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We have over 87 essays for "Glorious Revolution"

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Revolution in Rousseau and Burke

Words: 2166 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28038800

"

Here, urke argued that revolution in general, and the French Revolution in particular, must be matched with reason and a reluctance to completely give up to radical thinking.

Rousseau gave in directly to the revolution, arguing that it is a direct result of man's socialization, but urke was much more cautious: Revolution is not automatically good for urke, nor is it intrinsic to man.

Given urke's record as a strong supporter of American independence and as a fighter against royalism in England, many readers and thinkers were taken aback when urke published his Reflections on the Revolution in France in 1790. With this work, urke suddenly went on to became one of the earliest and most passionate English critics of the French Revolution, which he interpreted not as movement towards a representative, constitutional democracy but instead as a violent rebellion against tradition and justified authority and as an experiment…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Rousseau:

Discourse On The Arts and Sciences, 1750

The Social Contract, 1762

Discourse On The Origin And Basis Of The Inequality Of Men, 1754
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Glorious Cause The American Revolution

Words: 1082 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83620784



The second of Middlekauff's major theses is that the colonists were overmatched, militarily, and that the superiority of England's troops almost meant a victory for England. In many history books, the evolutionary figures are portrayed as almost super-human, and their victory against England's forces is portrayed as almost divinely mandated. The reality was much uglier and more vivid, and Middlekauff goes into painstaking detail about those battles. While most know that England used hired troops to fight the evolution, Middlekauff goes into an in-depth description of the hired Hessians and why they were considered such formidable foes. However, he also does a good job of explaining the advantages held by the colonists, including familiarity with the terrain, a guerrilla approach to warfare, and the determination to be free.

Middlekauff's approach to the book is that of a scholar. For example, while he attributes some part of the American victory to…… [Read More]

Referenced

Middlekauff, Robert. The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789. New York:

Oxford University Press, 2005.
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British Marinesduring the Amer Revolution

Words: 3305 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65852547

In regard to the naval force of the British, these frictions affected in particular the effective number of the marines that made up the fleet, despite the fact that the threat of the American uprising was looming and that the British strategists were well aware of the fact that the English power relied mostly on the naval forces. Therefore, once this aspect of the military force was weakened, the eventual failure of the naval operations was obvious. The internal situation in the Empire also led to a lack of consideration for the treatment of the sailors who had constantly rebelled against the negligence and the mistreatment they had been throughout the years subject to. (Trevelyan, 1962) Even more, following the actual clash with the American revolutionaries, the state of the navy was, according to Trevelyan, "a deplorable one (as) its ships were being evicted from the Mediterranean Sea, where the…… [Read More]

References

Boatner, Mark M. (1966) Encyclopedia of the American Revolution. New York: D. McKay & Co.

Gardner, Allen. (1913) a naval history of the American Revolution. Boston, Houghton. Retrieved 30 May 2007.  http://www.americanrevolution.org/nav1.html 

Halsall, Paul. Thomas Paine's Common Sense. Penguin: New York, 1982. Internet Modern History Sourcebook. Retrieved 30 May 2007  http://www.ushistory.org/paine/commonsense/singlehtml.htm 

Jenkins, P. (1997). A history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.
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Glorious Cause The American Revolution Middlekauff Robert

Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 1898552

Glorious Cause: The American Revolution

Middlekauff, Robert. The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.

Robert Middlekauff, born in 1927 in Washington state, holds a B.A. from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. from Yale. He saw active duty as a lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps in Korea from 1952-54. For most of his long career he has been a professor of history at the University of California at Berkeley. In addition to The Glorious Cause (1982), his published books include Ancients and Axioms (1963), The Mathers (1971), and Benjamin Franklin and His Enemies (1996). Dr. Middlekauff received the Bancroft Prize in 1972 and the Commonwealth Gold Medal in 1983. He is listed as a historical educator in Who's Who in America where this biographical information was obtained.

This work, a narrative historical study of the American Revolution, and the first volume to…… [Read More]

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His American Revolution

Words: 2318 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89659782

American evolution

History has shown that the form of government which emerged out of the American evolution was by no means perfect, but to recognize this does not diminish the importance of what was achieved as a result of the Constitutional Convention. Instead, it allows one to appreciate the disruptive and groundbreaking nature of the compromise government established by the various delegates while realizing how much it represents a continuity with the past. By examining Berkin's 2002 account of the creation of the American Constitution in her book A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution alongside Middlekauff's 2005 study The Glorious Cause, one is able to better appreciate the process and goals that went into the creation of the American Constitution, and how the problems that existed at its creation continue to plague the country to this day.

Before beginning this discussion of the Constitutional Convention and its details, it…… [Read More]

References

Berkin, C. (2002). A brilliant solution: Inventing the american constitution. Orlando: Harcourt

Books.

Middlekauf, R. (2005). The glorious cause: The american revolution, 1763-1789. Oxford:
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Radical Was the American Revolution

Words: 1029 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 76214394

In the end these early attempts at independent diplomacy, a radical notion in and of itself retained foreign aide from France, despite its early misgivings. This in a time that diplomatic aide to a rebellion would be seen as grounds for a new war the French recognized the Americans as an entity in need of aide and provided 1 Million livres for munitions for the Americans, in secret of course. The Americans then moved forward in hopes to draw actually military assistance from Spain and France. (Middlekauff 398-400) The radical nature of these ideas lays not in the fact that the rebellion deemed themselves in need of foreign aide but in the fact that they believed their colonial/constitutional and temporary government had the right to ask for open foreign aide, as an independent entity, potentially capable of total independence from the rule of the Crown. (400)

The rejection by America…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Middlekauff, Robert The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789, London UK: Oxford Press, 2005

Wood, Gordon S. The Radicalism of the American Revolution, New York: Vintage,
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Reason What Is the Raison D'etat

Words: 772 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71124527

reason

What is the raison d'etat ( reason for the existence of the state)? Compare and contrast the views presented by theorists on the purpose, role, and existence of governments: Jean Bodin, Jacques Bossuet, James II, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke. Discuss how political views reflected evolving views on human nature, humanity's place, and the Glorious evolution.

The concept of human liberty and the purpose of the state in Western Civilization have evolved over time. Jean Bodin, the French philosopher and jurist, was one of the first philosophers to advance the idea that as well as the loyalty the populace owed to the sovereign, the sovereign likewise had an obligation to educate the population in kind. Bodin wrote in his Six Books of the Commonwealth (epublique): "those who have written on the duties of magistrates and other similar books are wrong to support the idea that the Estates of the…… [Read More]

References

Duncan, Stewart. (2009). Thomas Hobbes. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Retrieved November 4, 2011 at  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/hobbes/ 

Turchetti, Mario. (2010). Jean Bodin. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved November 4, 2011 at  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/bodin/ 

Uzgalis, William. (2008). John Locke. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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American History Although the Early

Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 75111246



British reactions to the colonies wavered throughout the colonial era, from the policy of salutary neglect to the tightened controls of King George III. The Crown faced a dilemma: to allow the colonies to develop thriving commercial enterprises in the hopes of a trickle-down benefit for Great Britain; or to tighten the leash on the colonial governments to demand more regular tax revenues. In light of the thriving colonial economies in Massachusetts, Virginia, and Maryland, King George III opted for the latter, imposing tariffs on the colonies. Britain's policies toward the New World colonies remained, therefore, primarily economic: the Stamp and Sugar Acts exemplify the Crown's interest not so much in the development of colonial culture as in the colonial economy.

Friction between English settlers and Native Americans also impacted the development of colonial life and of Crown policies. Infiltration into lands inhabited by the indigenous Americans led to numerous…… [Read More]

References

An Outline of American History." Embassy of the United States, Stockholm. Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at http://stockholm.usembassy.gov/usis/history/chapter2.html

Colonial Settlement, 1600s-1763." The Library of Congress. Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at  http://memory.loc.gov/learn/features/timeline/colonial/indians/indians.html 

From Revolution to Reconstruction." Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/H/1994/ch1_p9.htm
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Colonial Transplantation That Occurred in Virginia Maryland

Words: 910 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36383781

colonial transplantation that occurred in Virginia, Maryland, and Massachusetts Bay. What were the major sources of friction between the Indians and the English in Virginia and Massachusetts Bay? Also explain the impact of the Glorious evolution on British rule and describe the policy of 'salutary neglect' and what it did for the government within the colonies. Be specific in your essay.

Colonial transplantation in Virginia, Maryland and the Massachusetts Bay

The colonization of Virginia, Maryland and the Massachusetts Bay represent crucial points on the history of the modern day United States. In the three regions, colonial transplantation processes were developed and these were characterized by distinctive elements. In both three regions, the colonization process was marked by a shortage of financial resources and the need to receive more money from London.

In Virginia for instance, the colonial transplantation effort had a grim start. Striving to protect themselves against the aboriginals,…… [Read More]

Reference:

Chapter 2: Transplantations and borderlands

Chapter 3: Society and culture in provincial America
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Revolutionary Comparison The English America

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 14770744

Unlike the English Revolution, the American Revolution was also bloody, not relatively peaceful, and created a new government, rather than sustained and substantially reformed an old one. But it was more desired and waged 'by the people,' rather than by the ruling classes, unlike the British. In this sense, the American Revolution was seen as a greater victory for the Enlightenment. Just as the Bloodless Revolution did make the English system more balanced in terms of monarchial authority and allowed the predominantly Protestant will of the English people to be respected, the American Revolution even more radically upheld notions of national self-definition, individual rights, and the right for a people to exercise self- determination over their futures. The philosopher John Locke believed that a sovereign abdicated his or her right of rule when he or she acted in a tyrannical fashion and deprived citizens of fundamental rights to life, liberty,…… [Read More]

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Delimitations Today Modern Business Systems

Words: 20751 Length: 75 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 13650636

A favorite target for conspiracists today as well as in the past, a group of European intellectuals created the Order of the Illuminati in May 1776, in Bavaria, Germany, under the leadership of Adam Weishaupt (Atkins, 2002). In this regard, Stewart (2002) reports that, "The 'great' conspiracy organized in the last half of the eighteenth century through the efforts of a number of secret societies that were striving for a 'new order' of civilization to be governed by a small group of 'all-powerful rulers.' The most important of these societies, and the one to which all subsequent conspiracies could be traced, is the Illuminati founded in Bavaria on May 1, 1776 by Adam Weishaupt" (p. 424). According to Atkins, it was Weishaupt's fundamental and overriding goal to form a secret organization of elite members of Europe's leading citizens who could then strive to achieve the Enlightenment version of revolutionary social…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2002). Publication manual of the American Psychological

Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Anderson, J. (1981, 1723). The charges of a Free-Mason extracted from the ancient records of lodges beyond the sea, and of those in England, Scotland, and Ireland, for the use of the lodges in London: To be read at the making of new brethren, or when the master shall order it. Reprinted in The Radical Enlightenment: Pantheists, Freemasons, and Republicans, by M.C. Jacob, 279-285. London and Boston: Allen & Unwin in Harland-

Jacobs at p. 237.
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British Constitutional History Has Largely Been a

Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19877154

British constitutional history has largely been a slow and deliberate process of evolution over a period of centuries. The following comments of a political scientist are thus largely true:

Nowhere else has the world witnessed a political evolution so relatively free from great civil commotion. Britain has not had a revolution comparable with the French Revolution of 1798 or the Russian Revolution of 1917. It is true that there have been threats of Revolution and so-called revolutions in Britain, but they did not deflect the main current of political development.

In this essay we shall discuss why the above comments are a reasonably accurate observation of the British political history.

Until the Middle Ages, Britain was a feudal kingdom that gradually transformed into a strong centralized monarchy. The monarchy came into its own in the middle ages and the monarchs felt secure enough in their position to seek the advice…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kishlansky, Mark. "United Kingdom." Section on History. Article in Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia, 2002

Belanger, Claude. "The British Constitution." Quebec History. February 26, 2001. Marianopolis College Web Site. December 6, 2002. http://www2.marianopolis.edu/quebechistory/index.htm

British History
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Building Reasons Events for the

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31248634



Reason 4: The Great Awakening awakened old cultural reminders of the reasons that the Puritans had left England, and the state-run Church of England, to found the colonies long ago.

Reason 5: England was making 'noise' about abolishing the slave trade, which the Southern colonists were profoundly opposed to, as they believed this would mark the end of their agriculturally-based way of life.

Reason 6: The rise of individualism, inspired partly by the Awakening and also the increased popularity of the philosophy of John Locke, was another contribution to the growing sense of discontent amongst the colonists.

All of these factors contributed to the rebellion. However, the old cliche about the drive of 'no taxation without representation' continues to be valid. Of all of the reasons, Reason 3 seems to be the driving factor, because it struck at the heart of conflicts over American government as well as American economic…… [Read More]

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Western Studies Emphasizes on the Following Two

Words: 2590 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 92266819

estern Studies emphasizes on the following two topics namely, Inspirational artists during the Renaissance and England before becoming a Constitutional Monarchy. The first topic takes into account the Renaissance era and the artists produced during it where as the second focuses on how the British monarchy was established and what were the perils that were faced in establishing it. This paper also highlights certain quotes.

estern Studies

Inspirational artists during the Renaissance.

The Europeans regard the Renaissance as an era that completely transformed their feudal society of the middle ages into a society dominated by political institutions, in which education was pursued and liberty was the right of all the citizens. This charismatic era gave birth to many philosophers, artists, scientists and thinkers who worked to present to their people a completely new perspective of life. Many artists concentrated upon human philosophy, which became the central movement during the Renaissance.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fort C. How To Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci; Liberating Creativity And Igniting

Innovation In The Workplace. PR Newswire. 8 Feb. 2001.

Joseph E. Reading Montaigne. Commentary. 1 Mar. 1993.

Leonardo Da Vinci. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 1 Jul. 2003.
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John Locke Believes That the

Words: 2156 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 21372855

Locke's version of the social contract is essentially a justification for the wealthy to assert political control over everyone else.

Locke's arguments justifying government were liberal, even radical for their time. The popular view was that kings ruled by mandate from God, and were not subject to the consent of the people. Locke's Two Treatises of Government were written during the exclusion crisis, and supported the hig position that the king did not have an absolute right to rule. (Rj) During the exclusion crisis, king Charles had no hier, making his brother James the next in line for the throne. James was a Catholic, which made him very unpopular in protestant England. Parliament repeatedly tried to pass bills excluding James from succession to the throne. Each time, Charles dissolved parliament before the bill could be passed. (Ellywa) Locke's version of social contract theory provides a justification for citizens rejecting Charles's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ellywa "Exclusion Bill" Wikipedia. 8, Jan 2005  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exclusion_crisis 

Gregmcpherson "Social Contract" Wikipedia. 26, Mar 2005  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Social_Contract 

Locke, John. Two Treatises of Government http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext05/trgov10.txt

Marx, Karl. Manifesto of the Communist Party. Feb 1848  http://wikisource.org/wiki/Manifesto_of_the_Communist_Party
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Rise of England's Military to 1688

Words: 2709 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71488409

English military to the year 1688. In order to undertsand the history of the English military, we must first examine the history opf England itself. The military has always been beholden to political and cultural factors and several developments in technology have changed the face of warfare and, by extension, the development of the military.

In the year 1688, King James II was forcibly removed from power and replaced by William of Orange. James II was a Catholic, and determined to reinstate Catholicism in England. After the birth of James' son and heir, a party of elder statesmen officially invited William of Orange, a Protestant, to come to England with a conquering army to save the kingdom from the Catholic rule of James II. This was known as the Glorious Revolution.

efore England

efore we can examine the history of the English military, we must examine the roots of England…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ashley, Mike. 2002. A Brief History of British Kings and Queens. New York: Carrol and Graf Publishers.

Black, Jeremy. 2000. A New History of Britain. Gloucestershire: Sutton Publishing.

Fry, Plantagenet Somerset. 1990. The Kings and Queens of England and Scotland. New York: Grove Weidenfeld.

Grun, Bernard. 1991. The Timetables of History. New York: Simon and Schuster/Touchstone.
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Marx Historical Context Classical Sociological and Economic

Words: 1342 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59721592

Marx Historical Context

Classical sociological and economic theories like those of Karl Marx emerged in Western Europe when it was experiencing the Enlightenment, the emergence of scientific method, a growing sense of individual autonomy over one's life conditions, the emergence of private property, urban growth, and a total shattering of the social balance of relations among peoples that had been in place for centuries if not millennia. Christianity and other traditional religions were being undermined by the new developments in science and technology, while urban, industrial capitalism was breaking up the old feudal-agrarian order in Europe and the Americas. All the founders of modern sociology had to deal with this radically new society, and attempted to describe its historical origins, the new social and economic problems of industrial capitalism, and how governments and societies should deal with them. Karl Marx received his PhD in economics in Germany during the dawn…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Appelrouth, S. And L.D. Edles (2010). Sociological Theory in the Classical Era: Text and Readings, 2nd Edition. SAGE Publications.

Greene, J.C. "Biological and Social Theory in the Nineteenth Century: August Comte and Herbert Spencer" in John Offer (ed). Herbert Spencer: Critical Assessments of Leading Sociologists, Volume 2. Routledge, 2000, pp. 203-26.

Marx, Karl and Friedrich Engels. The Manifesto of the Communist Party. Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1969.

 http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/
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Clauswitz at the End of Chapter One

Words: 1339 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76696980

Clauswitz

At the end of Chapter One, Book One of On War, Carl von Clausewitz famously gives his "paradoxical trinity" in regard to the nature of the forces arrayed against each other in war. He tells us war is a "total phenomenon" in which there are three "dominant tendencies" that characterize the nature of warfare, and that any theory of war which neglects or ignores any of these tendencies would both "conflict with reality" and thus be "totally useless."[footnoteRef:1] These three tendencies are so intertwined that they act like "three different codes of law, deep rooted in their subject and yet variable in their relationship with one another;" that is, each of the three tendencies is variable in its operative force, and the strength of each strand dominates or is diminished in any given particular case, but nevertheless, each magnet is still intimately involved in a given war or engagement.[footnoteRef:2]…… [Read More]

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Bacon Rebellion Has Been Considered

Words: 2870 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41842170



During the 18th century there was a fierce competition between the British and the French colonial empires which ultimately led to The Seven Years War. The final result of the conflict favored the English who, nonetheless, were forced to make appeal to the force of the American colonies in order to defeat the French. Following such an action, the opponents of the British rule over the American territories would later on recall and use in supporting the cause of independence the aid the Americans provided the British in tackling the French threat.

The British considered the Americans as being the closest political ally and colonial region. Moreover, the historical context determined such an approach. This special treatment protected the American colonies from any external and foreign threat; in return, the British sought to maintain a preferential trade connection with the American colonies who were, without a doubt, one of the…… [Read More]

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Gun Control in the 21st

Words: 5200 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51492225

Hence, while ratifying the U.S. Constitution, the Virginia convention passed a resolution specifying: "That the people have a right to keep and bear arms; that a well-regulated militia, composed of the body of the people trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defense of a free state;"

It is, therefore, clear that the central issue that led to the adoption of the Second Amendment, as part of the Bill of Rights -- ratified in 1791, was the concern that the powers granted in the U.S. Constitution to the Congress over the militia and a national army may be used to abrogate state sovereignty and power, rather than a desire to recognize the right for bearing arms by individual citizens. Nowhere in the background and history of the introduction of the Second Amendment in the U.S. Constitution do we find the issue of personal use of weapons, for purposes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Economic Costs of Gun Violence." Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. Updated 4/17/07. October 31, 2007.  http://www.bradycampaign.org/facts/factsheets/pdf/economic_costs.pdf 

Firearm Facts." Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. Updated 4/18/07. October 31, 2007.  http://www.bradycampaign.org/facts/factsheets/pdf/firearm_facts.pdf 

An interview with John R. Lott, Jr." University of Chicago Website. 2000. October 31, 2007.  http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/493636.html 

The Second Amendment." Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. 2007. October 31, 2007.  http://www.bradycampaign.org/facts/issues/?page=second
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Music & Skimmington Riots an

Words: 8558 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34158478

In this regard, when wage levels fell in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, the standard of living for laborers and cottagers in England declined precipitously and they were compelled to use the majority of their cash, garden crops, and milk just to buy bread and clothing (Kulikoff 2000:19). Not surprisingly, many of these workers found it almost impossible in some cases to even survive, even with the entire family - including young children - working as hard as possible (Kulikoff 19).

In some cases, laborers (but not their families) were paid in food and drink as part of their wages and some likely kept fowl or a pig, and cottagers, of course, produced much of their own food; nevertheless, poor landless families ate bread and porridge, on occasion supplemented by milk, ale, cheese, eggs, or cheap meat, a diet that was far removed from the same level enjoyed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abramovitz, Mimi. Regulating the Lives of Women: Social Welfare Policy from Colonial Times to the Present. Boston: South End Press, 1988.

Bonomi, Patricia U. Under the Cope of Heaven: Religion, Society, and Politics in Colonial America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Breen, T.H. The Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Daunton, M.J. Progress and Poverty: An Economic and Social History of Britain, 1700-1850. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1995.
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Analyzing the Forth Amendment

Words: 6920 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 92815852

4th Amendment's evolution and history, together with the "search and seizure" law.

4th Amendment Background

People's rights of being secure in personal effects, papers, houses and persons, against unreasonable seizures and searches, may not be breached, nor shall any warrants be issued, but in case of probable cause, which is supported by affirmation or oath, and describes, particularly, the place that must be searched, or the things or individuals that should be seized, under the 4th Amendment. Like most fields in U.S. law, the English common law forms the principal basis of the 4th Amendment. Broadly, it was created for limiting governmental powers and their capacity of enforcing legal actions upon citizens (4th Amendment - constitution -- Laws.com). Amendment IV was implemented in immediate reaction to the historical writ of assistance's abuse. This writ was a sort of general governmental search warrant employed in the American evolution's era. Amendment IV…… [Read More]

References"

(n.d.). Annenberg Classroom. The Right to Protection against Illegal Search and Seizure. Retrieved April 27, 2016, from  http://www.annenbergclassroom.org/Files/Documents/Books/Our%20Rights/Chapter_15_Our_Rights.pdf 

(n.d.). Arizona Defense Attorney James E. Novak Law Blog -- Legal discussions and observations with Arizona Criminal Defense Attorney James E. Novak. Requirements and Exceptions to Lawful Search Warrants in Arizona -- Legal discussions and observations with Arizona Criminal Defense Attorney James E. Novak. Retrieved April 26, 2016, from  http://blog.novakazlaw.com/2013/01/requirements-and-exceptions-to-lawful-search-warrants-in-arizona/ 

Boyd v. United States, 116 U.S. 616 (1886)

(n.d.). Conservative Policy Research and Analysis. Guide to the Constitution. Retrieved April 25, 2016, from  http://www.heritage.org/constitution/#!/amendments/4/essays/144/searches-and-seizures
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English Civil War

Words: 965 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56305858

English Civil War of the 17th century. Specifically, it will look at what the most important results of the English Civil War were, and how England in 1700 differed from England in 1600. The results of the English Civil War changed England forever, and altered many cultural aspects, from religious to government. Before the Civil War, England was divided from the inside, and after, it was more united, but stronger too, because of a better working relationship between the monarchy and the Parliament.

The English Civil War was really a series of wars fought during the mid-1600s in England, but also exacerbated by battles with the Scottish, the Irish, and the Welsh. In fact, modern historians often refer to the Civil War by several names, including, "Puritan evolution', 'English evolution', and more recently 'British Civil War(s)'" (Ohlmeyer, 1998, p. 16). It was a result of many things, including despotic rule…… [Read More]

References

Cannadine, D. (1995). Chapter 2 British history as a 'new subject.' In Uniting the Kingdom? The Making of British History, Grant, A. & Stringer, K.J. (Eds.) (pp. 12-28). New York: Routledge.

Ohlmeyer, J. (1998, November). The wars of the three kingdoms. History Today, 16.
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British Parliamentary System of Government With the

Words: 2576 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48035361

British Parliamentary System of Government with the United States Federal System of Government

The British Parliamentary system of government is one of the oldest political systems in the world that has evolved over a period of centuries. The British model has influenced the system of governments in many countries of the world including the United States. On the other hand, the U.S. system of government is a Federal system that came into existence when the United States (the former American colonies) rebelled against British rule and declared its independence in the latter part of the eighteenth century, followed by the adoption of its own constitution in 1787. Although having some similarities with the British System of government, the U.S. system of government is unique in several aspects, having its own characteristics. In this paper we shall look at some key features of the two systems of government and compare and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baker, Jean H. "The United States Government." Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia, 2003. CD-ROM Version

The British Constitution -- an Introduction." April 22, 2002. December 10, 2002.  http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/british_constitution1.htm 

The British Parliamentary System." BBC Web Site. 2002. December 10, 2002.  http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/classic/A591383 

Judicial Independence" April 2002. December 10, 2002.  http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/judicial_independence.htm
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Adjust Your Work Cited Accordingly

Words: 609 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 14311769

In our ideal world, love is a part of the equation, and Coontz open our eyes to how it has not always been this way. Even when we think of courtly love, we must realize that literature has romanticized it to a saccharin-sweet point. To be married and have it be considered quite normal to look outside that marriage for love and intimacy seems backwards. Coontz also points out that too much love between spouses was frowned upon in Greek and Roman societies as well as some Catholic and Protestants. Spouses who loved each other too much were committing "idolatry" (xxx). However, most cultures frowned upon placing love at the "center of marriage" (xxx). Love was not necessary and in best-case scenarios, love would eventually develop between husband and wife. Coontz's ability to trace this attitude toward love and marriage through the centuries, the age of Enlightenment and the Glorious…… [Read More]

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Biographical Report on Author Artist

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 48769417

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)

Satire and Irony in Dublin

LIFE OF JONATHAN SWIFT

Jonathan Swift is widely regarded as the greatest writer of satire in English literature. Yet it is crucial for understanding Swift's satire to know that he was not really English. Swift was born in Dublin in 1667, to a family that originally had emigrated from England -- for this reason, he is generally described as "Anglo-Irish." Swift did his university studies in Dublin at Trinity College, graduating in 1686. From here he became the personal secretary to a politician and writer, Sir William Temple, and moved to England. Political machinations, however, hampered Swift's advancement in a political career -- instead he would end up taking a position in the Protestant Church of Ireland, ultimately rising to the position of Dean at Saint Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin.

Swift's career encompassed both literature and politics. As a wit and satirist,…… [Read More]

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Positive Moral Basis for Capitalist Society

Words: 1891 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78168664

Moral Basis of Capitalism

Positive Moral Basis for Capitalist Society

The theory of property right is probably society's turning point towards capitalism. Locke's theory on civil society and government is centered around individuals' natural right to property. In the Second Treatise, the author's justification of individuals uniting into developing governments, societies, is represented by their intention of preserving property. In Locke's view, it is the preservation of property that draws the limits, rights and obligations of governments and civil society. The issue here is Locke's definition of property. The interesting point is that Locke seems to differently categorize property within the Second Treatise. For example, property in Locke's view is individual's life, liberty and estate in some parts of the writing, while in other parts property is represented by persons and goods. Although specialists in the field have found this view on property as confusing, I think it should not…… [Read More]

Reference list:

1. John Locke (2012). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved November 10, 2013 from  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/locke/ .
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George Washington the Indespensable Man

Words: 1397 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57005645

Its effects would have impact on the political decisions of all future generations; any mistake could have had disastrous consequences for the ones to come. Regarding the matter, the president at some point wrote to James Madison that given the historical circumstances and precedents his presidency constituted, he preferred that all decisions be made on a moral basis.. Washington couldn't have been more right; for instance, his refusal to serve a third term, in 1797 became common practice until today. The norm states that no other president could seek power for more than two terms.

His huge burden derived not only from the great amount of social changes that were to take place and not only from the laborious political measures and laws that had to be adopted; as first president of the newly-born nation, he was also to become the symbol of the ones he presided over.

People have…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Gregg, Gary L. II and Spalding, Matthew. "Patriot Sage, George Washington and the American Political Tradition." Wilmington, Delaware: ISI Books,1989

Middlekauf, Robert. "The Glorious Cause, (The American Revolution, 1763-1789)." London:Oxford Press, 2005

Morgan, Edmund. "The Meaning of Independence." Charlottesville:University of Virginia Press, 1976

Wikipedia Online Encyclopedia, www.wikipedia.org
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Revolutionary America the Difference Between

Words: 1997 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31394759

" It is course legitimate editorial decision-making to spend less time on one aspect than another writer might invest on that issue; but this points out the way in which Berkin makes her history more like journalism, bringing in as many quotes from a diverse set of speakers whenever she can. It was interesting to know that Jefferson was dead set against the proceedings going private.

Middlekauff (630) writes that by putting their Virginia Plan out first, the Virginians "had framed the terms of the discussion." And for the next two weeks the delegates supporting the Virginia Plan "had forced the pace of deliberations, and, for the most part, controlled the Convention." The momentum was on the side of the Virginians and their supporters; the Virginia Plan called for an executive branch, a judiciary, and a "supreme" legislature - and that the representation in the legislature should be allocated according…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berkin, Carol. (2002). A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution. New York:

Harcourt, Inc.

Middlekauff, Robert. (1982). The Glorious Cause. New York: Oxford University Press.
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Revolutionary History Describe Details of

Words: 1393 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84332756

Eventually, these deficiencies would lead to the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. But during the years that they 13 states struggled to achieve their independence, the Articles of Confederation accomplished what they had been intended to. Adopted by Congress on November 15, 1777, the Articles became operational on March 1, 1781 when the last of the 13 states signed the document (The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, 2009).

During the debates that took place regarding the adoption of the Constitution, the opponents argued that the Constitution would open the way to tyranny by the central government. With the memory of the British violations of their civil rights before and during the evolution, they insisted that a bill of rights be used that would spell out the protections of the individual citizens. During the state conventions that were held to ratify the Constitution, several states asked for these amendments (Bill…… [Read More]

References

Bill of Rights. (n.d). Retrieved June 13, 2009, from The Charters of Freedom Web site:

 http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights.html 

The Articles of Confederation. (2003). Retrieved June 13, 2009, from Ben's Guide to U.S.

Government Web site:  http://bensguide.gpo.gov/9-12/documents/articles/index.html
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Artifacts of Mexican History

Words: 1529 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65020521

elics of the Mexican evolution

There are numerous facets of Mexican culture and civilization represented in the Mexican Teotihuacan monument. An analysis of these different elements indicates that some of the goals of the revolution are embedded within this particular work. It renders various members of Mexican society who have a critical impact on both Mexico's history as well as its future. In this regard, the monument is of immense important to Mexico, because it helps to illustrate some of that country's glorious past -- and alludes to the impact that past could have on both its present and its future.

It is critical to denote that some of the more stark representations of this monument are from Mexico's pre-Hispanic past. Numerous people, some of whom are Mexican, attribute Mexico's present existence to the work that the conquistadores pioneered in this area during their global colonial rampage. There are myriad…… [Read More]

References

Hearn, K. (2016). Who built the great city of Teotihuacan?  http://science.nationalgeographic.com  / Retrieved from
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Architecture of Boston Is a

Words: 1481 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 61756872

com). Sedate it is definitely not. e read, "Even from this distance the tower's abundant ornamentation is clear. Its Northern Italian Gothic style adds exotic elements to the neighborhood's skyline." (iboston.org). Trinity Church cannot be overlooked when examining the history and architecture of Boston. It is said, "James O'Gorman described Trinity as 'a cultural event of the first importance in American history'" (O'Gorman qtd. In iboston.org). Trinity church is significant because it "represents a departure of the Boston's mind from its Puritan past, and emergence of American creativity as a force in architecture" (iboston.org). The churches of Boston are not special to Bostonians. It is written in the Catholic Historical Review that in 2005, "The National Trust for Historic Preservation announced... that it had included the Historic Catholic Churches of Greater Boston, Massachusetts, in its 2005 list of America's Eleven Most Endangered Historic Places" (Catholic Historical Review). The churches of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Old State House Museum." Boston History Online. Retrieved May 15, 2008.  http://www.bostonhistory.org 

Old State House." Story of Boston Online. Retrieved May 15, 2008.  http://www.storyofboston.com 

Boston History and Architecture. Retrieved May 15, 2008.  http://www.iboston.org 

Historic Places." Catholic Historical Review. Gale Resource Database. Retrieved May 15, 2008.  http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com
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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

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Language and What it Does

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44072447

Condors eat dead squirrels but the colossal birds also consume the poisons intended only for those squirrels. The Condors talk to each other, fearing extinction, introducing naturalism. In 1985 the last 22 Condors are plucked from their tortured habitat and taken to the San Diego Zoo and other venues for captive breeding.

Fast forward to 2012. n ristotelian plot structure with mind-bending irony -- first utilizing the reversal of fortune followed by society's recognition (anagnorisis -- a sudden discovery) that takes people from ignorance to knowledge -- could be a model useful for an enterprising screenwriter delving into the Condor's fate. The reversal of fortune is the demise of the Condor due to human interventions, intended and unintended. That many informed humans have gone from ignorance to knowledge completes the second part of ristotle's plot formula.

s to the irony in proposed ristotelian plot, take Oedipus Rex, for example. In…… [Read More]

As to the irony in proposed Aristotelian plot, take Oedipus Rex, for example. In the masterpiece by Sophocles, Oedipus launches an investigation into who murdered his father, and learns to his chagrin and shock that he alone murdered his father. A screenwriter in 2012 that is blending real-world reality with fictional / naturalism narrative would be to have the father of a little boy (who is fascinated with these enormous birds with the longest wingspan of any bird in North America) investigate -- at the urging of his son -- the reasons some recently released California Condors are seriously ill and dying.

It turns out the father is a member of the National Rifle Association (NRA), a group that refuses to accept the empirical science that shows Condors are poisoned when eating the carcasses of deer and other critters that have been shot with lead bullets. The father's investigation ironically points to his own organization as helping to kill Condors and he can't bear to tell his son, who is already heartbroken that some Condors are dying. This Oedipus-like irony could be considered Aristotelian. it's a father-son plot drenched in angst, descriptively genuine, written with the literary weapons of the future of hope colliding with history.

In conclusion, this not about a "Free Willy" plot. It is about a battlefield between the emerging conservation-minded generation now in middle school and those who are in benign denial as they kill natural world species. The details involve a restless adolescent revolution; thoughtlessness, greed, and adult resistance to good conservation are crushing the natural world. The brilliant, creative genius of a young boy -- who figures out a way to entertain the public (against the will of his parents) with a video that depicts not the toxic resistance of NRA members but the joy of a youthful future -- fits like a glove into the rough draft of a screenwriter searching for fresh themes in a world chocking on old themes.
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WWI WWII or Nazi

Words: 928 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 75308216

Nazi Germany

Nazi Propaganda and the Spread of Fascism

orld ar II was precipitated by the rise of fascism throughout Europe. As the mores of socialism began to take root in many parts of the continent, fascism emerged as a powerful counterpoint. For nations like Italy, Spain and Germany, the consequences of a sustained and devastating recession would be a coalescing of support behind strong, self-proclaimed and authoritarian leaders. Certainly, most notorious among them would be Adolph Hitler, whose Nazi party would first occupy Austria and Germany before ultimately pursuing a more global agenda. However, for our discussion, the primary interest is the degree of success that the Nazi party had in ultimately penetrating Germany with its values, ideals and policies. As the discussion here will show, propaganda would play a central role in the ability of the Nazi party to garner support and generate the impassioned loyalty of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

German Propaganda Archive. (2013). Es Lebe Deutschland. Bytwerk.com.

History Learning Site (HLS). (2012). Propaganda in Nazi Germany. Historylearningsite.co.uk.

Welch, D. (2011). Nazi Propaganda. BBC History.
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Texas History

Words: 1793 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57657863

Alamo is a major symbol of Texas history and one of the cultural heritage sites of the nation. It is also the subject of numerous books about its history, many seeking to restate the facts in order to overcome the influence of distorted media presentations of the story or of the many myths that have developed around the story of what occurred in that place. The Alamo by John Myers was published in 1973 and addressed the history of the Alamo in terms of what part the Alamo played in the expansion of territory for Europeans and then as a site where several Great Men came and acted in a certain way that helped create Texas and the nation.

To some degree, then, Myers subscribes to the Great Man theory of history, that certain individuals and their behavior decides issues of great moment and advance history. At the same time,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Myers, John Myers. The Alamo. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 1973.
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War Broke Out in 1756

Words: 7157 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43993603



The Seven Years War saw Britain established as the greatest colonial power, with control over India and North America seemingly secured, while Prussia emerged as the greatest power on the Continent, and the dominant force inside Germany, reducing still further the power of the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Austria. Frederick II of Prussia (the Great) emerges as the most remarkable leader of the war. Prussia was the smallest of the main combatants, and yet Frederick survived year after year of campaigning, and despite coming near to defeat he emerged triumphant (Richard).

Histories of the American Revolution tend to start in 1763, the end of the Seven-Year's War, a worldwide struggle for empire that pitted France against England in North America, Europe, and Asia. Fred Anderson, who teaches history at the University of Colorado, takes the story back a decade and explains the significance of the conflict in American history.…… [Read More]

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Revolutionary America Describe Shay's Rebellion

Words: 2441 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19771269

The ritish came to impose serious taxes as a result of the French Indian war. These in turn were unacceptable to a people which considered itself not to be responsible for the causes of the war. The confrontation had been in fact another matter of European dispute that had to be solved outside the continent in the colonies.

Third, there is a disagreement in the way in which the war was perceived at the local level. The American colonies viewed this struggle as a need for independence from a regime that continued to impose an undemocratic control over its institutions and the lives of the people. On the other hand, the ritish saw it as a rebellion that must be immediately squashed. In its view, it was a war for the maintenance of a certain order, while the Americans viewed it as one of disruption of this order. While the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brainard, R. (2005) "Shays' Rebellion." 18th century history. 11 June 2008. http://www.history1700s.com/articles/article1120.shtml

British Battles. (N.d.) the War of the Revolution 1775 to 1783. Accessed 11 June 2008  http://www.britishbattles.com/american-revolution.htm 

Calliope. (2008) "Shays' Rebellion." A Historical Synopsis. 11 June 2008. http://www.calliope.org/shays/shays2.html

Jenkins, P. (1997) a history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.
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Jesus' Teachings Prayer & Christian Life He

Words: 35411 Length: 109 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 95862373

Jesus' Teachings, Prayer, & Christian Life

"He (Jesus) Took the Bread. Giving Thanks Broke it. And gave it to his Disciples, saying, 'This is my Body, which is given to you.'" At Elevation time, during Catholic Mass, the priest establishes a mandate for Christian Living. Historically, at the Last Supper, Christ used bread and wine as a supreme metaphor for the rest of our lives. Jesus was in turmoil. He was aware of what was about to befall him -- namely, suffering and death. This was the last major lesson he would teach before his arrest following Judas' betrayal. Eschatologically speaking, the above set the stage for the Christian ministry of the apostles, evangelists and priests. Indeed, every Christian is called to give of him or herself for the Glory of God and the Glory of Mankind. The message at the Last Supper was powerful. People have put themselves through…… [Read More]

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Early Western Civilization

Words: 1369 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10885455

Race for Colonies in the Late 19th Century

Although European imperialism had started in the 15th century when a number of European powers such as Spain, Portugal and Great Britain began to look for new settlements around the world, another great race for colonies occurred in the late 19th century. This time around, other countries such as the United States and Japan also joined Europe in the race. Some of the major reasons for the establishment of colonies in the late 19th century and specific examples of such colonies are outlined below.

Industrial Revolution:

The industrial revolution in Europe and the United States had greatly increased their technological and military power by the second half of the 19th century. Japan, too, had embarked on a path of rapid modernization in the mid-nineteenth century. As a result, several countries in Europe (including England, France, Germany and Italy), the U.S. And Japan…… [Read More]

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May Fourth Movement and the

Words: 4193 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29158477



20. China must consult Japan whenever foreign capital is needed in improving the infrastructure of Fukien Province.

21. China must give Japanese the right to preach in China.

On May Fourth, some 3,000 students from Peking University and other schools gathered together in front of Tiananmen, the Gate of Heavenly Peace that fronts the Forbidden City complex in the center of eijing, and held a demonstration. They were furious at the news that had just come from the Paris Peace Conference. They shouted out such slogans as "Struggle for the sovereignty externally, get rid of the national traitors at home," "Do away with the 'Twenty-One Demands'," "Don't sign the Versailles Treaty." They demanded punishment of such figures as Cao Rulin, Zhang Zongxiang, and Lu Zongyu, who held important posts as diplomats. Despite the fact that China had sent nearly 100,000 soldiers to the Western front to assist the Allies, the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Answer.com. "Twenty-one Demands." 14 May 2005. .

Buoye, Thomas and Bruce Denton. China: Adapting the Past Confronting the Future. Ann Arbor: Center for Chinese Studies, 2002.

Chou, Tse-tsung. The May Fourth Movement: Intellectual Revolution in Modern China. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1960.

Elleman, Bruce. Modern Chinese Warfare, 1795-1989. New York: Routledge, 2001.
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Ow Does Frantz Fanon Justify

Words: 2791 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96673842

Fanon considered in this sense that violence can be used by those people least attached to the values of the colonial society and with the fewest connections with the foreign settlers, as change can take place only "from the bottom up. The extraordinary importance of this change is that it is willed, called for, demanded," therefore felt at the lowest levels of the society, the peasantry. (Fanon, 1963, 35)

On a similar note is Sartre's approach to the role of the peasant in conducting the revolutionary movement. Unlike Marx, Sartre is keen in underlining the importance of the peasantry to the revolutionary effort. However, in Fanon's consideration of the peasants as the moving force of the revolution, there is a certain lack of coherence. In this sense, it can be noticed the fact that despite acknowledging the role of the least affected people in the society in terms of colonial…… [Read More]

References

Fanon, Frantz. The Wretched of the Earth. Trans. Constance Farrington. New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1963.

Mortimer, Robert. "The Algerian revolution in search of the African Revolution." The Journal of Modern African Studies. Vol. 8, no 3. 1970.

Perinbam, B. Marie. "Fanon and the Revolutionary Peasantry - the Algerian Case." The Journal of Modern African Studies, Vol. 11, No. 3. Sep., 1973, pp. 427-445.

Wright, Derek. "Fanon and Africa: A Retrospect." The Journal of Modern African Studies, Vol. 24, No. 4. Dec., 1986, pp. 679-689
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Piaf Pam Gems provides a view into

Words: 46193 Length: 125 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 73251446

in "Piaf," Pam Gems provides a view into the life of the great French singer and arguably the greatest singer of her generation -- Edith Piaf. (Fildier and Primack, 1981), the slices that the playwright provides, more than adequately trace her life. Edith was born a waif on the streets of Paris (literally under a lamp-post). Abandoned by her parents -- a drunken street singer for a mother and a circus acrobat father -- Edith learns to fend for herself from the very beginning. As a natural consequence of her surroundings, she makes the acquaintance of several ne'er do wells. She rises above the lifestyles of the girls she grows up with who prostitute themselves for a living in the hope that they will eventually meet a benefactor with whom they can settle. Edith has a talent for singing and she indulges this interest by singing loudly in the streets.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beauvoir, Simone de, and Parshley, H.M. The Second Sex. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993.pp. lv, 786

Eisenstein, Zillah R. The Radical Future of Liberal Feminism. The Northeastern Series in Feminist Theory. Northeastern University Press ed. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1986.pp. xi, 260

Engels, Fredrick. "The Development of Utopian Socialism." Trans. Lafargue, Paul. Marx/Engels Selected Works. Revue Socialiste. Ed. Basgen, Brian. Vol. 3. New York: Progress Publishers, 1880. 95-151.

Origins of the Family, Private Property, and the State. 1894. Retrieved April 10, 2003 from. http://csf.colorado.edu/psn/marx/Archive/1884-Family/
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Influence of No Child Left Behind on Black Male Graduate Rate

Words: 4430 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 9486254

Vinoba Vhabe

Vinoba Bhave

Throughout his life, Mahatma Gandhi gave emphasis to the notion that his twin principles of truth and nonviolence must be put in practice in every aspect of life as they have the strength to solve a number of human problems. His teachings were being practiced by his faithful disciples after achieving the political independence. The most prominent person in this regard is the leader and the spiritual heir of Gandhi, Vinoba Bhave (Bary, Hay, Weiler & Yarrow, 1958).

Vinoba Bhave is, thus, one of those great devout reformers of modern India whose selfless services have inspired the hearts of innumerable countrymen. At a very early age, Vinoba was determined to undertake a lifetime celibacy & selfless service to the needy. He was in search of a life in which he could synthesize both spirituality and practicality. When he discovered Gandhi, both of them worked for the…… [Read More]

References

Bary, T.D., Hay, S.N., Weiler, R., & Yarrow, A. (1958). Sources of Indian Tradition. New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved April 17, 2012, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100539926 

Bhave, Vinoba. (2009). In The Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved April 16, 2012, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117006628 

Mehta, S. (n.d.). Bhoodan-Gramdan Movement-50 Years: A Review. Retrieved April 19, 2012 from  http://www.mkgandhi-sarvodaya.org/vinoba/bhoodan.htm 

Muzumdar, H.T. (1952). Mahatma Gandhi Peaceful Revolutionary. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. Retrieved April 20, 2012, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=9283380
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Gothic Period Cultural and Construction

Words: 4930 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20154020



William of Occam formulated the principle of Occam's Razor, which held that the simplest theory that matched all the known facts was the correct one. At the University of Paris, Jean Buridan questioned the physics of Aristotle and presaged the modern scientific ideas of Isaac Newton and Galileo concerning gravity, inertia and momentum when he wrote:

...after leaving the arm of the thrower, the projectile would be moved by an impetus given to it by the thrower and would continue to be moved as long as the impetus remained stronger than the resistance, and would be of infinite duration were it not diminished and corrupted by a contrary force resisting it or by something inclining it to a contrary motion (Glick, Livesay and Wallis 107)

Thomas Bradwardine and his colleagues at Oxford University also anticipated Newton and Galileo when they found that a body moving with constant velocity travels distance…… [Read More]

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Dark Ages or Early Middle Ages Is

Words: 1254 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41504692

Dark Ages or Early Middle Ages is that historical time period of the Western Europe that came after the collapse of the West oman Empire in the fourth and fifth centuries. It ended when the period of the enaissance started in the 15th century. The western civilization adopted a number of its ideas and institutions from the unstable and tumultuous events of the Early Middle Ages. It won't be incorrect to state that the culture in West in fact experienced a revolution in the Middle Age. The most important reason why Middle Age can be considered advancement in the humanities is that its effects influenced the world greatly. The significance of this specific time period "has been increasingly recognized as scholarship based on newly published source material, archaeological findings, and studies of demographics and migration patterns presents more accurate and detailed analyses of events and trends" ("Middle Ages," 2013).

Even…… [Read More]

References

Charles-Edwards, T.M. (2000). Early Christian Ireland. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Dawson, C. (2003). The Making of Europe: An Introduction to the History of European Unity. London: The Catholic University of America Press.

Middle Ages from The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. (n.d.). Questia. Retrieved September 11, 2013, from  http://www.questia.com/read/1E1-MiddleAg/middle-ages 

Ridyard, S.J. (1999). Chivalry, Knighthood, and War in the Middle Ages. Sewanee, Tenn.: Univ. Of the South Press.
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Knowledge and Skills to Get

Words: 4345 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 46430675

It involves the replacement of rule of thumb gradually with science for the mechanical arts.

Mesopotamia

The existence of the two rivers i.e. Euphrates and Tigris gave this name Mesopotamia which means the land between rivers to the region. Agricultural revolution was begun by the people of this region in about ten thousand years ago. They domesticated animals and plants instead of hunting and gathering as was common in the time. Their crops were tended in houses built of mud-brick or reeds and clustered in villages (Hyman 138). Their grains were stored in the granaries that they built and their trade and account were recorded in a token system that they developed. There was a sudden change and growth in the civilization of the southern Mesopotamia between 3000 and 3500, with the main focus being in the cities of Ur and Uruk. Rendering of the old ways of agriculture less…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Badiru, Adedeji, Triple C. Model of Project Management: Communication, Cooperation, and Coordination. Oxon: CRC Press, 2008.

"History of Greece." History World. 5 Jun. 2000. 22 March. 2010.



Hyman, Kavett. "Mesopotamia, A Difficult but Interesting Topic." Social studies 70.3 (1979):
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History and Development of Master Builder and Design Build Tradition of Western Civilization

Words: 6891 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 11303212

Architecture through the Ages

Mesopotamia

Construction in ancient times is second only to agriculture-it reaches back as far as the Stone Age and possibly further (Jackson 4). Before the existence of master builders in design and construction the Code of Hammurabi (1795-1750 B.C.) referred to design and construction as a simple process (Beard, Loulakis and undrum (13). Hammurabi was the ruler of Babylon, the world's first metropolis and he codified his code of laws (Beard 13). This is the earliest example of a ruler introducing his laws publicly. The code regulated the organization of society including the extreme punishments for violating the law. The builder's work is addressed in the code, however faulty design and improper construction were viewed as one (13). Six specific laws address the builder. These laws are;

228. If a builder build a house for some one, and does not construct it properly, and the house…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Albert the Great." The Masonic Trowel. Web. 26 Mar. 2010. .

"Architecture and the Medieval Builder." Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia. Web. 26 Mar. 2010. .

"Basilica of Santa Maria Novella." Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia. Web. .

Beard, Jeffrey, Michael Loulakis, and Edward Wundrum. Design-Build:planning through Development. McGraw-Hill, 2001. Print.
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Historiographical Debate Into the Effects of Santa Anna's Reign in Mexico

Words: 4136 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56022046

Santa Anna Dictatorship

In his self-described revisionist biography Santa Anna of Mexico (2007), Will Fowler has courageously taken up the defense of the Mexico caudillo, fully aware that he is all but universally reviled in the historiography of the United States and Mexico. From the beginning, he made his intention clear to vindicate the reputation of a dictator whose "vilification has been so thorough and effective that the process of deconstructing the numerous lies that have been told and retold" is almost impossible.[footnoteRef:1] Timothy J. Henderson asserted that he had a great talent for exploiting and manipulating political divisions but none for governing a country. In U.S. history and popular culture, he has always been portrayed as a corrupt megalomaniac, the 'Napoleon of the West', responsible for the massacres at the Alamo and Goliad. As John Chasteen and James Wood put it, even his autobiography was an "extraordinary work of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"The Alamo" in William Dirk Raat (ed). Mexico from Independence to Revolution, 1810-1910. University of Nebraska Press, 1982, pp. 84-90.

Borneman, Walter R. Polk: The Man Who Transformed the Presidency and America. NY: Random House, 2009.

Eisenhower, John S.D. So Far from God: The U.S. War with Mexico, 1846-1848. NY: Random House, 2000.

Fehrenbach Timothy R. Fire and Blood. De Capo Press, 1995.
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Anatoly Gladilin's Moscow Racetrack Is a Powerful

Words: 1607 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 60286816

Anatoly Gladilin's Moscow Racetrack is a powerful melange of satire, intrigue, and political commentary. Gladilin paints poignant portraits of the characters that populate the Moscow track, lending insight into gambling strategy and psychology. But interspersed with these vignettes is historical information and political commentary. The protagonist is Igor Mikhailovich Kholmogorov, better known as "The Teacher." He is a historian at public school and his side job is betting on the horses. Likewise, his cronies: The Professional, Coryphaeus, and Dandy also have "track names" that separate them from their daily lives. They bicker and talk over their gambling strategies, discuss the features of horses, and do all they can to maximize winnings and minimize losses. A group of gangsters also frequent the tracks, and the Teacher has nicknamed them himself: Ilyusha the Vegetable Man, the Bakunian, Yurochka the Gas Man, Lard Lardych, Fat Fatych, and Paunch Paunchich. Gladilin uses comic relief…… [Read More]

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Respectable Army The Military Origins

Words: 1347 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 34413149

However, these poor, landless and mercenary men, despite the fact they worked for hire still frequently exhibited selfless behavior for their fellow soldiers in the face of adversity, such as at Valley Forge.

One of the most unique aspects of this book is its methodology. It attempts to integrate evidence about battles, armaments, military technology and the history of the early army into the greater social and political history of the revolution. However, it is not merely an analysis of battles and tactics. It is a truly integrative approach of social and military history. The dual backgrounds of Martin in history and Lender in military strategy enable them to merge what often are competing disciplines, namely the political struggles of why and how a nation goes to war, and the day-to-day struggles in fighting that war. Martin and Lender are also willing to highlight unflattering aspects of the early American…… [Read More]

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Terrorism Has a Long and Violent History

Words: 3383 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12639816

Terrorism has a long and violent history and incidents of terrorism have been recorded from at least 2,000 years ago. Acts of terrorism have included political assassinations, violent political revolutions, hijackings, skyjackings, and bombings intended to attract attention, shock, intimidate and instill fear. Before the 911 terror attacks the threat of terrorism, though always a potential danger, was of an episodic nature, and seemed to be under control. The devastating attacks on the orld Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, however, have brought terrorism to the center stage of world politics and exposed the vulnerability of soft civilian targets to a small but determined group of terrorists. The issue of terrorism and home security now dominates the foreign policy of most countries including the United States. The focus on terrorism has also forced people to think deeply about its root causes, which may have historical, cultural, political,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ali, Abdullah Yusuf. "The Holy Qur'an." Translation in English. Wordsworth Classic of World Literature. UK: Wordsworth Edition Limited: 2000

Chomsky, Noam. "Who are the Global Terrorists?" Z-Net. May 19, 2002. April 22, 2005. http://www.zmag.org/content/ForeignPolicy/chomskyglobeterr.cfm

Cohn, Marjorie. "Understanding, Responding to and Preventing Terrorism." Arab Studies Quarterly (ASQ) (2002): 25+.

Hoffman, Bruce. "Terrorism." Article in Encyclopedia Encarta. 2005. April 22, 2005. http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761564344/Terrorism.html
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Victor Hugo Romantic Writings of Victor Hugo

Words: 2912 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64431488

Victor Hugo

Romantic ritings of Victor Hugo

The romantic period was partly in reaction to the impact that the industrial revolution had on the psyches of artists of all stripes. The move toward an industrial culture had moved many people from the pastoral scenes of the country into the grungy hearts of the cities. Many of the people worked in the factories six days a week for many hours a day, or they worked in mines and other industries to support the industry in the cities. The response from the artistic community was to remind the public of two things. They wanted people to remember where they came from and they wanted to help people see the true emotion of life.

One of the most influential writers of the period was a young Frenchman who was known for his poetry early in his career (Halsall x), but who gained international…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Halsall, Albert W. Victor Hugo and the Romantic Drama. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998. Print.

Hugo, Victor. Selected Poems of Victor Hugo. Trans E.H. And A.M. Blackmore. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001. Print.

Hugo, Victor. Ruy Blas. Boston D.C. Heath & Co., Publishers, 1888. Print.
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Reagan & the 80s Movies

Words: 4752 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87633231

Many young people voted for Reagan as he represented rebellion against the authority figures in society but was a rebellion characterized by valiance and effectuated through skillful communication. The approval rating of Reagan was approximately 42% when 1982 began but dropped to the record low 35% later that same year. The U.S. entered a recession. If one is to set their focus upon obtaining a chance at being the President of the United States, then that individual must take a political stance and hold a view that is somewhat differential from the opposing party. In the case of Ronald Reagan, who had been a democrat for most of his life, it was the democratic party that he must debate against in the attempt to establish a better public platform that the opposing candidate. Ronald Reagan may be viewed as a 'come-lately' at the time he entered the political scene at…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Jordan, C. (2003) Movies and the Reagan Presidency: Success and Ethics. Praeger June, 2003.

McChesney, R.W. And Nichols, J. (2002) Our Media, Not Theirs: The Democratic Struggle against Corporate Media. Seven Stories Press, 2002.

Curry, Tom (2004) Ronald Reagan, 1911-2004: An Indefatibable optimist who set American on a Consdervative Course: MSNBC Online avaialble at  http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3638299/ 

Kashani, Tony (2004) Hollywood as an Agent of Hegemony: The War Film. Dissendent Voice Online available at  http://www.dissidentvoice.org/Aug04/Kashani0807.htm
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Progress' for the Philosophy of

Words: 1822 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57786859

Such events must be political in nature. The author alludes to the utilitarian aspect of monumental history with this quotation.

Of what use, then, is the monumentalistic conception of the past, engagement with the classic and rare of earlier times, to the man of the present? He learns from it that the greatness that once existed was in any event once possible and may thus be possible again; he goes his way with more cheerful step, for the doubt that once assailed him…has now been banished.

The practical use of history, then, is to serve as the inspiration and even in certain instances, the impetus for present action. Such history is "monumentalistic" when it details the lofty achievements of those before. Even if those particular achievements were not political in nature, although a great many of them were, the application of them within contemporary society would virtually have to have…… [Read More]

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Race and Reunion

Words: 1833 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73001280

ace and eunion

Briefly describe each of the three visions

Vision one: The reconciliationist vision -- this vision had its roots in the "process of dealing with the dead from so many battlefields, prisons, and hospitals," the author writes on page 2; and it also developed in ways prior to the process of econstruction; people were weary of war, and many Americans longed for a time of forgiving, in the Christian sense; vision two: The white supremacist vision -- this vision was manifest through terror, violence, and its legacy promotes a memory of the Civil War aftermath as one of segregation on southern terms; those of white supremacist / racist leanings would never consider giving in to a Constitutional mandate to allow all blacks freedom, the vote, and other equal rights; vision three: The emancipationist vision -- this includes much of what African-Americans remember about gaining their freedom, it also…… [Read More]

References

Blight, David W. Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory. Cambridge,

Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2001.

Wilson, Clyde. "War, reconstruction, and the end of the old republic." Society 33.6

(1996): 68-75.
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U S A Germany and England Were

Words: 1290 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82222066



Monet started his creative activity being young by making scratches and cartoons for a local frame-maker. He took classes of art from Eugene Budent, who taught him lessons of work on open air. Later he goes to Paris and enters the circle of Paris painters. Because he had no financial support he enters French army and after military service he continues painting with Pierre-Auguste enoir, Alfred Sisley, Edgar Degas, Gustave Caillebotte, Frederic Bazille who were experimenting and searching for a new style different from official canons of art.

Technique developed by Monet and other impressionists was unique and innovative. Monet realized that a painting which was made on the open air, has a unique freshness and liveliness, which is unable to be achieved when working in the workshop, where artist plans the painting beforehand. Monet advised artists to rebuild the impression of image perception substituting routine objects by some naive…… [Read More]

References

Hannoosh, M. Delacroix, E. 1995.Painting and the Journal of Eugene Delacroix. Princeton University Press

Jobert, B. 1998. Delacroix. Princeton University Press

Schapiro, M. 1997.Impressionism: Reflections and Perceptions. George Braziller

Forge, a. 1995.Monet Art Institute of Chicago (Artists in Focus).Harry N
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Anglicization and Americanization

Words: 476 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45583840

Anglicization and Americanization

While the revolutionary period in American history may have been perceived by many as the most glorious time in the history of colonial America, the truth is that there were still some people who did not believe in Independence and trusted the British. These were called the Imperialists and whether they were British themselves or simply the victims of colonial rule who subscribed to British way of life, they all viewed Britain as a benevolent force that was working for the so-called benefit of the British American colonies. British way of life, English values and customs, and their way of thinking was introduced in the colonies merely to keep all colonies glued together and loyal to British Monarchy. This is an interesting paradox. On the one hand, colonies were becoming more sophisticated and enlightened because of their adoption of British lifestyle and ideals, but on the other,…… [Read More]

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Devil Highway Twenty-Six Men Walked In Twelve

Words: 1241 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73483549

Devil Highway

Twenty-six men walked in, twelve got out to tell the story. The numbers are pretty good, considering these men were walking the Devil's Highway. Human trafficking is a phenomenon that testifies to the political and social inequities and injustices that currently plague Mexico and have since the conquest. Therefore, the existence of the Devil's Highway can be easily traced to the time of the Conquistadors. In the Florentine Codex, which is reproduced in part in Michael Johnson's eading the American Past, the Nahuatl account of the invasion illustrates the extent to which the Spaniards oppressed the natives with the use of brute force. The descriptions of the iron swords are followed soon by even more saddening depictions of the plunder. The Spaniards "went everywhere, scratching about in the hiding places, storehouses, places of storage all around. They took everything that pleased them…" (cited by Johnson, 2009 p. 30).…… [Read More]

References

Ewing, W.A. (2012). Opportunity and exclusion: A brief history of U.S. immigration policy. Immigration Policy Center. Retrieved online:  http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/docs/Opportunity_Exclusion_011312.pdf 

Johnson, Michael P. (2009). Reading the American Past, Vol. 1. Boston: Bedford's.

"Mexican-American War," (2012). PBS. Retrieved online:  http://www.history.com/topics/mexican-american-war 

Urrea, L.A. (2005). The Devil's Highway. Back Bay.