Helen Of Troy Essays (Examples)

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Troy Wolfgang Petersen's 2004 Movie

Words: 1149 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7239352

For Paris was essentially a shepherd, and had only recently returned to Troy, thus, he had no military skills (Judgement pp).

Another way the movie made Paris a hero of sorts, is that he is portrayed as the one who tells his father King Priam to be cautious about the horse. hen actually, according to legend, it was his sister Cassandra, a priestess of psychic powers, knew the horse was deceptive and tried to warn her father, but he would not listen (Judgement pp). Then the priest, Laocoon, also tried to warn the Priam to beware of Greeks bearing gifts, yet he too was ignored (Judgement pp).

Another part of the legend that the movie left out was Agamemnon's sacrifice of his daughter, Iphigenia, to the goddess Artemis, in order to obtain favorable winds for the voyage to Troy (Judgement pp). And according to legend, the gods were basically the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Trojan War: The Judgement of Paris; pp.  http://www.royalty.nu/legends/Troy.html 

The Legend of the Trojan War

http://www.mala.bc.ca/~johnstoi/clas101/troy.htm

Troy." Director: Wolfgang Petersen. Warner Bros. 2004.
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Gorgias Encomium of Helen in the English

Words: 1083 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90839705

Gorgias, Encomium of Helen

In the English language in the twenty-first century, the term "sophistry" still exists to refer to a plausible-sounding but misleading argument, an evaluatively negative term to describe bad reasoning. Although the term derives from the original Sophists in Athens in the 5th century BCE, the modern usage of the term is inaccurate in describing the likes of the Sophist Gorgias. By examining Gorgias' "Encomium of Helen" and the related "dissoi logoi" fragment (sometimes attributed to Protagoras) we can see the real origins of sophistry in legal argumentation. In a society -- like that of Athens, or like most of the contemporary world -- that believes in jury trials as a means of obtaining justice, a work like Gorgias' "Encomium of Helen" represents the idea that even the most unlikely candidates deserve a good defense.

Athenian sophists like Gorgias were basically teachers of rhetoric. Because Plato frequently…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anonymous. "Dissoi Logoi." An Introduction to Classical Rhetoric: Essential Readings. Ed. James D. Williams. West Sussex, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. 54. Print.

Gorgias. "The Encomium of Helen." An Introduction to Classical Rhetoric: Essential Readings. Ed. James D. Williams. West Sussex, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. 64-66. Print.
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Film Troy 2004 A Mythical

Words: 892 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52233876

There are enough similarities of story and characterization, however, that while one must take care not to see Troy as fact, or even as an essentially faithful movie version of the Homer's the Iliad, one may still learn something about the plot, characters, and setting of Homer's great poem by seeing it. Educationally speaking, perhaps one of the greatest benefits of a major motion picture like Troy is that seeing it might interest more people in reading the Iliad, for comparison, and/or in learning more about Greek legends, myths, and mythological characters in general.

The basic plot and setting of the film is this: the Mycenae Greeks (Greece and Sparta) and the Trojans, having been at war, have finally reached peace after many years. Two handsome young Trojan princes, Hector and Paris (sons of King Priam) are celebrating this fact with Menelaus, King of Sparta (Menelaus's brother Agamemnon is King…… [Read More]

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Greek Concept to Movie Troy

Words: 962 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64147943

Greek Concept to Movie Troy

Ancient mythology as never ceased to amaze and fascinate its readers and followers. Especially Egyptian and Greek mythology, having followers everywhere; in the current times it has found a new fan, that is the movie making business, with a special interest in Greek mythology. Nothing is better than watching your favorite characters brought up to life and actually see them doing all the things we had previously only imagined them doing. One such captivating movie is 'troy' based on the Greek Trojan war starring Brad Pitt. Various Greek concepts were shed light in this movie, which will be discussed, in relation to the movie.

The first concept is Fate, since in Greek mythology fate does not just happen. The gods make things happen, in their own engineered ways, and interfere to make things happen on their own account. Then there is MOIA, which means that…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Walter Benjamin "The Task of the Translator" vol 1: 1913-1926. Marcus Bullock. Pg. 256-259

Roman Jacobson "The World of Movies, Media and Multimedia: language, history, theory" Pg. 26-266.

James Monaco "How to Read a Film" 3rd edition, Pg. 250-255.
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Competitive Landscape Analysis the Business

Words: 1673 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15608159

The modifications in the policies of the company's retail trade customers represent important risks that can lead to increased dependence on some of the retailers in developed markets. Another important risk is determined by the global manufacturing activities.

Although these companies develop and implement different strategies, some of the risks associated with their business are common. This is because some of these risks are determined by the international business environment that establishes the conditions in which these companies develop their activity. Some of the most important risks that these companies addressed in 2000 are represented by entering new markets. The potential presented by developing markets determined these companies to make investments in regions like Asian countries. Another important risk during that period was represented by companies' inability to retain important employees. This means that their human resources strategies did not reach the established objectives. In addition to this, the dependence…… [Read More]

Reference list:

1. Personal Care Appliances: A Global Strategic Business Report (2011). PRWeb. Retrieved May 19, 2011 from  http://www.prweb.com/releases/personal_care_appliances/hair_care_oral_care/prweb8128135.htm .

2. Annual Report (2010). Spectrum Brands. Retrieved May 22, 2011.

3. Annual Report (2010). Helen of Troy. Retrieved May 22, 2011.
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Dark Age and the Archaic Age

Words: 1920 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36563837

Dark Age and the Archaic Age

Having watched the lectures for the prior learning unit on video, I was prepared to enjoy the video lecture presentation for this learning unit. I previously found the presentation of lectures in the video format to be very convenient because I could observe at my own pace, rewind if I missed part of the lecture, have flexibility about when I was viewing the lecture, and not be distracted by the behavior or questions of other students. I acknowledged that there were some negatives to the video-learning environment, such as missing out on the organic and natural question and answers that develop in a live classroom setting, but had decided that missing those was an acceptable trade-off given the other benefits that I was receiving from the video lecture environment. Therefore, I was surprised to find that I did not enjoy the video lectures for…… [Read More]

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Cassandra Written by Christa Wolf

Words: 1455 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56943618

However, she is no bloodless female, absent of sexuality, despite her resistance of Apollo. In this respect, Wolf does update her story -- rather than a virgin or a sexless prophetess, Cassandra does have a relationship with Aeneas. She loves this hero with the ardor of a young woman, calling him the soul of Troy. But because he is a man, unlike Cassandra, Aeneas can master history and triumph. The admiration of Aeneas indicates the verisimilitude Wolf brings to her tale -- Cassandra has emotions and feelings, rather than simply spouts words, as in Agamemnon.

Wolf also interjects anecdotes into the story to make it more clearly told with Trojan eyes such as the Trojan's allegation that Helen was abducted because Priam's sister Hesione's eloped with a Spartan. Again, this underlines Wolf's theme of women as pawns and spoils of war -- it does not matter what Helen or Hesione…… [Read More]

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Epic Literature Women Are Shown

Words: 1368 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71556626

Many have seen her as Aeneas's counterpart, as she herself has led her people from Tyre to Carthage in an attempt to escape environmental vicissitudes. Like Aeneas, she is a true leader, a strong willed character and independent woman. Juno and Venus (the Roman counterparts of Hera and Aphrodite) manipulate them and Dido is soon seen infatuated with Aeneas, neglecting all ruling duties. She cannot change destiny and realizes this in ook IV, as she points out that "What am I saying? Where am I? What madness / Takes me out of myself? Dido poor soul, / Your evil doing has come home to you." According to ancient traditions, for a strong character such as Dido, the only possible ending is by suicide.

A comparison between Dido and Helen, both in terms of the influence they have on men and on their power to change courses in history and determine…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Character Analysis - Dido. On the Internet at http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/LitNote/id-3,pageNum-53.html

2. Virgil. The Aeneid. Translated by John Dryden. Book IV.

3.  http://www.umich.edu/~homeros/Politics%20in%20Homer/women%20in%20the%20iliad.htm 

4. Homer. The Iliad. Translated by Samuel Butler. Book II. 420-423
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Goethe and Marlowe Faust

Words: 1249 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18959769

Goethe and Marlowe, Faust

The Faust myth provides a writer with a chance to explore religious issues through the theme of damnation, while also allowing the writer to identify with the damned protagonist through a shared sense of ambition. This is palpable in both Marlowe's and Goethe's different versions of the Faust legend -- in both cases, it seems like the ambitious "striving" (to use a crucial Goethean word for Faust's essential nature) of the main character is mirrored by the author's ambition to present broad swathes of human and indeed divine experience on stage or into the reader's imagination. A comparison of the endings of these two different handlings of the Faust legend will, I think, illustrate crucial differences between not only Goethe's and Marlowe's differing literary ambitions, but also their different religious or spiritual worldviews.

In reality Marlowe's Faustus seems like Marlowe himself -- someone who is interested…… [Read More]

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Role of the Seven Deadly Sins in Doctor Faustus

Words: 1626 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29019835

Faustus, as Christopher Marlowe's character, is a German scholar who wants to exceed the limits of traditional logic, medicine, law and religion by practicing black magic. Through this, he calls upon Mephistopheles, a demon, who arranges a deal between Faustus and Lucifer for 24 years of power and glory in exchange for his soul. Despite Mephistopheles' warnings about the horrors of hell and his own doubts about what the deal really means, Faustus persists in the decision to enter into the bargain, which he signs in his own blood. ich gifts and displays of pleasure from Mephistopheles and Lucifer, though, distract his doubts and lull his senses and reason, in addition to Mephistopheles' impressive information about the nature of the universe. The parade of the seven deadly sins particularly wins Faustus' mind and will. In the fulfillment of their end of the bargain, Mephistopheles takes Faustus to ome, the court…… [Read More]

References

Dyce, Alexander, editor. The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe. The Quarto of 1616: Blackmask Online, 2001. http://www.blackmask.com/books15c/drfstadex.htm

Finnan, Dennis L. Seven Deadly Sins. The World, the Word and You! Broadcast, 1998. http://www.wwy.org/wwy3398.html

Goldfarb, Russell and Clarke, The Seven Deadly Sins in Doctor Faustus. http://www.industrialdisturbance.com/marlowe/explorer/seven.html

Marlowe, Christopher. The Tragedy of Doctor Faustus. Etext # 811, February 1997.  http://sailor.gutenbeg.org/etext97/drfsta10.txt
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Doctor Faustus Reasons Why He Was Willing to Accept Eternal Damnation

Words: 6431 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66458997

Faustus' Acceptance to Eternal Damnation

Many traditions and legends have been created all the way through the long history of western culture. Among which one of the most outstanding and well-known as well long lasting traditions of western culture is of the Faustus legend, where in this legend, a man called Faust or Faustus, sells his soul to the devil for almost twenty-four years for the purpose of worldly power. This makes it a very prominent story that has been narrated many times over by writers such as Goethe, Lessing, and Mann. However, most probably the famous telling is Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe.

The social upheaval during the time period is the most prominent influence on Marlowe's version of Doctor Faustus. This novel has been suspected of being first performed in 1594, which was a time of great change in Europe. During this period the Medieval Times were over…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Conflict in the Tragical History of Doctor Faustus. November 6, 1998.

A www.kcweb.nhmccd.edu

Christopher Marlowe. Books and Writers.

A www.kirjasto.sci.fi
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Dorian Gray Falls From Grace

Words: 1840 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92418343

Is this 'good' or natural one might ask, if Basil is one of the moral characters of the book and defying nature and wishing for eternal youth is immoral? Henry's counsel to Dorian that Dorian yield to his every natural temptation and not bow down to societal morality could be seen as an endorsement of the natural, but Henry also celebrates youth to an unnatural, unchanging degree and he too falls in love with Dorian's image before Dorian. Also, Henry, like Basil, is clearly amoral and self-interested himself, as seen in his disapproval that Dorian's impulses do not conform to Henry's own when Dorian is attracted to a pretty young actress.

Henry is a tempting figure, like Mephistopheles, but Dorian easily outdoes him in 'evil' or transgressions and unnaturalness. Dorian's love of youth, spawned by Henry, takes on a life of its own, just like Faustus' taunting of nature and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clausson, Nils. "Culture and Corruption": Paterian Self-Development vs. Gothic

Degeneration in Oscar Wilde's the Picture of Dorian Gray." Papers on Language and Literature. Fall 2003. 21 Apr 2007. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3708/is_200310/ai_n9329138

Marlowe, Christopher. "The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus." Project Gutenberg Etext.

1997. 21 Apr 2007. http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext97/drfst10a.txt
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Dante's Inferno

Words: 1018 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89378107

The Inferno: Cantos IV

The epic poem The Inferno, the first part of The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri, tells the story of the author on Good Friday in the 14th century. Lost in the forest, he encounters the spirit of the poet Virgil, who promises to reunite him with his beloved. In order to do so, they must take a path through hell. The Inferno is Dante’s tale of the underworld and subtle commentary on sin. There is much that is revealing regarding all the separate parts of this epic poem. This paper will discuss the many themes of the fifth Cantos. This Cantos shows us Dante’s panache for mixing history and myth as a means of confusing the reader, making the backdrop of hell appear more hellish. Also the relative innocuousness of the sins of the sinners of this level of hell also gives the entire presentation of…… [Read More]

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Hero The Definition of Hero

Words: 2709 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10495696



Madam Eglantyne the Nun, is also an ironic charater. She eats in a very refined manner and attempts other fine characteristics such as speaking French, although she fares poorly at this. Ironically, not all her language is pure, as she swears cosntantly by "St. Loy," a saint renowned for not swearing. Unlike the general conception of the Nun, she is very concerned with outward appearances and did not much care for human beings. Indeed, she cared much more for her three dogs than the human beings around her. Another irony is that she has a coral trinket to fight worldly temptations, which is clearly failing badly.

A second character is the Friar, Hubert. While he is jolly, merry, and festive, his actions are nevertheless evil and cunning. He impregnates girls, for example, and marries them off. He deceived the faithful by hearing confessions for a fee, and even begged from…… [Read More]

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Paul's Case Faust -- in

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86568737

Paul is rather lazy. He does not like to flatter other people, since he sees himself as superior to others, thinking he possesses greater refinement and culture. In contrast to another young man in the story, the young man who marries a serious woman to discipline his appetites, Paul has no desire to do so.

"It was at the Theatre and at Carnegie Hall that Paul really lived; the rest was but a sleep and a forgetting." (paragraph 29) --The last part of this quotation (in italics) is a sneaky reference to a poem by William Wordsworth, called "Intimations of Immortality." Look up this poem and determine what Wordsworth says about the various stages of life. How does this relate to Paul's story?

Paul lives in a fantasy world, not in the real world. His fantasy life leads to his death. The reference to sleep and forgetting suggests that he…… [Read More]

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British Lit Legends Tales About

Words: 2346 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55725005

"

In total contrast with these heroes lies the modern hero or better said the modern man defined by his struggle for power. The idea of an individual selling his or her soul to the devil for knowledge is an old motif in Christian folklore, one that is centered upon in Cristopher Marlowe's "Doctor Faustus."

Doctor Faustus, a well-respected German scholar unsatisfied with the traditional forms of knowledge decides he wants to learn to practice magic. He begins his career as a magician summoning Mephastophilis, a devil while Valdes and Cornelius instruct him in the black arts. Despite the devil's warnings about hell Faustus tells the devil to return to his master Lucifer with an offer of Faustus's soul in exchange for twenty-five years of service from Mephistopheles. As the twenty-five years have passed, Faustus begins to dread his impending death and on the final night he is overcome by…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. The Norton Anthology of English, Norton Topics Outline. 2003-2006. W.W. Norton and Company. On the Internet at http://www.wwnorton.com/nael/middleages/topic_4/welcome.htm.Last retrieved on November 24, 2006

2. The Sixteenth century topics: The Magician, the Heretic and the Playwright: Overview. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 2003-2006. W.W. Norton and Company. On the Internet at http://www.wwnortoncom/nto/16century/topic_1/welcome.htm

3. Jokinen, Aniina. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Luminarium: Anthology of English Literature. November 2006. On the Internet at  http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/gawainintro/htm.Last  retrieved on November 24, 2006

4. Sera, Joseph. A character analysis of Sir Gawain. Pace University Student Projects on Gawain. November 2006. On the Internet at http://csis.pace.edu/grendel/projs2d/ana/page.htm.Last retrieved on November 24, 2006
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Rhetorical Theory and Practice

Words: 2999 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3845924

Commonplace: "You Always Admire hat You Really Don't Understand"

There are a great many things that arouse admiration in this world of ours. Some of these things such as a creation of nature, a work of breathtaking art, scientific breakthroughs that benefit human kind, and acts of bravery are, without doubt, worthy of the admiration and the sentiment that they inspire. Unfortunately, however, human beings also fruitlessly admire a great many more things that are illusory in nature and, therefore, not really worthy of respect. Take, for instance, the human desire to be good looking, rich, successful and powerful. These qualities seem desirable purely because people who possess these attributes appear to be better off in life. But, are they really? Or, do these qualities give rise to admiration only because we don't really understand what being beautiful, wealthy, successful or powerful entails?

Perhaps, it is precisely the recognition that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cool Nurse. "Marijuana." Cool Nurse Web site. Accessed Oct. 28, 2004:

http://www.coolnurse.com/marijuana.htm

MDCH. "Key Facts from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health." Michigan

Department of Community Health. Accessed Oct. 28, 2004: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,1607,7-132-2941_4871-79336 -- ,00.html
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Sula by Toni Morrison

Words: 3078 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29838375

Life:

he main character of the novel, Sula, has always been in search of true love. She tried to seek compassion and love from many different sources, but every time had to face disappointment and failure. She had relationships and contacts with many people but the outcome was always unpleasant.

In her childhood she came close to Nel and eventually they both became best friends. he family background of both girls was different and contrasting yet they shared a strong bond and relationship. hey were friends since childhood but the incident where Sula accidently killed Chicken Little (drowned in the river and the girls decided to keep quite) changed their whole lives. hey started to get apart after this incident, as the differences in their personalities became visible and evident. Both of the friends took different decisions about their future lives. After ten years when Sula came back to Bottom,…… [Read More]

The tunnel was a source of earning livings by people especially by black African natives. They were appointed to build the tunnel. The tunnel was also known as new river road. This tunnel was a symbol of hope and respect for the people of town. It motivated and encouraged them that they will be able to get the equal rights and the world will acknowledge their presence. They also felt that they will have money to fulfill the needs and desires of their families. But all these hope and motivation ended when they had to face constant racism and discrimination from the white people. The white people were interested in destroying the land of black people and build a golf course.

Every year the Suicide Day was celebrated by the people of Bottom in order to get their rights of freedom. The writer demonstrated the civil rights movement during the period of World War I and World War II in the novel.

In 1941, people got aggressive as a result of the negative responses from the government about their rights. The black people were tired of facing and tolerating continuous discrimination, and as a result they marched towards the tunnel and destroyed the whole structure. The tunnel was ruined and destroyed and many lives were also lost during that riot.
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Ethics of War

Words: 2010 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43083612

Ethics of ar: Justified and Unjustified ar

hen countries launch hostile military actions against other nations to the point where war occurs, the belligerents will inevitably have fundamentally opposing views concerning the legitimacy of the conflict and each opposing side will offer its poignant justification for its respective moral, legal and political positions regarding the conflict. In many cases, all belligerents in a war may have equally compelling just causes, and these causes can change from just to unjust even as the war is being fought. Indeed, scarcity of resources is frequently at the heart of many wars, but virtually all wars throughout history have also been justified on the basis of both sound and spurious rationales, the veracity of which depends on who is asking and who is being asked, questions that quickly become heated when religious reasons are included in the mix. To get at the heart of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexandrov, Stanimir A. (1997, January 1). "Self-Defense against the Use of Force in International Law." The George Washington Journal of International Law and Economics 30(2/3): 605-610.

Dagi, Ihsan. (2013, Winter). "Editor's Note." Insight Turkey 15(1): 4-5.

Elshtain, Jean Bethke. (2005, October). "Against the New Utopianism: Response to 'Against the New Internationalism.' Ethics & International Affairs 19(2): 91-93.

Nardin, Terry. (2002, April). "The Moral Basis of Humanitarian Intervention." Ethics & International Affairs 16(1): 57-63.
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Chaucer and Shakespeare

Words: 328 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18441384

Troilus and Cressida, characters significant to Homer's depiction of the Trojan War in the epic Iliad by Homer, have been portrayed as different personalities in versions of the play written by Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare. Although the story is just adapted from Homer's epic, the two British writers created and used the lovers' story to make their own interpretation of life during the Trojan War, particularly the depiction of the characters of Troilus and Cressida during this significant period in the history of Western civilization. In Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, the setting happens in the midst of the Trojan War. Troilus is portrayed as an unloving man, who, after being struck by the curse of love, has loved Criseyde. Criseyde, on the other hand, is portrayed as a playful woman, going out with other men despite Troilus' devotion to her. The story ends with Troilus' tragic end, leading him…… [Read More]

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Shaw Rhys

Words: 2213 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32923381

Shaw's primary purposes in writing Pygmalion, the story of a phonetics professor who, on a bet, transforms a guttersnipe of a flower girl into a lady, was to educate. The title of the play comes from the Greek myth of Pygmalion, a sculptor who created a statue of surpassing beauty; at his request, the gods animated the statue as Galatea. The myth is updated, and substantially altered, by Shaw; instead of a statue, Galatea is Eliza Doolittle, a Covent Garden flower girl, whose accent immediately marks her out as from the very bottom of the English class structure. Professor Henry Higgins, an expert on accents and pronunciation, represents Pygmalion. He undertakes to transform her speech so that she can be taken for a duchess at a society party and succeeds in spite of the inherent difficulties.

In his foreword to the play, Shaw writes, "It is so intensely and deliberately…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Page, E. Postcolonial Discourse in Wide Sargasso Sea http://www.qub.ac.uk/en/imperial/carib/sargasso.htm

2. The Victorian Web, www.victorianweb.org/post/caribbean/dominica/rhys/ripple18.html

3. Romantic Times Book Club, "Plain Jane - What's the Appeal? www.romantictimes.com/f_reader/f3a_49.html

4. Literary Encyclopedia, Article on Jean Rhys www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=8787
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Daily Life for Greek Women

Words: 2765 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22352252

Odyssey: Daily Life for Women

When it comes to the Greeks, Homer's Odyssey is recognized as a piece of literature that was not just about gods, men, and creatures, this historical read served as a cultural example about the women and their place in society. This book, provides a wide-ranging view of the Achean's peacetime people. Throughout Odyssey, a person is able to pick up some understanding of what is appropriate or inappropriate in relationships among servant and master, father and son, guest and host, god and mortal, and--notably -- woman and ma. It is clear that the women are the ones that perform an important role in Odyssey. With that said, this essay will explore the daily life of women from the literature Odyssey.

Social customs, marriage, rights and freedoms

While Odysseus is looked at as being an interesting figure, the women persons in the Odyssey are just as…… [Read More]

References

Austin, Norman. Helen of Troy and Her Shameless Phantom. Ithaca: Cornell University Press,, 2009.

Cahill, Jane. Her Kind: Stories of Women from Greek Mythology. Peterborough, Ont: Broadview Press, 2005.

Cohen, Beth. The Distaff Side: Representing the Female in Homer's Odyssey. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

DeBois, Page. Centaurs and Amazons: Women and the Pre-history of the Great Chain of Being. Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2012.
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Homer and the Illiad What

Words: 1408 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4864014



The Guilt and Shame In Heroes

Sometimes, there is a misconception that heroes do not feel shame and guilt. For instance, in a movie, when heroes eliminate their adversaries, the viewers are happy because they just think of the good result that such action can bring to everyone. The viewers do not care of how the hero may have felt about his action of getting rid of the enemies and the viewers may think that the hero will feel happy and proud for what he did. However, in the Iliad of Homer, it is apparent that even heroes do feel shame and guilt. The best example of which are revealed in the characters of Achilles and Hector.

Achilles was a great Greek fighter. His passion was to fight and become well-known for his fighting skills. He was known to be the greatest fighter in Greece, thus despite Menelaus and Achilles…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Homer, The Iliad.  http://www.bopsecrets.org/rexroth/cr/1.htm#Homer,%20The%20Iliad 

Homer and the Oral Tradition. http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/ckostopo/GreeceY&T/Homer.rtf

Olesker, Katie. The Conflicting Views of Helen. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/classes/KOp.html

Shay, Jonathan. Review of Achilles in Vietnam.
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Ancient Mythology East and West Multicultural Comparison of Myths

Words: 1101 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76927417

mythology and ancient beliefs. Specifically it will compare the myths of heroism in the myth of Achilles to the modern film "Troy." The film "Troy," from 2004, is a remake of the Homer classic "The Iliad," which recounts the legend of the Greek warrior Achilles. In the film, actor Brad Pitt plays Achilles, giving him a larger than life, heroic quality. Achilles is the child of a mortal and a nymph, and his parents attempt to give him immortality by dipping him in the iver Styx, but they miss a tiny spot on his heel, and this leads to his downfall.

Both of these myths center around the idea of the hero in mythology, and in fact, they show the importance of heroes in the Greek society 3500 years ago. The translator of the Iliad writes, "Heroes are born into positions of prominence, which they also reaffirm by their public…… [Read More]

References

Homer. Iliad. Trans. Stanley Lombardo. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, 1997.

Troy. Dir. Wolfgang Petersen. Perf. Brad Pitt, Orlando Bloom, Eric Bana, Brian Cox. Warner Brothers, 2004.
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Homer -- Was the Blind Bard a

Words: 1516 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79448947

Homer -- Was the Blind Bard a Poetic Activist for War or Peace?

Homer is a poet of war, namely the war between the Greeks and Trojans, and later in his "Odyssey," of the war between Odysseus and the gods whom would bar him from his trajectory homeward. He is a poet of war in the sense that war provides the narrative structure of how he outlines how a moral human being lives in a violent, conflict-based society. However, Homer also chronicles in his works with what might seem to the modern reader, a distinctly anti-war literary sentiment and tone. This is perhaps best embodied in the example of Odysseus himself as a character. Homer's most famous anti-hero initially attempted to simulate madness to avoid being a participant in the Trojan wartime events, because they were far away from his beloved home of Ithaca and wife Penelope.

However, Homer's anti-war…… [Read More]

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Cassandra in Agamemnon Cassandra Prophecies

Words: 806 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57280100



The imagery she uses also reflects the pain that she experiences as she envisions the murder about to take place and the fact that she too will killed: she speaks of Clytemnestra as a lion: "Vengeance broodeth still, a lion's rage, which goes not forth to kill / But lurketh in his lair, watching the high hall…" Then she speaks of her as a wolf and as a serpent. The imagery is repeatedly of deadly animals, culminating in this terrible prophecy: "Some Skylla, deep / Housed in the rock, where sailors shriek and die, / Mother of Hell blood-raging, which doth cry / On her own flesh war, war without alloy…" Cassandra equates the revenge that Clytemnestra seeks with the revenge that the Greeks sought against Paris at Troy. War follows war -- even when peace is supposed and expected.

The narrative voice of Agamemnon is undisturbed by Cassandra's prophecy…… [Read More]

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Achilles a Sympathetic Character Achilles the Grandson

Words: 1660 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87694169

Achilles a Sympathetic Character

Achilles, the grandson of Aeacus was regarded as the greatest and primal character in Homer's Iliad, the ancient epic of Greek mythology. Even though Achilles is the central character of the epic, he is considered to be an unsympathetic character. Achilles was the son of the king of Meymidouns in Phthia, Pelues, and sea nymph Thetis. As the legend goes, Achilles made invincible by his mother Thetis by dipping him in the river Styx, however, ignored to wet his heel she held him by and made him vulnerable to be killed by a blow to that heel. (Achilles [Categories: LGBT mythology, People who fought in the Trojan ar]) Homer's Iliad, develops around the Trojan ar that spans for ten years between Greeks and the Trojans. Illiad depicts the involvement of gods and goddesses in the lives of mortal beings. (Troy Movie Review: arner Bros. Troy vs.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Achilles [Categories: LGBT mythology, People who fought in the Trojan War]. Retrieved

from http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/encyclopedia/a/ac/achilles.htm

Accessed 26 October, 2005

Eadon, Jim. Troy: Directed by Wolfgang Petersen. 2004. Retrieved from http://www.eadon.com/movies/troy.php Accessed 26 October, 2005
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Homer the Eternal Cycle of

Words: 2324 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26315712

Achilles, in effort to match his personal loss on a national level, strives to kill Hector, again fueling the economy of revenge, but this time in a far more 'high stakes' manner. Now, the loss of a man will result in the loss of Troy's greatest warrior. But even though Achilles emerges victorious from this struggle, his is an empty victory. He knows that his own death will follow shortly after the death of Hector. He does not care; revenge means everything to him in the heat of the moment, just like sacrificing the Greek advantage was worth upholding his honor at the beginning of the poem.

Although Achilles' sudden loyalty to his friend may seem honorable to some degree, perhaps more honorable than Menelaus' obsession with Helen, it also shows how the dynamic of loss leading to more and greater losses has spiraled out of control. The one real…… [Read More]

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Self and the Other

Words: 2063 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24224074

Trojan Wars and Culture

The three epic stories namely, The Iliad, the Trojan Women, Pericle's Funeral Oration are powerfully written master pieces of work, that illustrate the element of horridness of war beautifully.

The Iliad

The story of Homer's Iliad focuses on the "rage of Achilles." eading this epic poem makes one believe that it is based entirely on the totality and gruesomeness of war. However, it tells us about the details of war with full description and information. Though war is an important aspect of the tale, but the real story is based on the remarkable fighter and hero-that man is none other than Achilles.

Achilles possesses the greatest military expertise of any of the Achaean ranks and also the greatest fighting ability out of all of the warriors, Trojan or Achaean. At the beginning of the epic, Achilles becomes liberated from his fellow warriors and retreats back to…… [Read More]

References

Homer, The Iliad

McLaren, The Trojan Women

Thucydides, Pericles's Funeral Oration
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Peace or War in Homer

Words: 2107 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88344698



Is it a sign of inconsistency in Athena that at the end of the Odyssey she echoes the sentiment of Zeus and sues for peace whereas in Book 4 of the Iliad she is all too eager to ignore the sentiment of her father and manipulate the warriors into shedding more blood? Again -- not necessarily. hile, were it up to Zeus he would gladly see men work out their problems in a peaceful way, and, if he can help it, only sends strife and war when men need to be punished. The relationship between war and peace is complicated by the fact that he is not the only god (even if he is king of the gods). The gods seem to have just as many quarrels and disagreements among themselves as men do on Earth -- a point Zeus knows quite well. That is the reason he presides over…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. The Iliad. (Trans. By Richmond Lattimore). IL: University of Chicago Press,

1951. Print.

Homer. The Odyssey. (Trans. By Robert Fitzgerald). NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux,

1961. Print.
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Cassandra the Novel Cassandra by

Words: 1570 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14739738

In Homer, he can boast: "Do you not see what a man I am, how huge, how splendid / and born of a great father, and the mother who bore me immortal?" (Homer Book 21, lines 108-109, p. 421).

In Cassandra however, he can still boast but doesn't always get away with it. In a rather accusatory and insulting tone, olf referred to Achilles in this way: "A fiend in battle so that everyone would see he was not a coward, he did not know what to do with himself once the fighting was done...And this is the man to whom Calchas the seer later had to turn over his daughter." (83) Cassandra believed that Achilles' brave soldier act was but only a facade. hile Homer mentions facts to capture the essence of Achilles' personality, olf uses observation and perception to get her results. The bottom line was the same…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bibliography

McDonald, W.E. "Who's Afraid of Wolf's Cassandra-or Cassandra's Wolf?: Male Tradition and Women's Knowledge in Cassandra." Journal of Narrative Technique. Ypsilanti, MI (JNT). 1990 Fall, 20:3, 267-283.

Russi, Roger Ph.D. Dialogues of Epic Figures: Christa Wolf's Kassandra, Monique Wittig's Les Geurilleres, and Marion Zimmer Bradley's the Firebrand. Diss. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1993. Ann Arbor: A Bell & Howell Company, 1993.

Wolf, Christa. Cassandra: A Novel and Four Essays. Trans. Jan Van Heurck. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Inc., 1984.
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Atomic Testing Though Modern People

Words: 11346 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33269463



The First Nuclear Test

Of course, the first nuclear test occurred before the 1950s and was part of the United States' effort to develop an atomic weapon during World War II. This test occurred at 5:30 A.M. On July 16, 1945, at a missile range outside of Alamogordo, New Mexico. Even that test was enough to convince a large group of scientists that the atomic weapon was a dangerous and powerful weapon. "The Franck Report," a petition issued by Leo Szilard and 68 other scientists urged President Truman to first demonstrate the capabilities of the atomic bomb before using it as a weapon against the Japanese, because of the mass destruction that came with the bomb.

This test, known as the Trinity Test, was a tremendous success. "The energy developed in the test was several times greater than that expected by scientific group. The cloud column mass and top reached…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams, Cecil. 1984. "Did John Wayne die of cancer caused by a radioactive movie set?" The Straight Dope. http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a2_016.html (Accessed August 19, 2008).

American Cancer Society. 2006. "Radiation exposure and cancer." Cancer.org. http://www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/content/PED_1_3X_Radiation_Exposure_and_Cancer.asp?sitearea=PED (Accessed August 19, 2008).

Ball, Howard. 1996. "Downwind from the bomb." The New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A0DEED61438F93AA35751C0A960948260&sec=health&spon=&pagewanted=1 (Accessed August 19, 2008).

Brodersen, Tom. 2002. "Compensation available to fallout cancer victims." Sharlot Hall
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Power of the Gods Demonstrated

Words: 1166 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94955626

Here we can see that Agamemnon struggled over what to do but finally set his eyes upon the prize. His crime becomes justified through the victory. However, when Agamemnon kills his own daughter, he is violating one of the most fundamental rules set in place by the gods, which prohibits the murder of a family member. Agamemnon is indifferent to what he has done. hen Clytaemestra confronts him about it, he says, "I have no fear" (925) in relation to his sense of right and wrong. The gods will not allow him to enjoy his victory just as they did not allow Paris to enjoy his.

Zeus uses others to exact this revenge with Clytemnestra being the most powerful example of how events work out to his favor. hen she murders Agamemnon, we see how the glory of the king and his victories do not matter in the gods' big…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aeschylus. Agamemnon. The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1985.
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Cassandra -- a Woman Scorned

Words: 1105 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75678013

Ironically, Apollo who preferred Troy to Greece in the Trojan ar could have saved his city. Apollo's anger resulted in his beloved city of Troy's destruction. hen Cassandra warned that the Trojan horse would bring about the destruction of Troy, no one believed her, even her own father and mother.

hat is truly tragic about Cassandra, however, is not simply that the Trojan ar results in her eventual demise -- she is taken by Agamemnon at the war's end and killed by his angry and avenging wife Clymmenstra -- but of all the character of the Trojan saga, she alone does not chose her fate. Paris chooses to abscond with Helen, and thus brings about the war. Achilles on the Greek side chooses a short life filled with glory, rather than a long and uneventful life, and thus chooses to fight in the war. But Cassandra did not even chose…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fitton, Laura. "Cassandra: Cursed Prophetess." Art history. Images of Women. 1998. http://www.arthistory.sbc.edu/imageswomen/papers/fittoncassandra/intro.html

Parada, Carlos. "Cassandra." Greek Mythology. Accessed 12 Apr. 2005. http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/gml/cassandra.html

Sandels, V.E.K. "Cassandra." Greek Mythology: Troy. Page last modified 2004. Accessed 12 Apr 2005.  http://www.in2greece.com/english/historymyth/mythology/names/cassandra.htm 

Saunders, Chas & Peter Ramsey. Godchecker.com. Page last modified on 12 February 2004. Accessed 12 Apr 2005. http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/gml/cassandra.html
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Lucas Cranach the Elder the Judgment of Paris

Words: 1067 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85212590

artwork entitled "The Judgment of Paris," by Lucas Cranach the Elder. Specifically, it will briefly describe the subject of the work, and analyze the work in regard to its expressive content. What statement do you think the artist wanted to make? What techniques did the artist use to make this statement? Discuss the composition; the treatment of figures; the use of color, light/shade; scale; the treatment of space; the handling of paint; the organization of space. "The Judgment of Paris" depicts a famous mythological scene with great attention to detail and reality. Cranach's work expresses the myths of old set in his current time of the 15th and 16th centuries. His ability to combine ancient stories with modern settings might have been incongruous, but instead, his paintings are stimulating examples that blend elements to created a coherent and charming whole.

THE JUDGMENT OF PAIS

Lucas Cranach the Elder was a…… [Read More]

References

Editors. "Lucas Cranach the Elder." ArtCyclopedia.com. 2002. 3 April 2003.  http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/cranach_the_elder_lucas.html 

Scherer, Margaret R. The Legends of Troy in Art and Literature. 2nd ed. New York: The Phaidon Press, 1964.
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Achilles the Hero Without Doubt

Words: 1625 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12765227

He is described as being of gigantic size and of tremendous emotion. Always Achilles is described with the most exaggerated terms, shining like the sun or falling in the most absolute wretchedness. In a moment of sublimity oddly precognizant of gothic writers like E.A. Poe, Achilles refuses to bury his beloved Patrocles' body because "since I'm journeying under the earth after you, I'll postpone your burial...Till that time, you'll lie like this with me..." (book 18, 330-338) Achilles is perfect and heroic in the extremity of his nature. A more archetypal approach would say that he was heroic because, more than any other character, he represented the purity of war. Archtypically, he represents a purity of action and emotion than can drive men to battle, the pure warrior who is at once filled with the strength of emotion and will and yet resigned to perfect destiny, faithful towards the gods,…… [Read More]

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Illiad Being Acknowledged by Most

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6295352



The Myrmidon king took advantage of the opportunity and began to chase the Trojan, which had lastly realized his physical disadvantage and the fact that he had little chances of winning the combat. Hector had not been moved by his people's cries "and he stood his ground awaiting huge Achilles as he drew nearer towards him." The gods had also intervened in Achilles favor through Minerva, who tricked Agamemnon into thinking that she had been his loved brother, Deiphobus. Agamemnon responded to his brother's calls, stopping to fight Achilles, but shortly understood that he had been deceived, deducing that his "death is now indeed exceedingly near at hand." The clash had clearly been unfair, with Achilles putting an end to Hector's life both because of his physical advantage and because of the assistance received from the gods.

Observing that his son had been killed and that his body had been…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Homer. Geoffrey Stephen, Kirk. (1985). "The Iliad, a commentary." Cambridge University Press.

2. Yan, Hektor K.T. "Morality and Virtue in Poetry and Philosophy: A Reading of Homer's Iliad XXIV." Humanitas, Vol. 16, 2003.

3. Homer. Macleod, Colin. (1982). "Iliad." Cambridge University Press.
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Leda and the Swan Rhetorical

Words: 681 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29750502

"The broken wall, the burning roof and tower / and Agamemnon dead." Leda's body is broken through penetration, and Troy's wall also becomes broken. Zeus' desire burns, like the roofs and towers of Troy will burn. And men will die, including the great general Agamemnon. Time rushes forward in an instant.

Leda's pregnancy resulted in Helen, for whom the Trojan ar was waged. Yet the future war is also a kind of synecdoche for the violence done to Leda. The violence of war and the violence of sexuality are intertwined, and become metaphors for one another. The reader is suddenly aware that he or she has been reading an extended metaphor, both for how one sexual act can lead to violence, and also how violence is at the heart of all sexual activity. The poem reaches its climax with the sexual act, which foreshadows the horror to come.

Then, the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Yeats. W.B. "Leda and the Swan." Online Literature Library. 11 Nov 2007. http://www.online-literature.com/yeats/865
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Homer Will the Real Greek Homer Please

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5787006

Homer

Will the Real Greek Homer Please Stand Up?

Homer is the name by which the legendary Greek poet of great fame is known. He is credited with the Greek epics The Iliad and They Odyssey, as well as with the authorship of the mini-epic Batrachomyomachia, the corpus of the Homeric Hymns, and also the Margites. (Docu) Nothing about Homer's actual biographical information is known, (though he is commonly assumed to have been blind) and there are many theories that speculate Homer himself may have been completely mythological, or that he may have been more than one person. It is assumed, however, that Homer's works originated from the Greek settlements on the west coast of Asia Minor in the 9th century BC (Helenism), and several Ionian cities claim to be the birthplace of Homer. (Docu) Although Homer's works great works The Iliad and The Odyssey have shaped a great deal…… [Read More]

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Agamemnon the Characters in Aeschylus'

Words: 644 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77165336

Yet they also quickly undermine their strengths as leaders by focusing overly much on their impulse to take revenge. Revenge is a key theme of Agamemnon, a driving force behind most of the characters' actions.

Selfhood is depicted as a journey in Aeschylus' play mainly through the title character. Agamemnon's changing sense of self contrasts considerably with that of his wife. While Agamemnon has let go of the sacrifice of Iphigenia to focus on the present and future demands of his position, Queen Clytemnestra does not. She harbors guilt and resentment to a breaking point, feeling and then acting on an irrational urge to murder. Whereas Agamemnon becomes aware of the destructive power of hubris in the human spirit, his wife does not. He refuses to play into her egotistical demands such as walking with pomp down the purple-plated floor. By bolstering his image, Queen Clytemnestra only boosts her sense…… [Read More]

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African Novels When Authors Are

Words: 1723 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95300513

If anything, the more languages in which a book is published the better. This way there can be as much cross fertilization of ideas and solutions to pressing needs.

eferences

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: Penguin, 2006.

____African Trilolgy. London: Picador, 2000

Ashcroft, Bill; Griffiths, Gareth and Tiffin, Helen (eds.). The Post Colonial Studies eader, London: outledge, (1995)

Bassnett-McGuire, Susan. Translation Studies. London: outledge, 1991.

Chevrier, Jacques. "Writing African books in the French Language L'Afrique littcraire et artistique 50 (1979): 49.

Janmohamed, a. Janmohamed, a. "Sophisticated Primitivism: The Syncretism of Oral and Literate Modes in Achebe, Chinua Things Fall Apart.." Ariel: A eview of International English Literature 15 (1984): 19-39.

Gikandi, Simon. "The Epistemology of Translation: Ngugi, Matigari, and the Politics of Language." esearch in African Literatures 22.4 (1991): 161-67.

Gyasi, Kwaku. Writing as Translation: African Literature and the Challenges of Translation.: esearch in African Literatures a.2. (1999).,…… [Read More]

References

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: Penguin, 2006.

____African Trilolgy. London: Picador, 2000

Ashcroft, Bill; Griffiths, Gareth and Tiffin, Helen (eds.). The Post Colonial Studies Reader, London: Routledge, (1995)

Bassnett-McGuire, Susan. Translation Studies. London: Routledge, 1991.
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Achilles and Hector Are Depicted

Words: 1396 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23364255

It is rather like a feud in this respect -- the one who commits the final act of revenge is declared the winner.

Hector is the Trojan warrior whose character differs greatly from that of Achilles and who has very different reasons for fighting. here Achilles fights for glory, Hector sacrifices himself or his family, his country, and his ideals. His dedication to family is apparent as he visits his wife and children while delivering a message away from the battlefield, a clear contrast with the way Achilles ignores family obligations. Hector places himself in harm's way knowingly in service to his city, a contrast with Achilles, who sulks in his tent because of his own pride and not because of any concern for his country. At the same time, both men tend to be reckless, as seen in hector when he is advised by Polydamus to retire from the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Benjamin, S.G.W. Troy: Its Legend, History and Literature. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1880.

Fagles, Robert (tr.). The Iliad. New York: Viking, 1990.

Scott, John a. The Unity of Homer. New York: Biblo and Tannen, 1965.
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Homeric Epics -- a Comparison

Words: 2127 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12091991

However, when Achilles touches Priam as token that he should have no fear; both gods and mortals are said to be asleep. There is a sense of will in Achilles' gentleness towards the man, and his willingness to touch Priam's sleeve that night. In other words, human and divine reconciliation and pity is not simply a law, humans must accept the will of the gods, but they are also capable of choosing to add or subtract the misery of the world by showing pity to their fellow humans. Odysseus' cleverness, although aided by the gods, is also partly drawn from his own resourcefulness and character, as well as merely because Athena helps him.

Achilles makes what is said to be the greatest gift to Priam, that of Hector's body. In Greek custom, gifts were customary to give to visitors. ith such a gift, Achilles gives up his determination to mourn…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. "The Iliad." Trans. Robert Fagles. New York: Penguin, 1990.

Homer. "The Odyssey." Trans. Robert Fagles. New York: Penguin, 1996
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Hector vs Achilles the Noblest

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29420096

War is a fact of life, a terrible fact of life, but when it is willed by the gods it cannot be ignored.

Achilles does have some positive moral characteristics: although he spends much of the Iliad retreating from the fighting, he is clearly not a coward, in contrast to the Trojan Paris. He wants to fight, but his honor is too bruised. Furthermore, Achilles harbors a deep and abiding affection for his friend Patroclus, and the Greeks idealized this type of male friendship often more than husband-wife relationships. When Hector kills Patroclus in battle, because he believes him to be Achilles, Achilles is thrown into a frenzy of grief. He puts aside the slight done to him by Agamemnon, and vows to kill Hector.

Still, unlike Hector, who is repeatedly shown rallying the Trojans to fight in more glorious ways through his wise leadership, Achilles' bravery is often emotional,…… [Read More]

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Hero as a Model of

Words: 782 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95207241



Revenge, too, is prominent in all of these works: Beowulf must destroy the monster our of revenge for the havoc on the Kingdom; the Greeks must avenge the kidnapping of Helen and the slights against their lands; the Knight, the Miller and the ife of Bath all must seek revenge for perceived wrongs. Poems like Canterbury Tales, Beowulf, and the Iliad and Odyssey, especially as oral tradition, frame the journey of the hero through trials and tribulations to, eventually success. The saving of society, though, is often met with grave personal sacrifice, sometimes of tangible wealth, more often of loved ones, or, in the case of Beowulf, the ultimate sacrifice -- giving up one's own life in the service of society.

Yet in each of the tales there is at least one, and frankly many more, characters that have a fatal personality flaw that causes not only consternation, but increases…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bittarello, M.B. "Recrafiting the Past: The Complex Relationship Between Myth and Ritual." Pomegranate: The International Journal of Pagan Studies 10.2 (2008): 214-19.

Cambpell, J. The Hero With a Thousand Faces. New York: New World Library, 2008.

Campbell, J. And B. Moyers. The Power of Myth. New York: Anchor Books, 1991.

Voytilla, S. Myth and the Movies. New York: Michael Wiese Productions, 1999.
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Orchestrate the Plot Such That

Words: 1323 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19111953



The moral background in Life's a Dream is vastly different than that in Iphigeneia at Aulis, but the human elements of the story remain quite analogous. From Vasily's position as king, he acts to rob his son of his right to the throne, from his position as a father, he treats him is a way that Sigismund believes "denied me my humanity." (Calderon de la Barca, 118). In this way, Vasily violates his legal obligation to his son, as well as his patriarchal responsibilities to him. This second responsibility is immoral from a seventeenth century point-of-view in Europe, since a Christian father must raise his children with compassion and understanding; the first is illegal.

Unlike Agamemnon, Vasily behaves in such a way in the hopes of avoiding the fulfillment of prophesy -- Agamemnon felt that he had to fulfill it. As a result, Vasily sacrifices his son's well-being to preserve…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Calderon de la Barca, Pedro. Life's a Dream. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 2004.

Euripides. Iphigeneia at Aulis. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.

Morrison, Toni. Beloved. New York: Plume Publishing, 1998.
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Risk and Hazard Factors of

Words: 3788 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60811016

Even though users of light therapy are often advised not to look directly at the light source, the mechanisms of the eye focus incoming light onto the macula, the small region of the retina where vision takes place, and where age-related macular degeneration occurs. Since blue light wavelength make up only a small percentage of the light in white light, any form of light therapy using a high proportion of blue light therefore risks subverting a variety of defensive mechanisms that protect the retina against blue light hazard. These defensive mechanisms include the anatomical positioning and structure of eye and its surrounding features, as well as human posture, which makes it awkward for humans to gaze upwards for long periods of time. Sunnex iotechnologies, 2008)

The work of David H. Sliney entitled: "Ocular Hazards of Light" presented at the International Lighting in Controlled Environments Workshop states the following risks and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Figueiro, M.G., J.D. Bullough, R.H. Parsons, and M.S. Rea. Preliminary Evidence for Spectral Opponency in the Suppression of Melatonin by Light in Humans. Neuroreport, Vol. 15, 2004, pp. 313-316 in: Figueiro, Mariana, Bullough, John D. And Rea, Mark S. (2007) Light isn't just for vision anymore: implications for transportation safety. United States Department of Transportation Lighting Research Center Region 2 University Transportation Research Center Polytechnic Institute 31 Dec 2 -- "7

Figueiro, M., et al. Demonstration of additivity failure in human circadian phototransduction. Neuro Endocrinology Letters, Vol. 26, 2005, pp. 493-498.

Ingling, C.R., E. Martinez, and a.L. Lewis. Tonic-Phasic-Channel Dichotomy and Crozier's Law. Journal of the Optical Society of America, Vol. 73, 1983, pp. 183-189 in Figueiro, Mariana, Bullough, John D. And Rea, Mark S. (2007) Light isn't just for vision anymore: implications for transportation safety. United States Department of Transportation Lighting Research Center Region 2 University Transportation Research Center Polytechnic Institute 31 Dec 2 -- "7 Report

Lack, Leon, Bramwell, Toby, Wright, Helen, and Kemp, Krystyn (2007) Morning blue light can advance the melatonin rhythm in mild delayed sleep phase syndrome
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Characters in Search of an

Words: 2066 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27012235

Pirandello's self-conscious use of the nature of theater and the way people play roles in the theater and in family life was considered revolutionary at the time. His title "Six Characters in Search of an Author" stressed the fact that the fourth wall between the audience and the actors was being broken down in the construct of the drama itself, not merely alluded to, as in a Shakespearean soliloquy or a 'play within a play device' and within a family at war traditional roles, like father/son, father/stepdaughter are broken down.

Yet as revolutionary as he may seem, Pirandello's difficult family dynamics always recalls ancient Greece and Shakespeare as much as modernism and postmodernism, as in its invocation of the Orestes cycle where there is deep hate and alienation woven within the traditional family structure, the complex family dynamic of Oedipus, and the child-parent tensions of Hamlet. In the "Orestes" trilogy,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Herman, William. "Pirandello and Possibility." The Tulane Drama Review. 10. 3 (Spring, 1966): pp. 91-111

Illiano, Antonio. "Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author: A Comedy in the Making." Italica. 44. 1 (Mar., 1967): pp. 1-12
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Greek Artifacts the Civilization of

Words: 1921 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27467730

Also, this carving is quite sentimental in appearance, for it reflects "the solemn pathos of the Greek citizen, much like some of the sculptures found on the pediment of the Parthenon" (Seyffert, 245).

Our last artifact is titled Pair of Armbands with Triton and Tritoness Holding Erotes, made in the Hellenistic period, circa 200 .C.E. These jewelry objects were apparently designed for a woman of high Greek culture, for they are made from solid gold and are fashioned in the shape of two loosely-coiled snakes or serpents. Whomever designed these intricate and beautiful objects realized the special properties of gold, for the woman lucky enough to wear these could easily slip her arms through the loops, due to the malleability of solid gold. The two figures located at the tops of each piece are representations of Triton and Tritoness, most closely associated with the Greek god of the sea Poseidon.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

New Greek and Roman Galleries." The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Internet. 2007.

Retrieved at http://www.metmuseum.org/special/greek_roman/images.asp.

Seyffert, Oskar. The Dictionary of Classical Mythology, Religion, Literature and Art.

New York: Gramercy Books, 1995.
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Weaving Power of Athena and Penelope Homer's

Words: 1965 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94371648

Weaving Power of Athena and Penelope

omer's tale of the Odyssey is populated by many female characters, ranging in nature from the silent and submissive to the ferociously lethal. If one were to pick out two women who are most influential in the shaping of the story, however, the choice would certainly linger on the strange dyad of Athena and Penelope. Athena serves as the direct initiator of much of the action, and it is her force of will that drives the return of Odysseus and the death of the suitors. Penelope, on the other hand, is the inspiration which motivates the principle actors -- for herself, she takes precious little action and is deeply passive, even paralyzed, yet her very existence is enough to spur Odysseus from the side of his goddess-lover and to inspire the blind devotion of her suitors. There are certain ways in which Penelope and…… [Read More]

Homer. The Odyssey. trans. Samuel Butler. Available from The Internet Classics Archive. http://classics.mit.edu/Homer/odyssey.mb.txt. 11 January 2005.

Homer. The Odyssey. trans. Samuel Butler. Available from The Internet Classics Archive. http://classics.mit.edu/Homer/odyssey.mb.txt. 11 January 2005.

Homer. The Odyssey. trans. Samuel Butler. Available from The Internet Classics Archive. http://classics.mit.edu/Homer/odyssey.mb.txt. 11 January 2005.
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Achilles' Speech Agamemnon's Embassy Book 9

Words: 1281 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38814638

Achilles' speech Agamemnon's embassy Book 9 " Illiad" it Achilles reflects codes behavior heroes

The Right to Pride

The Trojan ar was fought for a variety of reasons, the most fundamental of which was because Helen was abducted from Sparta and delivered to Paris of Troy. Yet for many of the individual combatants, and particularly for those who were regarded as heroes, the war was fought for far more personal and lasting reasons. As many of the heroes within this epic indicate via their speech and actions, the Trojan ar was ultimately a chance for glory everlasting, and the opportunity to claim a renown and fame for deeds done and opponents conquered that would not present itself for quite some time, if ever again. Achilles, the hero of the epic and one of its most unequivocal champions, personified this desire for glory that drove most of the heroes in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. The Iliad. www.poetryintranslation.com.  http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Greek/Iliad9.htm . Web.

life.
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Depictions of Marriage in Greek Myth

Words: 2302 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73264203

Marriage in Greek Myth

efore we discuss the depictions of marriage in the Theogony, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter and the Odyssey, perhaps we should first discuss the real- life ancient Greek marriage rituals and reveal their attitude towards marriage.

Indeed, many of the things we see in Greek myths happened in real life as well. For example, the Greek girls usually married quite young, around the age of 14, which was meant to ensure that the girl was a virgin and pure in mind and body. "Marriage to a family member was an acceptable alternative and occasionally encouraged in order to consolidate family wealth"- if we look at many of the marriages between gods (taking only this example), we will notice that many of them were affiliated. Remember, for example, that almost all of the Olympian Gods were in some way related, most of them being brothers and sisters,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Roll, Rose. Gender Ideology in Myth: The Place of the Female Within Male Order. January 2003. On the Internet at http://www.gradesaver.com/ClassicNotes/Titles/eumenides/essays/essay1.html

2. Ancient Greek Marriage. On the Internet at http://www.pogodesigns.com/JP/weddings/greekwed.html

Ancient Greek Marriage. On the Internet at http://www.pogodesigns.com/JP/weddings/greekwed.html

The same excellent article on Ancient Greek Marriage that can be found online at http://www.pogodesigns.com/JP/weddings/greekwed.html
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Organized Response Topic Options 1 Discuss Role

Words: 715 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91262778

organized response topic options. 1. Discuss role religion literature Ancient, Middle, Renaissance periods, work period illustrate comments. How writer view God (gods)? How work view man's place universe.

Q2.Select two works from the readings for this course and demonstrate how each fits the definition of a tragedy. It is crucial that you understand and define in your response the elements that constitute tragedy and how each work fits those conventions.

The classical definition of a tragic hero is that of a great man brought low by a tragic, fatal flaw. Such is the case with Oedipus. Oedipus begins Sophocles' play as a great and respected king, widely beloved for freeing Thebes from control of the evil Sphinx. Oedipus is so confident in his ability as a leader that when a plague strikes Thebes, he vows to get to the bottom of the problem and exile the citizen who is responsible…… [Read More]

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Global Strategic Planning

Words: 477 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99758053

global strategy, retail giant Wal-Mart has a few different factors to consider, as is evident in the Newsweek article, "Wal-Mart World." Not only does Wal-Mart have certain factors that must be taken into account when considering their global strategy, but these choices differ from country to country.

According to the article, "Wal-Mart is the No. 1 retailer in the United States, Canada and Mexico, growing rapidly in Asia, but still a minor player in Europe and South America." This can be attributed to the ways in which Wal-Mart attempts to expand into these regions. For example, when considering whether or not to move into a region and how the process shall be achieved, Wal-Mart must look at things such as the country's current economy, local labor laws, how the country's market operates, what sort of government regulations are in place, and the country's culture, to name just a few.

A…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ernsberger, Jr., Richard. Wal-Mart World. Newsweek. (International ed.). New York: May 20, 2002. pg. 50.

Kotler Marketing Group. Defensive Strategy in Price Wars -- Asda. Retrieved November 14, 2003. Web site:  http://www.kotlermarketing.com/resources/miltonkotler/seeds/s18.html .

Wal-Mart Stores. Third Quarter Earnings Call. Retrieved November 14, 2003. Web site: http://www.walmartstores.com/wmstore/wmstores/Mainnews.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1737567764.1068923194@@@@&BV_EngineID=ccciadcjjgkgekmcfkfcfkjdgoodglg.0&pagetype=news&template=NewsArticle.jsp&categoryOID=-8298&contentOID=13385&catID=-8248&prevPage=NewsShelf.jsp&year=2003.