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Spirits Subtext Context and Other

Words: 1419 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57502145



Class struggles are one type of such instability, and this instability is hinted at again and again throughout the novel. Esteban's rape of one of the servants at the hacienda is indicative of the subjugation and authority that exists within the household, and the fact that this union ends up resulting in a child can be seen as indicative of the generative power of such a power and class structure. This child also ends up having a child, however, and the grandson of this class rape completes the cycle of violence by imprisoning and raping Esteban's granddaughter, showing a new type of class dominance that is representative of the equal evils yet changed perspective of the socialist/Communist regimes.

Gender Struggles and Female Power/Independence

Another very evident strain throughout the House of Spirits, and one that can be seen in both instances of rape along with may other events and details…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allende, Isabel. The House of Spirits. New York: Dial, 2005.

Garcia-Johnson, Ronie-Richele. "The Struggle for Space: Feminism and Freedom in the House of the Spirits." Revista Hispanica Moderna Volume 47, Issue 1 (1994), pp. 184-93.

Hamner, Lucia C. & a. Harron Akram Loodhi. "In the House of the Spirits: Toward a Post Keynesian Theory of the Household?" Journal of Post Keynesian Economics

Volume 20, Issue 3 (1998), pp. 415-33.
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Spirit Catches Have a Friend

Words: 790 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 66136276

Then, if the parents did not listen to the doctors, they assumed more of the responsibility of what happened. How could the doctors expect the medicine to be taken correctly when the parents did not read, did not know mathematical symbols and were given change after change. They were blindsided by their own diagnosis and the arrogance that everyone would follow their treatment exactly. Nor can the doctors be excused for not understanding the Hmong ways. Reading National Geographic (pg. 57) is not the way to learn about a culture! Dr. Murphy's comment that "[p]eople in the early years of their medical careers have invested an incredible amount of time and energy and pain in their training, and they have been taught that what they've learned in medical school is the only legitimate way to approach health problems" surely does not cover their actions, either. The story about Dr. Fife,…… [Read More]

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Spirit Catches You the World

Words: 1976 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45402548

They cannot ignore the socioeconomic issues of adversity so often present and, where necessary, need to act as advocates, mediators and social brokers (Compton, Galaway, & Curnoyer, 2005).

The concern is that the issue of healthcare for culturally diverse individuals is so complex, there are no exact rights and wrongs. For example, in Fadiman's book, no person(s) can be said to be ultimately correct or incorrect in his/her behavior or actions; everyone did what he/she thought was right. In order to help others who have different cultural backgrounds and experiences, as the Hmong, it is essential to be 1) proactive. That is, to forecast the transforming demographics in the U.S. over the coming decades and put plans into place that will best serve these individuals and 2) collaborative. The best results occur when professionals from different backgrounds and expertise share best practices and learn from each other. What could have…… [Read More]

References

Compton, B., Galaway, B., & Curnoyer, B.R. (1994). Social work processes (7th ed.).

Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Fadiman, Anne (1997) the Spirit Catches You, and You Fall Down. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Gladwell, M. (2002). The tipping point: How little things can make a big difference. Boston: Little Brown
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Spirited Away Film

Words: 3397 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 56785547

Asian media, specifically anime and animated movies like "Spirited Away," impact Saudi youth?

Argument

Anime or what some may consider, Japanese animation, is one of the main aspects of Japanese media. It has reached millions of people worldwide and inspired fashion, movies, and even an entire city, Akihabara. Hayao Miyasaki's "Spirited Away" is what some consider one of his best works. The magic of this animated film has brought countless fans into the realm of anime and Japanese animation. ith its themes of connection, the spirit world, and memory, it has generated meaning and depth within its growing audience. The creator, Hayao Miyasaki, is a traditional artist, focusing on strong images and themes of love, good and evil, and childhood to portray his character and tell his stories. These stories have brought him and Japanese animation in general, increased success, with "Spirited Away" becoming the most popular Japanese animated film…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baber, Zaheer. CyberAsia: the Internet and society in Asia. Leiden: Brill, 2005. Print.

Cubbison, Laurie. "Anime Fans, DVDs, and The Authentic Text." The Velvet Light Trap 56.1 (2005): 45-57. Project Muse. Web. 9 Apr. 2014.

Darling-Wolf, Fabienne. "Virtually Multicultural: Trans-Asian Identity and Gender in an International Fan Community of a Japanese Star." New Media & Society 6.4 (2004): 507-528. Print.

Ellis, Jonathan. "The art of anime: Freeze-frames and moving pictures in Miyazaki Hayao's." Journal of Japanese & Korean Cinema 2.1 (2010): 21-34. EBSCO. Web. 9 Apr. 2014.
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Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

Words: 567 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51803669

spirit catches you and you fall down.

Notions of epilepsy amongst the Hmong nation are diametrically different to those of the West.

The Hmong believe that epileptic individuals are particularly fancied by malevolent spirits (called 'dabs') that enter their bodies, make them sick, and allow them to communicate with the spirit realm in order to serve as mediums to help others in their present existence and to communicate with those who are dead.

This religious belief is called shamanistic animism, which asserts that malevolent spirits are constantly seeking human souls to inhabit, particularly those of vulnerable or unloved children (although Lia, in this case, was the favorite child) and that epilepsy is but one instance of the spirit's inhabiting the human body.

In Hmong culture, epilepsy is referred to as quag deb peg (I.e. "The spirit catches you and you fall down."). Perceived as an honorable condition, the epileptic individual…… [Read More]

Reference

Fadiman, A. The spirit catches you and you fall down. Farrar & co., 1997
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Spirit Using Specific Textual Examples

Words: 653 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64134394

Grace lives in a house, a house that bakes its residents like an oven, because it is really too hot and unsuited for life in a desert. Still, holding onto her status, Grace lives in a European-style dwelling, with stiff and uncomfortable furniture as an example of her wealth. Grace was born poor, but because of the oil-rich nature of her land, she has acquired status within her community. The piano she longed for as a young girl is not played, and rots, but Grace does not care, because her ability to buy it is testimony to the fact, in her eyes, that she has done something significant with her life.

In short, Grace has fully embraced all of the myths of capitalism within American culture. However, at the beginning of the book, she is dead, murdered, it is implied because of her wealth and the jealousy her wealth stirs…… [Read More]

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Capoeira and House Dance Music Capoeira

Words: 1274 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81041219

House music also influenced the development of b-boying, or breakdancing, which took house dance moves and made them more aggressive. Close physical posture and movement without physical contact in b-boying can be seen in capoeira. Like capoeira, house dance styles varied by region. For instance, in Chicago and Detroit, jacking was a major element of house dance. Jacking was a dance move that focused on torso movements and created a rippling effect, and the dance known as "The Farmer" also originated in this type of house music (Mirani). Jacking was influenced by the heavier sounds of techno and acid music. On the East Coast, house music was highly influenced by hip-hop music. Dance moves that originated on the East Coast include "Loose Legs," the "Train," skating, and Jamaican skanking (Mirani). On the est Coast, house music was more commercial and dance moves were influenced by b-boys.

In addition to the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, James. "Shared Characteristics of Music & Dance: Capoeira and Dance Music." Prezi.

20 April 2013. Web. 26 April 2013.

"Capoeira Instruments." Capoeira World. Web. 26 April 2013.

"History of Capoeira." 1999. Web. 26 April 2013, from http://www.capoeira.htmlplanet.com/
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Symbolism and Cisneros' the House

Words: 1702 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 98611598

However, there is also danger to the sexuality that lies behind sweetness, as when a girl Sally, marries a marshmallow salesman to escape an abusive father, entering a union that seems as bad as the home she is leaving.

A final symbol of the novel is that of play -- few adult women, except for the insane Ruthie, are seen enjoying themselves over the course of the novel. Girls can play at jump rope and look at clouds, but they worry about how the burdens and cares of an adult life -- like abusive or absent husbands, children, and money worries -- will weigh them down, as their bodies mature. Men are shown playing and gambling, but women must put their own pleasures aside for fathers, husbands, and brothers. Early on in the novel, Esperanza comments how even in her family the boys and the girls tend to separate as…… [Read More]

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Meeting House and Counting House The Quaker

Words: 704 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18771833

Meeting House and Counting House: The Quaker Merchants of Colonial Philadelphia, 1682-1763 by Frederick B. Tolles. (New York, W.W. Norton 1963, c1948), xiv, 292 p., [8] p. Of plates illus., ports, (BX7649.P5 T64 1963).

This book covers quite a specific part of our history, the Quakers of Philadelphia, and their influence on colonial merchant economics. Philadelphia was a commerce capital in early America, and banks and lenders from all over the world centered their American activities in the city. Quakers helped found the city, and were major forces in the business and industry of Philadelphia. Tolles cleverly intertwines the religious constraints of the Friends, and how these constraints consistently affected their ability to do business, and their own view of their dealings in the business world. One merchant, William Edmundson, seemed to be more interested in the spiritual rather than material welfare of his peoples, compared their merchant techniques to…… [Read More]

References

Tolles, Frederick B. Meeting House and Counting House: The Quaker Merchants of Colonial Philadelphia, 1682-1763.
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Doll's House an Analysis of

Words: 1098 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69025134

The people elected Andrew Jackson President of the United States even though he had married a divorced woman. Nonetheless…men and women had specific marital responsibilities and lived with considerable restraint on their behavior, always subject to community approval. Men were assigned the world of business and family support. omen were custodians of the home.

In such a social situation, Ibsen, by having Nora walk out on her husband, is literally slapping social convention in its face. In fact, in such a social context, Nora is a walking contradiction: she breaks convention by forging her father's name and taking on work herself (without her husband knowing) to pay a debt that saved his life. Yet his ungratefulness scathes her so badly that she sees no point in acting like his "doll."

Still, it is not social custom that Nora goes out of her way to buck. All of her actions have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Engel, Margorie. "The History of Divorce." Flying Solo. Web. 8 Aug 2011.

Ibsen, Henrik. "A Doll's House." Project Gutenberg. Web. 8 Aug 2011.

Johnson, Paul. Intellectuals. New York, NY: HarperCollins, 2007.

New Testament. New International Version, 1984. Biblos. Web. 8 Aug 2011.
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Samurai Spirit Their Obligation Loyalty

Words: 1851 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19174434

Spirit of the Samurai

I suppose I became a modern Samurai through the experience of my father's death. My father belonged to the old school of Samurai philosophy -- a way of life that I despised for one reason - he committed ritual suicide known to the Samurai as Seppuku, or Hara-kiri. I remember the day that he died. It was cold and very early in the morning when he came to me and told me about the ways of the Samurai. He told me about honor and a life dedicated towards a morality of perfection; a way of life that had the highest moral goals in attempting to achieve a perfect state of being and living. He also told me at length about the ancient Samurai who valued the warrior's aggression as much as kindness and compassion. I was a bit confused by his lecture. After all, I had…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Seppuku - Ritual Suicide. Retrieved November 21, 2004. Web site:

 http://victorian.fortunecity.com/duchamp/410/seppuku.html 

Matrasko C. BUSHIDO, WARRIOR CODE OF CONDUCT:the Samurai. Retrieved November 21, 2004 from Aikidp World. Web site: http://www.aikido-world.com/articles/Bushido-code%20of%20the%20Warrior,%20the%20Samurai.htm

Way of the Spiritual Warrior. Retrieved November 21, 2004. Web site: http://www.meaningoflife.i12.com/Warrior.htm
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Response to Setting in Edith Wharton's the House of Mirth

Words: 734 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38590432

House of Mirth is set in New York high society in the 1920s, where the affluent have little more to do than to criticize and gossip about one another. Their conversations with each other are filled with snappy comments and sugarcoated insults. Despite their wealth, their setting, an environment filled with insecurities and constant arguments, taints the characters.

The main character, Lily Bart breaks through the setting with her independent spirit, ability to speak her own mind and dismissal of the thought of simply marrying for security. Her personality is not well accepted by society and she is a target for their scorn and derision. In short, her refusal to conform to her environment makes her the enemy of society.

The setting is a society where appearances mean everything. Therefore, once Lily loses her status as an attractive asset in society, her world collapses. The social setting of the novel…… [Read More]

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The Wesleyan Doctrine of the Holy Spirit

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43789427

Susanna Wesley appealed to the idea of vocation in defending her practice of holding Sunday evening gatherings. Samuel Wesley spoke of the "inner witness" during his final witness. Describe a Wesleyan understanding of the Holy Spirit in conversation with one of these influences.

John Wesley's view of the Holy Spirit was a being that enabled the believer to love others as he loved himself and to enable the believer to participate in a universal spirit of divine love and grace (Wesley, 1980, p. 109). The Holy Spirit is a vehicle of grace that brings human beings to God by virtue of working upon their inner spirit. The fact that the Trinity has a component which is so mysterious underlines the notion that believers have a personal relationship with God that is manifest through faith alone. The Holy Spirit, like faith itself, is inwardly rather than outwardly visible. But it is…… [Read More]

Reference

Wesley, J. (1980). John Wesley (Library of Protestant Thought). A. C. Outler (Ed.). Oxford:

Wesley, S. (1742). A letter by his mother. Retrieved from:  http://carlarolfe.com/swesley.pdf
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Human Psychology Drives Economy Animal Spirits -

Words: 3421 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41035034

Human Psychology Drives Economy

Animal Spirits - How Human Psychology Drives Economy - the Theory ehavioral Economics Particularly work authors Robert Shiller ( Akerlof) Yale Richard Thaler Chicago. Shiller a web.

The essay is based upon behavioral economics and how human behavior or rather psychology act as an economic driver, thou this theory or opinion hasn't been fully accepted by all economist and authors the essay intends to explore more into behavioral theory or economic and at the end give its own conclusion about the topic.

The essay will first introduce the topic of study then look at some of the economic drivers that have been suggested by other authors and economist to understand more on what an economic driver is. After looking at some of the economic drivers that have been laid out, the essay embarks on the sub-topic which is the theory of behavioral economic in a manner…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ainslie, G. (1992). Picoeconomics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Ainslie, G. (1975). "Specious Reward: A Behavioral / Theory of Impulsiveness and Impulse Control." Psychological Bulletin 82 (4): 463 -- 496.

Alkerlof & Shiller (2009) Animal Spirits: How Human psychology drives economy and why it matters for global capitalism

Arrow, Kenneth and Gerard Debreu. (1954). "Existence of a Competitive Equilibrium for a Competitive Economy." Econometrica 22, no. 3 (1954): 265-90.
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Vacant and Eye-Like Windows of the House

Words: 996 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 32085782

vacant and eye-like windows" of the House of Usher spook the nameless narrator and his sickly childhood friend and title heir, Roderick Usher. Decaying trees and a "black and lurid tarn" dot the sullen landscape that greets the narrator on his approach to the Usher estate. This classic Gothic setting influences the narrator as soon as his horse trots towards the crumbling mansion. Probably familiar with depression, the narrator notices immediately what a profound effect the House of Usher has upon his frightened and weakened spirit. The eerie landscape of Edgar Allen Poe's short story "The Fall of the House of Usher" contributes to characterization.

From the onset of the narrative, the house itself acts as a character; it is humanized and personified by the narrator even before he meets Roderick. Indeed, the narrator is transfixed by the physical nature of the house even before he sets foot inside it…… [Read More]

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Setting in the Fall of the House

Words: 1129 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2201275

Setting in the Fall of the House of Usher

In many of Poe's stories and poems, setting is one of the most important elements used by the author. Poe possessed an uncanny ability to paint a gloomy and supernatural picture in the minds of his readers. Many critics believe that the reason for his use of gloom and despair was to make his readers understand the correlation between darkness and death.

Setting is one of the most important elements in Poe's short story, "The Fall of the House of Usher." His use of setting reveals early in the story that both the Usher family and the Usher mansion are decaying from the inside out. The reader can immediately identify with the setting, as it sits on the verge of collapse.

When the narrator first approaches the House of Usher, where he is visiting to comfort his old friend, Roderick Usher,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abel, Darrel. "A Key to The House of Usher." Interpretations of American Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1959.

Magill, Frank N. Magill's Survev of American Literature. Vol.5: Olsen-Snyder: New York: Salem Press, Inc., 1991.

Poe, Edgar Allan. "The Fall of the House of Usher." The American Tradition in Literature. New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1994: pgs. 1511-1523.

Walker, I.M. "The Legitimate Sources of Terror in 'The Fall of the House of Usher'." Twentieth Century Interpretations of Poe's Tales. Ed. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1971.
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Theatricality in Dreiser's Sister Carrie and Wharton's the House of Mirth

Words: 2818 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68352415

Gender as Performance

Theodore Dreiser's 1900 novel Sister Carrie is in style and tone in many ways radically different from Edith harton's The House of Mirth, published just five years later. And yet there is in both works a similar core, what might be called a parallel moral, for both novels explore the ways in which gender is performative in the two societies that we learn about within the world of each novel. hile, of course, in many ways gender is what we are born with, it is also just as clearly for these two writers (as it would be for any anthropologist) part of the performance of self, the way in which each person in these books presents herself or himself both to the world at large as well as internally. Both novels allows the authors to tell a compelling story while simultaneously exploring the gender roles expected of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ammons, Elizabeth. Edith Wharton's Argument with America. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1980.

Caserio, Robert L. "Edith Wharton and the Fiction of Public Commentary." Western Humanities Review 3 (40), Autumn 1986: 189-208.

Dreiser, Theodore. Sister Carrie. New York: Signet, 2000.

Elbert, Monika M. "Bourgeois Sexuality and the Gothic Plot in Wharton and Hawthorne" In Hawthorne and Women: Engendering and Expanding the Hawthorne Tradition, John L. Idol & Melinda M. Ponder (eds.). Amherst: University of Massacusetts Press, 1999: 258-270.
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Reason Why Teenage Shouldn't Leave Their Parent's House

Words: 486 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13186048

Smehra

Teenagers should wait until they are 21 to move out Teenagers face a lot of social pressures and difficulties as well as individual changes in their physique and personality that it may be sometime before they 'come into their own' and realize who they are. With all of these choices and decisions happening, it is in a teenager's best interest to live with their parents until they are 21, rather than move out as quickly as possible.

Many teenagers want to move out as soon as possible because they want to exert their freedom and independence, yet, for many teenagers this just causes an extra load of pressures, responsibilities and problems if they are not prepared to meet financial obligations, hold a job while going to school, and juggle a social life amongst it all. If teenagers draw up a plan of action, they could still find themselves falling…… [Read More]

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Frida Kahlos Spirit in Self-Portrait with Monkey

Words: 1594 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Paper #: Array

Kevin Cliche
Barrie, Ontario, Canada
Introduction
Self-Portrait with Money by Frida Kahlo was painted in 1938.  The work is an oil on masonite painting and was commissioned by Conger Goodyear, who served as the head of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City (PBS, 2005).  Frida painted numerous self-portraits through her career, but this one depicted something unique about the artist:  the monkey perched just behind her shoulder represented a kind of protective spirit.  Frida herself has a look in her eyes that warns the viewer not to try to fool her—for she sees everything that everyone is up to.  This paper will explain the self-portrait and what its content, composition and style communicate to the viewer.  
Content, Composition and Style
In terms of content, Frida’s self-portrait with monkey communicates something important and special about the artist herself.  As Lazzari and Schlesier (2017) note, Frida Kahlo’s self-portrait…… [Read More]

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Senses Meet the Spirit When

Words: 3295 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50825353

Diehl also points out that the poet's retrospective outlook cannot be overlooked, for "by placing this description in the realm of recollection, the speaker calls into question the current status of her consciousness" (Diehl). Here we come into contact with vivid imagery of the poet losing her faculties. Another interesting aspect we find in this poem is how it represents a personal experience. The poet's thoughts are coming from within. After all is said and done, we read "And the windows failed, and then/I could not see to see" (Dickinson 16). Obviously, the poet does not crack the mystery of death but she does seem to come to terms with it, at least.

The poet takes us on another journey in "I heard a Fly Buzz hen I Died." e are told about the "stillness of the air" (3) to the grieving to the distraction of a fly. The poet…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. Emily Dickinson. Broomall: Chelsea House Publishers.1999.

The Western Canon. New York: Harcourt Brace and Company. 1994.

Dickinson, Emily. "Because I Could Not Stop for Death." The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Ed. Thomas Johnson. New York: Little, Brown and Company. 1960.

Death is a Dialogue" the Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Ed. Thomas Johnson. New York: Little, Brown and Company. 1960.
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Role of Women in Latin

Words: 1348 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 14661383



Ursula's daughter is also defined primarily in relation to gender, and her desire and her relationship, or lack thereof, with men. Unlike her life-sustaining mother, Amaranta never marries, and instead spends her entire life mourning her lost love. But Allende's main feminine romantic heroine, Alba, is not merely psychologically bruised by the loss of her love, but is physically tortured at the hands of Esteban Garcia, Esteban Trueba's illegitimate son. This occurred with great frequency in Chile during the time when this part of the novel is set. Although Alba is devoted to her husband Miguel, this devotion does not preclude Alba from having a strong voice and will and the ability to withstand disappointment, even torture. Unlike the perpetually forlorn Amaranta, Alba transcends all stereotypes and resolves to tell the story of her clan to the world to use her unhappiness in a productive manner, although she is also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allende, Isabel. The House of the Spirits. New York: Bantam, 1986.

Marquez, Gabriel Garcia. One Hundred Years of Solitude. New York: Perennial, 1998.
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Person and the Work of

Words: 3588 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90469447

It is this selfsame Holy Spirit that will serve to convict within the unbeliever and to work within that individual until that person comes to the point of opening the inner door for the Christ and then urging the same individual forth into fulfilling the 'Great Commission' of spreading Christ to the world. In the fulfillment of this commitment inclusive of "baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit" the three faces of God's person are revealed and authenticated. Just as when Jesus entered the waters to be baptized and entered into communion with God the Father and God the Son was baptized of the God the Holy Spirit in the Gospel of John is clearly characterized in the evidence provided by John of the words Jesus spoke.

This one book of the ible explains clearly to believers and followers of Christ that the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Wintz, Jack (2003) the Work of Pentecost Continues. Friar Jack's E-spirations. American Catholic 26 June 2003. Online available at  http://www.americancatholic.org/e-News/FriarJack/fj062603.asp 

Piper, John (1981) That Which is Born of the Spirit is Spirit. The Role of the Holy Spirit in Conversion. 22 Feb 1981 Resource Library - desiring God. Online available at  http://www.desiringgod.org/ResourceLibrary/Sermons/ByDate/1981/284_That_Which_Is_Born_of_the_Spirit_Is_Spirit/ 

Step-by-Step with the Bible (Nd) Online available at  http://www.mbay.net/~jmejia/chapt32.htm .

Pentecost Sunday Gospel St. John 14: 23-31 (nd) Laselle.org Online available at  http://www.lasalle.org/English/Resources/Publications/PDF/WritingsJBDLS/Med43.pdf .
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Major Themes in European Literature

Words: 2421 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13929846

contemplated an individual's relationship with his or her environment. In Oedipus Rex and Antigone, Sophocles explores the relationship an individual has with the world and society. In each of these plays, Sophocles juxtaposes divinity and humanity and investigates the role of each within Theban society as well as looks into conflicts that arise when the laws of man conflict with divine laws. Through their narratives, Oedipus Rex and Antigone posit man is intended to serve others, including gods, and that they do not exist to be self-serving.

Oedipus Rex revolves around an eponymous anti-hero who by saving the city of Thebes from a Sphinx inadvertently and simultaneously brought forth a plague upon it. By defeating the Sphinx, Oedipus secured his place upon the Theban throne and as such was not only responsible for ensuring laws were abided, but was also responsible for protecting Thebes' citizens. Because of the plague that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sophocles. Antigone. The Complete Greek Tragedies. Eds. David Grene and Richard Lattimore.

2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1991. pp. 160-212.

-. Oedipus Rex. The Complete Greek Tragedies. Eds. David Grene and Richard

Lattimore. 2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1991. pp. 10-76.
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Religion Entered the 18th Century and With

Words: 8434 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 77108254

religion entered the 18th Century and with it a revival. The growth of the revival was overwhelming.More people attended church than in previous centuries. Churches from all denominations popped up throughout established colonies and cities within the United States. Religious growth also spread throughout England, Wales and Scotland. This was a time referred to as "The Great Awakening" where people like Jarena Lee got her start preaching.

Evangelism, the epicenter of the movement, preached the Old and New Testament summoned forth parishioners. Churches were erected, both grand and small by the rich and poor, however at this time, it did not matter which class system was inside; everyone was finding comfort in church attendance and the hearing of the word. The largest Protestant groups consisted of Presbyterians, aptists and Methodists. Those denominations (Anglicans, Quakers, and Congregationalists) established earlier were unable to keep up with this growing Protestant revolution.

In 1787…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Albanese, Catherine, and Stephen Stein, eds. Sisters of the Spirit: Three Black Women's Autobiographies of the Nineteenth Century. Edited by William L. Andrews. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986.

Bell, D.. "Allowed Irregularities: Women Preachers in the Early 19th-Century Maritimes" Acadiensis [Online], Volume 30 Number 2 (3 March 2001)

Brekus, Catherine A. Strangers and Pilgrims: Female Preaching in America, 1740-1845. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press, 1998.

Ditmire, Susan. "Cape May County." usgennet.org. http://www.usgennet.org/usa/nj/county/capemay/Jarena.htm  (accessed May 2, 2013). (primary source)
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Vindication of the Rights of

Words: 12319 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 94246949

Ross (1988) notes the development of Romanticism in the late eighteenth century and indicates that it was essentially a masculine phenomenon:

Romantic poetizing is not just what women cannot do because they are not expected to; it is also what some men do in order to reconfirm their capacity to influence the world in ways socio-historically determined as masculine. The categories of gender, both in their lives and in their work, help the Romantics establish rites of passage toward poetic identity and toward masculine empowerment. Even when the women themselves are writers, they become anchors for the male poets' own pursuit for masculine self-possession. (Ross, 1988, 29)

Mary ollstonecraft was as famous as a writer in her day as her daughter. Both mother and daughter were important proponents of the rights of women both in their writings and in the way they lived and served as role models for other…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Meena. Women in Romanticism. Savage, Maryland: Barnes & Noble, 1989.

Burke, Edmund. Reflections on the Revolution in France. Indianapolis: Hackett, 1987.

Cone, Carl B. Burke and the Nature of Politics. University of Kentucky, 1964.

Conniff, James. "Edmund Burke and His Critics: The Case of Mary Wollstonecraft" Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 60, No. 2, (Apr., 1999), 299-318.
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Christian Personal Christian Theory of

Words: 2458 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17212565



Anderson (2000) converses spiritual oppression and how Satan and his fallen angels are in the process of trying to overpower the believers will. He also provides the phases to independence, for example: fake vs. factual, dishonesty vs. truth, resentment vs. tolerance, revolt vs. obedience, arrogance vs. self-effacement, and oppression vs. lack of restrictions. Fake vs. real step show how we need to absorb to recognize God's certainty so we do not fall into Satan's trap. If fall for these tricks of deception then we automatically give up God's truth for what is considered a lie. Dishonesty vs. truth shows that we should battle Satan's trickery with God's reality. If we become deceived then we must do away with any misleading views for the truth that will bring us our liberation.

Bitterness vs. forgiveness is showing us that we do not need to harbor that illness in our hearts because Satan…… [Read More]

Works Cited

A., H.D. (1999). The Anxiety Cure: You Can Find Emotional Tranquility and Wholeness. Thomas Nelson, Inc. .

Adams, E.J. (1986). How to Help People Change: The Four- Step Biblical Process. Grand Rapids: Zondervan .

Anderson, T.N. (1990). The Bondage Breaker: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings and Habitual Sins. . Boston: House Publishers, Inc.

Backus, W.C. (1980). Telling Yourself the Truth: Find Your Way Out of Depression, Anxiety, Fear, Anger and Other Common Problems by Applying the Priciples of Misbelief Therapy . Grand Rapids: Bethany Publishing Group.
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Art in Non-Western Society the

Words: 1354 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57114131

Turtle shell rattles have been used for countless centuries. Such rattles have been recovered from ancient sites in the southwest and in the Mississippian civilizations.

The turtle rattle was also a musical instrument in ceremonial use. One of its most important functions was its significance in the False Face ceremonies. One of the most distinguishing features of the Iroquois belief system is the reliance on the mask for religious and ritual purposes. These masks are often designated as False Faces. This term refers to the first False Face and the mythical origins of protective and healing spirits. They are used in introductory and agricultural rituals. The turtle rattles play a significant part in these important rituals.

In the various curing and healing rituals, the wearer of the False Face will juggle hot coals and use ash and is apparently immune to cold (see below), and he bears a turtle-shell rattle…… [Read More]

American Indian Education. http://www.osseo.k12.mn.us/special/stusupport/stuserv/AmInd/LilBuffalo/catalog.htm (Accessed April 30, 2005)

THE IROUK CHARACTER.  http://www.icculus.org/~msphil/mythus/campaigns/aerth/irouk  / (Accessed May 1, 2005) www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=21005756

Frank G. Speck, and Alexander General, Midwinter Rites of the Cayuga Long House (Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 1995), 70.
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Dwight L Moody Was Certainly

Words: 3176 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27336998

For four long months God appeared to be just presenting himself. He found that he was motivated; he was not sermonizing for Christ; he was sermonizing for hope. He discovered the whole thing in his heart that should not be there. For four months a struggle went on inside him, and he was a dejected man. But after four months the delight came. It came over him as he was on foot in the streets of New York. (Dwilight Lyman Moody: 1837-1899: (www.higherpraise.com)

Several times he had thought of it since he has been here. Eventually, he went back to God again, and he was no more dejected. He virtually prayed in his delight, 'O stay Thy hand!' He said he felt this earthen vessel would collapse. God occupied him with complete Spirit. If he had not been a different man since, he did not know himself. He believed that…… [Read More]

References

Chapters 1-3 D.L. Moody 1837-1899. Retrieved at  http://www.whatsaiththescripture.com/Voice/Moody.The.Way.to.GOD.html . Accessed on 22 November, 2004

Gilchrist, J; Lawson, Anderson D.L. Moody. Deeper Experiences of Famous Christians... Ind.: Warner Press, 1911. Retrieved at  http://www.wholesomewords.org/biography/biomoody4.html . Accessed on 22 November,

Dwight Lyman Moody) 1837-1899. Retrieved at http://www.christiansintouch.com/greatMen_DLM.cfmAccessed on 22 November, 2004

Dwilight Lyman Moody: 1837-1899. Retrieved at  http://www.higherpraise.com/preachers/moody.htm . Accessed on 22 November, 2004
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Myths Myth of Marriage and Children Joseph

Words: 1995 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64860892

Myths

Myth of Marriage and Children

Joseph Campbell's The Power of Myth is a book that can potentially transform the reader's consciousness. Beyond being informative, Campbell's analysis of cultural myths is profound; it provokes genuine introspection. The author refers to the spiritual in whatever he speaks about, and yet he never lapses into religious diatribe or dogma. Subjects like marriage are elevated beyond the social to the psycho-spiritual. For example, he calls marriage "primarily a spiritual exercise, and the society is supposed to help us have the realization. Man should not be in service to society, society should be in the service of man," (8).

In light of modern society, Campbell's words hold new meaning. In America, we have few true rituals because we have turned our attention outward instead of inward. The wisdom of life is being denigrated through a preoccupation with technology and material goods. There is little…… [Read More]

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Kitchen Stairs Final Ext Victorian

Words: 4730 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 85092753

dining room. day.

MOTHER, ALICIA, and BOBBY are seated around the table. ALICIA and BOBBY are eating hungrily; MOTHER is staring at the wall vacantly.

ALICIA

What's wrong, Mom?

MOTHER

(distracted)

Hmm?

ALICIA

I asked you what's wrong. You've been taring at the wall for the past five minutes.

MOTHER

It's nothing, honey.

BOBBY

It's the kitchen.

MOTHER looks sharply at BOBBY.

MOTHER

What?

BOBBY

The kitchen. it's weird in there. I don;t really like it. It feels...funny. Like someone is after you.

ALICIA

(in a spooky voice)

And if you aren't a good little boy, the spirit of the kitchen will put you in the oven and make you into Thanksgiving dinner!

ALICIA cackles wickedly. FATHER enters, dressed for work and carrying a briefcase. He kisses MOTHEr on the top of the head.

FATHER

Isn't it a little early for evil laughter? What's going on?

ALICIA

I'm just telling…… [Read More]

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Quintessential Elements of Grotesque and the Burlesque

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29127153

quintessential elements of grotesque and the burlesque in Edgar Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher. The author opens the story with the description of a dreary environment. "DURING the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens"(1846). This introduction is reason enough for an instinctive reader to pre-empt the nature of things to unfold. He goes further to explain the landscape, the haunted house, "….upon the bleak walls - upon the vacant eye-like windows - upon a few rank sedges - and upon a few white trunks of decayed trees…"( 1846). Moreover, there are many other indicators of grotesque elements including the author's description of Roderick and his sister's health conditions. He goes into detail on Madeline telling of the feelings she evokes on him. Nonetheless, the vagueness in the story is also…… [Read More]

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Life of the Medieval Janet

Words: 1211 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26334220



Today my father and I did go to a funeral of an old woman. But it was not a sad day, for she was old and the death was expected. Together we passed over the ford, the in-between place where the dead and living meet, a place that is neither wet nor dry, and we held a flask from the water of a ford in our hands. Oh, although it is only the dead that live in between, I at fifteen, neither girl nor women feel that I stand upon such a ford myself, unsure of where I am about to go, to either heaven or hell -- should I become a nun, a wife, or flee this life entirely and go to live amongst the fairy people. I intend to have fun, regardless, while I still can!

A must confess I cast my dream-fate not to be amongst that…… [Read More]

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Harlem 1920-1960 Culture of the

Words: 9936 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29403060

Their main arguments are based on historical assumptions and on facts which have represented turning points for the evolution of the African-American society throughout the decades, and especially during the evolutionary War and the Civil War. In this regard, the Old Negro, and the one considered to be the traditional presence in the Harlem, is the result of history, and not of recent or contemporary events.

From the point-of-view of historical preconceptions and stereotypes, it would unwise to consider Harlem as being indeed a cancer in the heart of a city, taking into account the fact that there is no objective comparison being made. Locke points out the fact that the Negro of today be seen through other than the dusty spectacles of past controversy. The day of "aunties," "uncles" and "mammies" is equally gone. Uncle Tom and Sambo have passed on, and even the "Colonel" and "George" play barnstorm…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Karen Tucker. "Last Hired, First Fired: Black Women Workers during World War II" in the Journal of American History, Vol. 69, No. 1. (Jun., 1982), pp. 82-97.

Barnes, Albert C. Negro Art and America. (accessed 2 December 2007)  http://etext.virginia.edu/harlem/BarNegrF.html 

Brown, Claude. Manchild in the Promised Land. New York: Touchstone, 1999.

Charles S. Johnson. Black Workers and the City. (accessed 2 December 2007)  http://etext.virginia.edu/harlem/JohWorkF.html
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Ethics Project

Words: 4363 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 61479708

Life and Death: The Life Support Dilemma by Kenneth E. Schemmer M.D

Kenneth Schemmer in his thorough, thought provoking book brings to life the controversial subject of the life support issue. For years, many all over the country have pondered, "What if a person were in some kind of an accident and the physicians told them that they were not going to make it?" And all that he or she could do is just lie there in extreme pain waiting for their life to the end. Or even worse case scenario what if they happened to end up completely brain dead? These debated questions are taken on by Dr. Schemmer in making his point that life support decisions may not necessarily be the decision of the family, the doctor or the patient but by a higher being that gives life and takes life. Schemmer uses these controversial questions in his…… [Read More]

References:

Court backs right to die | terminally ill have right to refuse medical life support. (1984, Dec 28). The San Diego Union, pp. A.1-1.

Ackerman, T. (2005, Mar 27). Life support battle shifts / A decade ago, patients families had to press for 'right to die. Houston Chronicle, pp. 1-B.1.

Allen, P. (2000, Oct 07). Right to die upheld despite new euro law, doctors can end life support rules judge. Daily Mail, pp. 33-33.

Dolan, M. (2001, Aug 10). Justices deal setback to right-to-die movement; health: State court bans removal of life support from conscious patients whose wishes are not clear. Los Angeles Times, pp. A.1-A.1.
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Joseph Smith and the Book

Words: 6695 Length: 21 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24061704

On June 27, 1844, hundreds swarmed the jail and brutally murdered the Smith brothers, leading their followers to conclude that they were martyred (Sisk).

At Joseph's death, righam Young was president of the Twelve Apostles of their church and became the leader of the largest faction within (Sisk 1992). Some who separated from Young's group formed their own, called the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, under the leadership of one of the brothers of Joseph Smith. In 1846, Young's group declared that the "saints" would leave Nauvoo and they settled in Utah the following year and, for the next 20 or so years, many moved to Salt Lake Valley to join those "saints (Sisk)." The growth was so tremendous that many ascribe greater magnetism to Young than to Joseph himself in attracting followers. It is noted that the current-day Mormon Church has millions of such followers…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bowman, Robert N., ed. Mormonism. Christian Research Journal, 1989. http://www.mustardseed.net/html/tomormonism.html

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Joseph Smith: a Prophet of God. Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 2004.  http://www.lds.org/library/display/0,4945,104-1-3-2,00.html 

Griffith, Michael T. The Book of Mormon - Ancient or Modern? Could Joseph Smith Have Written the Nephrite Record? Refuting the Critics: Evidence of the Book of Mormons in Authenticity. Horizon Publishers, 1993. http://ourworld.cs.com/mikegriffith1/id108.htm

Institute for Religious Research. Translation or Divination? Mormons in Transition. Institute for Religious Research, 1999.  http://www.irr.org/mit/divination.html
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Complexities of Culture and Counseling

Words: 2436 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57159570

Culture and Counseling

In her book The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, author Anne Fadiman recounts the life and death of a little Hmong girl living in Merced, California. Lia Lee had what Western doctors call epilepsy, and which the Hmong have a far more lyrical explanation that lends itself to the title of Fadiman's book. The most common neurological disease, epilepsy can be frightening and potentially debilitating. However, in cultures around the world and throughout time, from the Hmong to the ancient Greeks, epilepsy opens pathways to creativity and an increased understanding of the universe. Thus, as Fadiman points out, many epileptics become shamans. When Lia Lee first started having epileptic seizures, her mom Foua, speaking not a word of English, rushed her to the Merced Community Medical Center. There, doctors tended to the eight-month-old child as best they could under the circumstances. Because all she was…… [Read More]

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Passover Theme an Analysis of

Words: 1846 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23219052

The Jews, of course, were as antagonistic to hearing Stephen preach the life of Christ as they were to Christ Himself -- ho is the way of salvation, and hom they have rejected. Stephen's speech is fiery and full of love and fury -- love for Christ, fury for the Jews who rejected Him: "You stiff-necked people! Your hearts and ears are still uncircumcised." (Here Stephen as much as says, "You are not real Jews. Real Jews would have recognized their Redeemer.) "You are just like your ancestors: You always resist the Holy Spirit!" The reaction of the Jews is to stone Stephen to death. Stephen accepts his martyrdom and dies as Christ died, with a prayer for his persecutors -- and out of that prayer comes (through the mercy of God) the conversion of St. Paul.

In conclusion, "we may say that perseverance as a Christian is the only…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fitzmyer, Joseph. The Gospel According to Luke (I-IX), vol. 28. Garden City, NY:

Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1981. Print.

Hamm, Dennis. "Are the Gospel Passion Accounts Anti-Jewish?" Journal of Religion

and Film vol. 8, no. 1 (Feb, 2004). Print.
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Exegesis of Pauls Letter to Philemon

Words: 1752 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78442362

Socio-Historical Background: Book Of Philemon

The epistle of Paul to Philemon has often been called a captivity epistle because it was written when Paul was imprisoned because of his Christian faith. The frequent references to the Church and to Philemon's house underline the fact that Paul likely intended this to be a public, instructive letter, not simply a private document conveying information (Witherington 54). Philemon is usually studied in conjunction with Philippians, Colossians, and Ephesians (Witherington 1). Although the authorship of Ephesians is in doubt, the majority of Biblical scholars believe that Paul is likely the author of Philemon.

Unlike the so-called Pastoral Epistles, Philemon can thus be viewed as relatively likely to be an account of Paul's own views. What we know of Paul is that he was originally a Pharisee, allegedly once persecuted Jesus (according to Acts, a less reliable account not by Paul himself) and that "Paul…… [Read More]

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Art History the Lure of

Words: 1819 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 11054975

A romanticism that was rooted in the legendary European past served well to bring comfort and a sense of place in space and time to people who might otherwise have felt rootless and adrift. In its eclecticism the Richardsonian Romanesque house gave visible expression to the deepest needs and of an age.

orks Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99883293

Gowans, Alan. Styles and Types of North American Architecture: Social Function and Cultural Expression. New York: Icon Editions, 1993.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99883726

Roth, Leland M., ed. America Builds: Source Docs in American Architecture and Planning. New York: Harper & Row, 1983.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=91043982

Roth, Leland M. A Concise History of American Architecture. Boulder, CO: estview Press, 1980.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=26178642

Roth, Leland M. Understanding Architecture Its Elements, History, and Meaning. 1st ed. Boulder, CO: estview Press, 1993.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99883482

Alan Gowans, Styles and Types of North American Architecture: Social Function and Cultural Expression (New York: Icon Editions,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

 http://www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o&d=99883293" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Jimmy Carter Annotated Bibliography Secondary

Words: 1912 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2391785



Barone's conclusion is based on exit polling conducted anyway, by the polling firm Sumate/Penn, Schoen & Berland, showing that Chavez should not in fact have won the election.

Porter, Joy. "Jimmy Carter: the Re-Emergence of Faith-Based Politics and the Abortion Rights Issue." Presidential Studies Quarterly, 35 (2005). HighBeam

Research. Retrieved January 30, 2007, from: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-134172066.html.

he article by Joy Porter examines one-time potentially (but never truly realized) long-term ground-breaking political effects of Jimmy Carter's Presidency, i.e., impacts (or, as Porter actually, finally, argues, the lack of them) of the former President's non-right-wing, comparatively liberal Evangelism, on religiously-based American political discourse (and activism) up to 25 years after his Presidency concluded in 1980. As Porter argues, during Carter's 1976 campaign for the Presidency especially, although he clearly used his own distinct faith-based politics as its centerpiece, Jimmy Carter's own personal Christian faith did not in fact promote the agenda of the…… [Read More]

The article by Joy Porter examines one-time potentially (but never truly realized) long-term ground-breaking political effects of Jimmy Carter's Presidency, i.e., impacts (or, as Porter actually, finally, argues, the lack of them) of the former President's non-right-wing, comparatively liberal Evangelism, on religiously-based American political discourse (and activism) up to 25 years after his Presidency concluded in 1980. As Porter argues, during Carter's 1976 campaign for the Presidency especially, although he clearly used his own distinct faith-based politics as its centerpiece, Jimmy Carter's own personal Christian faith did not in fact promote the agenda of the religious right, even if it was Carter himself who (ironically) initially awakened right wing Christians themselves to the galvanizing potential of their political agenda(s). Further, because Jimmy Carter's faith-based Presidency was in fact what originally stimulated, right-wing Christians to begin coalescing around their own distinctive political issues, the right wing itself ultimately rejected him for a second term, instead favoring Ronald Reagan since his own conservatism was comparable to theirs.

The U.S. And Israel Stand Alone." Spiegel Interview with Jimmy Carter. August 15, 2006. Spiegel International Online. Retrieved February 16, 2007, at  http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,431793,00.html .

In this interview with Germany's Der Spiegel online magazine that took place with former U.S. President Jimmy Carter in mid-August 2005 during the international publicity run-up to the January, 2006 publication of his then-newest book, Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis (2006), Former President Carter, discusses frankly what he sees as both the political and moral failings, into his second term as president, of George W. Bush, e.g., especially, the war in Iraq and his handling of it. Carter further notes within the interview that America now is in an especially precarious spot vis-a-vis the Middle East in general, and that the United States is alone in the world in its unconditional support, under George W. Bush as President, of Israel's overly aggressive political actions and attitudes. Carter also talks to Der Spiegel about Cuba's Fidel Castro, his protracted illness, and how Castro's eventual death will likely impact Cuba and its neighbors.
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Fate Society & Determinism In

Words: 4417 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48955957

hen Edith harton tells us that "it was the background that she [Lily] required," we understand that both Emma Bovary and Lily have a very important thing in common. They are first of all women in the nineteenth century society, fettered by social conventions to fulfill any kind of aspirations or ideals. A woman, as it is clearly stated in both novels, had no other means of being having a place in society than by acquiring respectability and money through a good marriage. To marry was the only vocation of a woman, as harton tells us.

Of course, there interferes a great difference between the two heroines here, because Madame Bovary, as her very title proves it, is already a married woman, while Lily in harton's book is in constant pursue of a redeeming marriage. But, essentially the frustration of the two heroines is the same, as Emma is as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The American Experience: Andrew Carnegie- The Gilded Age. PBS Online. 1999. 1 Oct. 2006  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/gildedage.html .

Byatt, A.S. Scenes from Provincial Life. The Guardian. July, 27, 2002. Oct.2006  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2342/is_n1_v30/ai_18631915 .

Cahir, Linda Costanzo Solitude and Society in the Works of Herman Melville and Edith Wharton. New York: Greenwood Press, 1999

Deppman, Jed. "History with style: the impassible writing of Flaubert - Gustave Flaubert." Style. 1996. Oct 2006
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Worlds of Phaedo and the

Words: 4337 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 48423269

It is only through occult understanding that the forms and the archetypal images and symbols can be interpreted.

Here we see that the term unconsciousness is very similar to the Platonic ideals and forms. Another aspect that will form part of the theoretical perspective of this study is the concept of transformation. In order to understand the occult and its relationship to the forms, a process of transformation has to take place. In Platonic terms this transformation is a radical change in life, morality and ethics; while for Jung it is transformation in terms of the deeper understanding of the relation of the unconscious to the conscious mind.

Transformation also has related occult meaning and symbols such as fire. Fire is an age-old indication of change of perception and consciousness. This also refers to Jungian concepts such as the shadow. There are many other points of reference and similarity between…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Archetypes as Defined by Carl Jung) October 9, 2004. http://www.acs.appstate.edu/~davisct/nt/jung.html#shadow

Arnzen. M. "The Return of the Uncanny." 1977. University of Oregon. March 17, 2004.  http://paradoxa.com/excerpts/3-3intro.htm 

Boeree, G. Carl Jung. October 11, 2004.  http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/jung.html 

Christian Churches of God) Mysticism Chapter 1 Spreading the Babylonian Mysteries (No. B7_1). October 9, 2004. http://www.holocaustrevealed.org/english/s/B7_1.html
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Suzhou Museum -- I M Pei

Words: 1955 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1219916

Pei did not stop at this but went ahead to choose Jiang Nan residence primary color, white and grey, and in capturing this Pei used gray granite to replace whitewashed plaster wall dark gray clay tiles. If anyone thinks that these colors are not modern then Jodidio and Adams (2008, Inc. 311) think otherwise, they say that "The gray and white forms recall those of the region, but they remain resolutely modern."

Summary and conclusion

In any project that is undertaken by man there must be challenges and so did the design of Suzhou museum face challenges. The first challenge was on the location which was at the historic district of the city and this would necessitate the moving or destruction of some traditional houses, obviously the residents complained. Pei was lectured by government officials, despite the respect they had for him, he was instructed to make the museum modern…… [Read More]

References

Barboza, D. "I. M. Pei in China, revisiting roots," the New York Times, 2006,

 http://www.nytimes.com/ 2006/10/09/arts/design/09pei.html?_r=1 (Accessed May 12, 2010).

Bryant, S. "I. M. Pei and the new Suzhou museum," Hub pages, 2009,

 http://hubpages.com/hub/I-M-Pei-and-the-New-Suzhou-Museum  (Accessed May 12, 2010).
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Glossolalia or Speaking in Tongues

Words: 4590 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 46535991

Therefore, we may conclude that the speaker has some cognitive function from the structure of the speech, even if it is based on a very basic set of language rules (Samarin 1972 120).

Three major linguistic traits emerged from other research into the subjec. Regardless of the geographic area, educational level, or age of the individual, glossolalia consists of:

Verbal behavior that has a certain number of consanants and vowels.

There seem to be a limited number of syllables that are reorganized into larger units.

These units are then rearranged using variations in pitch, volume, speed and intensity (e.g. A "word" group spoken with different inflections).

The "words" put together seem haphazard but emerge as word and sentence like because of the use of realistic timbre, rhythm, and melody (Samarin 1972).

Other research confims that glossolalia shows an oddly definitive syballant commonality with the particular spoken language of the speaker.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aquinas, T. "Summa Theologica Question 176." New Advent. March 2008.  http://www.newadvent.org/summa/3176.htm  (accessed September 2010).

Bock, D. Acts: Baker Exegetical Commentary. Ada, MI: Baker Academic, 2007.

Chavda, M. The Hidden Power of Speaking in Tongues. Shippensburg, PA: Destiny Image Publishers, 2003.

Coffman, J. "Commentary on Mark 16." Abeline Christian University Press. 1999.  http://www.searchgodsword.org/com/bcc/view.cgi?book=mr&chapter=016  (accessed September 2010).
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Louis Sullivan Form Follows Function

Words: 1931 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 1054199

"

His belief, of course, was that the Unity was of primary importance -- which was a departure from Sullivan's sense that beauty and transcendent forms (reflections of the human spirit) were central to the idea of all forms. Wright's anti-verticality was no more in tune to Sullivan's sense of the soul than the reuer's "functional" brutalism. Sullivan alone had the sense to achieve some sort of aesthetic standard while achieving the function so desired by his contractors.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Sullivan announced at the end of the 19th century that "form ever follows function" -- but that did not imply that form had to be as mechanical as function. In fact, it meant for Sullivan quite the opposite. The Guaranty uilding is a perfect example of how he saw architecture as an art: its purpose was to provide the space necessary for offices and retailers but also to make…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kaufman, Mervyn. Father of Skyscrapers: A Biography of Louis Sullivan. Boston:

Little, Brown, 1969.

Korom, Joseph. The American Skyscraper, 1850-1940: a celebration of height. Boston:

Branden Books, 2008.
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Persona Christi an Analysis of the Priesthood

Words: 5507 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24012181

Persona Christi

An Analysis of the Priesthood "in persona Christi" and "in nominee ecclesiae"

The questions that surround the functions of the priesthood and the diaconate today appear to be part and parcel of the greater uncertainty that surrounds ancient Church customs. This paper will attempt to analyze the meanings of the phrases "in persona Christi" and "in nomine ecclesiae" as they have reflected the functions of the ministers of the Church both in the past and in today. The conclusion of this research is that while the traditional Church maintained a clear definition (and reverent propriety regarding the mystery of the priestly aspect), today's Church is less sure of the role and function of the minister in relation to Church hierarchy and Church laity.

In Persona Christi

Historical Background: the Vestments

Pius XII's (1947) encyclical Mediator Dei describes for us the aspect of the priest in relation to Jesus…… [Read More]

Staley, V. (1894). The Catholic Religion. London, UK: Mowbray.

Tanner, N.P., ed. (1990). Decrees of the Ecumenical Councils. London: Sheed

and Ward.
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Antoni Gaudi as Some Who

Words: 4386 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 44005929



The second structural element used by Gaudi as a source of inspiration was the skeleton, the structure on which the entire construction relied. It is a fact that Gaudi studied both shells and animals' skeletons before proceeding to build his own structure for the construction. The Casa Milla, for example, shows previous studies of shells and a significant resemblance with them.

Perhaps one of the best examples of how Gaudi used biological elements around him as sources of inspiration comes from one his own stories, the way he created the donkey, from the "Flight into Egypt" ensemble, "carved in stone at the entrance of the big portal." Everything, including Joseph and Mary, had been inspired from people that Gaudi had met in the streets of arcelona. The donkey itself was a problem, so that the architect made an announcement seeking a donkey from which a plaster cast could be made…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Ragon, Michel. Histoire de l'architecture et de l'urbanisme modernes. Volume I - Ideologies et pionniers 1800-1910. Casterman. 1986

2. Bonells, Jordi. Catalogne. Barcelone. Points Planete Seuil. 1992

3. Halker Maria Anna and Fischer Thomas. Spagna. Gremese Editore. 1994

4. Permanyer, Luis. Gaudi of Barcelona. Rizzoli International Publications Inc. 1996
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Tom Shulich Coltishhum a Comparative Study on

Words: 9196 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Chapter Paper #: 33144233

Tom Shulich ("ColtishHum")

A comparative study on the theme of fascination with and repulsion from Otherness in Song of Kali by Dan Simmons and in the City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre

ABSACT

In this chapter, I examine similarities and differences between The City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre (1985) and Song of Kali by Dan Simmons (1985) with regard to the themes of the Western journalistic observer of the Oriental Other, and the fascination-repulsion that inspires the Occidental spatial imaginary of Calcutta. By comparing and contrasting these two popular novels, both describing white men's journey into the space of the Other, the chapter seeks to achieve a two-fold objective: (a) to provide insight into the authors with respect to alterity (otherness), and (b) to examine the discursive practices of these novels in terms of contrasting spatial metaphors of Calcutta as "The City of Dreadful Night" or "The City of…… [Read More]

References

Barbiani, E. (2005). Kalighat, the home of goddess Kali: The place where Calcutta is imagined twice: A visual investigation into the dark metropolis. Sociological Research Online, 10 (1). Retrieved from  http://www.socresonline.org.uk/10/1/barbiani.html 

Barbiani, E. (2002). Kali e Calcutta: immagini della dea, immagini della metropoli. Urbino: University of Urbino.

Cameron, J. (1987). An Indian summer. New York, NY: Penguin Travel Library.

Douglas, M. (1966). Purity and danger: An analysis of concepts of pollution and taboo. New York, NY: Routledge & K. Paul.
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Anderson Neil The Bondage Breaker Overcoming Negative

Words: 2163 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 82198563

Anderson, Neil. The ondage reaker: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings, Habitual

One of the most fascinating aspects of Neil Anderson's work of non-fiction, The ondage reaker, is that despite all of the different aspects of Christianity, spirituality, history, and contemporary culture that he details, the book revolves around a relatively simple precept. This tenet is the founding one of Christianity and the principle that has seen many an adherent through any assortment of beneficial or malefic circumstances. Quite simply it is that Jesus sacrificed himself on the cross, and in doing so gave a redemptive power to the world and to all who were willing to believe in him and his sacrifice. This power is referred to in Anderson's work again and again as a means of overcoming sin, evil, and self-indulgence, and to triumph in the spiritual warfare that the author posits occurs daily between Christians and minions of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, Neil. The Bondage Breaker: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings, Habitual Sins. Sisters, OR: Harvest House Publishers, 2006. ISBN: 0736918140.

Notes

1. Neil Anderson, The Bondage Brekaer: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings, Habitual Sins. (Sisters: Harvest House Publishers, 2006), 85.

2. Anderson, Bondage Breaker, 228
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Turned on the Television Any

Words: 3301 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18606096

Some governments are terrified of their people: The military government that is running Burma (the junta calls the country Myanmar: Many of those who oppose the brutality of the regime refer to the nation by its former name of Burma) murders Buddhist monks who protest its policies.

The longer one thinks about this fact, the more clearly one summons up the image of the slaughter of young holy men, the clearer it will be that this is a government that will do anything that will increase its power, its control over the population, and the longevity of their regime. When one reads Orwell and thinks about Burma, one thinks that Orwell was a jolly optimist about human nature and the role of government.

And Orwell's vision of government is indeed grim one, and it gets grimmer over the course of the novel as Winston -- the protagonist who is nothing…… [Read More]

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John 5 13-21 Passage -- John

Words: 3508 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 193098

Gnostics believed that they belonged to the "true church" of an elect few who were worthy; the orthodox Christians would not be saved because they were blind to the truth.

Part E -- Content - if we then combine the historical outline of the "reason" for John's writings with the overall message, we can conclude that there are at least five major paradigms present that are important in a contextual analysis of John.

John 5:13 - I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life. This seems to point that John saw a clear difference between those who believed in Jesus as the Son of God, but were unsure about eternal life. However, if we look back at other parts of his Gospel, we do find repetition of this theme. In John 1:5-7,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Raymond Brown, "Does the New Testament Call Jesus God?" Theological Studies.26: 1,

545-73.

Clark, N. Interpreting the Resurrection. (London: SCM Press, 1967).

Hamilton, James. God's Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old and New Testaments.
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Quality of Rice's Academic Life

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44886636

Even in my current extracurricular activities, such as on my Varsity football team, sacrificing my need to be a 'star' and instead serve the common good is a necessity. Teaching the novice debaters is an integral part of my duties on my school's Lincoln-Douglas Debate team. I must help them see the world from competing perspectives, and to see issues in terms of grey, rather than stark black and white.

I am so thankful for the people in my life who have taught me this spirit of community: the people I met over the summer in Texas taught me what it means to be a good neighbor, the children and senior citizens I have befriended who have shown me that friendship knows no age or socioeconomic status. I have, despite the shortness of my life, tried to craft an open soul with few fences, with no barbed wire around my…… [Read More]

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Equal Protection the Supreme Court

Words: 4130 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 69991310

The true spirit and meaning of the amendments, as we said in the Slaughter-House Cases (16 Wall. 36), cannot be understood without keeping in view the history of the times when they were adopted, and the general objects they plainly sought to accomplish. At the time when they were incorporated into the Constitution, it required little knowledge of human nature to anticipate that those who had long been regarded as an inferior and subject race would, when suddenly raised to the rank of citizenship, be looked upon with jealousy and positive dislike, and that State laws might be enacted or enforced to perpetuate the distinctions that had before existed. Discriminations against them had been habitual.

100 U.S. 303, 306).

Furthermore, while the Court's decision was based on Strauder's right to an impartial jury, the Court believed that all-white juries were discriminatory against the potential jury pool. It held that:

The…… [Read More]

References

Bolling v. Sharpe, 347 U.S. 497 (1954).

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954).

Civil Rights Act of 1875, 18 Stat. Part III, p. 335 (Act of Mar. 1, 1875).

Gratz v. Bollinger, 539 U.S. 244 (2003).
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American Constitution A Living Evolving Document --

Words: 1824 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93247708

American Constitution: A living, evolving document -- from guaranteeing the right to enslavement in the 18th century to modifications in favor of freedom in the 19th century

Constitution today protects the rights of all in its language, but this was not always the case in its text and spirit. As a political tactic as well as out of personal conviction and experience, Frederick Douglass' characterization of the American Constitution as an anti-slavery document is certainly an admirable piece of rhetoric. Douglass stated that although the America he spoke to at the time of his autobiography My Bondage and My Freedom, was a nation divided between free and slave states and territories, fundamentally America was and "is in its letter and spirit, an anti-slavery instrument, demanding the abolition of slavery as a condition of its own existence" (396)

Slavery, Douglass stated, deprives an individual of his or her dignity, deprives an…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Douglass, Frederick. My Bondage and My Freedom. Available in full text online at  http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/toccer  new2?id=DouMybo.sgm& images=images/modeng& data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed& tag=public& part=6& division=div2[29 Jan 2005].

Lincoln, Abraham. "First Inaugural Address: Monday, March 4, 1861." From Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States. Washington, D.C.: U.S.G.P.O.: for sale by the Supt. Of Docs, U.S.G.P.O., 1989. Bartleby.com, 2001. www.bartleby.com/124/. [29 Jan 2005].

Madison, James. "Federalist No. 10." The Federalist Papers. Available in full text online ( http://www.thisnation.com/library/books/federalist/10.html ) [29 Jan 2005].

"The United States Constitution." Available in full text online  http://www.house.gov/Constitution/Constitution.html . [29 Jan 2005].
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Representation of Death and the Impermanence in

Words: 3843 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96796499

representation of Death and the impermanence in the short story "A Father's Story" by Andre Dubus, and the poem "Because I could not stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson. These two works were chosen because both speak of Death and impermanence, yet these authors employ different literary forms, characters, settings and plots. "A Father's Story" follows the format of a short story, being prose written in concise paragraphs with a main point or moral and portraying its characters by the way they speak. "Because I could not stop for Death" follows the form of poetry, being structured in shifted lines and using language to evoke imagination or emotion in the reader. In addition, the two writers substantively approach Death very differently. Comparison of these distinct forms shows how writers can make very different styles and statements about Death and impermanence through different devices, including but not limited to the short…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Academy of American Poets. (2013). Emily Dickinson. Retrieved from www.poets.org Web site:  http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/155 

Bodwell, J. (2008, July/August). The art of reading Andre Dubus: We don't have to live great lives. Retrieved from www.pw.org Web site:  http://www.pw.org/content/art_reading_andre_dubus_we_don%E2%80%99t_have_live_great_lives-cmnt_all=1 

Clugston, R.W. (2010). Journey into Literature. Retrieved from www.content.ashford.edu Web site:  https://content.ashford.edu/books/AUENG125.10.2/sections/sec1.2 

Clugston, R.W. (2010). Poems for comparison, Chapter 12, Journey into Literature. Retrieved from content.ashford.edu Web site:
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Compare Edgar Allen Poe and Hannibal Lecter

Words: 1502 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93413902

Edgar Allan Poe and Hannibal

Edgar Allan Poe was more than a horror storywriter. He was a person that delved into the human psyche and created a psychological thriller that haunted the reader's mind well after the conclusion was made.

Poe has delved into the human spirit at a time when the idea of the unconscious mind had probably either not evolved, or had just been described and was not commonly known. In his stories of horror, Poe explored in depth the human psyche. Poe was a critic of rationalism but at the same time he was a master in the art of constructing, logically, the irrational 'rationale' for crime committed by his characters. Poe lived a difficult and rather impoverished life, and was himself often given to alcoholism in his private life and the narrator's fears and contradictions that the author describes are something he might have experienced himself.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

DeNuccio, Jerome, History, narrative, and authority: Poe's "Metzengerstein.' (Edgar Allan Poe's novel "Metzengerstein"). Vol. 24, College Literature, 06-01-1997, pp 71(11).

Arthur H. Quinn Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography by (1941)

Author not available, Hannibal Lecter, Superstar., The Toronto Star, 06-20-1999.

THOMPSON Douglas, Moral with a twist., Sunday Star Times (New Zealand), 03-29-1998, pp 5.
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Sweat A Case for Self-Defense Literature Plays

Words: 2109 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24397238

SEAT: a Case for Self-Defense

Literature plays many roles in our lives; it entertains us, frightens us, and thrills us, but if written well it also teaches us and gives us a greater understanding of ourselves and human nature as a whole. hen an author puts pen to paper he should have a story to tell or information he feels he must impart to the world at large so that the reader has a greater understanding of the life that surrounds him. Sweat by Zora Neale Hurston does that very well. Delia, the protagonist, attempts to live a moral and upright life, never dreaming of taking a life. Yet ultimately to save her own life she must use self-defense at the expense of her husband's life. Following this theme Hurston uses religious symbolism throughout her story to emphasize good and evil and the effect our choices have on our lives.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Borkat, Roberta F.S. "The Evil of Goodness: Sentimental Morality in The London Merchant." Studies in Philology 76.3 (1979): 288-312. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 15 Dec. 2010.

Harold, James. "Infected by evil." Philosophical Explorations 8.2 (2005): 173-187. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 15 Dec. 2010.

Hurd, Myles Raymond. "What Goes Around Comes Around: Characterization, Climax, and Closure in Hurston's 'Sweat'." Langston Hughes Review 12.2 (Fall 1993): 7-15. Rpt. In Short Story Criticism. Ed. Thomas J. Schoenberg and Lawrence J. Trudeau. Vol. 80. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resource Center. Web. 15 Dec. 2010.

Hurston, Zora Neale. "Sweat." E. Fictions. (2003). Ed. Joseph F. Trimmer, Wade Jennings, and Annette Patterson. London: Heinle & Heinle. Print.
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Global Changes in the Missiology

Words: 9755 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77300433

" It caused missionaries to deal with peoples of other cultures and even Christian traditions -- including the Orthodox -- as inferior. God's mission was understood to have depended upon human efforts, and this is why we came to hold unrealistic universalistic assumptions. Christians became so optimistic that they believed to be able to correct all the ills of the world." (Vassiliadis, 2010)

Missiology has been undergoing changes in recent years and after much serious consideration Christians in the ecumenical era "are not only questioning all the above assumptions of the Enlightenment; they have also started developing a more profound theology of mission. One can count the following significant transitions:

(a) From the missio christianorum to the missio ecclesiae;

(b) the recognition later that subject of mission is not even the Church, either as an institution or through its members, but God, thus moving further from the missio ecclesiae to…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bosch, David Jacobus (1991) Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission, American Society of Missiology Series; No. 16. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 1991.

Gelder, Craig Van (2007) the Missional Church in Context: Helping Congregations Develop Contextual Ministry. Volume 1 of Missional Church Series. Missional Church Network Series. Wm B. Eerdmans Publishing 2007.

Guder, Darrell L. (2000) the Continuing Conversion of the Church. Grand Rapids, NI: Eerdmans, 2000.

Hesselgrave, David J> (2007) Will We Correct the Edinburgh Error? Future Mission in Historical Perspective. Southwestern Journal of Theology.Vol. 49 No. 2 Spring 2007.
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Employment Discrimination at Wal-Mart Foundation of the

Words: 5383 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45363162

Employment Discrimination at Wal-Mart

Foundation of the Study

This study examines the legislative and judicial climate that enables corporations like Wal-Mart to engage in practices that violate workers' rights. The popular consensus is that Wal-Mart, the largest retail store in the United States, displays an inordinate disregard for the human dignity and morale of its employees and, despite continual litigation, continues to blatantly violate the legal rights of its employees. Wal-Mart faces charges of violating The Federal Fair Labor Standards Act (2011) by asking management to adjust time sheets so that overtime will not need to be paid, and so that all employees will work under the hourly limit required by the union in order to obtain membership. Employees were insured, without their knowledge, against their death by Wal-Mart. The company was named beneficiary; following death of an employee, the entire benefit amount was retained by the corporation. Not a…… [Read More]

References

Business Day, Companies. (2011) The New York Times. Retrieved  http://www.nytimes.com/ 

2011/03/30/business/30aldi.html?ref=walmartstoresinc

Byrne, T.P. (2009). False profits: Reviving the corporation's public purpose. Discourse, 57 UCLA L. Rev. Disc. 25, UCLA School of Law, UC Berkeley, (Associate, Chadbourne & Parke, LLP). Retrieved  http://uclalawreview.org/?p=1056 

Clifford, S. (2011, March 29). Where Wal-Mart failed, Aldi succeeds. The New York Times. Retrieved