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Health Care Disparity in Maryland

Words: 18449 Length: 67 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 96057578



Figure 1 portrays the state of Maryland, the location for the focus of this DR.

Figure 1: Map of Maryland, the State (Google Maps, 2009)

1.3 Study Structure

Organization of the Study

The following five chapters constitute the body of Chapter I: Introduction

Chapter II: Review of the Literature

Chapter III: Methods and Results

Chapter IV: Chapter V: Conclusions, Recommendations, and Implications

Chapter I: Introduction

During Chapter I, the researcher presents this study's focus, as it relates to the background of the study's focus, the area of study, the four research questions, the significance of the study, and the research methodology the researcher utilized to complete this study.

Chapter II: Review of the Literature in Chapter II, the researcher explores information accessed from researched Web sites; articles; books; newspaper excerpts; etc., relevant to considerations of the disparity in access to health care services between rural and urban residence in Maryland…… [Read More]

Potter, S. (2002) Doing Postgraduate Research. London: Sage.

Qualitative research: Approaches, methods, and rigour, (2008, Nov. 7). Microsoft PowerPoint Qualitative Research AdvC08 RS.PPT. Retrieved March 10, 2009 from www.unimaas.nl/bestand.asp?id=11629

Wolvovsky, Jay. (2008). Health disparities: Impact on Business and Economics Summit. Maryland's healthcare at a glance. The Heart of Community Health Baltimore Medical Syste. Retrieved March 10, 2009 at  http://dhmh.maryland.gov/hd/pdf/2008/oct08/Jay_Wolvovsky.pdf
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Healthcare and Information Technologies Nursing Colleges' Vital Course Offerings

Words: 1866 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36854286

Nursing Health Care Informatics

"…At the beginning of the 21st century, nursing informatics has become a part of our professional activities…[and has] advanced the field of nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as a science…" (Saba, 2001, 177).

Nursing Health Care informatics relate to and address technology and other cutting edge issues of great interest in the healthcare field. According to the AMIA, Nursing Informatics is the "…science and practice (that) integrates nursing, its information and knowledge, with management of information and communication technologies to promote the health of people, families, and communities worldwide." New and relevant knowledge presented in the genre of informatics helps to empower nurses and other healthcare practitioners to deliver the most effective patient-center care possible. This paper presents several informatics in the belief that applying healthcare technologies and practices that are genuinely progressive and helpful to today's nurse is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AMIA (2009) Working Group Nursing Informatics. Retrieved March 9, 2014, from  http://www.amia.org .

An, J.Y., Hayman, L.L., Panniers, T., and Carty, B. (2007). Theory Development in Nursing

And Healthcare Informatics. A Model explaining and Predicting Information and Communication Technology Acceptance by Healthcare Consumers. Advances in Nursing Science, 30(3), E37-E49.

Cipriano, P.F. (2011). The Future of Nursing and Health IT. Nursing Economics, 29(5).
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Embracing the Future of Healthcare

Words: 2461 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91244902

HEALTHCAE & INFOMATION TECHNOLOGY

The state of healthcare in the United States is very much influenced and improved through the increased use of technology solutions. Whether it be the use of tablets, laptops, electronic healthcare records and some others, the use of technology has become more and more pervasive as the years and decades roll on. However, not everyone is sold on technology being a saving grace and those same people often think that technology solutions being added to healthcare actually do not help or that they make things worse rather than make them better. However, there is a cacophony of evidence that suggests and proves that electronic healthcare records, electronic administration and the use of information technology in a strategic and adept fashion actually makes things better over the long haul. This is true for patients, administrators, healthcare professionals and the wider network of providers that are typically also…… [Read More]

References

Bloomfield, G.S., Hogan, J.W., Keter, A., Holland, T.L., Sang, E., Kimaiyo, S., & Velazquez, E.J. (2014). Blood pressure level impacts risk of death among HIV

seropositive adults in Kenya: a retrospective analysis of electronic health records. BMC Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 1-20. doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-284

Campbell, M. (2010). Technology in Healthcare: The Wave of the Future.

Ahdbonline.com. Retrieved 24 April 2015, from  http://www.ahdbonline.com/issues/2008/may-2008-vol-1-no-4/350-article-350
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Healthcare Reform Review of Literature

Words: 6070 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 45810582

(Menzel, 1990, p. 3) Fisher, Berwick, & Davis alude to the idea of integration in health care, with providers linking as well as creating networks of electronic medical records and other cost improvement tactics.

The United States and other nations over the last twenty or so years, have begun a sweeping change in health care delivery, regarding the manner in which health information is input, stored and accessed. Computer use in the medical industry has greatly increased over the last thirty years the culmination of this is fully networked electronic medical record keeping. (Berner, Detmer, & Simborg, 2005, p. 3) the electronic medical record trend began in the largest institutions first, as hospitals and large care organizations attempted to reduce waste and improve patient care, while the adoption has been much slower among physician's practices and smaller medical institutions. (Hillestad, et al., 2005, pp. 1103-1104) Prior to this time medical…… [Read More]

Resources, and Utilization
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Healthcare Information Systems Databases and

Words: 959 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Critique Paper #: 59218565

Here second question that is raised for the author is that till now and for the future, many healthcare architectures have been designed that increase the availability of the patient records, not only on the national but on an international scale as well. The author in the study has only focused on the national or local availability of the patient records.

Content of the article is strong and there are a number of important facts given in the article in relation to the importance of healthcare indexing systems. The healthcare indexing systems being used in U.S., UK and Australia have been mentioned as an example. The two models of the indexing architecture given by the author in the beginning have been linked by the author with the examples. The loopholes that can be noticed in these cases are the absence of any privacy and security concerns that may be an…… [Read More]

References

Liu, V., Caelli, W., Smith, J., May, L., Lee, H.M., Ng, H.Z., Foo, H.J., and Li, W. (2010). A Secure Architecture for Australia's Index-Based E-health Environment. Proc. 4th Australasian Workshop on Health Informatics and Knowledge Management (HIKM 2010), Brisbane, Australia, p. 7-16.
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Healthcare Budgetary Decision Making With Resources Becoming

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94531660

Healthcare Budgetary Decision Making

With resources becoming increasingly limited in the healthcare industry, managers are continually challenged with devising effective strategies for dealing with budgetary concerns. The most prominent challenge comes in the form of decision making that results in striking a balance between cost reduction and the maintenance of high quality care and safety for patients. The following discussion outlines approaches that can be utilized by managers to effectively deal with budgetary concerns in healthcare settings, with an emphasis on the advantages of group decision making strategies.

It is evident that there is often a struggle in the healthcare industry for managers to continually and effectively manage depleting resources, address the ever-changing needs of patients, and all the while provide a high level of patient care (Sibbald et al., 2010). This struggle has at its core a need for improvement in regards to the processes in which priorities are…… [Read More]

References

Burleson, G. (1984). Management, budgeting and the use of resources -- a private sector review. Hospital and Health Services Review, 80(3), 124-5.

Sibbald, S.L., Gibson, J.L., Singer, P.A., Upshur, R., Martin, D.K. (2010). Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study. BMC Health Services Research, 10, 131.

Xie, H., Chaussalet, T., Toffa, S., Crowther, P. (2005). A software tool to aid budget planning for long-term care at local authority level. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 114, 284-90.
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Healthcare Addressing the Issue of

Words: 8204 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34819035

Stated to be barriers in the current environment and responsible for the reporting that is inadequate in relation to medical errors are:

Lack of a common understanding about errors among health care professionals

Physicians generally think of errors as individual that resulted from patient morbidity or mortality.

Physicians report errors in medical records that have in turn been ignored by researchers.

Interestingly errors in medication occur in almost 1 of every 5 doses provided to patients in hospitals. It was stated by Kaushal, et al., (2001) that "the rate of medication errors per 100 admission was 55 in pediatric inpatients. Using their figure, we estimated that the sensitivity of using a keyword search on explicit error reports to detect medication errors in inpatients is about 0.7%. They also reported the 37.4% of medication errors were caused by wrong dose or frequency, which is not far away from our result of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Discussion Paper on Adverse Event and Error Reporting In Healthcare: Institute for Safe Medication Practices Jan 24, 2000

Patient Safety/Medical Errors Online at the Premiere Inc. page located at:  http://www.premierinc.com/all/safety/resources/patient_safety/downloads/patient_safety_policy_position_2001.doc 

Medstat / Shortell, S. Assessing the Impact of Continuous Quality Improvement on Clinical Practice: What It Will Take to Accelerate Progress.

Health Policy Monitor (2001) A Publication of the Council of State Governments Vol. 6, No. 1 Winter/Spring 2001 PO18-0101
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Healthcare Information Systems

Words: 840 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41592355

Healthcare Information Systems

Faculty of Information Technology at the Queensland University Australia, have written this article to point out the need to change the method of access control in the current health care environment. They have introduced this method keeping in the mind the latest information technology system structures, legal and regulatory requirements and the demands of security operation in the Health Information Systems. The authors have proposed "Open and Trusted Health Information System" as the feasible solution along with the capability to dominate the provision of appropriate levels of secure access control in order to protect the sensitive health data.

Authors have also pointed out what is the problem with NEHTA work programs. NEHTA focuses on securely and reliably exchanging the clinical information with the help of electronic means and secure messaging technology. Authors have raised an important issue that these critical health information computer systems are openly connected…… [Read More]

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Nursing Healthcare Information Systems Key

Words: 3682 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 9839470

Others include delays in data accessibility, albeit shorter delays and the continued need for source data verification (Donovan, 2007).

Other obstacles have occurred in the developing of mobile healthcare applications. These have included mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust (Keng and Shen, 2006).

A third problem that has been encountered is that of a lack of education on not only the importance of the information technology but also training on how to use the specific pieces of equipment. The tools that are provided to people are only as good as the training that is provided on how to use them. The tools may be able to do wonderful things, but if those that are using them do not know how to get the best use out of them they will in the end be less efficient.

Medical Errors

According to an Institute of…… [Read More]

References

Al-Assaf, Al F., Bumpus, Lisa J., Carter, Dana, and Dixon, Stephen B. (2003). Preventing Errors

in Healthcare: A Call for Action. Hospital Topics. 81(3), 5-12.

Brommeyer, Mark. (2005). e-nursing and e-patients. Nursing Management -- UK. 11(9), 12-13.

Damberg, Cheryl L., Ridgely, M. Susan, Shaw, Rebecca, Meili, Robin C., Sorbero, Melony E.,
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National Healthcare Systems Decision-Making Justification

Words: 2143 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 68328720

This is because in most health facilities, the data is kept in a uniform way and the same is used for your next visit. According to the privacy law which applies to medical practitioners, confidentiality and privacy of the patient should not be compromised at all times. It is therefore important that when using health informatics, the management should respect the fundamental rights of the patient.

Conclusion

The national health care system can effectively improve its collaboration by adopting computer technologies and methodologies such as the soft systems methodology. It is therefore crucial for the government and the healthcare providers to join efforts in creating a better national health informatics system.

eferences

Ahuja MK, Carley KM. (1998)Network Structure in Virtual Organizations. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication. 1998;3(4)

Brown JE, Isaacs JS, and Krinke UB (2007) Nutrition Through the Life Cycle

Checkland, P., Holwell, S. (1993), "Information management and organizational processes:…… [Read More]

References

Ahuja MK, Carley KM. (1998)Network Structure in Virtual Organizations. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication. 1998;3(4)

Brown JE, Isaacs JS, and Krinke UB (2007) Nutrition Through the Life Cycle

Checkland, P., Holwell, S. (1993), "Information management and organizational processes: an approach through soft systems methodology," J. Of Info. Systems, Vol. 3 pp.3-16.

Connell, N.A.D. (2001), "Evaluating soft or: some reflections on an apparently 'unsuccessful' implementation using a soft systems methodology (SSM) based approach," Journal of the Operational Research Society, Vol. 52 No.2, pp.150-60.
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Individualized Innovations and Technology in Healthcare

Words: 4367 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88476501

Personal Healthcare Technology

Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center and the Sunrise Children's Hospital

The Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center, which includes the Sunrise Children's Hospital, is an approximately 55-year-old facility located in Southern Nevada; it serves the greater Las Vegas area and the surrounding communities. The Sunrise Health and Medical Center is proud of its quality initiatives to ensure patient safety and comfort, including direct approaches to pharmaceutical safety such as safe medication dosing via smart pump technology, and bar coding on medications. As well, the Sunrise Health and Medical Center does not discriminate with respect to HIV / AIDS or in any manner related to employment, program participation, admission and/or treatment.

Sunrise has been rated as the most popular area hospital for 15 years in patient surveys. As well, Sunrise Health and Medical Center has developed community outreach programs for health education in a variety of areas, often based…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Appari, A., & Johnson, M.E. (2010). Information security and privacy in healthcare: Current state of research. International Journal of Internet and Enterprise Management, 6 (4), 279-314. Retrieved from  http://www.ists.dartmouth.edu/library/501.pdf 

Ayanian, J.Z., & Weissman, J.S. (2002). Teaching hospitals and quality of care: A review of the literature. The Milbank Quaterly, 80(3), 569-593. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2690120/pdf/milq0080-0569.pdf 

Baker, J.J., & Baker R.W. (2000). Health care finance: Basic tools for nonfinancial managers. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen

Byington, R., Keene, R., Masini, D. (2006). The impact of federal and state funding levels on strategic decisions and how those decisions affect patient care. The Internet Journal of Healthcare Administration. (4)2. Retrieved from  https://ispub.com/IJHCA/4/2/5827
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Economic Analysis of Supply and Market Structure of Healthcare Industry

Words: 1578 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74708771

Product or Service Supplied
The product supplied to patients is generic pharmaceuticals. “A generic drug is a pharmaceutical drug which is equivalent to a brand-name product in dosage, route of administration, strength, quality, Kinetics, and its intended use. It may also refer to any drug which is marketed under its chemical name without advertising” (Moin, 2016). The importance to the customer is an issue of affordability: the patient has to incur fewer out of pocket expenses in order to pay for crucial prescriptions in order to fulfill the needs of their chronic diseases or conditions. Generic drugs are essentially the ones that are comparable to their brand-name twins. “They are comparable in terms of the dosage, effectiveness, and intended use. Generics are important because they are essentially a less-expensive alternative to their brand-name counterparts. This, of course, is expected to be important to those who are ultimately picking up the tab, governments,…… [Read More]

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CIO Briefing Process of Health Care Information

Words: 717 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30505686

CIO Briefing: Process of Health Care Information System Selection and Organizational Goals

Process of Selection of Health Care Information System

In order for the organization to begin the selection of a health care information system, it is necessary that a records committee be formed for this purpose. The general staff for such an initiative will include the CIO along with a cochair of records and content management and other members which may include a direction of information technology and director of health information management, a compliance officer, an information security officer, a privacy officer, and representatives from: (1) nursing services; (2) business services; (3) pharmacy services; (4) laboratory services; (5) medical services; (6) surgical services; (7) mental health services; (8) human resources; (9) employee education services; and (10 quality improvement office. (Journal of AHIMA, 2008) This committee is responsible for the development of principles and procedures for managing and access…… [Read More]

References

Groen, Peter and Wine, Marc (2005) The Health Information Technology Sharing (HITS) Process. Healthcare Informatics, March 2005. Retrieved from:  http://www.healthcare-informatics.com/issues/2005/03/groen.htm 

ECRM Concepts, Terms and Definitions Practice Brief -- Practice Guidelines for Managing Health Information. Journal of AHIMA October 2008. Retrieved from:  http://library.ahima.org/xpedio/groups/public/documents/ahima/bok1_040518.pdf
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Evolution of Information Systems in Healthcare Settings

Words: 886 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31035509

History Of Information Systems in Healthcare Settings

Information and information exchange have developed to become one of the most important aspects in the delivery of care across all healthcare settings. The significance of information systems in healthcare settings is demonstrated by the fact that care delivery involves various stakeholders including the healthcare organization, the patient, and the healthcare team. Given the significance of information in care delivery, information systems in the healthcare field have constantly evolved and have a history that can be traced back to the late 1960s. As information systems continued to evolve in healthcare, backup and recovery systems were implemented to help in maintaining patient records in order to enhance care delivery.

History of Health Information Systems

Health information systems that have attracted significant attention in the recent past are not new concepts in healthcare since the use of Information Communications Technology in this field has existed…… [Read More]

References

Almunawar, M.N. & Anshari, M. (n.d.). Health Information Systems (HIS): Concept and Technology. Retrieved January 28, 2016, from  http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1203/1203.3923.pdf 

"Evolution of Healthcare Informatics Standards." (n.d.). HIMSS -- Transforming Health through IT. Retrieved January 28, 2016, from  http://www.himss.org/library/interoperability-standards/Evolution-of-Healthcare-Informatics-Standards
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Healthcare System Change M S Healthcare Administration Exploration

Words: 784 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39432463

Healthcare System Change

M.S. Healthcare Administration Exploration National quality performance improvement initiatives. The organizations noted focused specific areas research, study practices information dissemination national organizations public, private governmental sectors.

Center for Studying Health Care System Change:

Exploration of national quality and performance improvement initiatives

Charter

The Center for Studying Health Care System Change (HSC) is a non-profit, non-partisan group that is specifically committed to expanding the knowledge of healthcare to better enable policy-makers to make informed decisions. "HSC does not take policy positions and is a resource for decision makers on all sides of the issues because of its reliable data and objective analysis" (Mission statement, 2012, Center for Studying Health Care System Change). Although it has a variety of funders "HSC only accepts funding when it retains the right to publish all research results. Final research topic selection, methodological and editorial decisions ultimately reside with HSC" (Principles for research…… [Read More]

References

Christianson, Jon B. Ha T. Tu, Divya R. Samuel. (2007). Employer-sponsored health insurance:

Down but not out. Issue Brief No. 137. Center for Studying Health Care System Change.

Retrieved:  http://www.hschange.com/CONTENT/1251/?topic=topic01 

Ginsburg, Paul B. (2011). Containing healthcare costs. Testimony.
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Informatics in the Massachusetts Healthcare System

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 24046630

Innovation at Baystate Health

Informatics and Technology Innovations at Baystate Health

Baystate Health is among the largest health systems in New England and the largest employer in Western Massachusetts ("About Baystate Health," 2014). The crown jewel is the Baystate Medical Center (BMC), which represents the only level 1 trauma center for the region and the western campus for Tufts University School of Medicine. Each year, close to 2,000 residents, fellows, medical students, and nursing students call BMC home, so it should come as no surprise that BMC and Baystate Health are among the top healthcare innovators for the region and nationally.

In 2013, the health informatics software company InterSystems announced Baystate Health will adopt Intersystems' HealthShare platform to provide region-wide health information sharing capabilities. This health information exchange (HIE) will be called the Pioneer Valley Health Information Exchange (PVIX). PVIX will be designed to allow any provider within the Baystate…… [Read More]

References

About Baystate Health. (2014). Retrieved from  http://baystatehealth.org/Baystate/Main+Nav/About+Us .

Baystate Health. (2014). Patients & visitors: Frequently asked questions. Retrieved from  http://www.baystatehealth.org/Baystate/Main+Nav/Patients+%26+Visitors/Medical+Records/FAQs .

InterSystems. (2013). Who we are: Baycare Health Partners and Baystate Health select InterSystems HealthShare as strategic informatics platform for coordinating community engagement. Retrieved from  http://www.intersystems.com/who-we-are/newsroom/news-item/baycare-health-partners-and-baystate-health-select-intersystems-healthshare-as-strategic-informatics-platform-for-coordinating-community-engagement/ .

Kudler, N.R. & Pantanowitz, L. (2010). Overview of laboratory data tools available in a single electronic medical record. Journal of Pathology Informatics, 1, 3.
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Health Care Systems Based Upon

Words: 663 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 59594698



2.) Based upon your personal, non-professional experiences, briefly discuss 2 or 3 applications of it which have enhanced or hindered your financial or medical well being. It and cyber-commerce/e-commerce do not exist devoid of context; thus please help define and shape this context.

The advent of computerized billing and medical coding has undoubtedly streamlined the process of managing a hospital's income and expenditures, but this aspect of healthcare it has been known to create unanticipated disadvantages as well. Although it is true that "the management of healthcare organizations can be improved through the intelligent use of information ... (and) this requires systematic planning and management of information resources to develop information systems that support patient care, administrative operations, and strategic management" (Citation pg. 21), there are a number of caveats that still apply. In my own non-professional experience, I have encountered confusion, frustration, and ineptitude on the part of healthcare…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Organization

Words: 2433 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: SWOT Paper #: 22139084

Introduction
The main objective of this assignment is to conduct a SWOT analysis for a healthcare organization. Essentially, SWOT analysis is a beneficial framework for scrutinizing an organization’s strengths and weaknesses, and the opportunities and threats experienced. It is beneficial in being aware of the weaknesses and emphasizing on the strengths, alleviating threats, and capitalizing on the opportunities accessible. SWOT analysis lays emphasis on the internal factors of an environment, which are the strengths and weaknesses and the external factors of an environment, which are the opportunities and threats (Hill and Jones, 2011). Notably, these strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats ought to be examined in relation to the needs and competition within the market. Basically, SWOT analysis enables the company to ascertain its strong suits and the areas that necessitate enhancements (Hill et al., 2014). The healthcare organization selected in Cleveland Clinic. It is a healthcare organization that was founded…… [Read More]

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Health Care Organizational Leadership

Words: 1367 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32882819

Explain how empowerment and shared leadership promote a culture of continuous innovation

Empowerment encompasses handling individual authority or power to undertake something. Shared leadership implies that leadership responsibilities are disseminated within a team and that members influence each other. Shared leadership takes into account making the most of all the human resources in an organization by enabling persons and giving them a chance to take leadership positions in their areas of expertise. It necessitates members of a team to be willing and prepared to extend their feedback to the team in a manner that purposes to influence and motivate the direction to be taken by the group. In addition, the team in general must be inclined to accept and depend on feedback from other members of the team (Goldsmith, 2010). These elements can promote a culture of continuous innovation within a healthcare organization. This is in the sense that shared…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Delivery System Model

Words: 2778 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 97791529

A Model Healthcare Delivery System
Introduction
The healthcare delivery system also referred to in short as the HCDS is the most effective system that works for most healthcare organizations in all countries with fair, effective and efficient distribution of resources. It is a fast growing service that demands attention from various quarters and domains. At the optimal level, the service program presents relief and hope to the individual, and the general population. The system offers a balanced quality care service through efficiency and fairness. HCDS varies across the world but its focus is constantly on enhancing healthcare access, quality of service and coverage. The success of the program is dependent on the availability of certain basic resources (Kumar & Bano, 2017, p. 1).
HCDS is how the society has responded to the health determinants. The idea of a healthcare system contemplates involving the people that are likely to be served…… [Read More]

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Healthcare and its evolution due to the Affordable Care Act

Words: 869 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 60847559

Practicum Project in Health Informatics

Strengths

• This practicum thesis allows the student to work on developing informatics-based applications while also applying informatics science and skills.

• Uses technology to help streamline processes that ultimately aid in the patient experience

• Lowers costs while increasing efficiency

Weaknesses

• Does not focus on the "human component" of technology

• Focuses on the benefits of informatics but does not take into account the costs as it relates to onboarding. People must be training on the technology; stakeholders must know how to fix problems that arise. All employees must be willing to adopt the technology.

• Does not properly take into account the threat of cyber security and its implications on training nurses. A hack may disrupt the overall application of the technology

"Preceptor Training and Nurse etention"

Strengths

• Strong emphasis on a team approach as it relates to training and retention…… [Read More]

References:

1) American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials. (2006). The essentials of doctoral education for advanced nursing practice. Retrieved from  http://www.aacn.nche.edu/publications/position/DNPEssentials.pdf .

2) American Nurses Association. (2010). Scope and standards of practice. Silver Spring, MD: Nursebooks.org.

3) Bae, S., Mark, B., & Fried, B. (2010). Impact of nursing unit turnover on patient outcomes in hospitals. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 42(1), 40-9. doi:10.1111/j.1547-5069.2009.01319.x.

4) Baker, S. L. (2010). Nurse educator orientation: Professional development that promotes retention. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 41(9), 413-7. doi:10.3928/00220124-20100503-02.
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Information Systems in Healthcare

Words: 4901 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16336011

Health Information System

Promoting Action Design esearch to create value in healthcare through IT

ecently there has been varying proof showing that health IT reduces costs while improving the standard of care offered. The same factors that had caused delays in reaping benefits from IT investment made in other sectors (i.e. time consuming procedural change) are also very common within the healthcare sector. Due to the current transitive nature of the Healthcare sector, new IT investment is likely not going to provide maximum value unless this new investment is backed up with a total reform of healthcare delivery. The overall ability of healthcare IT value researchers to add value to practice will be severely limited as a result of the traditional ex-post approach to measuring IT and the fact that government spurs significant investment. It may be risky to generalize or compare results from traditional IT value research with those…… [Read More]

References

Fichman, R., Kohli, R., & Krishnan, R. (2011). The role of information systems in healthcare: Current research and future trends. Information Systems Research, 22(3), 419-428.

Goh, J.M., Gao, G., & Agarwal, R. (n.d.). Evolving work routines: Adaptive routinization of information technology in healthcare. Information Systems Research, 22(3), 565-585.

Hoffnagel, E., Woods, D., & Leveson, N. (2006). Resilience engineering: Concepts and precepts. Abingdon: GBR: Ashgate Publishing.

Jones, S., Heaton, P., Riudin, R., & Schneider, E. (2012). Unraveling the IT productivity paradox lessons for health care. The New England Journal of Medicine, 366(24), 2243-2245.
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Nursing Healthcare Business

Words: 5470 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Chapter Paper #: 30995758

Healthcare

We can compare the healthcare workplace to what is seen by a person when he/she looks through a kaleidoscope: since there are numerous different patterns that appear as the moments pass by. The shortage of nurses which has been publicized widely and the high turnover rates amongst the nurses are some of the unwanted patterns which have occurred. The dependence of healthcare institutions on the nurse-managers for the retention and recruitment of nurses is steadily increasing (Contino, 2004).

There are a number of routes through which the critical care nurses have become the leaders. Most of these routes don't have any educational or managerial training as a part of the process. There is a need for effective strategies for the care leaders who provide critical care in order to inspire the staff and manage the departmental operations in an effective manner to get positive results. One of the strategies…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J., Erickson, J., Jones, D., & Paulo, L. (2009). An evidence-based structure for transformative nurse executive practice, Nursing Administration Quarterly, 33(4), 280-87

Advisory Board Web site. (2004). Available at:  http://www.advisory.com .

Ales, B.J. (1995). Mastering the art of delegation. Nurs Manage. August; 26: 32A, 32E.

American Organization of Nurse Executives (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. Nurse Leader, 3(1), 15-22.
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Informatics Information Systems and History

Words: 693 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 21182061

electronic medical records have yet to become standardized in the United States, the contemporary physician's office differs significantly from one from twenty years ago. Information systems govern multiple aspects of care delivery, from patient intake, processing, and billing to medical records, access to electronic scholarly databases for knowledge management to purchasing and human resources management. Understanding issues like the system development life cycle (SDLC) and project management life cycles have now become common practice in most healthcare offices, whereas twenty years ago only the most cutting edge of those offices would have dedicated information technology specialists who would handle and address matters like product life cycles. Full time consultants or advisory positions related directly to IT are now expected of most medical practices. Since the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was passed just over twenty years ago, physicians offices have made significant strides by incorporating informatics into their…… [Read More]

References

Grandia, L. (n.d.). Healthcare information systems: A look at the past, present, and future. Health Catalyst. Retrieved online:  https://www.healthcatalyst.com/healthcare-information-systems-past-present-future 

Healthcare Information and Management Systems (HIMSS, 2016). Evolution of Healthcare Informatics Standards. Retrieved online:  http://www.himss.org/library/interoperability-standards/Evolution-of-Healthcare-Informatics-Standards 

Sewell, J.P. & Thede, L.Q. (2012). Computer development and health care information systems 1950 to present. Chapter 1. Retrieved online:  http://dlthede.net/informatics/chap01introni/healthcare_computers.html 

Wager, K. A., Lee, F. W., & Glaser, J. P. (2013). Health care information systems: A practical approach for health care management (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
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Technology and Healthcare Demographics of the Global

Words: 1063 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48110564

Technology and Healthcare

Demographics of the global community are rapidly changing so that each year there are more and more seniors within the population base. This has a profound implication on the healthcare system of many regions since a large number of elderly citizens will be spending their lives in the confines of their home, and some may have chronic illness that require continuous monitoring. Clinical telemedicine is one way to offer greater services to rural or homebound populations. Indeed, a variety of technological advances have made it possible to change the paradigm of healthcare. Clinical information systems, for instance, have expanded in scope and depth. Increased processor speeds and data storage devices have made it possible to collect more data than ever on the detailed encounters that make up the provider-patient care delivery process, and present it more effectively to a wider range of users. Healthcare monitoring is part…… [Read More]

Luppicini, R. And R. Adell, eds., (2008). Handbook of Research on Technoethics. New York: Information Science Publishing Company.

Teo, T., et.al. (2008). "Wireless Healthcare Monitoring Systems. World Academy Of Science, Engineering, and Technology. 42 (1: Retrieved from:

 http://www.waset.org/journals/waset/v42/v42-98.pdf
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Evolution of Health Care Information Systems

Words: 1425 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22301011

Evolution of Health Care Information Systems

The objective of this study is to compare and contrast a contemporary healthcare facility or physician's office health care facility or physician's office operation of 20 years ago and to identify at least two major events and technological advantages that influenced current HCIS practices. The physician's office and health care facility of 20 years ago was a paper-based operation. All records were paper records, appointments were written on calendars and prescriptions were handwritten, notations on the patient's health records was done by writing on the physical paper record and all hospital orders were written by hand. During the 1970s hospital growth and expansion occurred and the expenditures for Medicare and Medicaid were on the rise. At this time mainframes were still in use and microcomputers became available and not only were they smaller but they were also less expensive. However, transformation did not come…… [Read More]

References

Costs and Benefits of Health Information Technology (nd) Evidence Report/Technology Assessment Number 132. Southern California Evidence-based Practice Center, Santa Monica, CA. Retrieved from:  http://www.ahrq.gov/ research/findings/evidence-based-reports/hitsys-evidence-report.pdf

Friedman, S. (nd) Facts About Health Care Information Systems. eHow Retrieved from: http://www.ehow.com/about_6117257_health-care-information-systems.html

History and Evolution of Health Care Information Systems (nd) Chapter 4. Retrieved from:  http://www.slideserve.com/paul/history-and-evolution-of-health-care-information-systems
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Workarounds in Healthcare Facilities

Words: 1260 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 96665272

Workarounds in Healthcare Facilities

Workarounds refer to the alternative methods "of accomplishing an activity when the usual system / process is not working well" (Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory, 2013). In as much as workarounds may temporarily solve existing problems, they also indicate inefficiencies and deficiencies in the current system. Workarounds may at times be effective and more convenient, compared to the system in existence, but a regular use of the same could endanger both the safety of patients and the facility's reputation. A workaround can, therefore, be termed as an at-risk behavior that does not yield concrete long-term solutions to existing problems. Therefore, "workarounds perceived as necessary by the user for patient care, efficiency or safety, may be beneficial, neutral, or dangerous for patients' safety" (Koppel, Wetterneck, Telles & Karsh, 2008, p. 1).

A description of Workarounds in a Selected Facility

Workarounds can take a variety of forms. For instance,…… [Read More]

References

Flanagan, M.E., Saleem, J. J., Millitello, L.G., Russ, A.L. & Doebbeling, B.N. (2013). Paper- and Computer-Based Workarounds to Electronic Health Record Use at Three Benchmark Institutions. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 20(e1): e59-66.

Intel (2013). Workarounds in Healthcare, a Risky Trend. Retrieved from  http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/healthcare-it/workarounds-in-healthcare-risky-trend.html 

Koppel, R., Wetterneck, T., Telles, J.L. & Karsh, B. (2008). Workarounds to Barcode Medication Administration Systems: Their Occurrences, Causes, and Threats to Patient Safety. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 15(4), 408-423.

Merrill, M. (2009). Using Pen and Paper Workarounds Could Boost EMR Efficiency. Retrieved from  http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/using-pen-and-paper-workarounds-could-boost-emr-efficiency
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Management Project in the Health Care Organization

Words: 2486 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 81735449

Management Project in the Health Care Organization Setting

This study describes the implementation of a syndromic surveillance system. The syndromic surveillance system collects and analyzes prediagnostic and nonclinical disease indicators, drawing on preexisting electronic data that can be found in systems such as electronic health records, school absenteeism records and pharmacy systems. The systems are utilized to identify specific symptoms within a population that may indicate a public health event or emergency such as signaling an outbreak of an infectious disease. school absenteeism records and pharmacy systems. The systems are utilized to identify specific symptoms within a population that may indicate a public health event or emergency such as signaling an outbreak of an infectious disease.

Informatics Management Project In The Health Care Organization Setting

Part One - Introduction

The objective of this study is to describe the implementation of a syndromic surveillance system. Syndromic surveillance systems collect and analyze…… [Read More]

References

Buckeridge, DL, et al. (2005) An Evaluation Model for Syndromic Surveillance: Assessing the Performance of Temporal Algorithm. Vol. 54 MMWR Supplement.

Chen, H, Zeng, D, Ping, Y and Ping Y (2010) Infectious Disease Informatics; Syndromic Surveillance for Public Health and Biodefense. Springer Medical 2010. Retrieved from:  http://books.google.com/books?id=5BdCfSxtNJMC&dq=syndromic+surveillance+system:+state+of+the+art&source=gbs_navlinks_s 

Hurt-Mullen, K and Coberly, J. (2005) Syndromic Surveillance on the Epidemiologist's Desktop: Making Sense of Much Data. MMWR Supplement 26 Aug 2005. Retrieved from:  http://www.cdc.gov/MMWR/preview/mmwrhtml/su5401a22.htm 

Public Meaningful Use (2013) Arkansas Department of Public Health. Retrieved from: http://www.healthy.arkansas.gov/programsServices/MeaningfulUse/Pages/default.aspx
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Technology and Healthcare Please See the Attached

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27000369

Technology and Healthcare

Please see the attached case and answer 1a with it. also answer questions 2 and 3

Implementing a syndromic surveillance system & Case Study 3: Selection of a patient safety strategy

How the projects address current problems in health informatics

One of the most common problems with implementing a new informatics system is creating a cohesive network. In "Case Study 13: Implementing a syndromic surveillance system," all of the hospitals involved in the IT overhaul had different systems, with different vendors and data sets. There were also radically different levels of knowledge and willingness amongst staff members to devote time, money, and manpower to support the new interface. Federal grants would support the initial implementation, but it still needed to be financially sustainable and the staff needed to know how to analyze the data correctly at all of the member hospitals. Each hospital had widely different patient…… [Read More]

References

Anshari, Muhammad & Mohammad Nabil Almunawar. (2011). Evaluating CRM implementation in healthcare organization. International Conference on Economics and Business

Information. IPEDR, 9: 30-34. Retrieved:

 http://www.ipedr.com/vol9/5-I00005.pdf  2011

Electronic medical records (EMR). (2005). Open Clinical. Retrieved:
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Systems Theory Discuss Relationship Systems Theory Healthcare

Words: 1238 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68949566

Systems Theory

Discuss relationship systems theory healthcare deliver U.S. - What current concepts healthcare explained helped a system theory approach? - What system theory? - How researchers (Ludwig von Bertalanffy Everett M.

Systems theory and diffusion of innovation theory

Systems theory

Systems theory was not specifically designed to cope with the challenges of the U.S. healthcare system, although it has been frequently applied to some of its issues. Systems theory was originally coined by the scientist Ludwig von Bertalanffy to sum up his idea that the 'whole' of systems -- both biological and otherwise -- were larger than the sum of their parts. According to von Bertalanffy, "in the past, science tried to explain observable phenomena by reducing them to an interplay of elementary units investigable independently of each other, conceptions appear in contemporary science that are concerned with what is somewhat vaguely termed 'wholeness', i.e. problems of organization, phenomena…… [Read More]

Resources

Diffusion of innovation theory. (2013). University of Twente. Retrieved:

 http://www.utwente.nl/cw/theorieenoverzicht/Theory%20clusters/Communication%20and%20Information%20Technology/Diffusion_of_Innovations_Theory.doc/ 

This website contains excerpts from E.M. Rogers' work on diffusion of innovation theory, along with a helpful graphical representation of how the information is disseminated.

Kaminski, J. (Spring 2011).Diffusion of innovation theory. Canadian Journal of Nursing.
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Personal Professional Healthcare Communication Paper What Is

Words: 1849 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18387520

Personal Professional Healthcare Communication Paper

What is Healthcare Communication?

Communication can be generally defined and the method of imparting information from a source to targets. The process of sharing thus has its own set of rules and for human communication the written and spoken words are used. There is also a series of communication called non-verbal which is also significant. There are behaviors that show what a person thinks or feels is also communication. (Berry, 2007)

These types of communication applies in the health care settings too. Health communication may be defined as the study of the means of communication and its strategies not only to communicate to individuals but to the community thus creating decisions on health questions. Thus for the health service the communication within itself and the society concerned with individual and public health, is a very important field that requires specialization and research in medical information…… [Read More]

References

Berry, Dianne. (2007) "Health Communication: Theory and Practice." Open University Press:

Maidenhead, England.

Diebold Institute for Public Policy Studies. (1995) "Healthcare Info structures: The

Development of Information-Based Infrastructures for the Healthcare Industry." Praeger: Westport, CT.
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Important Elements of a Healthcare Organization's Strategic Plan

Words: 1197 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 728471

Nursing: Management and Leaderships

Every good healthcare institution has a strategic plan of goals and methods for reaching those goals. Because it is a business, a healthcare institution has some goals and methods that can be found in other kinds of businesses. Because it is a provider of special services, a healthcare institution has special goals and methods that are unique to healthcare. At a minimum, a healthcare institution's strategic plan has goals and methods regarding patient safety, data management and informatics, internal and external marketing, and hazard preparedness. Goals and methods in these categories can help a healthcare institution start with and constantly improve its strategy for business and healthcare success.

Body: Strategic Plan of an Institution

An institution's strategic plan is a carefully developed description of its long-term goals and its plan of action for reaching those goals. Major institutions in all walks of life develop strategic plans…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boden, T.W. (2012). Marketing as a worldview. Journal of Medical Practice Management, 28(3), 192-4.

Gordon, L. (2014). Seeing informatics in action. Journal of AHIMA, 85(2), 23.

Harrison, J.P. (2010). Essentials of strategic planning in healthcare. Chicago, IL: Health Administration Press.

Levi, J., Lieberman, D., & Lang, A. (2013). Preparedness must permiate health care: Yet still has a long way to go. Health Progress, 94(6), 52-6.
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Quality and Safety in Healthcare

Words: 1647 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 10681556

Quality & Safety

The quality and safety of health care services has been a major issue in the recent past because of the significance of these factors in the improvement of patient outcomes and enhancing the effectiveness of the health care system. Health care professionals and practitioners have increasingly focused on the need to improve the quality and safety of their services given the constant increase in patient population. As a result, various measures have been developed and implemented in attempts to enhance the quality and safety of care services and improvement of practices. These measures include delivery of patient-centered care, safety initiatives, teamwork and collaboration, informatics, quality improvement, and evidence-based practice. There are several ways with which incidents or interactions in each of these components are handled and can be improved based on leadership/management theory content.

Patient Centered Care -- Interaction

A bedside report was not done at bedside…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Evanoff, Bradley, Patricia Potter, Laurie Wolf, Deborah Grayson, Clay Dunagan, and Stuart Boxerman. "Can We Talk? Priorities for Patient Care Differed Among Health Care Providers." Advances in Patient Safety 1 (n.d.): 5-14. AHRQ -- Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Advancing Excellence in Health Care. Hhs-logoU.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. .

"How Fast Is Too Fast For IV Push Medications." ISMP Medication Safety Alert. Institute for Safe Medication Practices, 15 May 2003. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. .

Laws, Dawn, and Shelly Amato. "Incorporating Bedside Reporting into Change-of-Shift Report." Rehabilitation Nursing 35.2 (2010): 70-74. Rehabilitation NURSING. Rehabilitation NURSING, Mar.-Apr. 2010. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. .
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environmental and'strategic analysis of health care

Words: 1546 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72308575

environmental analysis helps any organization to recognize factors that impact its performance. The factors impacting an organization's performance may be internal to the organization and they can also be external. Environmental analysis is therefore critical to an overall strategic plan. Several methods of performing environmental analysis can help organizations like the Carolina Health Care System, including the PESTLE and SWOT analyses ("What is Environmental Analysis?" n.d.). These types of analyses help to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT), as well as political, economic, social, technological, legal, and environmental (PESTLE) factors impacting the organization. Without performing systematic environmental analyses, business and public sector administrators would be working blindly and likely lead their organizations to fail in key preventable ways. On the other hand, a skillful and deft environmental analysis helps managers to develop strategic plans for the future, buffer against possible challenges, mitigate crises, and ensure long-term success.

The Carolinas…… [Read More]

References

Arthur, L. (n.d.). The implications of environmental analysis on strategic plan. Houston Chronicle. Retrieved online:  http://smallbusiness.chron.com/implications-environmental-analysis-strategic-plan-35303.html 

Carolinas Health Care System (2016). About Carolinas Healthcare System. Retrieved online:  http://www.carolinashealthcare.org/about-us 

Henry Schein Medical Systems (2016). Advantages of electronic medical records. Retrieved online:  https://www.micromd.com/emr/advantages.html 

"What is Environmental Analysis?" (n.d.). Pestle. Retrieved online:  http://pestleanalysis.com/what-is-environmental-analysis/
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Learning Healthcare Reform From the Lean Experts

Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 7755963

Evidence and Expert Interview

SMAT Goals - Evidence and Expert Interview

I chose goals in the areas of leadership development and organizational planning because I believe these are pivotal skills for a nurse to have in order to be an effective member of a healthcare team. My SMAT goals are as follows:

SMAT Goal 1: Leadership Development

To implement a process of increasing communication between field staff and case managers to increase patient meeting nursing goals to 80% by July 2014.

SMAT Goal 2: Organizational Planning

As a nurse administrator of a home health agency, it is my goal to incorporate a time management-mentoring project for all nurses to balance a healthy work-life balance by March 1, 2015.

Peer-eviewed Articles

SMAT Goal 1: Leadership Development

Staggers, N., Gassert, C.A., and Curran, C. (2002). esults of a Delphi study to determine informatics competencies for nurses at four levels of practice. Nursing…… [Read More]

References

Staggers, N., Gassert, C.A., and Curran, C. (2002). Results of a Delphi study to determine informatics competencies for nurses at four levels of practice. Nursing Research, Nov/Dec. Retrieved  http://nursing-informatics.com/niassess/NIcompetencies_Staggers.pdf 

Retrieved  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12464758 

Spear, S.J. (2005). Fixing Health Care from the Inside, Harvard Business Review. Retrieved  http://hbr.org/2005/09/fixing-health-care-from-the-inside-today/ar/1 

The Lean Healthcare Exchange. Retrieved  http://www.leanhealthcareexchange.com/
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List and Bibliography Healthcare Terms

Words: 1270 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 39201547

ABC/123 Version X

Definition and Purpose Explain each term in your own words using complete sentences.

Health Care Example Identify an example of each term and discuss how it is used in a health care setting.

References Provide two APA formatted references to support your claims for each term.

Clinical decision support ?

Clinical decision support or CDS is a way of organizing and utilizing information and patient-specific knowledge, streamlined for utility and employed under the right circumstances, to improve the health care that is provided and to improve the health of the patient.

CDS in a health care setting can include a variety of things, such as technology to provide reminders or alerts for patients or providers, or also data reports, and relevant information

Garg, AX, Adhikhari, NKJ, et al. (2005) Effects of computerized clinical decision support systems on practitioner performance and patient outcomes: A systematic review. Journal of…… [Read More]

Maheu, Marlene M.; Whitten, Pamela; & Allen, Ace (2001). E-Health, Telehealth, and Telemedicine: A Guide to Start-up and Success. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

Norris, A. C. (2002). Essentials of Telemedicine and Telecare. West Sussex, England; New York: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Copyright © XXXX by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.
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Workflow Analysis of a Healthcare Organization

Words: 1450 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43434292

Workflow Analysis

Workflow is a term that is utilized to refer to processes or steps undertaken to complete a specific task (Mastrian & McGonigle, 2015). In a healthcare organization, this concept refers to initiatives undertaken to provide patient care services. This essentially means that workflow is crucial towards the achievement of organizational goals since it plays a critical role in the accomplishment of desired tasks/activities. Given its significance to realization of organizational objectives, organizations conduct workflow analysis to help identify workflow patterns that maximize effective resource utilization and reduce those that do not add value. Workflow analysis process is carried out using several tools to examine workflow processes and shed light on potential areas for removing waste. This paper provides a workflow analysis through flowcharts of medication administration in a community health center.

Common Event in My Organization

The organization I work for is a community health center that provides…… [Read More]

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Transitioning to Computers and Electronic Medical Records in Healthcare

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 86620643

HMS (healthcare management systems) and EMRs (electronic medical records) have been widely praised as significantly adding to patient safety and quality of care. They can permit healthcare institutions to keep more accurate databases on patients, all in one location, and can ensure that a patient’s full medical records are available, even if the patient is not responsive and the patient’s family is not available. Prior treatments, current and past medications, and patient allergies can all be easily accessed with a point and a click. But transitioning to such healthcare systems is not always without issues and often involves a significant investment of time and money.

First of all, from a staffing point of view, change management is needed to ensure that the transition is effective. One helpful way to view change of any kind within an organization is that of Lewin’s Change Management Model, which suggests that organizations must first…… [Read More]

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Standardizing Data Coding in Healthcare

Words: 747 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11994340

Coding: Comparing Different Systems

Standardized comparisons are essential when evaluating a new drug. To understand the drug's efficacy relative to other drugs on the market and to place any adverse events in perspective requires an effective and uniform system of comparative analysis. "Coding of patient data is critical in the grouping, analysis, and reporting of data. Coding decisions directly impact submissions for New Drug Applications (NDAs), safety surveillance, and product labeling" (Troung & Li, 2007, p.1). This paper will review a number of the most popular methods of coding data, specifically MedDA and WHO Drug, and will examine their unique and specific uses. It will also assess attempts to provide greater standardization to the system of conducting research trials.

MedDA (Medical Dictionary for egulatory Activities) is the "globally accepted, clinically validated medical terminology used within all phases of the drug development process, including classification of medical events for clinical trials…… [Read More]

References

Frequently Asked Questions -- MedDRA. (2016). Retrieved from:

 http://www.thesisinc.com/faq-meddra.html#1 

Frequently Asked Questions -- WHO Drug. (2016). Retrieved from:

 http://www.thesisinc.com/faq-whodrug.html#1
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Statement of Interest for Health Care Administration Fellowship

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 26266393

speak French (this fulfill the requirement of a foreign language) and find that it matches all my interests perfectly in that I have an interest in Practice Management; an Interest in an Administrative Fellowship; and an Interest in academic medicine. I am a pmp candidate. I also have seven years of IT experience with an emphasis on Business Analysis and will shortly be graduating with a Masters in Health Care Administration informatics.

I am attracted to the offer of the Fellowship in that it promises to provide me with the education and practical experience necessary to successfully establish a career in international healthcare management and administration. I have the technical know-how and extensive informatics experience; now I need the practical general experience. The Fellowship offers to give me this through real-time, hands-on operational experiences in top international healthcare institutions -- and this is fantastic since it will bring me into…… [Read More]

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Importance of Research in Healthcare Administration

Words: 1013 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31723396

EM Systems

Benefits of esearch-based EM Systems

esearch is an investigation conducted on the sources and study materials for the researcher to establish facts and offer new conclusions on a given subject matter. Currently, research is the main factor considered before an organization implements an idea on the product service to be offered to the customers. In this case, it is important for the health care institutions to utilize research concerning the benefits of Electronic Medical ecords (EM) (Greenberg et al., 2016). EM is an electronic record of any information related to health care of individuals, which can be gathered, created, consulted, and managed by nurses, clinicians, and other authorized staff within healthcare organizations.

With the help of research conducted, health care institution can understand the benefits of EM systems before implementing the systems. The research will enable the healthcare managers, stakeholders, and other authorities to compare the benefits of…… [Read More]

References

Greenberg, A. E., et al., (2016). Development of a Large Urban Longitudinal HIV Clinical Cohort Using a Web-Based Platform to Merge Electronically and Manually Abstracted Data from Disparate Medical Record Systems: Technical Challenges And Innovative Solutions. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 23(3), 635-643.

Hazlehurst, B. L., et al., (2015). CER Hub: An Informatics Platform for Conducting Comparative Effectiveness Research Using Multi-Institutional, Heterogeneous, Electronic Clinical Data. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 84(10), 763-773
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Information in Health Care

Words: 1603 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20240725

Management in Practice in Health Care Settings

The Benefits of IT-based Knowledge Management Systems

The delivery of quality health care and the process quality can be significantly impacted by the adoption of information technology in healthcare for the recording, management and use of knowledge developed on an everyday basis.

In recent times, the management of knowledge through the information and technology has been introduced in many health care settings. There have been many research and studies in ascertaining the measureable effect of the use of information technology for management of knowledge. Such studies have specifically stressed on the qualitative changes in health care and treatment delivery after adoption of the knowledge management process. The studies also stress on the importance of the use of information and technology for recording and documentation of information that can serve as knowledge in health care settings (Goossen, 1996).

Such documentation includes information related to…… [Read More]

References

Ammenwerth, E., Rauchegger, F., Ehlers, F., Hirsch, B., & Schaubmayr, C. (2011). Effect of a nursing information system on the quality of information processing in nursing: An evaluation study using the HIS-monitor instrument. International Journal Of Medical Informatics, 80(1), 25-38. doi:10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2010.10.010

Big data and the future of nursing knowledge. (2015). Nursing Management (Springhouse), 46(4), 27-28. doi:10.1097/01.numa.0000463797.35429.a2

Conrad, S., & Sherrod, D. (2011). Nurse managers as knowledge workers. Nursing Management (Springhouse), 42(2), 47-48. doi:10.1097/01.numa.0000393010.34127.44

Goossen, W. (1996). Nursing information management and processing: a framework and definition for systems analysis, design and evaluation. International Journal Of Bio-Medical Computing, 40(3), 187-195. doi:10.1016/0020-7101(95)01144-7
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Health it Information Technology and Cultural Transformation

Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 60181940

Health IT

Information Technology and Cultural Transformation in Healthcare

apid advances in information technology have continued to drive change in many sectors, including healthcare. Ongoing research suggests that cultural transformation is necessary in order to properly adapt to the capabilities and constraints of the increasing complexity and pervasiveness of information technology in healthcare settings. Better utilizing the information technology available to healthcare organizations and more accurately understanding the social impacts of this technology can actually help to achieve the cultural changes that are needed, as is demonstrated in the following brief literature review.

At one level, there needs to be a certain degree of autonomy for individual healthcare organizations in their adoption and utilization of information technologies in certain operations, as this will enhance opportunities for cultural adaptability and a willingness to undergo such transformations (Abraham et al. 2011; Lopez et al. 2011). Different communities can experience significantly different effects…… [Read More]

References

Abraham, C., Nishihara, E. & Akiyama, M. (2011). Transforming healthcare with information technology in Japan: A review of policy, people, and progress. International Journal of Medical Informatics 80(3): 157-70.

Box, T., McDonell, M., Helfrich, C., Jesse, R….Rumsfeld, J. (2010). Strategies from a Nationwide Health Information Technology Implementation: The VA CART STORY. Journal of General Internal Medicine 25(1): 72-6.

Karsh, B., Weinger, M., Abbott, P. & Wears, R. (2010). Health information technology: fallacies and sober realities. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 17(6): 617-23.

Lopez, L., Green, A., Tan-McGrory, A., King, R. & Betancourt, J. (2011). Bridging the Digital Divide in Health Care: The Role of Health Information Technology in Addressing Racial and Ethnic Disparities. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety 37(1): 437-45.
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History of Informatics

Words: 1016 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18566498

Health care has always been concerned about information management, especially as health care interventions and management have become increasingly complex. In spite of this, health care has weakly welcomed information technology into its midst, shunning computerized data management systems in favor of anachronistic and antiquated ones. When health care started using information technology, the role informatics played was largely ancillary. There were few specialists, and informatics were considered novel and strange. Yet since Virginia Saba introduced technology specifically designed for healthcare, the informatics field has become one of the most relevant to the gamut of healthcare management and operations. Currently, healthcare informatics stands alone as a unique area of specialization that fuses passion for health care management, concern for patient care, and computer technology.

There are five major milestones in the creation and evolution of health informatics. The first was the initial first wave of computing and information technology that…… [Read More]

References

AMIA (2012). Mission and history. Retrieved online:  http://www.amia.org /about-amia/mission-and-history" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Ouuch Making Excellent Health Responses

Words: 4319 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 96010800



Prior to Launching Technology Initiatives

Over the past seven years, many healthcare organizations, like OUUCH, have begun to transition from the traditional paper-based systems to EH systems. esearch has shown that over a period of time. EH systems can improve quality of care for patients, provide more accurate information, and overall improve safety issues relating to reducing mistakes with patients. In the exploratory study, "Change factors affecting the transition to an… [EH] system in a private physicians' practice: An exploratory study," Aaron D. Spratt, Social Security Administration and Kevin E. Dickson (2008), Southeast Missouri State University, report that the U.S. health care industry reportedly ranks among the world's leading inefficient information enterprises. Although the system needs major changes, the transition process however, creates a high change in the business aspect of an organization. Spratt and Dickson (2008) explain that for an EH system to be successful, doctors must be involved…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Amatayakul, M. (2009). EHR vs. EMR: what's in a name? Healthcare Financial

Management. Healthcare Financial Management Association. Retrieved May 13, 2010

from HighBeam Research:  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-202487730.html 

Bennett, D. (2009). EMR market includes small and large system vendors. Managed Healthcare
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Informatics Organizations

Words: 977 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 32262584

Organization

Information organizations

Description of Selected Informatics Organizations

In this paper, we will describe a selected number of informatics organizations dealing with the field of healthcare and medicine. We would assess the main purpose of these organizations and what they stand for in brief detail, also the main aim here is to focus on the major points which define these organizations.

American Medical Informatics Association

American Health Information Management Association

American Society of Health Informatics Managers

Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

International Medical Informatics Association

Introduction to informatics organizations

American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA)

AMIA is known to be a group of personals from many different disciplines whose purpose is to convey for the sole interest of bringing improvement in health informatics since it relates to different aspects of the main health care policy. This group has about four thousand members which include pharmacists, physicians, consultants, educators and government…… [Read More]

References

Harris, L. (1995). Health and the New Media. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Kulge, E. (2001). The Ethics of Electronic Patient Records. New York: Peter Lang.

Rees, A. (2003). Consumer Health Information Source Book. Connecticut: Greenwood Press.

Slack, W. (2001). Cybermedicine. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Informatics Implication for Nursing Safety

Words: 1316 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Paper #: 67386841

challenging environment that the world faces has placed much strain and stress on the health care industry and their many institutions. Despite the rapid advances in technology, nutrition and fitness, the world is in constant need of medical treatment and assistance. The role of the nurse and the professional duties that accompany this experience has also changed rapidly along with technology and medical advancement. It is important to investigate how nurses can take advantage of these newly developed systems to perform at a higher level and eventually ease the suffering and pain that accompanies medical procedures in today's day and age.

Informatics is a newly formed discipline that provides some of the solutions to the many problems that nurses are faced with. The purpose of this essay is to discuss and highlight the importance of informatics and its synthesis into the nursing profession. The essay will first give some background…… [Read More]

References

Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (2008). Nursing Informatics: Scope and Standards of Practice, ANA 2008. Retrieved from  http://www.himss.org/resourcelibrary/TopicList.aspx?MetaDataID=767 

Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina, Barbara Elliott, and Roger Watson. "Review: evaluating information systems in nursing." Journal of clinical nursing 17.5 (2008): 567-575.

Thede, L., Schwiran, P., (February 25, 2011) "Informatics: The Standardized Nursing Terminologies: A National Survey of Nurses' Experiences and Attitudes - Survey I*" OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 16 No. 2.
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Health System Management and the Use of New Grad Program for Reducing Turnover

Words: 2457 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 39644169

Reducing Turnover in New Graduate Residence Program

Introduction- The process of recruiting and training, particularly in high-impact fields like healthcare, has become increasingly complex and expensive. Turnover is the rate at which an organization gains or loses employees. High turnover means that more employees are leaving more rapidly, which can be harmful to productivity and finances. Real costs of hiring including recruitment time, opportunity costs, and investment in both the new employee and the staff in Human Resources. Indirect costs include training, loss of production, reduction of performance levels, overtime due to inexperience, etc. In fact, this issue is so important that in for-profit organizations, the cost of employee turnover is estimated to be about 150% of the total payroll and benefit package (Rothwell, 2012). One needs to also understand the high costs of post-employment; drug-screening, physical exams, orientation, learning curve, coaching from others, etc. Staff time is difficult to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Nurses' job satisfaction well below average. (2012, March 5). Retrieved from Medical Express:  http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-03-nurses-job-satisfaction-average.html 

The Real Costs of High Turnover. (2012, October). HRNNewsdaily. Retrieved from:

http://hrnewsdaily.com/the-real-costs-of-high-turnover/

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2013, January). Researcha dn Data. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:  http://www.ahrq.gov/
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Informatics Reflection

Words: 577 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Creative Writing Paper #: 88332893

master's program with SON, I had worked as a nurse in a hospital setting for 16 years. As a manager, I did gain some experience with informatics through patient satisfaction scores. The corporation I work for, HCA, is big on numbers. I would share the patient satisfaction scores with staff because it is a reflection on work performance. The patient satisfaction scores told employees where performance was good and what areas needed a higher focus for higher improvements in our work performance.

After entering the master's program, Healthcare Research and Statistical Analysis was a requirement. This class was very valuable in how the SON helped me to learn. Assignments included how to apply for an IRB application process, literature review, learning how to analyze data, learning how to interpret articles and publications, and completing a research paper that required reading multiple articles and data analysis. Additional learning experience came with…… [Read More]

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Human Resource Issues in Health Field

Words: 1627 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 8292223

Human esource Issues in Health Field

The field of health human resources in the health field deals with issues such as planning, performance, management, development, information, retention, and research on human resources in the health sector Successful realization the mission and goals in this field is determined by the dedication and skills that the specialists possess. This study identifies various issues that often arise and bedevils this field. Current trends relating to technological advancements affecting the success and performance of employees in this field are also identified (Fried, & Johnson, 2002). Therefore, in order to improve service delivery in the health sector and consequently promote a healthy society, it is critical to identify and analyze the various challenges facing human resources in the health sector. This will provide a basis for developing various interventions aimed at dealing with the identified challenges and consequently improving the quality of service delivery in…… [Read More]

References

American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration. (2012). American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration ... membership directory. Gainesville FL: Naylor.

Fried, B., & Fottler, M.D. (2011). Fundamentals of human resources in healthcare. Chicago: Health Administration Press.

Fried, B., & Johnson, J.A. (2002). Human resources in healthcare: Managing for success. Washington, DC: AUPHA Press.

Kabene, S.M. (2011). Human resources in healthcare, health informatics and healthcare systems. Hershey, PA: Medical Information Science Reference.
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Technology and Health Information Usage

Words: 6821 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 66338022

" (MediLexicon International, Ltd., 2006).

The PCIP was formed from the recognition that high costs and low quality inherent in the Healthcare system of the U.S. is largely due to a system that is antiquated and fragmented (DOHMH, 2006a). The inability to properly collect and use health information is one of the primary problems associated with proper health care maintenance. The PCIP. was formed in response to this need. The primary care physician acts as the conduit between the patient and the healthcare system. However, the physician often has no means to effectively transmit the information that they collect to other entities within the system. The PCIP grew out of a need for the primary health care Physician to be able to transmit the needed information to others in the Healthcare system.

There are three essential parts to the PCIP. The first is the Primary Care Health Information Consortium (PCHIC).…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. (DOHMH) 2006. PCIP. Retrieved August 30 at http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pcip/pcip.shtml

DOHMH 2006b. Primary Care Health Information Consortium (PCHIC). Retrieved August 30 at http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pcip/pcip-pchic.shtml.

MediLexicon International, Ltd. (2006). 1,000 New York City Doctors Will Get Electronic Health Records Systems. Retrieved August 30 at  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=42483 

The American Health Quality Foundation (AHQF)(2006). Quality Improvement Organizations and Health Information Exchange. March 6, 2006. Retrieved August 30 at  http://www.ehealthinitiative.org/assets/documents/QIOHIEFinalReportMarch62006.pdf#search=%22Health%20care%20information%20management%20PCIP%22
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Successful Implementation of Electronic Health

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69141364

From personal experience it is clear that including the healthcare professionals' feedback in each of the five phases of the SDLC model leads to systems that better align to patient's needs and streamline information delivery and knowledge management. Personal experiences have provided a unique glimpse of how powerful this dynamics is when done well with full inclusion of stakeholders. In the majority of instances however stakeholders are often ignored or only provided what the healthcare systems can deliver with little if any customization or configuration (Buntin, Burke, oaglin, Blumenthal, 2011). This is because customization and configuration is expensive and time-consulting to complete and is one of the leading causes of nurses being ignored during each phase of the SDLC model (Buntin, Burke, oaglin, Blumenthal, 2011). When this occurs a system fails to align to an organization and a significant amount of time and money are wasted.

In the first phase…… [Read More]

Healthcare organizations that define their Health Information Technology (HIT) initiatives and plans from the perspective of the internal customer or user of the system first have significantly greater levels of system adoption, process improvements, greater impact on positive patient outcomes as well (Buntin, Burke, Hoaglin, Blumenthal, 2011). From personal experience it is clear that including the healthcare professionals' feedback in each of the five phases of the SDLC model leads to systems that better align to patient's needs and streamline information delivery and knowledge management. Personal experiences have provided a unique glimpse of how powerful this dynamics is when done well with full inclusion of stakeholders. In the majority of instances however stakeholders are often ignored or only provided what the healthcare systems can deliver with little if any customization or configuration (Buntin, Burke, Hoaglin, Blumenthal, 2011). This is because customization and configuration is expensive and time-consulting to complete and is one of the leading causes of nurses being ignored during each phase of the SDLC model (Buntin, Burke, Hoaglin, Blumenthal, 2011). When this occurs a system fails to align to an organization and a significant amount of time and money are wasted.

In the first phase of the SDLC Model, which is Requirements Analysis, is when a systems' functional specifications are defined and the system development frameworks are designed (Moore, Nolan, Gillard, 2006). When nurses aren't involved in this process, the entire foundation of a system will be incomplete and often based only on assumptions about what is needed; the system designers won't actually know what the requirements are because they haven't involved healthcare professionals. The rationalization sit hat inviting too much feedback from nurses will drive up customization costs (Buntin, Burke, Hoaglin, Blumenthal, 2011). In fact the opposite is true. Building the functional requirements and specifications of nursing professionals into requirements ensures each succeeding stage of the SDLC-driven development stays consistent.

The second stage of the SDLC model, which is design, is critical for ensuring a high degree of system adoption in that
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Trends Issues in Provision of Health Information Resources Services

Words: 1930 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90814371

Health Information esources/Services

Libraries have traditionally been safeguarded the fulfillment of goals of continuing education in their respective fields. It is felt to accord enhanced priority to the health science librarians while the continuing education experts enhance their knowledge of the learning process and the various elements that make the scope of the continuing education effective. eally, the role of health sciences libraries is enormous particularly in the sphere of the lifelong learning and Continuing Education. The concept of Continuing Education has been conveniently been divided by Gruppen as formal CE that concentrates on conventional programs concerning specific topics and aimed at particular audiences; and the informal CE that emphasizes on the learning that involves the anxiety of practitioners anxious of resolving the problems in their routine practice. (Messerle, 1990)

The role of health science libraries has been realized to be significant in both the categories of continuing education and…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Block, Karla J. (Summer, 1997) "Problem-based learning in medical education: Issues for health sciences libraries and librarians" Katharine Sharp Review. Graduate School of Library and Information Science, Dominican University/College of St. Catherine. No. 5. pp: 25-28

Braude, Robert. M; Wood, Samuel. J. (January, 1997) "On the origin of a species: evolution of health sciences librarianship" Bull Medical Library Association. Vol: 85; No: 1; pp: 116-121

Kronenfeld, Michael R. (January, 2005) "Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the "knowledge nexus" for their academic health centers" Journal of Medical Library Association. Vol: 93; No: 1; pp: 32 -- 39.

Messerle, J. (April, 1990) "The changing continuing education role of health sciences libraries" Bull Medical Library Association. Vol: 78; No: 2; pp: 180 -- 187.
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Significance of the Health

Words: 1555 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56901

Telemedicine: Possibilities and Issues

This is a paper regarding the use of communication technology in medicine and healthcare. The Issue is telemedicine, and the article related to is given in the reference.

The possibility, practicality and the desirability of the use of communication technologies are discussed and the issues in telemedicine identified. It is recommended that the issues be researched further and the implications, technical and medico legal sorted out side by side with the use of information and communication technologies in medicine.

The benefits of telemedicine can be enormous, and even save money in many cases, but there is also the potential for medico legal implications and the danger of excessive dependence on the machine rather than the man in the use of telemedicine. Overall, it is potentially a highly beneficial field provided it is driven by patient and healthcare needs rather than driven by the profit motive of…… [Read More]

References

Coiera, Enrico: "Recent Advances: Medical informatics" BMJ 1995;310:1381-1387 27 May, 1995. Enrico Coiera is project manager at Hewlett-Packard Research Laboratories, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS12 6QZ ]