmjournals.com/cgi/reprint/94/9/437.pdf

Audrey, Suzanne et al. (2008) What Oncologists Tell Patients About Survival Benefits of Palliative Chemotherapy and Implications for Informed Consent: Qualitative Study. BMJ 2008, 337:a752. Online available at: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/337/jul31_3/a752

McGrath, Pam D. (2007) Description of an Australian Model for End-of-Life Care in patients with Hematological Malignancies. Oncology Nursing Forum. Vol.43 No.1 2007. Online available at: http://ons.metapress.com/content/w1l1mx43646772k3/

Maganto, Vincente Valentin, Gonzalez, Maite Murillo and Moreno, Maria Valentin (2004) Continuous Care in the Cancer Patient: Palliative Care in the 21st Century. Clinical and Translational Oncology. Vol. 6 No. 7 October 2004.
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Healthcare Distribution Channels and Analyze

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46940105

However, the use of the Internet can also result in more patient self-diagnosis and greater exposure to healthcare advertising, which can increase consumer demand for visits for imagined illnesses, or for new, advertised but untested or unnecessary drugs.

The target market for these new healthcare distribution channels

Consumers who use the Internet frequently who wish to find a provider in the area, providers seeking to reduce their administrative costs, consumer wishing to see if a particular provider is in-network, are all potential ways for using the Internet to access information about their healthcare plans and increase this medium's usefulness for consumers accessing data through larger channels and venues.

The way technology is used to offer services at these new channels

The ability to provide information to a wide range of people enables, theoretically, an increasingly expansive health care insurance bureaucracy to disseminate information to consumers. For example, consumers can log…… [Read More]

Works Cited

About Soundbite." (2007). Soundbite Official Website. Retrieved 23 Jul 2007 at http://www.soundbite.com/industries/healthcare

Aetna. (2007). Official Website. Retrieved 23 Jul 2007 at http://www.aetna.com/index.htm
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Diversity in Healthcare A Synopsis

Words: 3232 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80574563

Barak concludes by suggesting that the issue and concept of diversity take on a "special urgency" in human service healthcare organizations among the organization as a whole and staff, and that the organization review its quality of service and commitment to the community in order to truly impact the lives of diverse populations.

Managing Diversity: Best Practices

H Management often works off of the ideals of 'best practices.' This concept is discussed in the next article, "Managing the Diversity evolution: Best Practices for the 21st Century Business." Aronson takes a more general approach to diversity but one that can be applied directly to the healthcare industry nonetheless. Aronson points out many of the trends previously identified with regard to diversity problems in the nation's business climate as a whole. In particular the author points out that diversity issues may stem from a number of causes including cultural differences and systematic…… [Read More]

References:

Aronson, D. (2002). "Managing diversity revolution: Best practices for the 21st century."

Civil Rights Journal, 6(1):46

Barak, M.E.M. (2000). "The inclusive workplace: An ecosystems approach to diversity

Management." Social Work, 45(4):339
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Health Care A the Different

Words: 2409 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52518976

Day treatment programs can provide services at less cost because the patient goes home at night after being treated during the day, which often is used for rehabilitating chronically ill patients (Sharfstein, Stoline, & Koran, 1995, p. 249). The mere fact of having more choice benefits some patients by giving them more say in their care.

Patient-focused care involves a method for containing in-patient costs for hospitals and for improving quality by "restructuring services so that more of them take place on nursing units rather than in specialized units in other hospital locations, and by cross-training staff on the nursing units so that they can do several 'jobs' for the same small group of patients rather then one 'job' for a large number of patients" (Kovner, 1995, p. 186). Kovner notes a number of barriers to this type of care. One reason has been that hospitals have not had to…… [Read More]

References

Doctors Say Managed Care Strains Patient Relationships (1997, June 9). Westchester County Business Journal 36(23), p. 24.

Kovner, a.R. (1995). Hospitals. In Jonas's Health Care Delivery in the United States, a.R. Kovner (ed.), pp. 162-193. New York: springer Publishing.

Moore, G.T. (1991,

April 24). Let's provide primary care to all uninsured Americans ? now! JAMA, pp. 2108-2109.
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Training Scope of Training Large Health Care

Words: 2230 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49504335

Training

Scope of Training

Large health care organizations will undoubtedly have a large scope of training. The investments and systems approach is beneficial for companies who can realize economies of scale. Through economies of scale the unit cost for each selective individual trained decreases. This ultimately allows the cost of investments and systems to be spread throughout the entire organization. The systems approach is particularly beneficial as it creates and distills consistent behavior throughout the entire organization. Each individual that is trained is usually receiving and absorbing the same information as their peers. This insures the continuity of the business and its underlying operations. The scope will depend primarily on the needs of the business. In some instances, training may involve the entire health care organization while in other instances; it may only require a select department. In either case, investments in systems allows for the most efficient use of…… [Read More]

References:

1) Draper, Elaine, Joseph LaDou, and Dan J. Tennenhouse. 2011. "Occupational Health Nursing and the Quest for Professional Authority," New Solutions 21, 47 -- 81

2) Fang, D., Wilsey-Wisniewski, S.J., & Bednash, G.D. (2006). 2005-2006 enrollment and graduations in baccalaureate and graduate programs in nursing. Washington, DC: American Association of Colleges of Nursing

3) Levsey, K.R., Campbell, D., & Green, A. (2007). Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow; Challenges in Securing Federal Support for Graduate Nurses. Journal of Nursing Education, 46(4), 176-183

4) Lucia, Patricia R.; Otto, Tammy E.; Palmier, Patrick A. (2009). "Chapter 1
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Convenient Care Clinics

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42467900

Convenient Care Clinics

How do Convenient Care Clinics (CCC) fit into the hierarchy of health care delivery systems?

With the exorbitant costs of modernized health care delivery coming to the forefront of the national debate, and the continued effects of a prolonged economic recession restricting the options of countless Americans, the role of Convenient Care Clinics (CCCs) has significantly expanded during the last decade. As opposed to a full-scale hospital or comprehensive medical facility, CCC's are typically small practices located in strip malls and shopping centers, serving local communities by treating uncomplicated or minor illnesses, tending to basic injuries, and providing preventative health care services. While CCCs represent level of competition to major hospitals and other large-scale health care providers, by enabling patients to obtain medication and treatment without visiting the emergency room, in all actuality CCCs are an integral component of the nation's evolving hierarchy of health care delivery…… [Read More]

References

Schmit, J. (2006, August 28). Could walk-in retail clinics help slow rising health costs?. USA Today. Retrieved from http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/health/2006-08- 24-walk-in-clinic-usat_x.htm

Turton, T.H., Ryan, S., Miller, K., Counts, M., & Nash, D.B. (2010). Convenient care clinics: The future of accessible health care. Convenient Care Association White Paper, (September), 1-23. Retrieved from http://www.ccaclinics.org/images/stories/downloads/whitepaperfordistribution.pdf

Wynter, C., & Leifer, J. (2008). Dealing with the emergence of convenient care retail clinics: A guide for health centers. National Association of Community Health Centers, (June), 1- 26. Retrieved from  http://iweb.nachc.com/Downloads/Products/ST_RETAIL_08.pdf
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Legacy Emanuel A Healthcare Organization Audit Summary

Words: 1793 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4977496

Legay Emanuel:

A healthare organization audit summary

Legay Emanuel Medial Center, at 2801 North Gantenbein Avenue, Portland, Oregon is

is an IRS 501 ( ) 3 not-for-profit, tax-exempt orporation omprised of five full-servie hospitals and a hildren's hospital. The Center's award-winning failities offer an integrated network of health are servies: aute and ritial are, inpatient and outpatient treatment, ommunity health eduation and a variety of speialty servies.

The area's largest loally owned, nonprofit health system, Legay Health's is a lead healthare institution in the region, ommitted to omprehensive servie provision to lients through a network of healthare providers toward a healthier and wellness ommunity. Projeted growth for the institution under the diretion of the Offie of Development advanes the mission and vision of Emanuel Medial Center, dediated to legay of good health for 'Our people, Our patients, Our ommunities, Our world' through development of sustainable programs that generate private support…… [Read More]

cited in the cultural protocol of the Medical Center's daily routine are mentioned in Table 2.

Table 2

Image: Legacy likes to be perceived as family and patient oriented, not for profit, and for giving back to the community.

Department: All RNs must wear scrubs that cannot be worn in to work. RNs cannot wear false or painted nails.

Status Symbols and Reward Systems: Kudos if the co-workers think other co-workers have done good jobs. The manager will sometimes give coffee cards of something like that. Every 5 years of service workers receive recognition and get to select a prize.
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Nurse Patient Interactions Related to Diabetic Foot Care

Words: 596 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3685932

Diabetes Foot Care

Qualitative esearch Critique: Diabetes Foot Care

Sue Flood (2009) saw a need to examine the nurse-patient interaction in relation to diabetes foot care outcomes, in part because at least one health care organization (Agency for Healthcare esearch and Quality) has concluded that diabetes care received by patients often do not meet best practice standards. The impact of substandard care includes a 45 to 85% difference in the incidence of foot ulcers and amputations, as reported by the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. The author further justified this study based on the ongoing global obesity and diabetes epidemics.

Flood (2009) decided to examine the nurse-patient interactions because this relationship has been shown to have a significant impact on patient outcomes. This represents the primary assumption the author tests in her study. The four components of nurse-patient interactions are: (1) affective support, (2) health information, (3) decisional…… [Read More]

References

Flood, L.S. (2009). Nurse-patient interactions related to diabetes foot care. MEDSURG Nursing, 18(6), 361-370.
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Technology and Healthcare Please See the Attached

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27000369

Technology and Healthcare

Please see the attached case and answer 1a with it. also answer questions 2 and 3

Implementing a syndromic surveillance system & Case Study 3: Selection of a patient safety strategy

How the projects address current problems in health informatics

One of the most common problems with implementing a new informatics system is creating a cohesive network. In "Case Study 13: Implementing a syndromic surveillance system," all of the hospitals involved in the IT overhaul had different systems, with different vendors and data sets. There were also radically different levels of knowledge and willingness amongst staff members to devote time, money, and manpower to support the new interface. Federal grants would support the initial implementation, but it still needed to be financially sustainable and the staff needed to know how to analyze the data correctly at all of the member hospitals. Each hospital had widely different patient…… [Read More]

References

Anshari, Muhammad & Mohammad Nabil Almunawar. (2011). Evaluating CRM implementation in healthcare organization. International Conference on Economics and Business

Information. IPEDR, 9: 30-34. Retrieved:

 http://www.ipedr.com/vol9/5-I00005.pdf  2011

Electronic medical records (EMR). (2005). Open Clinical. Retrieved:
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Healthcare Addressing the Issue of

Words: 8204 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34819035

Stated to be barriers in the current environment and responsible for the reporting that is inadequate in relation to medical errors are:

Lack of a common understanding about errors among health care professionals

Physicians generally think of errors as individual that resulted from patient morbidity or mortality.

Physicians report errors in medical records that have in turn been ignored by researchers.

Interestingly errors in medication occur in almost 1 of every 5 doses provided to patients in hospitals. It was stated by Kaushal, et al., (2001) that "the rate of medication errors per 100 admission was 55 in pediatric inpatients. Using their figure, we estimated that the sensitivity of using a keyword search on explicit error reports to detect medication errors in inpatients is about 0.7%. They also reported the 37.4% of medication errors were caused by wrong dose or frequency, which is not far away from our result of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Discussion Paper on Adverse Event and Error Reporting In Healthcare: Institute for Safe Medication Practices Jan 24, 2000

Patient Safety/Medical Errors Online at the Premiere Inc. page located at: http://www.premierinc.com/all/safety/resources/patient_safety/downloads/patient_safety_policy_position_2001.doc

Medstat / Shortell, S. Assessing the Impact of Continuous Quality Improvement on Clinical Practice: What It Will Take to Accelerate Progress.

Health Policy Monitor (2001) A Publication of the Council of State Governments Vol. 6, No. 1 Winter/Spring 2001 PO18-0101
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Health Care Disparity in Maryland

Words: 18449 Length: 67 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96057578



Chapter II: Review of the Literature in Chapter II, the researcher explores information accessed from researched Web sites; articles; books; newspaper excerpts; etc., relevant to considerations of the disparity in access to health care services between rural and urban residence in Maryland and the impact of the lack of financial resources. The researcher initially accessed and reviewed more than 35 credible sources to narrow down the ones noted in the reference section in this study. The literature review chapter presents a sampling of literature to support the research questions this study addresses.

Chapter III: Methods and Results Throughout Chapter III, the researcher proffers information the utilized to address contemporary concerns/challenges/consequences relating to determining the information used in this investigation. This chapter also presents the overall methods and techniques the researcher implemented to conduct this study. Considerations for the methodology chapter include data/information the researcher uses; identifying it as primary and/or…… [Read More]

Potter, S. (2002) Doing Postgraduate Research. London: Sage.

Qualitative research: Approaches, methods, and rigour, (2008, Nov. 7). Microsoft PowerPoint Qualitative Research AdvC08 RS.PPT. Retrieved March 10, 2009 from www.unimaas.nl/bestand.asp?id=11629

Wolvovsky, Jay. (2008). Health disparities: Impact on Business and Economics Summit. Maryland's healthcare at a glance. The Heart of Community Health Baltimore Medical Syste. Retrieved March 10, 2009 at http://dhmh.maryland.gov/hd/pdf/2008/oct08/Jay_Wolvovsky.pdf
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Health Care -- Philosophy of Graduate Nursing

Words: 516 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89487080

Health Care -- Philosophy of Graduate Nursing Education

In many senses, the nurse practitioner (NP) takes the profession of nursing to the next level. While the treatment of illness important, the NP also has broader focus of total well-being, including wellness, rights, education and preventative medicine for the patient, his/her family, and local, state, national and global communities. Consequently, in addition to treating the physical ailments of a patient, the modern NP must be clinically and intellectually excellent, an eternal student and teacher who fulfill numerous roles in nearly every health care situation.

A crucial aspect of nursing is the caregiver's relationship with the patient. Patient education is an important aspect of nursing and when carried over to the NP role, patient education greatly improves treatment because the patient has a greater understanding of the reasons for treatment and is likelier to effectively participate in treatment. A NP is a…… [Read More]

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Individualized Innovations and Technology in Healthcare

Words: 4367 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88476501

Personal Healthcare Technology

Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center and the Sunrise Children's Hospital

The Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center, which includes the Sunrise Children's Hospital, is an approximately 55-year-old facility located in Southern Nevada; it serves the greater Las Vegas area and the surrounding communities. The Sunrise Health and Medical Center is proud of its quality initiatives to ensure patient safety and comfort, including direct approaches to pharmaceutical safety such as safe medication dosing via smart pump technology, and bar coding on medications. As well, the Sunrise Health and Medical Center does not discriminate with respect to HIV / AIDS or in any manner related to employment, program participation, admission and/or treatment.

Sunrise has been rated as the most popular area hospital for 15 years in patient surveys. As well, Sunrise Health and Medical Center has developed community outreach programs for health education in a variety of areas, often based…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Appari, A., & Johnson, M.E. (2010). Information security and privacy in healthcare: Current state of research. International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management, 6 (4), 279-314. Retrieved from http://www.ists.dartmouth.edu/library/501.pdf

Ayanian, J.Z., & Weissman, J.S. (2002). Teaching hospitals and quality of care: A review of the literature. The Milbank Quaterly, 80(3), 569-593. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2690120/pdf/milq0080-0569.pdf

Baker, J.J., & Baker R.W. (2000). Health care finance: Basic tools for nonfinancial managers. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen

Byington, R., Keene, R., Masini, D. (2006). The impact of federal and state funding levels on strategic decisions and how those decisions affect patient care. The Internet Journal of Healthcare Administration. (4)2. Retrieved from https://ispub.com/IJHCA/4/2/5827
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Educational Mission the Unc Health Care System

Words: 917 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27540462

Educational Mission

The UNC Health Care System runs a teaching hospital that publishes its mission statement, statement of core values, and nursing philosophy on the organization's Web site at < http://www.unchealthcare.org/site/Nursing/nurseleadership/visionvalues >. The mission is stated briefly as: "to be a leader in providing compassionate, quality care focusing on the unique needs of patients and their families." Key words in the mission statement include "compassionate," "quality care" and "unique needs." The core values of the UNC Health Care System's nurses include five main elements. Those elements include "My patient," "My team," "My Hospital," "My Community," and "My Profession." Phrasing these five main values in terms of "my" helps the nurse to feel like an integral part of the organization.

Furthermore, the nursing philosophy of the UNC Health Care System is outlined as being a reflection of the vision and values of the organization as a whole. The main principles of…… [Read More]

References

East Carolina University College of Nursing (2012). Philosophy of the college of nursing. Retrieved online: http://www.nursing.ecu.edu/philosophy.htm

UNC Health Care System (2007). Nursing mission, core values, philosophy. Retrieved online: http://www.unchealthcare.org/site/Nursing/nurseleadership/visionvalues
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Healthcare Case Study

Words: 1972 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85745335

Healthcare Study

Defined as the philosophical study of right and wrong action, Ethics is a predominant subject of concern in nursing (Michael Dahnke, 2006). Being presented with various situations, the ethical and cultural problems are a serious concern faced by the nursing and healthcare staff which needs to be catered to day in and out. There is no time tested methodology that can be applied here, since the every patient is different, with a different background history, therefore the ethical and cultural implications of each decision would also vary.

Importance of Ethical Theory to Nursing

Defining what is right and wrong is a very subjective approach and even that can change from scenario to scenario. Therefore it is important to have some form of umbrella under which the functioning of nurses takes place. It is under this rationale that the importance of ethical theory emerges in front of us.

In…… [Read More]

Works Cited

DuAnne Foster Edwards, R.M. (1999, Feburary). The Synergy Model: Linking Patient Needs to Nurse Competencies. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from American Association of Critical Care Nurses: http://www.aacn.org:88/wd/certifications/content/synpract2.pcms?pid=1&menu=

Green, D.B. (2001, July). Medical Ethics. Retrieved September 30th, 2011, from Priory.com:  http://priory.com/ethics.htm 

Michael Dahnke, H.D. (2006). Defining Ethics and Applying the Theories. In P.M. Vicki D. Lachman, Applied Ethics in Nursing (p. 3). New York: Springer.

Samar Noureddine RN, M. (2001). Development of the ethical dimension in nursing theory. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 2-7.
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Romer Model of a Healthcare

Words: 995 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17597873

Furthermore, most universities are private or receive private aid as well as public financing in the case of state-run medical schools, thus management of care is taught and passed on through private institutions.

In terms of economic support, even nationally funded systems or 'free' systems are dependent upon taxes and other forms of public aid -- health care always 'costs' in some way. Health care organizations are for-profit businesses in the U.S. And make up 34% of health care payments and costs within the national system (Koehlmoos 2008). Out-of-pocket payments make up 15%, and Medicare and Medicaid 17% and 16% respectively (Koehlmoos2008). The selling of services to hospitals and physicians dominates the bulk of money spent on care in the U.S. Of the funds allocated to health care delivery, 33% of all the money spent on health care goes to hospitals, 23% to physician services. Healthcare is the largest industry…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Koehlmoos, Tracey Lynn (2008). U.S. Health Care: Roemer Model. Lecture 2: HSCI 609

Comparative International Health Systems George Mason University. Retrieved 1 Sept 2008 at http://gunston.gmu.edu/healthscience/InternationalHealth/USHealthCareRoemerModel.ppt.

Romer
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Kangaroo Care and Premature Babies

Words: 1339 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20586324

Kangaroo Care and Premature Babies

Kangaroo care entails holding a full term infant or premature so that there is a skin-to-skin contact between the newborn and the individual holding it. Individuals practice kangaroo care for premature infants for approximately two to three hours every day over a certain period. This takes place during early infancy, and the parent holds the baby against her bare chest. Medically stable babies can receive kangaroo care for up to any period since there is no maximum duration for them (Feldman et al., 2002).

Most parents may keep their babies in their arms for hours each day. According to research carried out, kangaroo care is essential as close bodily contact between the infant and the mother helps to stabilize the heartbeat, breathing and temperature of the premature infant. This is crucial as premature babies always have problems in harmonizing their heart and breathing rate. Mothers…… [Read More]

References

Aucott, S., Donohue, K., Atkins, E., & Marilee, C (2002). Neurodevelopmental Care In The

Nicu, 8, 298 -- 308.

Dodd, L. (2003). Effects of kangaroo care in preterm infants,

Feldman, R., Weller, A., Sirota, L., & Eidelman, A. (2002). Skin-to-Skin Contact (Kangaroo Care) Promotes Self-Regulation in Premature Infants: Sleep -- Wake Cyclicity, Arousal Modulation, and Sustained Exploration, Vol. 38 (2), 194 -- 207.
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Ambulatory Care Unit Designing Your Own Healthcare

Words: 3449 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74042928

Ambulatory Care Unit

Designing your own healthcare unit

Designing a health care unit

The health care system in the world continues to grow amid the several challenges it faces from the developments in the related sectors. The world health organization puts strict restrictions on the quality of services that hospitals and all other care units should abide. It is in this resolution that the sector is changing tremendously from the federal centered and directed care units to privatization sector. Consequently, it increases the need for introduction of quality care units in hospitals to ensure that patients and all other needy people receive the deserved attention. The emergency care system is one sector that needs critical improvement and increment of services to cater for the rising incidences of emergencies. Thus, an ambulatory care unit best fits for introduction into the current hospital to ensure quality attendance to patients.

The mission statement…… [Read More]

References

Wolper, L.F. (2011). Health care administration: Managing organized delivery systems. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Fisher, A., & OCR (Organisation). (2005). Health & social care. Oxford: Heinemann

Niemcryk, S.J., Joshua-Gotlib, S., & Levine, D.S. (2005). Outpatient experience of patients with GERD in the United States: Analysis of the 1998-2001 national ambulatory medical care survey. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 50(10), 1904-8. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-005-2959-0

Mangione-Smith, R., DeCristofaro, A.H., Setodji, C.M., Keesey, J., Klein, D.J., Adams, J.L., . . . McGlynn, E.A. (2007). The quality of ambulatory care delivered to children in the United States. The New England Journal of Medicine, 357(15), 1515-23. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMsa064637
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Healthcare Policies

Words: 1952 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86833684

Health Policies Medicare

hen everyone in our country finally starts to reach the age of 65 years of age or older, then every person will become eligible for Medicare. It is clear that there are some elderly that are having minimum health concerns while others recurrently are dealing with medical issues for which they will have to seek out treatment by the doctor. However, research is starting to display that there are at least five top conditions that are enhancing on medical and drug spending. It is obvious that Heart disease circumstances are the number one medical issue that the those that are considered elderly are facing and that is becoming very costly to them. Most are unaware that the second one is the disease cancer and it could be internal or external for various elderly patients. Other issues such as joint ailments a lot of the times can cost…… [Read More]

Work Cited:

Wenzlow, Audra T., et al. "Effects of a Discharge Planning Program on Medicaid Coverage of State Prisoners with Serious Mental Illness." Psychiatric Services 62.1 (2011): 73-8.

Sommers, Benjamin D. "Loss of Health Insurance among Non-Elderly Adults in Medicaid." Journal of General Internal Medicine 24.1 (2009): 1-7.

Verdier, James, and Allison Barrett. "How Medicaid Agencies Administer Mental Health Services: Results from a 50-State Survey." Psychiatric Services 59.10 (2008): 1203-6.

Harman, Jeffrey S., Allyson G. Hall, and Jianyi Zhang. "Changes in Health Care use and Costs After a Break in Medicaid Coverage among Persons with Depression." Psychiatric Services 58.1 (2007): 49-54.
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Physicians Agree That Managed Care Is Not

Words: 1344 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92475383

physicians agree that managed care is not doing the job it was originally created to do. Although reform efforts have not worked in the past, many doctors believe now is the time to revisit reform to combat the lack of health care access to a growing number of Americans, escalating costs, and deteriorating quality. This paper explores the evolution of managed care, and its problems and possible solutions from the viewpoint of two organizations representing the interests of physicians.

In 1993, President Clinton introduced a plan for regulated health care reform in response to escalating costs and the growing ranks of the uninsured. From 1970 until the time of the reform proposal, health care spending had increased from $74.4 billion to $752 billion annually. The Clinton proposal was met with huge opposition from the "medical industrial complex" comprised of insurance firms, pharmaceutical companies, hospital suppliers and medical device companies and…… [Read More]

Bibliography better-quality alterantive; single-payer national health system reform. Retrieved on February

3, 2003 Physicians For A National Health Program Web Site: http://www.pnhp.org/publications/archives/000015.php national health program for the United States: a physician's proposal. Retrieved on February 3, 2003 Physicians For A National Health Program Web Site: http://www.pnhp.org/publications/archives/000016.php

Caplan, A. (2000, December 21, 2000) In 2000, managed care our no. 1 health crisis, Retrieved on February 3, 2003 from MSNBC News Web Site: http://www.msnbc.com/news/671464.asp

Healthcare crisis: managed care. Retrieved February 3, 2002 from PBS Web site:  http://www.pbs.org/healthcarecrisis/managedcare.html 

Position paper on universal access to health care and health system reform. Retrieved on February 3, 2003 from American Medical Women's Association Web Site: http://www.amwa-doc.org/publications/Position_Papers/univesal_access.htm
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Concept Ethics of Care

Words: 1051 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14510810

Ethics of care is one of the normative ethical theories, and examines the things that make actions perceived to be wrong or right. Developed in the second part of the 20th century by feminists, its emphasis is about the importance of a person's response to various things. Instead of considering what is just and fair, the person is asked to consider how to respond. There are generally universal standards as to how to respond to specific statements, acts, and situations. However, this is considered by those who follow ethics of care to be a morally problematic statement. The reason behind this is that it attempts to make every person and situation the same. It breeds indifference and blindness to the true person and situation, which implies a lack of caring. That lack of care is highly significant, because one has to care about themselves and others in order to work…… [Read More]

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Nursing Healthcare Business

Words: 5470 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30995758

Healthcare

We can compare the healthcare workplace to what is seen by a person when he/she looks through a kaleidoscope: since there are numerous different patterns that appear as the moments pass by. The shortage of nurses which has been publicized widely and the high turnover rates amongst the nurses are some of the unwanted patterns which have occurred. The dependence of healthcare institutions on the nurse-managers for the retention and recruitment of nurses is steadily increasing (Contino, 2004).

There are a number of routes through which the critical care nurses have become the leaders. Most of these routes don't have any educational or managerial training as a part of the process. There is a need for effective strategies for the care leaders who provide critical care in order to inspire the staff and manage the departmental operations in an effective manner to get positive results. One of the strategies…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J., Erickson, J., Jones, D., & Paulo, L. (2009). An evidence-based structure for transformative nurse executive practice, Nursing Administration Quarterly, 33(4), 280-87

Advisory Board Web site. (2004). Available at: http://www.advisory.com.

Ales, B.J. (1995). Mastering the art of delegation. Nurs Manage. August; 26: 32A, 32E.

American Organization of Nurse Executives (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. Nurse Leader, 3(1), 15-22.
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Healthcare Education for Community Members

Words: 1474 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11971286

Community Teaching Plan

Community Teaching Work Plan Proposal

Directions: Develop an educational series proposal for your community using one of the following four topics which was chosen within your CLC group:

Bioterrorism/Disaster

Environmental Issues

Primary Prevention/Health Promotion

Secondary Prevention/Screenings for a Vulnerable Population

Planning Before Teaching:

Estimated Time Teaching Will Last:

Three 2-hour sessions

Location of Teaching:

Athens Community Health Department

Supplies, Material, Equipment Needed:

Laptop; digital projector; screen

Estimated Cost:

Community and Target Aggregate:

Athens Community Health Department, Athens, Georgia

Secondary Prevention/Screenings for a Vulnerable Population

Session I: Sources of Vulnerability

Session II:Implications for Healthcare Providers

Session III: Innovative Practice; Gordon's Functional Health Patterns Assessment

Epidemiological ationale for Topic (statistics related to topic):

The literature on vulnerable people clearly indicates that the special needs of these populations and the ubiquitous barriers to quality care access lead to traceable disparities in the provision of healthcare and in their health outcomes…… [Read More]

References

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). National healthcare disparities report 2008. Chapter 3, Access to healthcare. Washington: AHRQ; 2008. Retrieved http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/nhdr08/Chap3.htm

Edelman, C.L. And Mandle, C.L. (2006). In D. Como, L. Thomas (Eds.), Health Promotion Throughout the Lifespan. St. Louis, Missouri: Mosby.

[Type text]
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Why Don't Republicans Support Healthcare Reform

Words: 839 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96895138

Media and Health Policy Processes

There is no doubt that politics plays a crucial role in healthcare legislation and reforms in the United States. After all, the U.S. Congress passes laws, and so automatically any proposed legislation is passes or fails due to how political representatives act on the law. Professor Thomas Oliver (John Hopkins University) makes that point abundantly clear in his scholarly article. This paper references Oliver's article and a peer-reviewed piece in the journal Economics, Management, and Financial Markets (Boubacar, 2006).

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

It should be noted that when Barack Obama ran for election among his major points was the need to reform healthcare policies in America -- and the need to create new laws and policies. He was elected by a wide margin and he set out to develop legislation that could bring meaningful reform and could provide insurance for an…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boubacar, I, and Foster, S. (2014). Analysis of Small Business Owners' Perception of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Evidence from Wisconsin Farmers.

Economics, Management, and Financial Markets, 9(1), 11-20.

CNN. (2009). Obama calls for health-care reform in 2009. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://www.brandnewz.com.

O'Keefe, E. (2014). The House has voted 54 times in 4 years on Obamacare. Here's the full list. The Washington Post. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://www.washingtonpost.com.
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Health Care Reform Legislation

Words: 716 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88595361

Quality of Care: Healthcare eform

Health care reform legislation is expected to reduce health care spending by $590 billion over 10 years and lower premiums by nearly $2,000 per family by slowing the annual growth rate in national health expenditures. Discuss how this savings will be accomplished and what potential sacrifices in health care delivery may be experienced. Is the figure of $590 billion when calculated over a ten-year period really a significant savings?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to make healthcare more accessible to a wider array of Americans and also more equitable in its method of delivery. Some of its provisions included requiring all adults (with some hardship exemptions) to have healthcare or pay a penalty. The hope was that expanding the risk pool of young, healthy insured who might otherwise forgo coverage would support the costs of some of the other provisions of the bill,…… [Read More]

References

Carroll, A. (2014). Why increasing access to healthcare does not save money. The New York

Times. Retrieved from:

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