Grief Essays (Examples)

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Lewis Is Considered by Many

Words: 1181 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95780263



In showing the strength of his Christian faith and the rhetoric behind his revelations, Lewis uses the theme of his wife's death as a rhetorical devise. Lewis provides a rationale for the death of his wife in the context of grief. He argues, "[T]here's no denying that in some sense I 'feel better,' and with that comes at once a sort of shame, and a feeling that one is under a sort of obligation to cherish and foment and prolong one's unhappiness." Lewis within this passage concludes that prolonged grief after the death of his wife is a selfish act, because it is a pretense of "heroic love and tragedy." In putting forth this claim, Lewis carefully begins both his recovery and the explanation of his reaffirmation in Christianity. He cloaks this revelation in pessimism, "Praise in due order; of Him as the giver, of her as the gift. I…… [Read More]

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Combination of Modern and Postmodern Bereavement Theory Explain and Contrast

Words: 5009 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16035742

Postmodern Bereavement Theory

Bereavement is a universal observable fact as every human being experiences the loss of a loved one at some point in his/her life. However, every individual experiences it in a unique way. It is, without a doubt, an undeniable truth that to be human is to grieve. The passing away of a loved one can be difficult, irresistible and dreadful for any normal individual. When people are faced with such overwhelming situations, a majority of them especially the older adults get into the habit of enduring their loss with time. On the other hand, to forget and live without a loved one is not as easy for some individuals. It becomes difficult for these people to cope up with the grief-stricken situations as they experience a grief of greater concentration or time (Hansson & Stroebe, 2007). There are a number of theorists who have put forwarded their…… [Read More]

References

Bartholomew, K., & Horowitz, L.M. (1991). Attachment styles among young adults: A test o f a four-category model. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 61(2), 226-244. Retrieved from http://www.sfu.ca/psyc/faculty/bartholomew/attachmentpub_files/bh1991.pdf

Bonanno, G.A., Keltner, D., Holen, A., & Horowitz, M.J. (1995). When avoiding unpleasant emotions might not be such a bad thing: Verbal-autonomic response dissociation and midlife conjugal bereavement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,

69(5), 975-989.

Dent, A. (2005). Supporting the Bereaved: Theory and Practice. Counselling at Work, 22-23. Retrieved May 28, 2012 from http://www.bacpworkplace.org.uk/journal_pdf/acw_autumn05_ann.pdf
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Clinicians Offering Supportive Interventions a

Words: 3316 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30450397



The first on the recommended list is that the physician must acknowledge the grief that the person is feeling, and also acknowledge the fact that he, himself, may not know what the bereaved person is going through at that particular moment. He can directly express sympathy for the bereaved family, and he can talk freely about the deceased, and mention his name too, when talking about him. He can elicit questions about the exact circumstances in which the death had occurred, and he can ask direct questions about how the bereaved feels, and what he thinks about the death and how it has affected him. The don'ts to be followed by the physician or clinician are that the clinician must never adopt a casual or passive attitude, like for example, saying, 'call me if you want to talk'. He must also learn never to make statements that what happened was…… [Read More]

References

Ambrose, Jeannette. "Traumatic Grief, what we need to know as Trauma Responders" Retrieved from http://www.ctsn-rcst.ca/Traumaticgrief.html. Accessed 15 July, 2006

Christie, Grace. (2000) "Healing Children's Grief, surviving a parent's death from cancer"

Crisis Intervention" Retrieved at  http://www.minddisorders.com/Br-Del/Crisis-intervention.html . Accessed 14 July, 2006

Davidson, Joyce D. (1999) "Living with Grief, at work, at school, at worship"
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Heward Reference Is a Book Review of

Words: 3341 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1397380

Heward reference is a book review of Nancy Close's book Listening to Children: Talking With Children About Difficult Issues -- It is improper to reference a book review-unless of course you are also reviewing the book. I have included the proper reference

Perhaps the one of the worst fears of new parents is that their child may develop a serious disability such as mental retardation or other developmental disability. Arguably the most important influences on the development of any young child would be the child's parents and the sociocultural environment in which the child grows up (Skinner & Weisner, 2007). This socio-cultural environment includes the family environment, community environment, and geographic locale including all shared beliefs and assumptions about child development and about disabilities. However, one can argue that the most important aspect of the sociocultural environment that a child with a disability grows up in is the influence of…… [Read More]

References

Barnett, D., Clements, M., Kaplan-Estrin, M., & Fialka, J. (2003). Building new dreams:

Supporting parents' adaptation to their child with special needs. Infants & Young Children, 16(3), 184-200.

Bostrom, P.K., Broberg, M., & Hwang, P. (2010). Parents' descriptions and experiences of young children recently diagnosed with intellectual disability. Child: Care, Health and Development, 36(1), 93-100.

Bruce, E.J. (2000). Grief, trauma and parenting children with disability: cycles of disenfranchisement. Grief Matters: The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement, 13(2), 27-31.
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Bereavement the Role of Acute

Words: 3707 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27571803



In the case of the former of these groups, there is a demand for proper training and experience in helping family members face the practical realities imposed by the death of a loved one. Further, research demonstrates that many acute care settings are lacking in the capacity to manage these particular issues, failing particularly to make some of the most basic steps needs to help the bereaved face this difficult period. According to Murphy et al. (1997), a survey of area hospice facilities revealed that such settings were problematically deficient in the areas of preparation for bereavement. Accordingly, Murphy et al. report that "the facilities completed surveys about on-site services routinely offered by licensed hospice agencies. 55% of the homes sent sympathy cards after the patients death. 99% of the facilities did not provide materials to the family or primary caregiver on the grieving process or bereavement after the death.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Benoliel, J.Q. (1999). Loss and Bereavement Perspectives, Theories, Challenges. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 30(4), 263-272.

Birtwistle, J.; Payne, S.; Smith, P. & Kendrick, T. (2002). The role of the district nurse in bereavement support. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 38(5), 467-478.

Bunting-Perry, L.K. (2006). Palliative Care in Parkinson's Disease: Neuroscience Nursing Implications: Bereavement Care. Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, 38(2), 106-113.

Hanson, L.C.; Danis, M. & Garrett, J. (1997). What is wrong with end-of-life care? Opinions of bereaved family members. Journal of American Geriatric Society, 45(11), 1339-1344.
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Shore Case Study

Words: 4008 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31359343

Categories and Phases of Loss and Grief for Nancy

Diagnostic Statement for Nancy

Nancy is obese and reports feeling anxious and depressed. Nancy has gained 15 pounds does not sleep well, has low concentration ability and is forgetful. Nancy has a social phobia and exhibits some signs of paranoid schizophrenia. In addition, Nancy has a back injury, which contributes, to her general feeling of ill health and results in not getting the exercise she needs. Nancy is a chain smoker. Nancy feels that she has lost control of her life. Nancy's son Michael has asthma. It appears that Nancy's husband suffers from some type of behavior disorder and is likely somewhat mentally retarded.

DSM-IV-T (2000) Diagnosis

The multiaxial assessment includes analysis on the following five stated Axis:

(1) Axis 1: clinical disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, learning, motor skills and communication disorder

296.xx Major Depressive Disorder

301.0 Paranoid Personality Disorder

300.23…… [Read More]

References

Antonovsky, A. And Sourani, T. (1998) Family Sense of Coherence and Family Adaptation. Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 50. No. 1 Feb 1998. National Council on Family Relations. Retrieved from:  http://psych.wfu.edu/furr/362/Family%20Sense%20of%20Coherence%20Scale.pdf 

Connell, Cindi (2010) Multicultural Perspectives and Considerations Within Structural Family Therapy: The Premises of Structure, Subsystems and Boundaries. Rivier Academic Journal. Vol. 6. No. 2 Fall, 2010. Retrieved from:  http://www.rivier.edu/journal/ROAJ-Fall-2010/J461-Connelle-Multicultural-Perspectives.pdf 

Fischer, J. And Cocoran, K. (1994) Measures of Clinical Practice. Social Science. Retrieved from: http://books.google.com/books?id=y2C9YvSU53sC&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Ruiz, MA (nd) Transgenerational and Structural Family Therapy, An Analysis of Both Schools. Retrieved from:  http://miguelangelruiz.webs.com/Transgenerational%20and%20Structural%20Family%20Therapy.pdf
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Lament for a Son

Words: 1020 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4789406

Grief

The author of this report is asked to analyze and assess the work Lament For a Son as authored by Wolterstorff. Indeed, the author of that treatise exemplifies and shows the five stages of grief as defined and described by Elisabeth Kubler-oss. The author of this report will briefly cover the Kubler-oss framework and how it manifests in the Wolterstorff offering. Further, the author of this report will describe the manner in which Wolterstorff found joy after his loss. Also, there will be a description and a depiction of what death means when it comes to the common Christian narrative. Finally, the author will cover how the hope of a resurrection plays a role in the comforting of Wolterstorff. While the death of his son is shown to have hit Wolterstoff very hard as he offers his thoughts, it is clear that he eventually finds at least some solace…… [Read More]

References

Aitken, R. (1968). The Holy Bible. New York: Arno Press.

Grief.com. (2015). Five Stages of Grief by Elisabeth Kubler Ross & David Kessler. Grief.com - Because LOVE Never Dies. Retrieved 17 July 2015, from http://grief.com/the-five-stages-of-grief/

Wolterstorff, N. (1987). Lament for a son. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans.
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Surviving the Death Experience Rituals

Words: 980 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51568187

This particular notion of reconnection with lost loved ones helps many people recover from the loss of loved ones. On the other hand, those who do not believe in religion or in any gods might argue that such beliefs are delusional and actually interfere with a more realistic acceptance of death for what it actually is. Nevertheless, it is difficult to argue that religion provides a valuable coping mechanism for many people in connection with death, irrespective of whether or not it is actually an accurate representation of reality.

The ole of Grief Counseling

Sometimes, people have a particularly hard time coping with the loss of loved ones, especially in circumstances where that loss is unexpected (such as the loss of a child), where it occurs much earlier than is ordinarily the case, or where the survivors actually witnessed the traumatic death of a loved one. Understandably, all of these…… [Read More]

References

Deits, Bob. Life after Loss: A Practical Guide to Renewing Your Life after Experiencing

Major Loss. New York: Bantam. 2004.

Henslin, James M. Essentials of Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. Boston: Allyn

and Bacon. 2006.
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Genetic Counseling Dealing With Its

Words: 2480 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92171465

"Accurate descriptions of sex chromosome differences are critical, the decisions potentially regrettable, and the long-term outcomes devastating if a termination is based on the misinformation," that the patient later discovers to be misinformation for instance, "that any of these conditions is comparable to Down's Syndrome" (Biesecker r 2001:2) Conversely, it is also important not to minimize the odds of a potentially fatal genetic condition like Tay Sachs disease.

Providers are obliged to obtain useful up-to-date information and to ensure parents have adequate opportunity to consider their decision with the help of an experienced healthcare provider, preferably in medical genetics, and if necessary, a counselor who is attuned to the cultural assumptions and needs of the couple's population group, and religious beliefs. Certain populations might have a different view and understanding of the real difficulty of raising a child suffering from a heritable disorder, or even the concept of heritability of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baker, Schuette & Uhlmann. (Eds.) (1998). A guide to genetic counseling.

Beery, Theresa a & Kerry a. Schooner. (Nov 2004). "Family History: The First Genetic

Screen." Nurse Practioner. Retrieved 23 Jun 2007 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3958/is_200411/ai_n9469874/pg_5

Biesecker, Barbara. (24 Feb 2001). "Prenatal diagnoses of sex chromosome conditions:
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Counseling Model a Practical Pastoral Counseling Model

Words: 3760 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43723048

Counseling Model

A Practical Pastoral Counseling Model

Counseling Setting

Where Will Counseling Take Place?

oundaries for Safety and Security

Relational Style

Relational/Communication Style

Structure/Strategy

Sessions

Summation

Supportive Feedback

God's Riches at Christ's Expense

Annotated ibliography

A Practical Pastoral Counseling Model

This is an overview of the counseling position that I will take when working with clients/parishioners. I realize that this cannot encompass every eventuality that may occur during a counseling session, but it should be comprehensive enough to account for most of the possibilities that present themselves. I acknowledge that this is also the treatise of someone who is going to be practicing as a pastor first and a counselor second, therefore the relationship of a shepherd to his assigned sheep is the most important consideration in all of this. Also, the counseling relationship that a pastor enjoys with a parishioner is not as extensive as that between a patient…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anger

Carlson, Dwight L. 2000. Overcoming hurts and anger. Eugene: Harvest House. ISBN: 0736901965

This book is a real help when dealing with anger. The author gives you steps on how to prevent your anger and deal with past anger in a Christian manner. He gives examples of mishandled anger, biblical principles about anger, and how to handle anger in a Christ-like way.

LaHaye, Tim and Bob Phillips. 2002. Anger is a choice. Grand Rapids: Zondervan. ISBN: 0310242835
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Counseling Sessions

Words: 1589 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14135301

Bereavement-Counseling Group

Bereavement group

The bereavement groups are social gatherings that most people need and belong to since there is no way to tell when bereavement may come by. However, these groups come in handy when such unforeseen sad situations come by and the affected individuals need support emotionally to go through the sad times. In as much as it is a voluntary group, in most parts people find that it is of great help to be engaged in one of these groups always.

While designing a bereavement-counselling group, there are several ways that can be used to market or publicize it. The first would be to have a brochure that the potential members are served with within the community that will be targeted. This brochure is a sure way of having the individuals who received it have a point of reference as frequently as possible incase they need details…… [Read More]

References

American Cancer Society, (2014). Coping with Loss of a Loved One. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/emotionalsideeffects/griefandloss/coping-with-the-loss-of-a-loved-one-intro-to-grief-mourning-bereavement

Carneley B.K., et.al., (2006). The Time Course of Grief Reactions to Spousal Loss: Evidence From a National Probability Sample. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from  http://www.psychology.sunysb.edu/cwortman-/papers/Carnelle_Wortman_Bolger_Burke_2006_article.pdf 

Johnson J., (2010). Honoring the Memory of a Deceased Loved One. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/judith-johnson/the-power-of-bearing-witn_1_b_736710.html 

Peck and Stephanics, (1987). Learning to say Goodbye: Dealing with Death and Dying. Library of Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from http://books.google.co.ke/books?id=EjtY2WtamJcC&pg=PA53&lpg=PA53&dq=outcomes+for+Learning+how+to+say+goodbye&source=bl&ots=LeIlhpSwap&sig=9bG0SBXyVPoewYTUAhpyE_rwwms&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ZJwgVPrCG4HnygOE84HYAg&ved=0CGoQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=outcomes%20for%20Learning%20how%20to%20say%20goodbye&f=false
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Joan Didion in Several Films

Words: 2007 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46628797

"You can use it if you want to," he said. The horror of Dunne's death is that it fixes the deceased in time. Frustrated and full of self-reproach, Didion is left to look and keep on looking for fresh possibilities in the past: missed clues, wrong turns, alternate endings, places to correct the record, to, as she says, "get it right."

Finally, she realizes that it is okay if she does not "get it right." It is okay to be wrong. It is okay not to be her infallible self. "Life changes fast. Life changes in an instant. You sit down to dinner and life as you know it ends." This is where the studies of Erikson and Gould come into play. Didion is not alone. More than likely, most of the people who read her book will be in the same situation with someone close person at one time…… [Read More]

References

Didion, J. 2005. Year of Magical Thinking. New York: Alfred Knopf.

Erickson, E., and Erickson, J. (1998) the life cycle completed. New York: Norton.

Gould, R.L. 1972. The phases of adult life: a study in the development psychology.

Journal of Psychiatry. Vol. 129., no. 5.
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Personal Statement for Application to

Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92052507



As rewarding as that experience was, not all of my work at the adoption agency was as satisfying. Most people understand that any adoption process -- especially when it occurs internationally -- is a long and complicated process that must deal with significant layers of bureaucracy. Success is, unfortunately, not necessarily guaranteed. But when adopting families are only a few weeks away from receiving their new children, we all begin to assume that adoptions will go through and we will have helped create many new families. Thus, it was especially devastating for all of us at the agency, not to mention the families involved, when two weeks before a new batch of Chinese children was meant to arrive, the Chinese government decided against letting the children leave the country. In hindsight, the reasons are unimportant; no rational explanation could have assuaged the grief of the families who had expectantly and…… [Read More]

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Film I Recently Saw One

Words: 758 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86792828

They become part of our personality and the way in which interact with others and feel about ourselves. When one of these connections is lost by means of death, it is painful, because the connections are important to us. Like the connections we form in life, the loss of these connections also shape us in an important way. The way and the time of death, as well as the specific person who dies, becomes as much part of us and our personality as the living connections we make. This means that we never really "let go." Instead, we integrate what the death means to us as part of the events in life that shape our personality. It is therefore important to hold on, in a sense, to what the person meant to us, and how the death affected us. This is an improtant part of life; being aware of how…… [Read More]

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Proust and Narrativity We Read Marcel Proust's

Words: 3396 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10806230

Proust and Narrativity

We read Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time - that greatest work of his the title of which is more commonly translated as Remembrance of Things Past both because of the simple beauty of his language and because of the power that he has to find our own lost pieces of time. For while he makes us interested in his past because of his marvelous descriptions of his own childhood and we become entranced by his memories because of the elegant and lush way that he conveys them to us, we also read the book because it seems to offer to us a type of magic, seems to serve as a talisman to all pasts, not just his alone. This paper examines the narrative structure of In Search of Lost Time and the ways in which that structure, joined to Proust's language and symbolism, can help…… [Read More]

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Grieving Process and Models

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11939851

Grieving

Losing a loved one is a major event that every individual experiences because death is a normal part of life. The process through which an individual approaches death or grieves after losing a loved one is usually affected by his/her social environment. The social environment affects this process through familial, societal, and cultural factors. One of the most common issues in today's social work practice helping clients deal with the loss of a loved one. Consequently, understanding the grieving process and models is an important competency for social workers because of the likelihood of handling clients who need to learn and know how to grieve with the loss of a loved one. An understanding of the grieving process helps the social worker to understand how to address the needs of a grieving individual and his/her family. However, social workers need to develop self-care strategies since handling such individuals can…… [Read More]

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Tan Amy the Joy Luck

Words: 910 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96707291

One is virtually provided with the chance to become 'friends' with the narrators as the respective individual realizes that he or she is being told personal things and that it appears that the story-tellers actually go as far as to consider that they are telling their stories to someone that they have a special relationship with.

Amy Tan is putting across averly's personal feelings to readers as she expresses her understanding of her mother's thinking. "My mother believed you could be anything you wanted to be in America. You could open a restaurant. You could work for the government and get good retirement. You could buy a house with almost no money" (Tan 132). hen looking at things from the narrator's perspective, it almost feels impossible not to sympathize with averly and not to consider that it would be essential for you, as a reader, to support her by using…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Baldwin, James, "Sonny's Blues," (Klett International, 31.01.2000 )

Bierce, Ambrose, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," (Forgotten Books, 1948)

Selvadurai, Shyam, "Story-Wallah: Short Fiction from South Asian Writers," (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 07.04.2005 )

Tan, Amy, "The Joy Luck Club," (Penguin 2006)
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Child and Adolescent Counseling

Words: 1404 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73325937

1989-1990 antidepressant medications were not approved for use on nine and ten-year-olds and this poor kid is put on antidepressants immediately after his father dies. Then of course the kid experiences mood swings which get worse and he is eventually diagnosed with bipolar disorder (of course no one considers that a fairly common side effect of antidepressant medications is mania). Secondly, we have a troubled young man that comes from an unstable home who is immediately tossed into grief therapy right after the death of his father. I cannot think of a more obvious way to tell a nine-year-old he is sick- that there is something wrong with the way he feels. So I guess no nine-year-old ever went through such an incident without professional help-I mean what did kids who experience tragedies do before we had professional counselors? I guess they all went crazy and then grew up as…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.-text revision). Washington, DC: Author.

Golden, L.B. (2002). Case studies in child and adolescent counseling. Columbus, OH: Prentice Hall.

Sadock, B.J. & Sadock, V.A., (2007). Kaplan and Sadock's synopsis of psychiatry:

Behavioral sciences/clinical Psychiatry (10th edition). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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Race Class & Gender Color-Blind

Words: 1805 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32893564

For example, one of the interesting points that grabbed my attention was Dill's discussion of gender relations among African slaves. Slave men and women had a more egalitarian relationship than free white men and women. That is because slave men did not possess the power and authority of free men. So, power is inherently corrupting? At least, this is what Dill's description of gender relations in antebellum America suggest.

I wish, as a professor of sociology, Dill could have made more direct relations with the present (describing history just for the sake of history is the job of historians). I also wish, she could have allotted as much space to the story of Chinese-Americans that she does to White, African-American, and Chicano families. But I still admired this essay because it powerfully tells how society often subjects women to double or triple burdens. In colonial and antebellum America, the society…… [Read More]

References

Andersen, M.L, & Collins, P.H. (2010) Race, Class & Gender: An Anthology, 7th Edition. Wadsworth Publishing.
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Hamlet's Emotional State the Oxford

Words: 2374 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43640164

He questions whether he should try to clear the court of corruption or just give up and end his life now. It is this emotional doubt that drives Hamlet to act deranged at times, but he overcomes it, and almost manages to answer the difficult questions posed in his life. In Act V, when calm returns, Hamlet repents his behavior (V, ii, 75-78) (Lidz, 164).

In Lidz's book Freud is quoted as saying "that if anyone holds and expresses to others an opinion of himself such as this [Hamlet's "Use every man after his desert, and who shall escape whipping?"], he is ill, whether he is speaking the truth whether he is being more or less unfair to himself." Though Hamlet has proved his intellectual stability, he is quite obviously emotionally "ill."

This emotional illness and uncertainty is why Hamlet procrastinates in the killing of Claudius. On his way to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Babcock, Weston. A Tragedy of Errors. Purdue Research Foundation 1961.

Charlton, Lewis. The Genesis of Hamlet. Kenniket Press, Port Washington, NY 1907.

Elliot, T.S. "Hamlet and His Problems." Sacred Woods. 1920.

Leavenworth, Russel E. Interpreting Hamlet: Materials for analysis Chandler Publishing CO, San Francisco 1960.
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Throned in Splendor Deathless O

Words: 1437 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41650743



The poems Catullus wrote to the woman Lesbia are among his best known. How would you characterize their affair?

Catallus describes a conflicted and stormy affair with the women of Lesbia. Sexual tension is evident in his poems, which have a strong erotic content. Therefore, his affairs were passionate and physical.

If the gender roles were reversed and the woman were the narrator, do you think this series of poems would read differently? Explain.

The poems would read differently not because their content would have changed but because they would subvert social norms. As a male, Catallus is allowed, almost expected to write such explicit details about his physical affairs including references to love and hatred. Females would have been more subtle because of the widespread social persecution they might suffer if they admitted to promiscuity or tumultuous romantic interludes especially with married people.

Catullus ends up calling his lady…… [Read More]

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Setting the Stage for the Group Psychological

Words: 4820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96691655

Setting the stage for the group

Psychological intervention might be most efficient when females start modification by leaving the abuser and get in a shelter. Shelters are an essential resource for victims because they offer females and kids security and link them with social, legal, and financial resources (Dutton, 1992). Furthermore, battered females in shelters have a greater threat for PTSD than those who do not look for shelter (Jones et al., 2001). Provided the problems connected with PTSD, these signs might disrupt victims' capability to successfully utilize resources made to enhance their security once they leave the shelter (Foa, Cascardi, Zollner, & Feeny, 2000).

Unlike various other PTSD victims, damaged ladies in shelters deal with continuous security issues. Numerous of their viewed dangers are genuine (Foa et al., 2000). For that reason, conventional PTSD therapies that include exposure are contraindicated, as habituation to feared stimulations might enhance their danger…… [Read More]

References

Baer, R.A. (Ed.). (2006). Mindfulness-based treatment approaches: Clinician's guide to evidence base and applications. New York: Academic Press.

Bagshaw, D., Chung, D., Couch, M., Lilburn, S. And Wadham, B. (2000), Reshaping Responses to Domestic Violence: Final Report, University of South Australia.

Beauchamp, T.L., & Childress, J.F. (2001). Principles of biomedical ethics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford.

Betan, E.J., & Stanton, A.L. (1999). Fostering ethical willingness: Integrating emotional and contextual awareness with rational analysis. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 30, 295-301.
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Fictional Short Story in Story

Words: 663 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23001558

" As the reader soon discovers, this heart trouble wasn't physical; rather, her trouble was related to personal unhappiness in her marriage. The heart disease as not being a physical condition is once again reinforced at the very end of the story when the author writes, "When the doctors came they said she had died of heart disease -- of joy that kills." However, the reader is well aware by this time that she is experiencing despair knowing that her husband is still alive rather than joy upon his return to her life.

Likewise, "The Storm" involves a character vs. society conflict. This time the conflict deals with the loss of passion in marriage and is perhaps indicative of Chopin's own extramarital affair. For the reminder of a lost passion, Calixta is visited by an old lover while her lover is away as illustrated by the lines, "The contact of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kate Chopin. "Story of an Hour."

Kate Chopin. "The Storm."

"Kate Chopin." Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Chopin
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Fiction Analysis of Passage From

Words: 1309 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95964709



Analysis of passage from The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Other Stories by Carson McCullers (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1951; rpt. 1971), pp.3-5

Carson McCullers' short story "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe" is set in a town that is immediately established as remote, rural, and Southern: it is located near a cotton mill, there are peach trees all over the area, and there is only a single church. Even the buses are three miles away, which suggest the stranded and isolated nature of the residents. The main street is only two miles long, and there is "nothing whatsoever to do" during the long, hot summers. Even the nearest train stop (the significantly named 'Society' City) is far away. The largest building looks lonely and is boarded up completely. This large building, half-painted and left unfinished becomes a kind of metaphor for the town, as well as the woman…… [Read More]

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Robert Frost Poems Stopping by

Words: 2878 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18310667

One study published in the American Psychiatric Association found that "PTSD has been shown to predict poor health not only in veterans of the 1991 Gulf ar but also in veterans of orld ar II and the Korean ar. Our study extends these findings in a group of active duty soldiers returning from recent combat deployment to Iraq, confirming the strong association between PTSD and the indicators of physical health independent of physical injury" (Hoge, Terhakopian, Castro, Messer & Engel, 2007). From this study one can certainly glean that PTSD has a somatic component to it, or at least there is a prevalence in which persons afflicted with PTSD also suffer from physical health problems. One can also assume that the somatic component was downplayed or overlooked in prior studies, as most treatments for PTSD do not seem to address the physical aspect of the disorder.

To elaborate on this…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cooper, M. (2008). The Facts are Friendly. Therapy Today.net. Retrieved from http://www.therapytoday.net/article/15/8/categories/

Frost, R. (1923). Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening. New Hampshire. Retrieved from  http://www.ketzle.com/frost/snowyeve.htm .

Gelso, C., Fretz, B. (2001). Counseling Psychology Second Edition. Orlando, FL:

Harcourt, Inc.
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Loss Are Common Concepts in Poetry That

Words: 1431 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96861109

loss are common concepts in poetry that have been explored by men and women alike, across time and across cultural boundaries. Two such poets are Louise Labe, a French, Renaissance poet and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, a New Spanish nun and Baroque poet. In Sonnet 23 by Labe and Sonnet 165 by Cruz, issues of love, loss, and impermanence are explored through imagery and tone.

In Sonnet 23, Labe attempts to understand why her lover no longer finds her attractive or no longer wants to have a relationship with her. Labe asks, "What good is it to me if long ago you/eloquently praised my golden hair, compared to my eyes and beauty to the flare/of two suns where, you say, love bent the bow, sending the darts that needled you with grief?" In the sonnet, the narrator claims that she was once compared to the sun, which is…… [Read More]

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Alcohol vs Coffee Literary Reaction The Sweet

Words: 571 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19617674

Alcohol vs. coffee: Literary reaction

"The sweet Poison of the Treacherous Grape/....Drowning our very Reason and our Souls." The 18th century marked the beginning of what would come to be known as the neoclassical era of art and literature. It was the era of satire, marked by a belief in reason over emotion, an age which prized what was artificial, man-made and constructed over what was natural and instinctive. It was also the era of coffee and the coffee house. In this poem, coffee is celebrated as a beverage that sharpens the intellect, rather than dulls it like alcohol, the 'poison' that drowns reason. Throughout the poem, a dichotomy of coffee vs. alcohol is created. The values of the Age of Enlightenment are exemplified in this contrast, as well as many of the literary features of the era, including rhyming couplets, metrical verse, and poems that 'say' what they mean…… [Read More]

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Political Theory

Words: 2505 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10334450

Gorgias, Plato addresses the Sophists and shows Socrates facing off against several of them in a discussion of justice. As can be seen from this dialogue, different Sophists taught somewhat different doctrines. In general, though, the Sophists considered the nature of law and whether law could be viewed as something objective, a scientific certainty to be applied to the world. Essentially, the Sophists found that there was no way to know whether there could be such a law or not and that therefore there was no reason to seek it. Later Sophists argued that there is no real "justice" or "right" and that these are only names applied to local and changing conventions. They further argued that the only real authority in the world is force. Thus the law is what can be imposed by force in a given society, which is the position Callicles takes in this dialogue. Plato…… [Read More]

Reference

Plato (1987). Gorgias (tr. D.J. Zeyl). Indianapolis: Hackett.
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Case Assessment of Antwone Fisher Story

Words: 1830 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50160905

Antwone Fisher Story

Antwone Fisher was a young black man with a disruptive family history. His emotional development was severely affected as he matured, which created situations and difficult choices for the first 25 years of his life. The middle child in a family of foster children, Antwone never knew his father, and was abandoned by his mother into the foster care system at the age of two. At the time he was given to the 'system' his mother was a prostitute, or at least a bar made who rarely stayed in an employed status for a long period of time. It could be assumed that she never returned for her first born son, to retrieve him from the foster care system because of her own unstable living conditions. As a result, Antwone became part of a religious, but abusive foster family where he endured the degradation of beatings, threats,…… [Read More]

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Counseling the Broken Hearted -

Words: 3946 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57065322

" In the process, one learns to see oneself as strong and resilient, courageous, and empowered. Whether the individual can get up and go on and have a happy life after the loss depends on how the person views self

Is he or she a victim or a survivor? A strong person making spiritual progress or weak and debilitated? Whiting & Bradley (2007) argue that there must be an outcome for every loss. Whether the outcome is "reconciliation" or "vulnerability" or "victimization" depends on successful and positive identity reconstruction.

It used to be believed that the grieving individual had to achieve detachment from the person who had died. This was Freud's theory, that "grieving people need to break free from the deceased, let go of the past and reassert their individualism by charting a new course for life.

A healthy grief experience, according to Freud [was] one in which the…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, R.A. (2006). Immunity and grief. Townsend Letter: The Examiner of Alternative Medicine, 276, 128.

Briggs, C.A. And Pehrsson, D. (2008). Use of bibliotherapy in the treatment of grief and loss: A guide to current counseling practices. Adultspan Journal, 7 (1), 32-43.

Bush, H.K. (2007). Grief work: After a child dies. The Christian Century, 124 (25), 36-40.

Care of the elderly - bereavement: An essential guide (2006). The Practitioner (June 29), 22-29.
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Assessment Process

Words: 3434 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42011974

therapy is usually applied in cases such as the one exhibited by Kong, following the loss of a loved one. The procedure is outlined below:

The Semi-Structured Clinical Interview

The informal assessment of individuals faced with the effects of the loss of a loved one such as Kong's case is the semi structured interview. This approach allows the therapist to classify victims according to the symptoms that they exhibit. The approach allows for the recording of changes in profile symptoms demonstrated over time. The information below should be collected from a client.

One's bio-data

The mental illness history of the family

Ones medical history

Any past visits or interactions with a psychiatrist

One's social history

Varying aspects of one's specific information should be collected regarding the loss of a loved one

There is need to focus the interview details on the secondary and primary…… [Read More]

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Ordinary People Intervention Family Dynamics

Words: 4439 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57218799

They have grandparents who visit them during the holidays. However, for the most part family members deal with their problems as individuals, not as a family unit.

Information provided by the family is an important source of information about the family. However, one cannot ignore outside sources of information as well. For instance, the worker may contact the school, neighbors, or others who are involved with the family to examine factors that may influence the current situation. The assessment plan will involve contacting the school to find out about Conrad's performance in terms of grades, attendance and overall performance.

Systemic Goals

The case of the Jarretts is complex, with many individual goals that must be completed on the way to resolution of the systemic problems. In this case, the identified patient is Conrad, as he was the one who tried to commit suicide. The goal of family therapy is the…… [Read More]

References

Bowen Center for the Study of the Family. (2010). Bowen Theory. Retrieved April 13, 2010

from http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/theory.html

Missouri Department of Social Services. (2007). Child Welfare Manual. Retrieved April 13,

2010 from http://www.dss.mo.gov/cd/info/cwmanual/section7/ch1_33/sec7ch25.htm
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Theory -- Horotwitz & Bartholomew

Words: 4058 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33183152



c. Other theorists (Modern Attachment Theories)

Upon the establishment and strengthening of Bowlby and Ainsworth's Attachment Theory, other theorists have developed new studies which either tested the theory or sought to apply it in different contexts or scenarios. Inevitably, most scenarios and contexts that new theorists and psychology researchers took is the path to explaining grief and bereavement. Others, however, have centered on specific aspects of the theory and sought to expound and/or test it, as Ainsworth did when Bowlby was still in the process of strengthening his attachment theory.

One such study was conducted by Schore and Schore (2008), which explored the emotion regulation aspect of the theory. In their study, the authors realized the potential of attachment theory in developing a "therapeutic intervention" from which coping on the loss of the attachment figure would be a healthier process for the individual. The authors shifted from the issue of…… [Read More]

References

Ainsworth, M. (1984). "Attachment across the life span." Bulletin of New York Academy of Medicine.

Ainsworth, M. And J. Bowlby. (1991). "An ethological approach to personality development." American Psychologist, Vol. 46, No. 4.

Bartholomew, K. And L. Horowitz. (1991). "Attachment styles among young adults: a test of a four-category model." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 61, No. 2.

Bartholomew, K. And P. Shaver. (1998). In Attachment theory and close relationships. J. Simpson and W. Rholes (Eds.). NY: Guilford Press.
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Close Scrutiny of Books Journal

Words: 9042 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21005672

2) states:

An eligible employee shall be entitled to a total of seven days of leave because of the death of a parent, spouse, son, daughter, or person for whom the employee serves as designated representative... If the deceased died in the line of duty as a member of the uniformed services. Such leave is intended to permit the employee to prepare for or attend the burial ceremony of the deceased member of the uniformed services and may be paid or unpaid leave.

Conversely, however, the United States Federal government presently has no laws in place to similarly (or otherwise, in comparable and appropriate ways) formally acknowledge and honor the passing of federal government personnel other than military personnel.

According to U.S. Code Title 5, Part III; Subpart E; Chapter 63; Subchapter II (2005), the federal government does in fact authorize, according to three separate sections of Title 5: (1)…… [Read More]

References

Acuff, J. (c2004). The relationship edge in business: Connecting with customers and colleagues when it counts. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Andrus, P. (2005). Grief in the workplace. Martin & Castille. Retrieved February 3, 2005 at http://www.mourning.com/your_grief_workplace.html.

Banusiewics, J.D. (2004). Customs of military funerals reflect history, tradition.

United States Department of Defense. Retrieved January 31, 2005, at http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Jun2004/n06102004_200406106.html.
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Older Americans Experience Spousal Bereavement

Words: 1803 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70988413

hile sadness and grief are possibly the most commonly accepted and expected emotions, normal responses to bereavement can be varied, thus individual differences in response can make a diagnosis of pathological response to bereavement difficult (Pachana pp).

orks Cited

Cearlock, Dianne M.; Laude-Flaws, Maribeth. (1997 October). Stress, immune function, and the older adult - Successful Aging in America, Part 7

Medical Laboratory Observer. Retrieved July 22, 2005 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3230/is_n10_v29/ai_20076531

Gray, Francine du Plessix. (2000, June 22). The ork of Mourning.

American Scholar. Retrieved July 23, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library eb sit.

Gupta, Rashimi. (2002, June 22). Chinese cultural dimensions of death, dying, and bereavement:

focus group findings. Journal of Cultural Diversity. Retrieved July 22, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library eb site.

Khin, Ni A.; Sunderland, Trey III. (2000 January). Bereavement in Older Adults:

Biological, Functional and Psychological Consequences

Psychiatric Times. Retrieved July 22, 2005 at http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/p000147.html

Older Adults and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cearlock, Dianne M.; Laude-Flaws, Maribeth. (1997 October). Stress, immune function, and the older adult - Successful Aging in America, Part 7

Medical Laboratory Observer. Retrieved July 22, 2005 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3230/is_n10_v29/ai_20076531

Gray, Francine du Plessix. (2000, June 22). The Work of Mourning.

American Scholar. Retrieved July 23, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web sit.
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Mourning and Melancholia the Father of Psychoanalysis

Words: 1252 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18254605

Mourning and Melancholia," the "father of psychoanalysis" meditated on how the human psyche deals with loss. While melancholia and mourning share many of the same surface traits, the two are very different.

Mourning," he wrote, "is regularly the reaction to the loss of a loved person." Freud believed that the normal way to deal with grief is to mourn and after a period of time, the loss will be overcome. If anything interferes with mourning, the result can be damaging.

Melancholia, on the other hand, is identified by Freud as a pathological illness, which results from an inability to recover from a loss and return to normalcy. Therefore, "the complex of melancholia behaves like an open wound," a wound that will not heal.

Douglas Crimp, an art critic, used Freud's essay in promoting AIDS activism. In 1989, Crimp wrote and essay of his own, titled "Mourning and Militancy" which implied…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Freud's Collected Papers. "Mourning and Melancholia." 1917.

Crimp, Douglas. "Mourning and Militancy." 1989.

Archer, John. The Nature of Grief. 1998.