Homeostasis Essays (Examples)

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Adrenal Gland Keeping the Body

Words: 2250 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25520423

S. Congress that the prospects of stem cell research were so vast that it could touch all the realm of medicine (Connor 2000). An unlimited source of embryonic stem cells will solve the problem of shortage of transplants. Embryonic stem cells will save lives by curing generative diseases of the brain, hepatitis, diabetes, leukemia, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis and diseases of the heart and kidneys. ut current laws restrict the use of stems cells on embryos less than 14 days old and for correcting fertility, reproduction or congenital disorders. The restriction is grounded in the belief that the embryo is a potential human being from the moment of conception. It thus possesses a soul and a dignity just like any other viable person (Connor). Previous scientific research presented evidence that genetically engineering cells could partly repair a defective immune system (Travis 2002). Two new studies bolstered this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bauer, D.G. (2005). Review of the endocrine system. MedSurg Nursing: Jannetti Publications, Inc.

Connor, S. (2000). Science: the miracle cure with a catch. The London Independent: Newspaper Publishing PLC

Degen. D (2008). Body organization and homeostasis. 1 page. Bones, Muscles and Skin. Pearson Education, Inc.: Pearson Prentice Hall

Farabee, M.J. (2006). Animal organ systems and homeostasis. 18 web pages. Estrella Mountain Community College. Retrieved on February 1, 2006 at http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/biobk/BioBookMUSSKEL.html
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Senescent Cells Are Essentially Cells

Words: 771 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28302829

When DNA is damaged, cells can react through cell cycle checkpoints which allows repair to begin before further division can occur. There is also the prokaryotic SOS response which changes gene expression in bacteria as a result of DNA damage. This response is regulated by the production of certain proteins. Moreover, eukaryotic cells also react to DNA damage through producing proteins that begin the process of DNA repair.

8. Mice are often the favored mammalian in the testing of aging interventions. This is often because of the fact that there are many mice easily available for testing but also the fact that "generation time is short" (Yuan et al. 2011). Essentially, the aging process and testing in interventions can be done on a much shorter time scale then with tests using monkeys.

9. Enzymes may change the transcription patterns of a cell by adding chemical groups to histone proteins. This…… [Read More]

References

Books. W.R. Clark. (2009). Human genetic diseases that mimic the aging process. Progeria? The Progeria Project Foundation. Web. http://www.progeriaproject.com/progeria/mimic.htm

Conboy, I.M., Conboy, M.J., Wagers, a.J., Girma, E.R., Weissman, I.L., & Rando, T.A. (2005). Rejuvenation of aged progenitor cells by exposure to a young systemic environment. Nature, 17(433), 760-764.

Conti, Matteo. (2008). The Selfish Cell: An Evolutionary Defeat. Springer Publishing.

McClintock, D., Ratner, D., Lokuge, M. (2007). The mutant form of Lamin a that causes Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria is a biomarker of cellular aging in human skin. PLOS One, 2(2). Web.  http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0001269
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Nurse Speech to Group of Residents in

Words: 540 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12719716

Nurse Speech to Group of esidents in a Large Independent Living Facility

The information addressed today in this speech are those involving the body's regulation of the correct numbers and ratios of blood cells and how blood pressure homeostasis is achieved as well as age-related changes to the heart including coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction.

Homeostatis and the Body's Balancing Act

The work of Vikrant and Tiwan (nd) report that studies on the population indicate that blood pressure is a continuous variable and there is really not a line that divides normal and abnormal values. However, there is a point of balance also called internal equilibrium and this is known as homeostasis. This state of balance describes how the human body reacts to certain changes. This can be viewed by picturing a set of scales in which coins are poured in unevenly with one side heavier…… [Read More]

References

Vikrant, S. And Tiwan, SC (nd) Essential Hypertension -- Pathogenesis and Path physiology. Retrieved from: http://medind.nic.in/jac/t01/i3/jact01i3p140.pdf
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Multisystem Failure in a Geriatric Patient

Words: 2043 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98093554

Multisystem Failure in a Geriatric Patient

Multisystem Failure in a Geriatric

eflect on your analysis of the geriatric patient in multisystem failure by doing the following:

Explain key immediate assessments you should make that would help assess the patient's homeostasis, oxygenation, and level of pain.

There are various diagnoses undertaken in assessing the patient's homeostasis, oxygenation, and level of pain. The immediate objective that nurses prioritize on is checking the patient's vital symptoms. Vital symptoms form the baseline of the assessment by providing significant information that illustrates whether the most essential organs function as required.

The assessment may involve checking the health status of the patient in the laboratory (Kane, 2004). In the laboratory, there is an assessment of the patient's capillary tube, urine test and blood pressure. When there is simultaneous malfunctioning of the body organs, nurses refer to this condition as multiple organ dysfunction (MODs).

Multiple organ dysfunction…… [Read More]

References

Esteban, A., Anzueto, A., Frutos-Vivar, F., Alia, I., Ely, E.W., Brochard, L., et al. (2004).

Outcome of older patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Intensive Care

Medicine, 30(4), 639 -- 646. Evidence Level IV: Nonexperimental Study.

Happ, M.B., Baumann, B.M., Sawicki, J., Tate, J.A., George, E.L., & Barnato, A.E. (2010).
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Journey Begins as We Enter

Words: 1067 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22172212

The blood in which we are traveling in is composed of red blood cells called hemoglobin, plasma, platelets, and white blood cells. Blood is transported through the body by the heart's pumping action. As we continue, we will enter the hepatic portal vein, which delivers blood from the gastrointestinal tract to the liver, into the ascending aorta, up towards the heart. As we approach the heart, it's pumping will pull us up into its chambers and through to the lungs where we will get oxygen and continue our journey to the kidneys. As we return to the heart, we will pass through the aortic arch and descend through the thoracic aorta continuing past the descending abdominal aorta until we reach the renal artery. We will make a left turn and pass through the glomeruli through the kidney's tubules and conclude this phase of our journey into the left kidney.

The…… [Read More]

Reference List:

Thibodeau, G. (1992). Structure and Function of the Body. Chicago: Mosby Year Book.
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Questions Concerning the Study of

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76550023


Homeostasis is the goal promoted by both positive and negative
feedback mechanisms. This is the principle which indicates that there is a
balance in autonomic life functions which the body attempts always to
maintain. This refers to such features as body temperature, heart rate,
respiration and the powering of vital organs. When stimuli create a
divergence from this status, the body will activate a set of responses
designed to regulate a return to balance.

4. In anatomical position, how many planes can be described and what
are their names?
There are three major anatomical planes, which are used to refer to
different ways of addressing the body and its systems. The anatomical
planes include the Coronal Plane, which refers to the frontal surface of
the body from head to foot. The Sagittal Plan refers to the surface which
might be viewed from a profile, indicating a lateral perspective on the…… [Read More]

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Lungs What Are the Lungs

Words: 3387 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31909477

However, it was 1953 that the formation of serotonin was from the lungs was substantiated. It is also observed that detoxification of the blood takes place in the lungs. Later, it was observed that one of the important activities of the lung is to provide chemical filtration by shielding the regular circulation of blood from the attack of vasoactive mixtures and other exogenous compounds present in the arteries. The physiology of the lungs and its location makes the lung exclusively suitable to perform these activities. (Wet; Moss, 1998)

The total output from the cardiac system is obtained by the lungs whereas other organs acquire only a very small quantity of output. The blood that circulates the lungs is subject to the vast capillary endothelial plane of the body which is of seventy square meters. This aspect of output and circulation enable the lung to perform the efficient function of biochemical…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, Taylor. B. (1996) "Essentials for Animal Research: A Primer for Research Personnel"

Diane Publishing.

De Reuck, a.V. S; O'Connor, Maeve. (1962) "CIBA Foundation Symposium on Pulmonary

Structure and Function" a. Churchill Ltd.: London.
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Faith and Science Today

Words: 2014 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28790437

Anatomy/Christianity

The Breath of Life

Throughout scripture the concept of breath represents life. Genesis 2:7

It is evident that we need to breathe to live and that without our respiratory system, we would die. But why is this? Can we know why other than to say that this is how our Creator designed us to be? Perhaps an understanding of our own respiratory system can help us to better understand our Creator? I think so.

What do we find in our nose? A kind of filter that keeps out of our lungs harmful particles and spores that would otherwise pollute them. This can be a symbol of how we should filter our minds of impure thoughts so as to keep our souls clean. It can also be a symbol of how important God's grace is in our souls -- it is to our souls as oxygen is to our bodies.…… [Read More]

South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.

Sheen, F. (1951). Three to Get Married. Princeton, NJ: Scepter Publishers.

Holy Bible, New Living Translation. (2004). IL: Tyndale House Publishers.
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Galectin-1 in the Regulation of

Words: 4060 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10094274



The success was remarkable, according to the researchers: Even muscles that had already lost half of its mass, recovered visible. (Leppanen et al. p5549-65) At the same time, the mice survived for several weeks longer than their untreated counterparts and also developed a healthy appetite again. (Mantovani, p296) The new study is therefore interesting in two respects: First, it demonstrates that the muscle loss at least in animal models in fact, affects the chances of survival, and secondly, it shows a way, may be how to prevent this degradation, and even reversed. (Bruera et al. p857)

Muscle atrophy

Muscle atrophy is a medical term that refers to the decrease in the size of skeletal muscle, losing muscle strength because of the strength of muscle is related to its mass. (Burnfoot, p323-34)

All changes in cell morphological character may affect isolated cells or groups of them, therefore the modification of a…… [Read More]

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Homeostatis a Term Which Refers to the

Words: 511 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26236364

Homeostatis, a term which refers to the maintenance of the internal state of a given body that is quite distinct from the external environment in an effort of defending it against perturbation is an important element of every male and female on the planet. In this paper we attempt to explain how homeostatic mechanisms affect the homeostasis of the eproductive system.

How homeostatic mechanisms affect the male reproductive system

The hypothalamus produces the hormone gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnH) which controls the anterior pituitary gonadotropins. The anterior pituitary gonadotropins then releases Folicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing hormone (LH).The Folicle stimulating hormone (FSH) then indirectly stimulates spermatogenesis by simulating sustentacular cells to effectively release andogen-binding protein (ABP).The andogen-binding protein (ABP)

then prompts the spermatogenic cells to effectively bind while also concentrating testosterone which then stimulates spermatogenesis.

The Luteinizing hormone (LH) effectively binds to the interstitial cells which then secretes testosterone and a…… [Read More]

References

Atkins, JA (2006). GNRH-induced Ovulation and Gonadotropin Surge in Beef Heifers: Effect of Day of the Cycle. University of Missouri - Columbia

Chrousos, GP. Stress and disorders of the stress system. Nat. Rev. Endocrinol. 5, 374 -- 381 (2009); published online 2 June 2009; doi:10.1038/nrendo.2009.106

Sherwood, L (2012). Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems. Cengage Learning

Figure 1.
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Lymphatic System Is a Sub-System of the

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43064359

Lymphatic system is a sub-system of the circulatory system. It contains a network of nodes, or vessels and filters, which remove toxins from the body. The role of the lymphatic system in the homeostasis of the body is that it serves as the primary drainage for all of the body's other systems, removing all toxins and excess fluids. It is a major defense against disease and also helps carry nutrients throughout the body.

The lymphatic system does not circulate blood. Lymph is its primary fluid and is formed from fluids surround cells throughout the body and passed into lymph vessels. If this fluid were not removed or filtered, the result would be toxins accumulating in the body. This would create swelling and also prevent the body from fighting against infection and disease.

Disorders or complications originated in the lymphatic system create serious illness in the body. This is because this…… [Read More]

References

Brown, P. (2005). Lymphatic system: Unlocking the drains. Nature, 436(7050), 456-458. doi:10.1038/436456a.
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Clinical Experience

Words: 694 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7413488

traumatic experience with a patient a few years ago that still left me with a bad feeling. It was a hit-and-miss instance, and the fact that it was so, more closely being miss than hit, has stayed with me ever since. It was the first time that I ever came so breathtakingly close to being implicated in causing another to die. I hope it will be the last. As to the lessons that it can teach me -- there are several.

The story was the following: It was one fine, not especially busy aturday morning when this patient was wheeled in for a percutaneous transfemoral aortic valve implantation. While the cardiology team was inserting the femoral guide wires and sheath for valve placement the ventricle was perforated. Usually we have more time and can proceed more placidly, but in this particular case, we had to rapidly respond and open the…… [Read More]

Source

Brennan, TA et a l (1991). Incidence of Adverse Events and Negligence in Hospitalized Patients -- Results of the Harvard Medical Practice Study I. N Engl J. Med 1991; 324:370-376

Greenlaw, J. (1981). Understaffing: Living with the Reality, 9 L. Med. & Health Care 23- 41
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Drive Theory Woodworth's Drive Theory Applied One

Words: 833 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 562764

Drive Theory

Woodworth's Drive Theory Applied

One of the theories of human motivation that was developed in the first half of the twentieth century by psychologist obert Woodworth is the drive theory, or more specifically the drive theory based on an assumption of basic homeostasis and the biological desire to maintain this homeostasis (Halvers 2011; Eysenck 2000). Simply put, this theory asserts that humans are driven to satisfy their biological needs and maintain homeostasis by taking care of basic needs like hunger, thirst, and other physical and physiological needs (Vigori 2011). According to this theory, when these needs are not being met the lack of homeostasis triggers a response that creates a conscious impulse or motivation on the part of the individual, leading to conscious actions that attempt to satisfy the conscious desire and thus the subconscious need by restoring homeostasis (Halvers 2011).

One situation in which this theory of…… [Read More]

References

Eysenck, M. (2000). Psychology: A Student's Handbook. New York: Taylor & Francis.

Halvers, R. (2011). Motivation. Accessed 18 April 2011.  http://home2.fvcc.edu/~rhalvers/psych/Motivation.htm 

Vigori, M. (2011). Drive theory. Accessed 18 April 2011.  http://pirate.shu.edu/~vigorimi/Motivation_and_Emotion/chapter5.htm
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Main Systems of Human Body

Words: 3828 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37436002

The circulatory or cardiovascular system is responsible for moving nutrients, wastes and gases between body cells, transporting blood across the whole body and battling disease (Circulatory System). Its principal elements are the heart, numerous blood vessels, and blood.

The heart forms the circulatory system's core. This 2-sided, 4-chambered pump which distributes blood to various arteries comprises of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria. The ventricles, situated within the heart's lower half, are responsible for pumping blood to the whole body (away from our heart), whilst the atria, situated within the heart's upper half are in charge of receiving blood from different parts of the human body. The right and left ventricles pump de-oxygenated and oxygenated blood, respectively; de-oxygenated blood is pumped to lungs while oxygenated blood is pumped to the remainder of the human body (smith, 2013). These 4 chambers are connected to one another by…… [Read More]

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Globalization and Innovations in Telecommunications

Words: 18188 Length: 66 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2190458



Chapter 2:

Review of Related Literature

Chapter Introduction

This chapter provides a review of the literature concerning hypnosis, Eastern Meditation, Chi Kung, and Nei Kung and how these methods are used to treat various ailments and improve physical and mental functioning. A summary of the review concludes the chapter.

Hypnosis

In his study, "Cognitive Hypnotherapy in the Management of Pain," Dowd (2001) reports that, "Several theories have een proposed to account for the effect of hypnosis. State theories assume that the hypnotic trance is qualitatively different from all other human experiences. From this perspective, trance capacity is supposedly a fairly stale trait that exhiits sustantial individual differences. Nonstate theories, often referred to as social learning, social psychological or cognitive-ehavioral theories of hypnosis propose that hypnotic phenomena are related to social and psychological characteristics such as hope, motivation, expectancy, elief in the therapist, desire to please the therapist, a positive initial…… [Read More]

bibliography. (2010).  http://science.jrank.org  / pages/7857/Meditation-Eastern.html.

Many religious traditions have practices that could possibly be labeled meditation. In Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, these practices are usually associated with prayer, contemplation, or recitation of sacred texts. In the religious traditions of the Native Americans, Australian aboriginals, Siberian peoples, and many others, what could be identified as meditation techniques are incorporated within the larger rubric of shamanism. It is, however, in the religions of Asia that meditation has been most developed as a religious method.

Meditation has played an important role in the ancient yogic traditions of Hinduism and also in more recent Hindu-based new religious movements such as Maharishi Mahesh Yogi's Transcendental Meditation program. But it is most especially in the monastic or "elite" forms of the various traditions of Buddhism (Theravada, Tibetan/Vajrayana, and Ch'an/Zen) that meditation techniques have taken center stage and have been developed to the highest degree of sophistication and complexity.

Short-Term Effects of Meditation vs. Relaxation on Cognitive Functioning. Contributors: Gillian King - author, Jeffrey Coney - author. Journal Title: Journal of Transpersonal Psychology. Volume: 38. Issue: 2. Publication Year: 2006. Page Number: 200+.

Authors cite the lack of relevant studies concerning the effect, if any, of meditation on short-term improvements in cognitive performance. The results of this study clearly showed that meditation, per se, does not produce a short-term improvement in cognitive performance compared to other relaxation techniques.
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Shore Case Study

Words: 4008 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31359343

Categories and Phases of Loss and Grief for Nancy

Diagnostic Statement for Nancy

Nancy is obese and reports feeling anxious and depressed. Nancy has gained 15 pounds does not sleep well, has low concentration ability and is forgetful. Nancy has a social phobia and exhibits some signs of paranoid schizophrenia. In addition, Nancy has a back injury, which contributes, to her general feeling of ill health and results in not getting the exercise she needs. Nancy is a chain smoker. Nancy feels that she has lost control of her life. Nancy's son Michael has asthma. It appears that Nancy's husband suffers from some type of behavior disorder and is likely somewhat mentally retarded.

DSM-IV-T (2000) Diagnosis

The multiaxial assessment includes analysis on the following five stated Axis:

(1) Axis 1: clinical disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, learning, motor skills and communication disorder

296.xx Major Depressive Disorder

301.0 Paranoid Personality Disorder

300.23…… [Read More]

References

Antonovsky, A. And Sourani, T. (1998) Family Sense of Coherence and Family Adaptation. Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 50. No. 1 Feb 1998. National Council on Family Relations. Retrieved from: http://psych.wfu.edu/furr/362/Family%20Sense%20of%20Coherence%20Scale.pdf

Connell, Cindi (2010) Multicultural Perspectives and Considerations Within Structural Family Therapy: The Premises of Structure, Subsystems and Boundaries. Rivier Academic Journal. Vol. 6. No. 2 Fall, 2010. Retrieved from: http://www.rivier.edu/journal/ROAJ-Fall-2010/J461-Connelle-Multicultural-Perspectives.pdf

Fischer, J. And Cocoran, K. (1994) Measures of Clinical Practice. Social Science. Retrieved from:  http://books.google.com/books?id=y2C9YvSU53sC&source=gbs_navlinks_s 

Ruiz, MA (nd) Transgenerational and Structural Family Therapy, An Analysis of Both Schools. Retrieved from:  http://miguelangelruiz.webs.com/Transgenerational%20and%20Structural%20Family%20Therapy.pdf
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Endocrinology Amazing Hormones Counterbalance of Sugar and

Words: 2340 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87661716

Endocrinology

AMAZING HORMONES

Counterbalance of Sugar and Fat Content between Insulin and Glucagon

Physical survival depends on the sustained availability and use of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate or ATP from sufficient levels of a substance, called glucose (owen, 2001). The use of energy depends on the varying levels of activity. Hence, the amount of glucose needed for activity likewise varies each day. Too much or too little glucose is damaging to the body, hence the need for some system to regulate the availability of glucose. It must be present at the precise time and amount that it is needed in order to maintain what is called glucose homeostasis. Homeostasis is the tendency of the body to maintain internal stability and balance through the coordinated responses of body parts to stimuli or conditions (owen).

Insulin and Glucagon

The regulation of glucose availability begins with the pancreas, primarily by…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Biomed (2002). Insulin/glucagons. Brown University. Retrieved on November 25, 2013

from http://biomed.brown.edu/Courses/B1108/B1108_2002_Groups/pancstems/stemcell/insulin_glucagon.htm

Bowen, R.A. (2001). Hormones, receptors and control systems. University of Colorado.

Retrieved on November 25, 2013 from http://arbl.cvmbs.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/endocrine/basics/index.html
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Skin Blood Flow Thermoregulation Is

Words: 6746 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92554129



The picture to the left depicts the various elements that are responsible for thermoregulation in human skin. The illustrations shows the various layers of skin along with the veins, arteries and capillaries of the circulatory system that assist in insuring that the thermoregulatory system works properly. The sweat glands are responsible for selectively removing materials from the blood the sweat glands then concentrates or alters these toxins, and secretes them for elimination from the body. The perspiration or sweat is then removed through the sweat pore. This has a twofold purpose: to remove toxins and thermoregulation (in this case cooling the body).

Thermoregulation involving perspiration is brought about by both internal and environmental heat and exercise. As it relates to the latter, there have been many studies related to exercise and thermoregulation. According to Marino (2004)

"thermoregulatory effector responses of humans and concluded that temperature regulation during exercise is dissimilar…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Caterina MJ, Schumacher MA, Tominaga M, Rosen TA, Levine JD, Julius D. The capsaicin receptor: a heat-activated ion channel in the pain pathway. Nature. 1997;389:816-824.

Dugan SA, Powell LH, Kravitz HM, Everson Rose SA, Karavolos K, Luborsky J (2006)

Musculoskeletal pain and menopausal tatus. Clin J. Pain 22: 325 -- 331

Deecher, D.C.K. Dorries (2007)Understanding the pathophysiology of vasomotor symptoms
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Education Sociology and Education While

Words: 2024 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49340898



Symbolic interactionalism thus posits a much more dynamic view of human learning, rather than the rote reception of societal norms in functionalism, or functionalism's belief in education to shape human minds in a pre-determined fashion. But it also is a more positive view of education than conflict theory, because even if there are problematic ideas in the way knowledge is conveyed, human beings may be creative enough to reconfigure preexisting systems of meaning in a liberating fashion. Also it is the individual who chooses how his or her personal liberation and development should take place, not the teacher. "Symbolic interactionalism emphasized several important dimensions of knowledge management through schooling: in school classroom interaction; by the professionalizing of the teaching process; through the bureaucratization of school organization; and, at the cultural level, where the links between the sociology of education and the sociology of knowledge are more immediately visible" (Marshall 1998).…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Four 20th century theories of education." Excerpt from George F. Kneller. Introduction to the Philosophy of Education. 1962. Excerpt available 2 Jan 2008 at  http://people.morehead-st.edu/fs/w.willis/fourtheories.html 

McClellan, Kenneth. (2000). "Functionalism." Sociological Theories. Grinnell University.

Retrieved 2 Jun 2008 at  http://web.grinnell.edu/courses/soc/s00/soc111-01/IntroTheories/Functionalism.html 

Marshall, Gordon. (1998). "Sociology of education." Retrieved 2 Jun 2008 from the Dictionary of Sociology
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Role of Hormones in the Control of

Words: 1898 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7095470

role of hormones in the control of body fuel/energy mechanism has been appreciated for close to a century (Dzamko & Steinberg,2009). This concept was identified by the groundbreaking findings by the scientists, Banting et al. (1922) that the hormone, insulin could effectively restore euglycaemia. This paper seeks to give an in depth understanding of metabolism by definition and gives the various component of metabolism and finally the hormonal influence of metabolism. This paper looks into the various substrates that are influence the hormonal actions in fuel metabolism, circumstances under which they occur and the various pathways followed during these metabolisms (Becker, 2001). The intermediary compounds are also considered to the effect. In conclusion, the paper discuses the medical conditions that would arise once these hormones fail to act.

Metabolism is a biological process that takes place in living organisms throughout their lives, once metabolism stops the individuals automatically dies. A…… [Read More]

References

Banting, F., Best, C., Collip, J., Macleod, J. & Noble, E. (1922). The effects of insulin on experimental hyperglycemia in rabbits. Am J. Physiol 62, 559 -- 580.

Campfield, L.A., Smith, F.J., Guisez, Y., Devos, R. & Burn, P. (1995). Recombinant mouse OB protein: evidence for a peripheral signal linking adiposity and central neural networks. Science 269, 546 -- 549.

Cusin, I., Sainsbury, A., Doyle, P., Rohmer-Jeanreneaud, F. & Jeanrenaud, B. (1995). The ob gene and insulin: a relationship leading to clues to the understanding of obesity. Diabetes 44,

1467 -- 1470.
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Alcohol and Adh There Are

Words: 497 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31631243

This lack of ADH makes the collecting duct impermeable to water (www.nmc.edu/~koverbaugh/bio106/su02/chapt15.htm)." ADH production decreases when alcohol is consumed, resulting in dehydration.

When there is a low blood volume, the "juxtaglomerular apparatus secretes enin, leading to Angiotensinogen, Angiotensin I, and Angiotensin II. Angiotensin II causes the adrenal gland to secrete aldosterone, which increases the return of Na to blood. This increased salt in the blood causes water to diffuse into the blood from the urine (www.nmc.edu/~koverbaugh/bio106/su02/chapt15.htm)." The secretion of aldosterone is "also triggered when potassium levels are elevated (hyperkalemia), and through the sodium-potassium pump, it increases potassium excretion while increasing sodium reabsorption (http://www.dacc.edu/~lgarret/fluid.html)."

Conclusion

Alcohol consumption negatively affects the urinary system by decreasing the production of ADH. This reduction of ADH will cause the body to become dehydrated, and can lead to electrolyte imbalance.

eferences

Controlling the Internal Environment. (accessed 04 October, 2004). www.3redravens.net/apbio/Chap44notes.html).

Fluid, Electrolyte, and pH Balance. (accessed…… [Read More]

References

Controlling the Internal Environment. (accessed 04 October, 2004). www.3redravens.net/apbio/Chap44notes.html).

Fluid, Electrolyte, and pH Balance. (accessed 04 October, 2004).  http://www.dacc.edu/~lgarret/fluid.html ).

The Urinary System. (accessed 04 October, 2004). www.nmc.edu/~koverbaugh/bio106/su02/chapt15.htm).
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Osmoregulation Endocrines Osmoregulation Is the Process by

Words: 2423 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75085230

Osmoregulation

Endocrines Osmoregulation

Osmoregulation is the process, by which the body adjusts to a change in an environment of different water volume and amount of solutes in a cells and body fluid of organisms including vertebrates. Vertebrates are animals, which have a backbone, and can be warm either blooded or cold blooded. The body of such organisms adjusts in order to maintain the body balance both inside and outside their bodies in mild and harsh environments ranging from seawater, fresh water, and terrestrial habitats to very hostile environments. Endocrine glands found in such organisms play a major role in constant and persistent regulation of body balance, which secretes hormones directly into the blood whenever the body witnesses any environmental change (Bentley 45).

Endocrine glands present in vertebrates play a major role in controlling the level of water and salt in vertebrate's bodies. Hormones produced in vertebrates play a major role…… [Read More]

References

Bentley, P., 2002. Comparative Vertabrate Endocrinology. chicago: Cambridge university press.

Bentley, P., 2002. Endocrines and Osmoregulation. chicago: springer publishers.

Crvendish, M., 2006. Growing up with Science.. london: marshall carvendish publishers.

Kaiser, G., 2007. The Inner Bird.. New York: UBC press.
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Use Paradigms to Compare Cold War to Culture Wars

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98890655

Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union is known as such because it was waged not through direct conflict, but in through military and political stand-off between nations. On an international level, the Cold War was waged through techniques such as the U.S.S.R. extending its sphere of influence into Eastern Europe and the United States' Berlin airlift. However, its effects were also felt inside the United States, with the hysteria that resulted in the form of McCarthyism and the often-obsessive fear people expressed in regards to protecting themselves from possible nuclear conflict. The hatred an American expressed for communism was used to validate his or her status as a 'real' American. This line of reasoning can be seen today in issues of discrimination against Arabs and other demonized ethnic groups, as well as upon moral issues as abortion and gay parenting. One's stance on these issues is…… [Read More]

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Utero Development on the Health

Words: 1915 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10393552

The program includes five components namely 'Family Support', 'Maternal Interview', 'Records review', 'case review' and 'Community action'. (FIMR, 2010)

The FIMR Process

FIMR Informed of Fetal/Infant Death

Family Support

Data Collection/Record Review

Maternal Interview

Records Review

Case Review

Community Action

Improved Maternal & Infant Health

(FIMR)

Conclusion

Fetal origins of health and disease has developed into a new medical frontier for researchers. The growing body of research evidence has affirmed positive associations between the gestational environment and the development of various physical and mental disorders in the infant, adolescent and the adult population. The new knowledge that even gestational diet composition has the ability to alter the human epigenome resulting in the expression of undesirable genes and the onset of obesity, diabetes, cancer and other chronic health conditions, is convincing scientific evidence for pregnant women to be careful and cautious in their diet choices. Results from the studies on maternal…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Annie Murphy Paul, (Nov 4-2010), "How the First Nine Months Shape the Rest of Your Life," TIME, retrieved Dec 3rd 2010, from,  http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2020815-1,00.html 

2) Barry E. Levin. (July 2006) " Metabolic Imprinting: Critical Impact of the perinatal environment on the regulation of energy homeostasis," Biol Sci. 29; 361(1471)

3) Irwing B. wiener & Richard M. Lerner et.al (2003), "Handbook of Psychology: Developmental Psychology," John Wiley & Sons

4) Kjersti M. Aagaard-Tillery, Kevin Grove, & Jacalyn Bishop et.al (Aug 2008), "Developmental Origins of Diseases and Determinants of chromatin Structure: Maternal diet modifies the Primate fetal epigenome," J. Mol Endocrinol 41 (20) 91 -- 102
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Geriatric Patient With Multisystem Failure

Words: 1769 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13936281



6. Identify the collaborative team members pertinent to the care of the geriatric patient in the scenario, including the emergency room nurse's response to changes in the level of consciousness and increasing respiratory distress.

The collaborative team here would consist of a primary care physician / geriatrician, pain management specialist, laboratory specialists, and x-ray team. Additional consultants may be neurologist, neurosurgeon, gastroenterologist, psychologist, and drug and alcohol detoxification specialist.

In the case of increasing respiratory distress, the nurse is advised to continue or modify the interventions: to continue to teach patient how to breath and cough correctly; to summon a productive cough; to attempt to clear lungs to auscultation; and to achieve symmetric chest excursion of at least 4 cm; also that her respirations and pulse beats should be regular, and that she should inhale a normal volume of air. This is done by encouraging Fowler or semi-Fowler's position; monitoring…… [Read More]

Sources

Eliopoulos, C. (2001). Gerontological nursing Philadelphia: Lippincott,

Kandel, J. (2009). The encyclopedia of elder care New York, NY: Facts on File,

Marvin J.A. (1995). Pain assessment vs. measurement. J Burn Care Rehabil 16, 348-357

Melzack R. (1975). The McGill Pain Questionnaire: Major properties and scoring methods. Pain 1, 277-299
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Empowerment One of the Catch

Words: 5216 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44254789

What management does still exists must maintain an open door policy, so as to help lower level employees transition and communicate concerns but again managers are likely to have a clear idea that this is a behavioral manner of influencing actions. (Tyler, 1997, p. 323)

Though the transition to flat organisation may benefit most organisations, it is still a transitional situation that requires special understanding of employee empowerment as well as interactions. Smaller firms of coarse will find this transition easier while larger firms may need to create quasi-flat systems that better serve multi-factorial production systems and require the system to work together in a streamlines fashion, without one area of production causing unintended problems for another. Employee empowerment is clearly one of the biggest reasons why employees express happiness and comfort within a system and therefore create active retention and motivated work. (Weissberg, 1999, p. 46) a flat organisational…… [Read More]

References

Della Rocca, G. (1992). "Voice" and "Exit" in the Middle-Management Labor Market. International Studies of Management & Organization, 22(1), 54.

Dew, J.R. (1997). Empowerment and Democracy in the Workplace: Applying Adult Education Theory and Practice for Cultivating Empowerment. Westport, CT: Quorum Books.

Duke, B.C. (1991). Education and Leadership for the Twenty-First Century: Japan, America, and Britain. New York: Praeger Publishers

Foss, N.J. (2005). Strategy, Economic Organisation, and the Knowledge Economy: The Coordination of Firms and Resources. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
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Skeletal System Purpose and Functions

Words: 1351 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41575906

Calcium is needed in blood clotting, stability and permeability of the membrane, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, cellular secretion, enzyme activity, and cell growth. Magnesium is needed for the metabolism of potassium and calcium and for the mobilization of calcium from bones. Phosphorus plays and important role in the development and maturation of the bone. Its chief role in bone resorption, mineralization and collagen synthesis makes it essential in calcium homeostasis (Michael's).

Diseases and disorders of the skeletal system include leukemia, bursitis, osteoporosis, sprains, fractures, spina bifida, scurvy, arthritis, scoliosis, talipes equinovarus or clubfoot, tendonitis, kyphosis and poliomyelitis (Family Shock 2001). Leukemia is also called cancer of the blood where abnormally large numbers of white blood cells multiply at an uncontrolled manner so that they interfere with the body's production of red blood cells. The cause is still unknown. ursitis is a painful condition, which most commonly affects the hips and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Discovery Kids. Skeletal system. Discovery Communications, Inc., 2000. Retrieved May 30, 2007 at  http://yucky.discovery.com/flash/body/pg000124.html 

Family Shock. Diseases and Disorders. The Shock Family, December 21, 2001. Retrieved May 30, 2007 at http://www.shockfamily.net/sksleton/DISEASE.htmL

Michael's. Skeleton Factors. Michael's Naturapathic Programs: Inner Health Group, Inc., 1996 Retrieved on May 30, 2007 at http://www.michaelshealth.com/pdf/skeletalfactors.pdf

ThinkQuest. Skeletal System. Think Quest USA: Oracle Education Foundation, 1999. Retrieved on May 30, 2007 at http://library.thinkquest.org/5777/sked.htm
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Maslow's Models in His Experiments

Words: 3835 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94561422

Maslow gave them that self-meaning and appreciation and became one of the pioneers of a movement that brought the focus of individual feeling, yearning and wholeness into psychology. He sort of read them out and spoke their thoughts, feelings and aspirations for them. He devoted much energy to humanistic psychology and the human potential and inaugurated the "fourth force" in psychology towards the end of his life. The first force consisted of Freud and other depth psychologists; the second force, the behaviorists; his own humanism and European existentialism, the third. This fourth force was made up of transpersonal psychologies that derived from European philosophies, which examined meditation, higher consciousness levels and para-psychological phenomena and which reacted against the then dominant psychoanalysis and behaviorism schools of the 20th century. Among the most prominent European philosophers were Kierkegaard, Husserl and Heidegger and the most prominent in the humanist/existential group were Carl Rogers,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beneckson, Robert E Personality Theory. Florida International University.  http://vorlon1.com/PersonalityTheory2b.htm 

Boeree, George C. Motivation and Personality by Abraham Maslow. Understanding Human Motivation. Personality Theory, 1970

http://www.psy.pdx.edu/PsiCafe/KeyTheorists/Maslow.htm

Dickinson, Dee. Revisiting Maslow. Transforming Education: New Horizons for Learning, 2002.  http://www.newhorizons.org/trans/dickinsonmaslow.htm
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Living Things Are Characterized by the Following

Words: 4492 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61564004

living things are characterized by the following seven characteristics namely mobility, respiration, excretion, sensitivity or response to external stimulus, growth, feeding, and reproduction. Though there may be variations between animal and plant kingdom (ex, plants take in carbon dioxide and prepare their own food), these characteristics are commonly observed among all living things.

iology is a very broad field that encompasses the study of characteristics of living things. It includes botany, zoology and all other sub-disciplines that range from microbiology to evolution and ecology.

Evolution is the branch of biology that deals with the study of natural development of living organisms and the changes in them over time. Evolution refers to the heritable changes that occur in a population over a period of time. All the diversity that is observed currently in plant and animal kingdom can be ascribed to evolution over a long period of time.

Atoms are the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Mark Rothery, "Cells," Accessed on Sep 20th 2005, Available from http://www.mrothery.co.uk/cells/cellnotes.htm
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Myra Levine Nursing Reasons Why the Myra

Words: 1487 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77993211

Myra Levine Nursing

easons why the MYA LEVINE NUSE theorist developed the theory

Myra Levine an influential figure in the nursing vocation set up new methods which were effective for educating the nursing degrees students with fundamental concepts and caring, of the patients (Parse 2009). Her objective was to present individualized and reactive care of the patients which concentrated less on medical procedures and maximized on individual contexts of the patients. With this, it led to nursery theory's creation and patient care approach. The theory implies criteria which help in evaluating the nurses and what to do.

It offers concepts which are skilled in sustaining research which are useful to the nurses. Hence, it creates knowledge which is exclusive to the nurses. By that, it enhances the nurse's status as a better profession. In promoting the research, the nurses' theory endorses the education of the nurse (Allan 2011). With that,…… [Read More]

Reference

Allan, H.T., Smith, P., & O'Driscoll, M.. "Experiences of supernumerary status and the hidden curriculum in nursing: a new twist in the theory-practice gap?"Journal Of Clinical

Nursing, 2011 p850.

Melat, Z. "Theory -- Directed Nursing Practices" Wolterskluwer.2005. p. 270

Reimer, A.P., & Moore, S.M.. "Flight nursing expertise: towards a middle-range theory."
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Myra Levine Nurses and Patients Are Engaged

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87582430

Myra Levine

Nurses and patients are engaged in a "partnership of human experience," (Levine, 1977, p. 845). The ethical obligations and core values of nursing are rooted in this fundamental assumption about the relationship between nurse and patient. Nursing entails ethical obligations. "To be a nurse requires the willing assumption of ethical responsibility in every dimension of practice," (Levine, 1977, p. 845). The ethical obligations of a nurse are best explained by the belief that patients are holistic beings who constantly "thrive to preserve wholeness and integrity," ("Levine's Four Conservation Principles," 2012). Each patient is unique, too, and each seeks wholeness in a unique way. Nursing is defined as "a human interaction designed to promote 'wholeness' through adaptation." Myra Levine's theory is patient-centered, rather than disease-centered; the patient is treated and not just the disease. Because it offers specific guidelines within a rubric of ethical and philosophical tenets, Levine's conceptual…… [Read More]

References

Levine, M. (1966). Adaptation and assessment: A rationale for nursing intervention. The American Journal of Nursing 66(11): 2450-2453.

Levine, M. (1977). Nursing ethics and the ethical nurse. American Journal of Nursing 77(5): 845-849.

Levine, M. (2007). The rhetoric of nursing theory. Journal of Nursing Scholarship 27(1): 11-14.

"Levine's Four Conservation Principles," (2012). Nursing Theories. Retrieved online:  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Levin_four_conservation_principles.html
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Motivation Many Psychologists Have Put Forward Theories

Words: 1274 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78701089

Motivation

Many psychologists have put forward theories to advance the concept of motivation. Some of the psychological theories and models that explain motivation include incentive theory, drive theory, self-control model, push and pull model, intrinsic and extrinsic model, and rational motivations among others. Motivation stems from a number of sources, which dictate the way a person acts. It is paramount to note that motivation is one of the greatest determinants of motivation, and one can tell the level of motivation of a person through the way one behaves. The discussion below is an insight into this concept for a better understanding of motivation.

Motivation is a term in psychology that is hard to define; a number of theories have different views of motivation. These views of motivation include drive theories, incentive theories, and homeostasis, and one can draw a common definition of motivation from these views (Kalat, 2011). According to…… [Read More]

References

Bernstein, D.A. (2007). Psychology. Boston, Mass: Houghton Mifflin.

Dinibutun, S.R. (2012). Managing Effective Motivation. GSTF Journal on Business Review, 1(4). Retrieved from http://dl.globalstf.org/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage_images.tpl&product_id=1671&category_id=73&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=4

Kalat, J.W. (2011). Introduction to psychology. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Katzenbach, J.R. (2006). Motivation beyond money: Learning from peak performers. Leader to Leader, 2006(41), 59-62. Retrieved from  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=22223121&site=ehost-live&scope=site
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Joy Kogawa's Obasan

Words: 2488 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92937448

Obasan, Oppression, & emembrance

Children whose parents survived the Holocaust often report that their parents spent their entire lives attempting to conceal the fact that they were persecuted, had narrow escapes, and -- for many survivors -- were interred in concentration camps. The desire to protect their children from the horrors they experienced is certainly one of the reasons that survivors give for their silence. But their silence also enables them to keep their fears, anxieties, and regrets at bay, at least for those brief periods of time when forgetting has its intended effect. In effect, the reluctance of survivors to remember puts up a barrier that neither generation can easily cross -- not the generation of survivors, who have grown old in the years that have passed since World War II, and not the generation of children who have managed not to ask too many questions or follow their…… [Read More]

References

Goellnict, DC Tulsa Minority History as Metafiction: Joy Kogawa's Obasan. Reviewed work. Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Autumn, 1989), 287-306.

Kogawa, "The Penelope Work of Forgetting:' Dreams, Memory, and the Recovery of Wholeness in Joy." Rufus Cook, Reviewer. College Literature, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Summer, 2007), 54-69.

Ueki, T "Obasan: Revelations in a Paradoxical Scheme" Reviewed work. MELUS, Vol. 18, No. 4, Asian Perspectives (Winter, 1993), 5-20.
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A& 38 P 2 Kidneys

Words: 652 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1650968

blood ion levels, particularly sodium, potassium, and calcium levels, if there is a decrease in overall blood flow to the kidneys. A full credit answer will discuss the mechanisms at the cellular and chemical level.

Kidney failure: What occurs when there is a decrease in blood flow to the kidneys?

A decrease in blood flow to the kidneys can lead to complete organ failure at worst or at minimum severely disrupt the body's state of homeostasis. The kidneys play a critical role in the regulation of electrolytes, particularly sodium, potassium, and calcium. As their name suggests electrolytes, or ions, "are the charged particles in body fluids that help transmit electrical impulses for proper nerve, heart, and muscle function" (Astle 2005). In a healthy organism, positive and negative ions are in a state of equal balance. Decrease in blood flow to the kidneys severely disrupts the body's ability to not only…… [Read More]

References

Astle, S. (2005). Restoring electrolyte balance. Modern Medicine. Retrieved:

http://www.modernmedicine.com/modern-medicine/news/restoring-electrolyte-balance

Fluid and electrolyte balance. (n.d). Berkeley. Retrieved:

 http://mcb.berkeley.edu/courses/mcb135e/kidneyfluid.html
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Ethics and Morality of Paul Taylor's View

Words: 778 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25911525

ethics and morality of Paul Taylor's view of the environment

One key ethical issue, contentious amongst environmentalists today as well as those activists who oppose the ethical philosophy of environmentalism, is whether environmentalism should be focused on improving the lot of the human animal on earth, or should attempt to benefit all species upon earth in an equal fashion. The philosopher Paul Taylor argues that environmental ethics should emphasize the interdependent nature all individual members of earth's biological community. He states that environmentalists should embrace the idea that no single species is superior to the others. However, although Paul Taylor's philosophy is commendable in its emotional intensity when he says, "we have a self-evident moral obligation to the individual members of the Earth's biotic community to protect and promote their good for their sake" (518), his philosophy of species equality is fundamentally flawed. Environmentalism is a human ideological construction. No…… [Read More]

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Open Systems What Would You Consider to

Words: 453 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67684325

Open Systems. What would you consider to be the advantages of these characteristics?

One major characteristic of an open system is the importation of energy: "No human organization is self-contained or self-sufficient; thus, it must draw energy from outside to ensure survival. Take the case of a consulting firm that specializes in conducting employee opinion surveys for client organizations" (Von Bertalanffy et al., ). The consulting firm in this example is constantly drawing upon outside energy from the surrounding environment in order to fulfill its obligations and the needs of its customers. The second major characteristic is "negative entropy" which states that all organizations move naturally to the state of disorganization or death, but it is through the concerted action of all involved through importing energy via the environment that one can combat the evolution to this natural state (Von Bertalanffy et al., 1950). Another trait is that of the…… [Read More]

References

Griffin, D. (2013). Open System Organizational Structure. Retrieved from Chron.com:  http://smallbusiness.chron.com/open-system-organizational-structure-432.html 

von Bertanlanffy, L. (2013). Open Systems Theory. Retrieved from babson.edu:  http://faculty.babson.edu/krollag/org_site/encyclop/open_system.html
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Analyzing Motivational Theories

Words: 2495 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51234336

MASLOW'S THOEY VS. HULL'S THEOY

Integrating Two Theories of Motivational Psychology

Maslow Hierarchy of needs vs. Hull's Drive eduction Theory

Motivation is common term, but it is not easily defined. This is due to the many studies, which provide different definitions for the term. While some define it as a set of beliefs, values, interests, others define it as a cognitive decision making process. For this paper, motivation is central to a set of processes, which induce, direct, and maintain actions towards an objective. It is not similar to job performance, but it is a contributor to job performance (Linder, 1980). Motivation is a crucial component in the workplace, which explains why organizations are borrowing concepts from the motivation theories. There are many motivational theories, but they either fall under the content or process categories. Content theories assume that individuals have similar needs, and process theories emphasize the importance of…… [Read More]

References

Brewer, E.W., & McMahan-Landers, J. (2003). Job satisfaction among industrial and technical teacher educators. Journal of Industrial Teacher Education, 40(2), 65.

Benson, S.G., & Dundis, S.P. (2003). Understanding and motivating health care employees:

integrating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, training and technology. Journal of nursing management, 11(5), 315-320.

Jensen, R. (2006). Behaviorism, latent learning, and cognitive maps: Needed revisions in introductory psychology textbooks. Behavior analysis fall, 29(2), 187-209.
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Hyper as a Sniper

Words: 438 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25975475

Thyroid and Hormones

In some ways, the thyroid, parathyroid, aldosterone, and antidiuretic hormone (also known as ADH) all contribute to similar types of effects on the body, since they are either glands that secrete hormones or actual hormones themselves. Hormones help to regulate processes in the body. Many of the aforementioned glands and hormones regulate processes that pertain to water and electrolytes either directly or indirectly. The thyroid is one of the most sizable endocrine glands existent within the body and is located in the neck in the area that is close to where one's Adam's apple is (Tweed, 2015, p. 46). The thyroid plays an invaluable role in the regulation of other hormones because it essentially controls how responsive the body is to other hormones. Therefore, in terms of electrolytes and other types of energy that may be gained from conventional food and drink sources (such as water), the…… [Read More]

References

Thompson, L. (2014). Parathyroid adenoma. Ear, Nose & Throat Journal. 93(7), 246-248.

Tweed, V. (2015). Feed your thyroid. Better Nutrition. 77(2), 46-49.
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Evaluation of the Aging Process

Words: 665 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69979374

Aging can be defined as the buildup of damage in molecules, tissues, and cells throughout an individual's lifetime. As a result of this accumulation, the capacity of an organism to sustain homeostasis in stress situations is decreased and enhanced risk for many diseases emerges (Rodriguez-Rodero et al., 2011). The process of aging, which is commonly known as senescence, affects people in different ways because of its varying impact on different parts of the body and at varying rates (Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman, 2016). Given these differences, the aging process is different between individuals as some seemingly age faster than others.

There are several factors that affect the aging process and contribute to the differences through which some people seem to age faster than others. One of the major factors that affect the aging process is cell aging, which entails DNA damage and telomeres. In this case, aging is a by-product of…… [Read More]

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Psychology the Use of Amino

Words: 2867 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39137500



Drugs thought to enhance serotonin-mediated neurotransmission have been shown to diminish appetite for carbohydrates. In a study done by Heraief, Burckhardt, Wurtman and Wurtman, (1985), they examined the ability of tryptophan (TP), serotonin's amino acid precursor, or a placebo to influence weight loss among 62 obese Swiss outpatients who were on a reducing diet known as the Protein-Sparing Modified Fast (PSMF) Diet which is often associated with severe carbohydrate craving. This diet provided relatively large amounts of protein but little carbohydrates, thus stimulating ketone body production. Its consumption also reduced the ratio of plasma TP to the summed concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids, thereby probably diminishing brain TP and serotonin levels. It was found that among moderately obese patients the TP significantly enhanced weight loss, especially during the first treatment month but also during the total. The TP didn't modify the reported adherence to the PSMF diet.…… [Read More]

References

Gordon-Elliott, Janna S. And Margolese, Howard C. (2006). Weight loss during prolonged branched-chain amino acid treatment for tardive dyskinesia in a patient with schizophrenia. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. 40(2), p195-195.

Group, Edward F. (2009). Amino Acid Weight Loss. Retrieved March 12, 2010, from Weight

Loss & Obesity Web site: http://www.weightlossobesity.com/weight-loss/amino-acid-weight-loss.html

Heraief, Eric, Burckhardt, Peter, Wurtman, Judith J. And Wurtman, Richard J. (1985).
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Enzyme Deficiency Cause Ailments or

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56418955



Lipases digest fat and fat soluble vitamins. Enzyme.com reports, "Lipase deficient people have decreased cell permeability, meaning nutrients cannot get in and the waste cannot get out of the cell. For example, diabetics are lipase deficient and cannot get glucose into their cells, and wastes or unwanted substances cannot get out." Heart disease can come from this.

Cellulase deficiency can lead to sugar or gluten intolerance. Enzyme.com writes, "Cellulase deficiency is a malabsorption syndrome (impaired absorption of nutrients, vitamins, or minerals from the diet by the lining of the small intestine) with its many symptoms of lower abdominal gas, pain, bloating and problems associated with the jejunum and pancreas as well as nervous system conditions such as ell's Palsy, Tic and facial neuralgia."

Ethnicity can be related to deficiencies of the body. Emedicine.medscape.com (2010) reports, "Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency is most common in Canadian Eskimos and natives of Greenland. They cannot…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Enzymes.com. (2010). "Enzyme deficiencies" Retrieved on April 19, 2010 from http://www.enzymes.com/enzyme_deficiencies.html

Emedicine.medscape.com. (2010). Retrieved on April 19, 2010 from  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/931041-overview
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Occupational Stress in a Public

Words: 5453 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35693330

The stress alarm, therefore, can actually assist the employee to improve her performance and is necessary especially, if positive perceptions regarding the challenges of the work environment exist. The response to the stress under the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress, provided that the exceptions held by the employee are positive, is healthy and necessary for survival and productivity. Eriksen H.., Murison, ., Pensgaard, a.M., Ursin, H. (2005). Under this theory, emotional and physical health within the individual is sustained through a positive expectation for the outcomes, compliance with the expectations, or through resisting the stress altogether. Eriksen H.., Murison, ., Pensgaard, a.M., Ursin, H. (2005). A summary chart outlining these different theories on stress and their potential effects on the organization follows.

A Comparison of Theories of Stress and How They Affect Organizational Operations

Theory

Basic Concept

Basic eaction

Effect on the Organization

Fight or Flight

The stress produces physiological…… [Read More]

References

Afzalur, R. (1996). Stress, strain, and their moderators: An empirical comparison of entrepreneurs and managers. The Journal of Small Business Management, 34, 1-12.

Cooper, C.L. ed. (2002). Theories of organizational stress. New York, NY: Oxford University

Press,

Inc.
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Neurofibroma Genetic Traits and Impact

Words: 5537 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52789543

However, recently, anesthesiologists have suggest a low to mid thoracic epidural combined with adequate general anesthesia. This anesthetic technique will allow for adequate inter-operative monitoring. After the operation, the anesthesiologist must continue to monitor the patient for either hypertension, hypotension and hypoglycemia. The presence of either of these conditions may alter the course of the medication given to the patient once the patient is removed from the anesthesia.

Respiratory System

Neurofibroma can cause systemic problems within the various components of the Respiratory System. As has already been presented, Neurofibromas can cause partial blockages within upper parts of the trachea. However, Neurofibromas can also pose challenges or the anesthesiologist when dealing with nasal, sinus or maxilofacial cavities with Neurofibromas present within. One example of how devastatingly complex the Neurofibroma can become is seen when a benign neurofibroma can cause a superior vena cava compression. Such was the case of a 21-year-old…… [Read More]

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Ethical Case Analysis JOHNSO62 on

Words: 3376 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71485907

The Tasman Spirit crew and financiers should work to investigate acute health concerns as well as the marine ecosystem surrounding Karachai. The American Club, likely one of two involved parties with the financial resources to affect significant change in the region which actually suffered the effects of the environmental disaster. ather than working against each other with suits and counter suits and the assorted other motions and legal actions underway, it would be most effective and positive for those two companies to work together with environmental awareness and protection agencies to restore the region.

Step Three

Affected Parties

This portion of the analysis is concerned with the specific affected individual parties. While it is important not to allow empathy for a specific group to outweigh the impartiality of an effective analysis it is also important to understand the relevant human components of a situation especially one which has such a…… [Read More]

References

1. Janjua, N.Z., Kasi, P.M., Nawaz, H. (2006). Acute health effects of the Tasman Spirit oil spill on residents of Karachi, Pakistan. BMC Public Health, 6, 84. 435- 488.

2. Ha, M., Lee, W.J., Lee, S., & Cheong, H.K. (2008). A literature review on health effects of exposure to oil spill. Journal of Preventative Medicine and Public Health 45,5 345-354.
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Brain Summary Though Not Much

Words: 768 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46636391



pp. 85-6

The brain can be understood in terms of its lobe-like structures, or it can be mapped out according to the regions that seem to dictate and influence certain behaviors and processes. The three major areas of the brain in this schema are the motor areas, the sensory areas, and the association areas, though in reality almost all human functions and behaviors involve interactions between these areas. Interestingly, large and imprecise movements have been found to originate in a very small space of the motor areas, whereas more precise yet much smaller movements require large brain areas. The sensory area consists of three composite areas -- the somatosensory area, the auditory area, and the visual area.

pp. 87-8

The association areas of the brain are believed to control higher-level thinking and processes that regulate behavior in a larger sense, such as turning Phineas Gage from a hardworking and responsible…… [Read More]

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Biology Function of the Metabolic

Words: 2030 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64208353

d.).

The primary organ that is accountable for regulating metabolism is the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is situated on the brain stem and forms the floor and part of the lateral walls of the third ventricle of the cerebrum. The main functions of the hypothalamus is to control and integrate activities of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), production and regulation of feelings of rage and aggression, regulation of body temperature and regulation of food intake (Graham, 2005).

BM goes down with age and with the loss of lean body mass. Increased muscle mass and cardiovascular exercise can help to increase BM, even when the body is at rest. Measured in calories, metabolic rates vary with exertion, recent food ingestion, muscle exertion, environmental temperature, emotional state, body temperature, pregnancy, menstruation, level of thyroid hormones stress hormones (epinephrine and norepinephrine), fear and illness. The human body requires energy in order to stay alive…… [Read More]

References

Basal Metabolic Rate. (2010). Retreived July 22, 2010, from Buzzle Web site:

 http://www.buzzle.com/articles/basal-metabolic-rate.html 

Basal metabolic rate. (2010). Retreived July 22, 2010, from Wellness.com Web site:

 http://www.wellness.com/reference/fitness/basal-metabolic-rate/practice-theory-and-evidence
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Global Change Science the Negative

Words: 3243 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67525149

As the road is being laid the fumes from the chemical materials and the concussive force of the construction equipment are devastating to local wildlife (Forman & Alexander, 1998). The result, is displaced organisms which ultimately put increased pressure for food, land, and water on other ecosystems. The extent of these ripple effects are still yet to be fully known.

In instances where above or below ground water supplies must be altered in order to make way for a new road system the effects are if anything more dire. When laying the bed of a road, it is nearly impossible to prevent a percentage of the chemicals used in the road surface itself from leeching into the soil (Forman & Deblinger, 2000). When in the presence of water those toxins are carried the course of the water supply affecting all of the vegetation and wildlife which it comes into contact…… [Read More]

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Immune Biopsychology Interactions of the

Words: 4188 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47766172



An interesting view of the immune system with particular implications for the current review and collation of information is provided by the field of computer science. The immune system makes many series of continual trade-offs, distributing resources in a way that necessarily leaves certain vulnerabilities in the system as a whole while providing greater comprehensiveness in coverage and protection when necessary (Hofmeyr 1997). This makes the immune system an adaptive and continually evolving and self-improving system; with little outside direction it is capable of assessing changing needs, and altering itself not only in particular instances but even in some of its general responses in order to provide greater long-term efficacy for the task of protecting the human organism from disease (Hofmeyr 1997). This view of the immune system as a contained and self-informing system is not entirely accurate, but it is a very useful perspective for our purposes herein.

The…… [Read More]

References

Buske-Kirschbaum, a. (2009). "Cortisol Responses to Stress in Allergic Children: Interaction with the Immune Response." Neuroimmunomodulation 16, pp. 325-32.

Coe, C. & Laudenslager, M. (2007). "Psychosocial influences on immunity, including effects on immune maturation and senescence." Brain, behavior, and immunity 21(8), pp. 1000-8.

Dugdale, D. (2008). "Immune response -- overview." University of Maryland medical center. Accessed 22 May 2010.  http://www.umm.edu/ency/article/000821.htm 

Dunigan, J.; Carr, B. & Steel, J. (2007). "Posttraumatic Growth, Immunity and Survival in Patients with Hepatoma." Digestive diseases and sciences 52(9), pp. 2452-9.
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Independence Less Than Half a

Words: 12705 Length: 46 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94035562

Notwithstanding the challenges involved, the stakes are high and there is little room for false starts or experimentation; therefore, identifying a general set of best practices that Gambian organizations can follow in developing their own set of sustainable productivity practices represents a valuable and timely undertaking, which relates to the purpose of the study which is discussed further below.

Purpose of Study

The overall purpose of this study was to study to provide a review of the relevant juried and scholarly literature together with the findings of a survey of Gambian business leaders to generally identify the most pressing priorities for developing the nation's infrastructure and sustainable organizational productivity. The specific purpose of the study was to determine whether SMEs face the same types of challenges of to optimum performance as their larger corporate counterparts, and to identify any peculiar organizational characteristics that determine levels of performance between SMEs and…… [Read More]

References

About us. 2010. The Gambia Experience. Retrieved from  http://www.gambia.co .uk/Docs/About" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Gut Reaction to This Reading

Words: 609 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29306603



Q3. Explain the role of an Indian band leader (known as sachem or sagamore). How did he gain and keep his position? What were his duties and how did the value of reciprocity function in his relationship with the band? Explain who pnieses and powwows were.

The sagamore or sachem's primary duties were to mediate between clans and to engage in inter-tribal diplomacy. Anything that required greater coordination efforts beyond that of families or clans, such as large-scale hunting, was the sachem's responsibility. The European observers were often horrified that the sachem's position depended upon the collective will of the people, versus that of European monarchs, the latter of whom ruled by force and heredity, Some sagamores did claim to have shamanistic powers that caused them to be more "dreaded" (Salisbury 44). However, most sagamores depended upon counsels of pnieses and powwows, which were made up of other members of…… [Read More]

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Sigmund Freud to the Science

Words: 2064 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65632482

In this regard, Demorest concludes that, "Together these and other theorists have provided accounts of what it means to be a person that all fit within the psychodynamic paradigm, a perspective that holds a vision of people as at their core driven by dynamic forces in their unconscious minds" (2005, p. 3).

Freud's influence on psychoanalytic thought, though, required some time to take hold and many of his methods were rejected outright by the contemporary medical establishment, particularly in the United States. For example, following Freud's only trip to North America in 1909, one psychiatrist believed that, "Many patients were psychotically disturbed and deemed to be beyond the reach of Freud's intellectual 'talk therapy'" (Beam, 2001, p. 94). Not only did others think that Freud's methods were not appropriate for some patients, Freud himself acknowledged their limitations. In fact, Beam points out as well that, "Freud himself thought most schizophrenics…… [Read More]

References

Beam, A. (2001). Gracefully insane: The rise and fall of America's premier mental hospital.

New York: Public Affairs.

Cherry, K. (2010). Freud's patients and therapy. About.com: Psychology. Retrieved from  http://psychology.about.com/od/sigmundfreud/ig/Sigmund-Freud-Photobiography/Freud-s-Patients-and-Therapy.htm .

Demorest, A. (2005). Psychology's grand theorists: How personal experiences shaped professional ideas. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Psychology & Nbsp general Taumatic Brain

Words: 5753 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54980300

The accident occurred while the actress was taking a skiing lesson. She initial experienced no symptoms from her fall, but later complained of a headache and was taken to a local hospital. Reports indicate that her fall was not very spectacular and occurred at a low speed on a beginner run. She was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident. (Quinn, 2009)

However, while it is true that sometimes there are no immediately obvious signs of a severe brain injury, at other times there are.

Severe Traumatic Brain njury

The symptoms of a severe traumatic brain injury (which can result in permanent neurological damage) include a number of cognitive problems including inability to concentrate, problems with memory, problems in focusing and paying attention, ability to process new information at a normal rate, a high level of confusion, and perseveration, which is the action of doing something over…… [Read More]

In describing the course of their patients, experienced clinicians who use HBOT to treat patients with brain injury, cerebral palsy, and stroke refer to improvements that may be ignored in standardized measures of motor and neuro-cognitive dysfunction. These measures do not seem to capture the impact of the changes that clinicians and parents perceive. Caregivers' perceptions should be given more weight in evaluating the significance of objective improvements in a patient's function. Unfortunately, studies have not consistently measured caregiver burden, or have assessed it only by self-report. Studies in which the caregivers' burden was directly observed would provide much stronger evidence than is currently available about treatment outcome. (AHRQ Publication Number 03-E049, 2003)

In other words, this somewhat alternative treatment produces results that are more meaningful to the injured person and his or her caregivers.

I have focused here primarily on the biochemical end of treatments for those with traumatic brain injury because it is this level of treatment that offers the long-term possibility of the greatest level of treatment. Such treatments as are described here have the chance to cure traumatic brain injury. But until these are perfected, every other kind of treatment and therapy -- from drug treatments to speech therapy to the love of friends -- will remain priceless.