Holocaust Essays (Examples)

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America's Failure to Act During

Words: 1874 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92946954



On the other hand there is a growing consensus that these reasons do not fully explain the failure to deal with a problem like the Holocaust when the dimensions of the situation were known at a relatively early stage. The weight of the argument would the therefore be inclined towards critics such as Wyman who see political reasons for this lack of action based on anti-Semitic sentiment in the county at the time. This seems to be supported by the fact that strict immigration laws were implemented in a time of crisis

eferences

Abzug . America and the Holocaust. etrieved April 23, 2007, at http://www.utexas.edu/opa/pubs/discovery/disc1997v14n2/disc-holocaust.html

Ambrose S. How America Abandoned the Jews in World War II. etrieved April 23, 2007, at http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/site/pp.asp?c=gvKVLcMVIuG&b=395061 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=26215709

Barnett, V.J. (1999). Bystanders: Conscience and Complicity during the Holocaust. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. etrieved April 23, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=26215709

Brustein W.I. (2003) oots of…… [Read More]

References

Abzug R. America and the Holocaust. Retrieved April 23, 2007, at  http://www.utexas.edu/opa/pubs/discovery/disc1997v14n2/disc-holocaust.html 

Ambrose S. How America Abandoned the Jews in World War II. Retrieved April 23, 2007, at http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/site/pp.asp?c=gvKVLcMVIuG&b=395061 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=26215709

Barnett, V.J. (1999). Bystanders: Conscience and Complicity during the Holocaust. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. Retrieved April 23, 2007, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=26215709

Brustein W.I. (2003) Roots of Hate: Anti-Semitism in Europe Before the Holocaust. New York: Cambridge University Press.
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Impressions of War the Most

Words: 6472 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55535844

" There is a more calm feeling to his description. This is not to say that the author was portraying war as being a patriotic act, but the author was not as graphical in his describing what the soldiers were seeing and going through. The reader is more connected to the actions of the poem and not the fact that someone is dying. He ends his poem by referencing "hell" and the reader is left wondering whether the hell that he is referring to the war that is being left behind, or to dying itself.

3) Rites of Passage Activity

In speaking to my grandmother, I was able to find out what it was that she took when she first left her home. At the age of sixteen, she was married to my grandfather and was getting ready to start her knew life as a wife and very soon, as…… [Read More]

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Roma Persecution by the Nazis

Words: 3715 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67748426



Even though the Gypsies in prewar Germany consisted of a very limited per capita population they received massive amounts of attention from the Regime and were left ripe for further marginalization and destruction.

Though they made up less than 0.1% of the German population (between 20,000 and 30,000), Gypsies, like Jews, received disproportionate attention from the authorities as the various agencies of the state sought to transform Germany into a racially pure society. etween 1934 and the outbreak of World War II, a series of laws and regulations created a web of restrictions that set Gypsies apart and severely restricted their ability, individually and collectively, to survive. In July 1934, a decree forbade intermarriage between Germans and Gypsies. 4 the same year, the law permitting the deportation of aliens was extended to foreign Gypsies. 5 in September 1935, the Nuremberg Laws declared the Gypsies "an alien People" 6 and restricted…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Crowe, David, ed. The Gypsies of Eastern Europe,. Armonk, N.Y: M.E. Sharpe, 1991.

Csepeli, Gyorgy, and David Simon. "Construction of Roma Identity in Eastern and Central Europe: Perception and Self-Identification." Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 30, no. 1 (2004): 129.

Csepeli, Gyrgy, and Antal rkeny. "The Changing Facets of Hungarian Nationalism." Social Research 63, no. 1 (1996): 247-286.

Epstein, Eric Joseph, and Philip Rosen. Dictionary of the Holocaust: Biography, Geography, and Terminology. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1997.
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Misperceptions of History -- the

Words: 1674 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47062818

They wagged their heads in sympathy and then proceeded to speak in the barren legalism of constricted hearts of their inability to intervene in the domestic affairs of other nations and of their own inviolate immigration laws."

(Leff, 2005, p. 218)

The Psychology of the Denial of Historical Fact

Numerous examples exist of the extent to which even individuals without anti-Semitic animus ignored what, in retrospect, might be considered painfully obvious. In fact, the ultimate fate of European Jews under Nazi occupation was so outrageous that even many Jews caught within the Nazi snare either could not or would not recognize the reality and magnitude of what was in store for them. Many German Jews, in particular, could have taken the opportunity to leave the country before that option was cut off by German authorities. If the victims of horrific persecution cannot easily accept the evidence in front of them,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Leff, Laurel. Buried by the Times: the Holocaust and America's Most Important

Newspaper. Cambridge University Press: New York. 2005.

Lipstadt, Deborah. Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory.

Penguin Group: New York. 1993.
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Israeli Cinema

Words: 1495 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38534293

cinematic image of the Sabra beginning with the early Zionist films, through the national-heroic mode, and ending with the critical attitude of the late 1970s and 1980s

The 1955 film Hill 24 Doesn't Answer is one of the first products of Israeli cinema. It is meant to be a stirring portrait of the new Jewish state. It dramatizes the then-recent war of independence. The film shows the war bringing together Jews of disparate backgrounds, all united by the need to defend Israel. "In Israeli culture, the figure of the Sabra" during the time period when Hill was made was considered a kind of ideal national type, exemplifying the new Jewish attitude that was free from fear and persecution (Avisar 132). The national ideal of a state that could triumph against all odds and was strong, both spiritually and militarily, is conveyed by the film through the physical strength and determination…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Avisar, Ilan. "The national and the popular in Israeli cinema." 2005. 24.1 (2005): 125.

Charlie Ve'hetzi. Directed by Boaz Davidson. 1974

Hill 24 Doesn't Answer. Directed by T. Dickenson. 1955.

Smith, Anthony. "The formation of national identity." Identity. Oxford, 1995.
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Witnesses Five Teenagers Who Died

Words: 1074 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54333484

His life became a constant dread, a horrible fear that German militia would kill him or his family.

On June 16, 1941, the Nazis ordered his father to report to the militia. "I looked out the window for hours on end," David wrote in his diary (p. 17). He thought his parents would return soon but "…the hours went by and still no sign of them…in the end I didn't know what to think." On the 17th of June, the Nazis came into David's village and searched other houses but not David's. One day a Nazi (David always referred to them as "militiamen") pushed a motorcycle into David's house after the motorcycle had broken down. hile the Nazi was still in the neighborhood, some Jews came along; the Nazi checked their papers and then administered "…a severe beating" to an innocent man (p. 18).

"Nowadays a person can be arrested…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boas, Jacob. (2009). We Are Witnesses: Five Diaries of Teenagers Who Died in the Holocaust.

New York: Macmillion.

CBN News. (2009). Amid Protests, Iran President Denies Holocaust. Retrieved Nov. 10, 2010,

From http://www.cbn.com.
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Danish in April 2004 Danish

Words: 4304 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2284365

In 1918 Iceland became independent but remained under the rule of the Danish king. At the end of the war a plebiscite showed a 75% pro-Danish majority and the North Slesvig was once again reunited with Denmark (Miller 224).

As World War I was coming close and Denmark remained neutral Jews started moving to the country. There are no exact statistics since many of these immigrants were wary of the authorities, but as many as twenty to thirty thousand Eastern European Jews may have entered Denmark during this period and approximately 3,000 stayed permanently, thus doubling the Jewish population (Hammerich in Kisch). More did not stay because the existing assimilated Jewish community wanted to pay their passage out; they believed their position in society was threatened and latent anti-Semitism would spread. The Jewish congregation even actively cooperated with authorities such as the police to expel unemployed or unwanted individuals from…… [Read More]

References

Buckser Andrew. After the Rescue. New York: MacMillan, 2003

Bauer, Yehuda. Rethinking the Holocaust. New Haven: Yale University, 2001

Fein, Helen. Accounting for Genocide. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1979

Kische, Conrad. The Jewish Community in Denmark: History and Present Status.
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Eliezer's Struggle to Keep His

Words: 698 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10972740

God never intervened and Ellie had to reconsider the role of his faith in his life. Though the absence of God may have led many to question their faith, there is another component of faith that must be considered. Elie's faith in God, by itself, had allowed him to find the strength to carry on as the elders reminded him, "You must never lose faith, even when the sword hangs over your head. That's the teaching of our sages" (iesel, 40).

Lack of faith can quickly turn to despair Elie considered the idea that he was "alone-terribly alone in a world without God" (iesel, 75). He goes as far as to mention that he might believe in Hitler beyond all others because he is one that kept his promises; though the results of these promises were horrific. This represents the lengths that he went in his fall from faith. There…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Wiesel, E. (1972). Night. New York City: Hill and Wang.