Human Physiology Essays (Examples)

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Human Learning and Memory Learning

Words: 869 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29447726

hen the behavior is followed by a favorable consequence, the behavior is more likely to recur over and over. However, if the behavior is followed by a negative consequence or a painful consequence, then the behavior is less like to happen again.

The third type of learning is Motor Learning. Carlson says that motor learning is "the establishment of changes within the motor system." (433). He claims that this type of learning is a component of the stimulus-response type of learning. However, this type of learning must involve some form of sensory guidance from the environment and it elicits a reaction from the body.

Finally, the fourth type of learning that Carlson describes is Relational Learning. This is the most complex type of learning and it "involves learning the relationship among individual stimuli." (431) Relational Learning involves spatial learning which is the actual process of identifying similarities and differences among…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Carlson, Neil. Physiology of Behavior, Ninth Edition. Published by Allyn and Bacon in Institute of Perceptual Learning. How Perceptual Learning Works. Retrieved on December 10, 2009 from  http://www.perceptuallearning.com/plearn.php .

Motor Teaching and Motor Learning. Retrieved December 10, 209 from http://moon.ouhsc.edu/dthompso/mtrlrng/mtrlrng.htm
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Humans as a Diverse Species

Words: 3179 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99987217

It is not startling that some remarkable variation exists between the great apes as well as humans with regard to mental capabilities. Humans possess a lot higher intricate types of verbal communications compared to any other primates. Humans are the sole animal to make and apply symbols as a way to communicate with each other. Humans also have diverse as well as complex forms of social organizations compared to that of the other nonhuman primates. The most unique characteristic of humans lies in human mental capability to build novel ideas as well as intricate technologies. This has been considered to be important in the fight for endurance. (O'Neil 2007)

Further, the relatively negligible structural variations among humans and apes are generally an outcome of regular bipedalism observed in human beings. Quite a number of alterations in human bodies were linked to the growth of this type of locomotion. As opposed…… [Read More]

References

Berg, Kate; Bonham, Vence; Boyer, Joy; Brody, Larry; Brooks, Lisa; Collins, Francis;

Guttmacher, Alan; McEwen, Jean; Muenke, Max; Olson, Steve; Wang, Vivian Ota; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Vydelingum, Nadarajen; Warshauer-Baker, Esther. 2005, 'The Use of Racial, Ethnic, and Ancestral Categories in Human Genetics Research', American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 77, no. 4, pp: 519-532.

Bethesda, MD. 2006, 'Present-Day Non-Human Primates May Be Linchpin in Evolution of Language' Terra Daily. 25 Jul., p. 4

British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection, 2007, the Zero option, Available at http://www.buav.org/campaigns/primates/zerooption.html
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Human Factors

Words: 3134 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39195503

Human Factors in Aviation

rief Historical ackground

The Airline Industry has a history that dates back to 1903 when the Wright brothers made their first successful flight in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Initially the public did not take the idea of the airplane travel favorably. ut this event marked the beginning of the Airline Industry as more and more inputs were given by people such as Charles Lindbergh who successfully completed a solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1927 and created massive interest in flying with the general public.

The concern for human factor involvement in aviation started as soon as the interest of general public was roused in it. The initial concern was for the safety of people daring to fly the aircraft as accidents were reported due to a flaw in the design or working of the plane. A pilot task was to juggle with the complexity…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Daniel J. Garland, V. David Hopkins, John A. Wise. (1999). Handbook of Aviation Human Factors. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Clint A. Bowers, C. Shawn Burke, Eduardo Salas, Katherine A. Wilson. (2001) Team Training in the Skies: Does Crew Resource Management (CRM) Training Work?, Vol. 43

Clint A. Bowers, Janis A. Cannon-Bowers, Randall L. Oser, Carolyn Prince, Eduardo Salas, Renee J. Stout. (1999) A Methodology for Enhancing Crew Resource Management Training, Vol. 41

Airlines in the industry. (N.d.) Retrieved on Sep 30, 2005 from:
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Human Factor in Aviation

Words: 2295 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64063261

Moreover, the study compares the effect on human factors on different types of aircraft. The study also reveals the correlation between the anomalies and type of aircrafts.

Human factors cause of Aircraft Accidents

The results of the descriptive statistics reveal that situational awareness is the most contributing human factor to aircraft accidents with the Mean =112. Moreover, the Mean value of the communication breakdown is 80 which rank second as the human factors problem to aircraft incidents. Typically, communication breakdown occurs when the pilot or other aircraft crew is unable to communicate with terminals. Communication is very critical for effective operations of aircraft, a pilot will require to constantly making radio communication when on air to ensure the aircraft safety and the aircraft is on the right direction. Confusion as human factor ranks third with the Mean =70. The descriptive statistics table shows other important human factors that cause the…… [Read More]

Reference

Balk, A.D. & Bossenbroek, J.W. (2010). Aircraft Ground and Human Factors, A comparative study of the perceptions by ramp staff and management. NLR Air Transport Safety Institute.

Boeing (2013). Commercial Jet Statistical Summary of the Airplane Accidents Worldwide Operations 1959 -- 2012. Boeing 707.

Eldredge, D. Mangold, S.J. & Dodd, R.S. (1992). A Review and Discussion of Flight Management System Incidents Reported to the Aviation Safety Reporting System. U.S. Department of Special Programs & Transportation Research Administration

Deitz, S.R. & Thomas, W.E (1991). Pilots, Personality and Performance: Human Behavior & Stress in the Skies.
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Human Intelligence Twin Studies and the Acquisition

Words: 1242 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25435261

Human Intelligence

Twin Studies and the Acquisition of Human Intelligence

The question of nature vs. nurture has been a topic of conversation, a hotly debated issue and reason for researchers to gather copious amounts of material for thousands of years. Philosophers discussed whether a child was mainly constructed of inborn (nature) or learned/observed traits (nurture) before Alexander the Great had conquered anything. Nature refers what is commonly called genetics today; nurture, conversely, is what an individual picks up from the environment. Many have been in one camp or another, but only recently have scientists had the ability to truly assess which is more correct.

One facet of this study, that of intelligence, may be the single greatest issue of discussion among scientists and lay persons. Intelligence as nature has taken a beating in the public arena due to such publications as "The Bell Curve." Many did not appreciate the findings,…… [Read More]

References

Collins, W.A., Maccoby, E.E., Steinberg, L., Hetherington, E.M., and Bornstein, M.H., 2000. Contemporary research on parenting: The case for nature and nurture. American Psychologist, 55(2). pp. 218-232.

Farber, S.L., 1981. Identical twins reared apart: A reanalysis. New York: Basic Books.

Gander, E., 2003. On our minds: How evolutionary psychology is reshaping the nature- versus-nurture debate. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press.

Mackintosh, N.J., 1998. IQ and human intelligence. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Human Factors in Aviation Safety

Words: 1458 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46624101

The mechanic must have adequate knowledge, training, data for assigned task, tools and equipment, be mentally and physically prepared, take safety precautions, have adequate resources, and have researched FAR, Federal Aviation Regulations, to ensure compliance. The task must be performed with a committed attitude, in accordance with appropriate data and acceptable methods, techniques, and practices that are industry acceptable. The mechanic must perform without pressures, stresses, and distractions, re-inspect work, properly record work performed, and perform operational checks. The mechanic must also be willing to sign for work performed and be willing to fly in the aircraft upon approval for return to service.

Discussion

In spite of having measures in place to mitigate human error in aviation, there is still a major amount of incidents that involve human error. A Quantas plane flew from Darwin to risbane with a rag over a power generator, left on the generator during a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Administration, F.A. (2009). Aircraft Inspection and Repair: Acceptable Methods, Techniques, and Practices. New York, NY: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

Airline worker killed at N.C. airport. (Aug, 9, 2007). Aviation Human Factors Industry News, Vol III Issue 28, Retrieved from http://www.system-safety.com/...n%20HF%20News/AVIATION%20...

Aviation operators cut corners at espense of safety. (Oct. 9, 2007). Aviation Human Factors Industry News, Retrieved from http://www.system-safety.com/Aviation%20HF%20News%203707%20.pdf.

Higgins, C. & . (n.d.). Human factors in improving aviation safety. Retrieved from Boeing:  http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/aero_08/human.pdf
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Main Systems of Human Body

Words: 3828 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37436002

The circulatory or cardiovascular system is responsible for moving nutrients, wastes and gases between body cells, transporting blood across the whole body and battling disease (Circulatory System). Its principal elements are the heart, numerous blood vessels, and blood.

The heart forms the circulatory system's core. This 2-sided, 4-chambered pump which distributes blood to various arteries comprises of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria. The ventricles, situated within the heart's lower half, are responsible for pumping blood to the whole body (away from our heart), whilst the atria, situated within the heart's upper half are in charge of receiving blood from different parts of the human body. The right and left ventricles pump de-oxygenated and oxygenated blood, respectively; de-oxygenated blood is pumped to lungs while oxygenated blood is pumped to the remainder of the human body (smith, 2013). These 4 chambers are connected to one another by…… [Read More]

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Human Beings Have Continued to Experience Numerous

Words: 1046 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61376882

human beings have continued to experience numerous health problems as they age unlike when they are young. This paper presents a review of an analysis of the design of the human body based on an article known as if humans were built to last. The paper examines some of the claims presented by the three authors on their analysis of the human body. The paper also discusses some of the reasons that the authors used to support their claims that the human body was not designed for an extended period of time.

eview of If Humans Were Built to Last:

The article examining the concern about if human were built to last was developed as a result of an analysis on what the human body would be like if it was designed for a healthy long life. Jay Olshansky, Bruce Carnes, and obert Butler developed the article following their examinations…… [Read More]

Reference:

Olshansky, S.J., Carnes, B.A. & Butler, R.N. (2001, March). If Humans Were Built to Last.

Scientific American.
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Human Circulatory System and Oyster

Words: 1722 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65511169

"An electrical analogue of the entire human circulatory system ." Medical Biological and Engineering and Computin 2.2 (1964): 161-166. SpingerLink. eb. 15 Nov. 2010.

Inlander, Charles B.. The people's medical society health desk reference: information your doctor can't or won't tell you - everything you need to know for the best in health care. New York: Hyperion, 1995. Print.

Jodrey, Louise, and Karl ilbur. "Studies on Shell Formation. IV. The Respiratory Metabolism of the Oyster Mantle." Biological Bulletin 108.3 (1955): 346-358. JSTOR. eb. 15 Nov. 2010.

Ruppert, E.E., and Karen Carle. "Morphology of metazoan circulatory systems." Zoomorphology 103.3 (1983): 193-208. SpringerLink. eb. 15 Nov. 2010.

Southgate, Paul C., and John S. Lucas. The pearl oyster . Amsterdam: Elsevier Science, 2008. Print.

"The onders of the Seas: Mollusks." Oceanic Research Group. N.p., n.d. eb. 15 Nov. 2010. .

eight, Ryan, John Viator, Charles Caldwell, and Allison Lisle. "Photoacoustic detection of metastatic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arnaudin, Mary, and Joel Mintzes. "Students' alternative conceptions of the human circulatory system: A cross-age study." Science Education 69.5 (2006): 721-733. Wiley Online Library. Web. 15 Nov. 2010.

De Pater, L, and JW Van Den Burg. "An electrical analogue of the entire human circulatory system ." Medical Biological and Engineering and Computin 2.2 (1964): 161-166. SpingerLink. Web. 15 Nov. 2010.

Inlander, Charles B.. The people's medical society health desk reference: information your doctor can't or won't tell you - everything you need to know for the best in health care. New York: Hyperion, 1995. Print.

Jodrey, Louise, and Karl Wilbur. "Studies on Shell Formation. IV. The Respiratory Metabolism of the Oyster Mantle." Biological Bulletin 108.3 (1955): 346-358. JSTOR. Web. 15 Nov. 2010.
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Human Body Cavity the Internal

Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16317327

The large intestine begins near the lower coils of the small intestines but then ascends up the right side and bend back over the top of the highest loop of the small intestine. Several layers of muscle and sinewy tissue wrap around the area housing the internal organs (Iazzetti & igutti, 2007).

The other organs located in the major body cavity include the bladder, gall bladder, and pancreas. In addition, the female body cavity also contains a uterus.

Besides the major internal organs, there are major blood vessels that run down the body cavity directly from the heart and branch off to smaller arteries and veins that carry blood throughout the rest of the body (Iazzetti & igutti, 2007).

eferences

Iazzetti, G, igutti, E.…… [Read More]

References

Iazzetti, G, Rigutti, E. (2007). Atlas of Anatomy. London: TAJ Books.
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Human Development

Words: 746 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19920041

Exterogestation

The anthropologist, Ashley Montagu, developed quite a diverse and versatile number of theories ranging from views on the concept of race, social factors that contribute to crime, the measurement of internal anatomical markers found of the heads of humans, cooperative behavior as it relates to evolution, and understanding biological and cultural dynamics of sex roles and aggression. Montagu stressed gene-environment interactionism which is the notion that heredity is not merely driven by biological factors in humans but represents a dynamic interactive process between one's experiential history and one's genetic potential (Montagu, 1961). One of Montagu's most interesting ideas is that of the need for contact, especially human infants. Montagu designated the typical nine-month pregnancy as uterogestation: the period when the fetus develops within its mother's uterus so that it will be capable of surviving outside its mother's womb (Montagu, 1986). However, Montagu believed that the human infant emerged only…… [Read More]

References

Harlow, H. F & Harlow, M. (1962). Social deprivation in monkeys. Scientific American, 207,

136-146.

Montagu, A. (1961). Man in process. Cleveland: World Publishing.

Montagu, A. 1986. Touching: The human significance of the skin. New York: Harper & Row.
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Dehydration Impacts on Human Metabolism In This

Words: 2238 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41795082

dehydration impacts on human metabolism. In this sense, a short introduction in the issue of deficient water input is followed by delimitating the notions of metabolism and dehydration in terms of definition and classification. Afterwards, focus falls on the possible degrees of dehydration and body mass loss, and their implications for a human body.

According to usan Kleiner, Ph.D., "water is the one essential element to life as we know it" (Rabkin, 2000). It makes up approximately 60% of an individual's body mass. Each human cell, tissue and organ needs it in specific amounts in order to function properly, and nearly every life-sustaining body process requires it, too. Water is present in human muscles, fat cells, blood and even bones, transporting nutrients and oxygen to cells, helping to discard waste products, moistening skin tissues, mouth, eyes and nose, and most importantly, keeping body temperature in check.

Thus, water is unspeakably…… [Read More]

Several physiologic, medical, environmental, and lifestyle factors associated with old age can interfere in homeostasis and bring a significant contribution to dehydration. Illness, fever, diarrhea, vomiting, infection, dementia, chronic renal disease, diabetes mellitus, and use of diuretics and laxatives altogether increase the risk for dehydration in elders, and may lead to chronic dehydration in many geriatric individuals. Furthermore, potential complications of dehydration in elders include hypotension, constipation, nausea, vomiting, mucosal dryness, decreased urinary output, elevated body temperature, and mental confusion (Bernstein & Schmidt Luggen, 2011). Moreover, some forms of medication frequently employed by older adults may favor dehydration or require adequate body water for proper metabolism, hence emphasizing the need for a balanced fluid consumption.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it can be asserted that, in the instance where one of the many types and degrees of dehydration affect an individual, his/her metabolism will slow down and begin a chain process meant to gradually depress many of the body's functions, starting with thermoregulation and continuing with heart rate, kidneys, muscles and joints. Finally, pediatric patients have a faster and more sensitive reaction to dehydration than adult individuals due to their fast metabolism and proportionately large body surface area, whereas geriatric patients are similarly vulnerable to the phenomenon through their medication routine and overall complicated health spectrum.
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Psychological Research of the 21st Century Human Memory

Words: 7275 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3668581

Human Memory

Psychology

This literature review upon human memory will cover a fairly wide spectrum of ideas regarding the subject. While there will be a number of connections among the divisions or categories of this literature review, there will certainly be several distinctions or differences among them. The psychological research a part of the review will span, roughly, the duration of the 21st century thus far, with a few sources of research having taken place in 1999, just before the turn of the century. The review will approach the selected body of psychological research on human memory by dividing the research loosely into the following sections: memory distortion, repressed memories, body memory, and the changes in perspective on memory with respect to appropriate psychological/psychotherapeutic treatment.

The section of the review that focuses upon memory distortion will identify that memory distortion does, in fact, occur. The research presented in that section…… [Read More]

References:

Conway, M.A. & Pleydell-Pearce, C.W. (2000). The Construction of Autobiographical Memories in the Self-Memory System. Psychological Review, 107(2), 261 -- 288.

Health Services Commissioner. (2005). Inquiry into the Practice of Recovered Memory Therapy. Health Services Commissioner of Australia, Victoria, AU. Print.

Johnson, M.K. (2001). Psychology of False Memories. International Encyclopedia of Social & Behavioral Sciences, 5254 -- 5259.

Leijssen, M. (2006). Validation of the Body in Psychotherapy. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 46(2), 126 -- 146.
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Organelle Functioning in the Human Cell

Words: 1568 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89357581

a&P Lab

Design Project -- A&P Lab

Ammonia (NH3) is produced by cells located throughout the body; most of the production occurring in the intestines, liver, and the kidney, where it is used to produce urea. Ammonia is particularly toxic to brain cells, and high levels of blood ammonia can also lead to organ failure. The imaginary organelle referred to as a hydrosome functions in a manner that decreases the blood ammonia levels in people, thereby circumventing the need for medications such as to treatment to prevent hepatic encephalopathy and conditions associated with a failing liver. The hydrosome functions similarly to a primary lysosome, also containing a highly acidic interior with lytic enzymes called hydrolases. However, the waste disposal that the hydrosome conducts serves to convert ammonia to a water-soluble waste that is then excreted by the kidneys.

About this Organelle

I came up with the idea for this organelle…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Batshaw ML, MacArthur RB, Tuchman M. Alternative pathway therapy for urea cycle disorders: twenty years later. Journal of Pediatrics. 2001; 138: S46-55.

Haberle J, Boddaert N, Burlina A, Chakrapani A, Dixon M, Huemer M, Karall D, Martinelli D, Crespo PS, Santer R, Servais A, Valayannopoulos V, Lindner M, Rubio V, and Dionisi-Vici C. "Suggested guidelines for the diagnosis and management of urea cycle disorders." Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases 2012: 7, 32. doi:10.1186/1750-1172-7-32. PMC 3488504. PMID 22642880 Retrieved http://www.ojrd.com/content/7/1/32

Interactive Concepts in Biochemistry - Interactive Animations. John Wiley & Sons Publishers, Inc. 2002. Retrieved  http://www.wiley.com/legacy/college/boyer/0470003790/animations/cell_structure/cell_structure.htm 

Prasad S, Dhiman RK, Duseja A, Chawla YK, Sharma A, Agarwal R. "Lactulose improves cognitive functions and health-related quality of life in patients with cirrhosis who have minimal hepatic encephalopathy." Hepatology 2007: 45 (3): 549 -- 59.
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Application of Theory to Social Concerns or Human Behaviors

Words: 1143 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93027941

Social Concerns

Theory to Social Concerns or Human Behaviors

The Theory of Social Concerns or Human Behaviors provides a broad framework into which more narrowly focused research can be viewed from. This analysis will consider three individual research journal articles and first provide an overview of the work that was conducted. Then this analysis will try to relate the study and its results to the broader theories mentioned. The external factors related to a child's development can have a substantial influence on their development as well as be highly correlated with MEB issues later in life. The paper will conclude with a short discussion of why this research is important to society in regard to public health initiatives.

Parenting a Child with a Disability

Parents who have children with disabilities often have additional challenges that are presented in the situation when compared to the responsibilities of parents when their children…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Glanz, K., & Bishop, D. (2010). The Role of Behavioral Science Theory in Development and Implementation of Public Health Interventions. Annual Review of Public Health, 399-418.

Ha, J., Greenberg, J., & Seltzer, M. (2011). Parenting a Child With a Disability: The Role of Social Support for African-American Parents. The Journal of Contemporary Social Services, 405-411.

Herrenkohl, T., Lee, J., Kosterman, R., & Hawkings, J. (2012). Family Influences Related to Adult Substance Use and Mental Health Problems: A Developmental Analysis of Child and Adolescent Predictors. Journal of Adolescent Health, 129-135.

Yoshikawa, H., Aber, J., & Beardslee, W. (2012). The Effects of Poverty on the Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Health of Children and Youth. American Psychologist, 272-284.
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Kinesiology Human Kinetics

Words: 2279 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39999107

Kinesiology -- Human Kinetics

Dunking

Dunking, also known as slam dunk, is a basketball trick in which the player jumps in the air and dunks the ball in the basket with one or both the hands over the rim of the basketball hoop. It is a popular shot among the audience and provides an entertaining experience to the viewers. Slam dunk contests are also held separately due to the popularity of this shot.

Phases of the movement

There are four distinct phases involved in dunking. In the first phase, the player or MJ in this case, extends his body by bending his right knee and extending his left leg so that it propels him off the ground. In the second phase, he is jumping in the air and his right knee is more bent than his left knee. He also raises his right elbow and extends his left arm to…… [Read More]

References

Hoffman, Shirl. (2009). Introduction to Kinesiology: Studying Physical Activity. Illinois: Human Kinetics.

Redmond, Kevin; Foran, Andrew; Dwyer, Sean. (2009). Quality Lesson Plans for Outdoor Education. Illinois: Human Kinetics.

Milner, Clare. (2008). Functional Anatomy for Sport and Exercise. Kentucky: Taylor & Francis.

Pangrazi, Robert; Dauer, Victor. (1979). Lesson Plans for Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. Minneapolis: Burgess Publishing Company.
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Endocrine System in the Human

Words: 327 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57127349

Hormone (or endocrine) disruptors interfere with the normal functioning of the endocrine system. They can: mimic a natural hormone and thus fool the body into responding a certain way, interfere with the reception of hormones by hormone receptors, directly alter a hormone and impede its function, cause the body to overproduce or under produce natural hormones, or decrease or increase the number of hormone receptors. These effects are especially potent during prenatal development, when even minute exposure to hormones can severely disrupt the normal development process. Potential hormone disruption effects include abnormalities of the reproductive system, birth defects, behavioral changes, depressed immune systems, and lowered intelligence. (Pettit, 2000, p. 413)

eferences

Patrick, G.T. (1929). What Is the Mind?. New York: The Macmillan Company.

Pettit, H.E. (2000). Shifting the Experiment to the Lab: Does EPA Have a Mandatory Duty to equire Chemical Testing for Endocrine Disruption Effects under the Toxic…… [Read More]

References

Patrick, G.T. (1929). What Is the Mind?. New York: The Macmillan Company.

Pettit, H.E. (2000). Shifting the Experiment to the Lab: Does EPA Have a Mandatory Duty to Require Chemical Testing for Endocrine Disruption Effects under the Toxic Substances Control Act? Environmental Law, 30(2), 413.
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Ergonomics Also Known as Human

Words: 2338 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6948547

Use tools and equipment that are properly designed to reduce the risk of wrist injury, (Zieve & Eltz 2010)

Workstations, tools and tool handles, and tasks can be redesigned to enable the worker's wrist to maintain a natural position during work, (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 2010).

Ergonomic aids, such as split keyboards, keyboard trays, typing pads, and wrist braces, may be used to improve wrist posture during typing, (Zieve & Eltz 2010)

Training and awareness; the encouragement of frequent breaks; yoga classes offered for free at the workplace; job rotation.

Employers can develop programs in ergonomics, the process of adapting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of workers, (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 2010)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and other nonprescription pain relievers, may ease symptoms that have been present for a short time or have been caused by strenuous…… [Read More]

"Tension Neck Syndrome" (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www.rsi.org.uk/text_only/conditions/tension_neck_syndrome.asp

Zieve, D. & Eltz, D.R. (2010). Carpal tunnel syndrome. National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved online: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001469

Carpal tunnel
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Values for Your Work as Human Services

Words: 834 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42998160

Values for Your Work as Human ervices Professional

As human service professional, I interact in various ways. These include caregiver, case manager, teacher, counselor, behavior changer, consultant, mobilizer, advocate, community planner, community change organizer and implementer, administrator, and evaluator (*). In order to most effectively and successfully carry out these responsible and diverse roles, I am recommended to adhere to a set of values and ethics particularly prescribed for human service professionals.

The values not only make me do the work that I love in the most effective way but it also helps me better help people and avoid conflict. I may, for instance, have my own ideas about how to best help people and in my fervor and ardor commit indiscretions. The values advise me to respect confidentiality of client at all times. They also tell me to place client foremost and to treat him or her with respect…… [Read More]

Sources

Alder, Ken (2007). The Lie Detectors. New York: Free Press.

National Organization for Human Services. Ethical Standards for HS Professionals

http://www.nationalhumanservices.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=43
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Physiological Issues in Human Spaceflight Review and

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22152395

Physiological Issues in Human Spaceflight: Review and Proposed Countermeasures

This article by Grant Bonin explores some of the physiological problems faced by astronauts during extended periods of space travel. Bonin notes that early stages of exploration under hostile conditions have primarily been dominated by technological concerns, with matters regarding the health and well-being of explores themselves limited to issues of basic survivability. This phenomenon can be traced back to early maritime exploration. Early focus on manned spaceflight followed the pattern. Space exploration over the past half century has focused mainly on the development of propulsion systems capable of lifting humans beyond the boundaries of Earth's gravity. Physiological concerns have generally been dealt with on a per issue basis rather than a preventative basis.

Bonin contends that learning to combat the physiological issues of exploration has been a largely iterative process throughout history. However, an iterative methodology and slow evolution are…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bonin, Grant. "Physiological Issues in Human Spaceflight: Review and Proposed Countermeasures." Carleton University, Ottawa, ON. 6 December 2005. Web. 9 September 2012. <  http://www.4frontierscorp.com/dev/assets/00%20-%20MAAE%204906%20-%20Biomechanics%20Final%20Project.pdf >

Wickman, Leslie A. "Human Performance Considerations for a Mars Mission." Center for Research in Science, Azuza Pacific University. (2006). Web. 9 September 2012.
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Culture and the Evolutionary Process of Human Beings

Words: 3353 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67181596

Acheology

THE ROLE OF CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT IN THE EVOLUTION OF HUMANITY

Undestanding the evolution of humanity has been one of the most citical quests fo most individuals in the cuent society. The intesection between envionmental influences and cultue ceates an aea of social inteest with a focus on human evolution. Empiical eseach shows that the society plays a significant ole in shaping the evolution of human beings as evidenced by psychological analysis of human evolution. The extaodinay coopeative natue of human beings aises moe questions on the peceived changes of human behavio and inteaction ove time (Hawkes, Paine, & School, 2006). Among the factos that dive human beings to stive to undestand thei evolution, include paleoanthopology esults that povide unique infomation that povides significant evidence to the aspects of human evolution postulated to have occued millions of yeas ago. Results fom fossil studies such as inceasing bain size and…… [Read More]

references: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12(01), 1 -- 14.

Croll, E., & Parkin, D. (2002). Bush Base, Forest Farm: Culture, Environment, and Development. Routledge.

Darlington, P.J. (1978). Altruism: Its characteristics and evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 75(1), 385 -- 389.

Eagly, A.H., & Wood, W. (1999). The origins of sex differences in human behavior: Evolved dispositions vs. social roles. American Psychologist, 54(6), 408 -- 423.

Foley, R. (1995). The adaptive legacy of human evolution: A search for the environment of evolutionary adaptedness. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 4(6), 194 -- 203
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Hodgkin's Disease - Human Lymphatic

Words: 2766 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81244452

Pressure on the superior vena cava may produce SVC syndrome, a swelling of the head and arms. SVC syndrome involving the brain can be fatal and must be treated immediately. But enlarged lymphatic tissue in the chest cavity generally tends to displace -- rather than press upon or encase -- adjacent structures. Therefore, compromised breathing and SVC syndrome are relatively uncommon signs of lymphoma. (Hodgkin's Disease, 1998-2008)

Effects on Bone Marrow

Night sweats, fevers or anemia (a low red-blood-cell count), fevers may indicate Hodgkin's disease has spread to an individual's bone marrow. In these scenarios, a physician may order bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. In biopsy, medical staff uses a large needle to remove a narrow, cylindrical piece of the patient's bone. In another option, medical staff performs an aspiration, a process utilizing a needle to remove small bits of bone marrow. Generally, in both instances, to help determine cancer…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Atlas of the Body: The Lymphatic System." (1999). American Medical Association. 2 June 2008 http://www.medem.com/medlb/article_detaillb.cfm?article_ID=ZZZG0S6CGJC&sub_at=518.

Carson-DeWitt, Rosalyn S; Alic, Margaret. "Hodgkin's Disease," Gale Encyclopedia of Cancer, January 1, 2002. 2 June 2008 http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G2-3405200219.html.

Detailed Guide: Hodgkin Disease What Is Hodgkin Disease? American Cancer Society. Revised: 08/30/2007. 2 June 2008 http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/content/CRI_2_4_1x_What_Is_Hodgkin_Disease.sp?rnav=cri.

Hodgkin's Disease Signs and Symptoms. (1998-2008). 3 June 2008 http://www.oncologychannel.com/hodgkins/symptoms.shtml.
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Scientific Effects of Smoking on the Human

Words: 942 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96151006

scientific effects of smoking on the human body especially on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We will give a brief analysis on how smoking affects the mentioned systems and see how the human body system works if the individual does not smoke. We will also support our paper with scientific and statistical evidence regarding the facts related to smoking.

Smoking and its effects

Before looking at smoking and its effects lets review on how the respiratory and cardiovascular systems work. When we breathe air it first enters Trachea/windpipe through which it enters on each of the bronchi present at both of the lungs. The bronchus is spread throughout the lungs like branches on trees and at its tips is as thin as a hair (bronchioles). Each lung has about thirty thousand bronchioles. At the tip of every bronchiole lies an area which leads to tiny air sacs known as alveoli.…… [Read More]

References

Timmins, William. (1989). Smoking and the workplace. New York: Quorum Books.

Klarreich, Samuel. (1987). Health and fitness in the workplace. New York: Praeger.

Weiss, Stephen. (1991). Health at work. New Jersey: Laurence Erlbaum Associates.

Bunton, Robin. (2002). Health Promotion. London: Routledge.
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Revolutions the History of Modern Human Civilization

Words: 925 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88844686

evolutions

The history of modern human civilization reflects the gradual evolution of thoughts, ideas, political reform, and technological progress. At various times, specific periods of change were important enough to have been recorded as revolutions. Some of the most significant of these revolutions contributed to human history and societal development individually as well as in conjunction with other simultaneous or nearly simultaneous changes.

The Scientific evolution was responsible for fundamental changes in the understanding of the physical world, chemistry, biology, and of human anatomy and physiology. The French evolution represented the recognition of the fundamental rights of citizens to fairness and humane consideration on the part of their respective monarchical governments. The Industrial evolution increased the availability of information and provided new modes of transportation and mechanical processes that radically changed the lives of large numbers of people throughout Europe and the North American continent.

The Scientific evolution

The Scientific…… [Read More]

References

Bentley, Jerry H. Traditions & Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past (4th

Edition). McGraw-Hill: New York. 2005.

Kishlansky, Mark; Geary, Patrick; and O' Brien, Patricia. Civilization in the West.

Penguin Academic Edition (Combined Volume) Penguin: New York. 2009.
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Anesthesia Inhalation Agents Effects on

Words: 1587 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33227949



Gurkan, Y., Canatay, H., Agacdiken, a., Ural, E., & Toker, K. (2003). Effects of halothane and sevoflurane on QT dispersion in paediatric patients. Paediatr Anaesth, 13(3), 223-227.

Kerssens, C., Ouchi, T., & Sebel, P.S. (2005). No evidence of memory function during anesthesia with propofol or isoflurane with close control of hypnotic state. Anesthesiology, 102(1), 57-62.

Macario, a., Dexter, F., & Lubarsky, D. (2005). Meta-analysis of trials comparing postoperative recovery after anesthesia with sevoflurane or desflurane. Am J. Health Syst Pharm, 62(1), 63-68.

Marczin, N. (2004). Editorial I: Tiny wonders of tiny impurities of nitrous oxide during anaesthesia. Br J. Anaesth, 93(5), 619-623.

Ng, a. (2005). Sevoflurane sedation in infants - a fine line between sedation and general anesthesia. Paediatr Anaesth, 15(1), 1-2.

Preckel, B., Mullenheim, J., Hoff, J., Obal, D., Heiderhoff, M., Thamer, V., et al. (2004). Haemodynamic changes during halothane, sevoflurane and desflurane anaesthesia in dogs before and after…… [Read More]

References

Desalu, I., Kushimo, O.T., & Odelola, M.A. (2004). Cardiovascular changes during halothane induction in children. Niger Postgrad Med J, 11(3), 173-178.

Gungor, I., Bozkirli, F., Celebi, H., & Gunaydin, B. (2003). Comparison of the effects of neuroleptanesthesia and enflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia on neuromuscular blockade by rocuronium. J Anesth, 17(2), 129-132.

Gurkan, Y., Canatay, H., Agacdiken, a., Ural, E., & Toker, K. (2003). Effects of halothane and sevoflurane on QT dispersion in paediatric patients. Paediatr Anaesth, 13(3), 223-227.

Kerssens, C., Ouchi, T., & Sebel, P.S. (2005). No evidence of memory function during anesthesia with propofol or isoflurane with close control of hypnotic state. Anesthesiology, 102(1), 57-62.
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Questions Concerning the Study of

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76550023


Homeostasis is the goal promoted by both positive and negative
feedback mechanisms. This is the principle which indicates that there is a
balance in autonomic life functions which the body attempts always to
maintain. This refers to such features as body temperature, heart rate,
respiration and the powering of vital organs. When stimuli create a
divergence from this status, the body will activate a set of responses
designed to regulate a return to balance.

4. In anatomical position, how many planes can be described and what
are their names?
There are three major anatomical planes, which are used to refer to
different ways of addressing the body and its systems. The anatomical
planes include the Coronal Plane, which refers to the frontal surface of
the body from head to foot. The Sagittal Plan refers to the surface which
might be viewed from a profile, indicating a lateral perspective on the…… [Read More]

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Cardiac Health and Lifestyle

Words: 568 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36543295

incidence rates of childhood obesity are linked to socio-economic factors. Core drivers of obesity in both children and adults are diet and exercise, and research has shown that a calorie is not a calorie. That is to say that certain foods serve as triggers for metabolic responses and physiological events that impact the overall health of individuals. The old adage that people can focus on loosing weight -- the associated implication is that they will be healthy as a result -- has shown not to be true. Much of the prepackaged food consumed today -- particularly so-called junk food -- is high in sugar, fats, and calories. However, this statement is too reductionist to be of help to people who are interested in improving their diets in order to actually become healthier.

ecent research indicates that obesity is certainly a factor in the incidence of diabetes, as is total caloric…… [Read More]

References

Basu, S., Yoffe, P., Hills, N., & Lustig, R.H. (2013). The relationship of sugar to population-level diabetes prevalence: An econometric analysis of repeated cross-sectional data. PLoS ONE, 8(2): e57873. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0057873

Breen, C., Ryan, M., McNulty, B., Gibney, M., Canavan, R., & O'Shea, D. (2014, February). High saturated-fat and low-fibre intake: a comparative analysis of nutrient intake in individuals with and without type 2 diabetes. Nutrition and Diabetes, 4, e104. doi: 10.1038/nutd.2014.2.

Eckel, R.H. (1997). Obesity and Heart Disease: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the Nutrition Committee, American Heart Association. Circulation, 96, 3248-3250. doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.96.9.3248

[Type text]
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Social Justice in Global Health

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12906124

Blog: Place Within Populations

Blog -- Place Within Populations

How individual and community social behaviors and responses to the physical environment alter, disrupt, impair and/or damage the ability of human physiology to fight infectious diseases. The following concepts will be explored: drug resistant microorganisms, herd immunity, and re-emergence of vaccine preventable diseases, genetic susceptibility of some populations.

The idea that individual and social responses to the environment can impact human health, particularly with regard to the ability to fight off infectious disease is not new. As far back as the 1800s when John Snow connected an epidemic of cholera to sewage in the Broad Street pump, epidemiologists (as they are now known) have been making connections between behavior, environment, and disease. Some variables influence public health through policy rather than through medical practice. The public health system has labeled phenomena such as these social determinants of health (SDH). The World…… [Read More]

Gore, D.M. & Kothari, A.R. (2013). Getting to the root of the problem: health promotion strategies to address the social determinants of health. Canada Journal of Public Health, 104(1), e52-e54.

2. How the practice decisions of health care providers, health educators, health organizations, policy nation and globally. Consider the leadership and management roles of nurses in recognizing the global health implications of patient education, screening and care delivery management.

An unwillingness to accept health care advice from outsiders is not a trait buried in our historic past, as I will discuss in more detail below. Trust is more readily given to those who are live among us or who are like us in important ways. Dr. Shirley, who has established clinics and home visitation networks in the Mississippi Delta, can attest to the resistance to outsiders that seem intractable in local residents. Referring to the diseases born of poverty and obesity that are not prevented by traditional -- and even non-traditional -- approaches to healthcare, Dr. Shirley told The New York Times staff reporter, "I've been coming here for 40 years and nothing has changed" (Hansen, 2012). Could it be that this reluctance -- to let those outside of one's culture or ethnic group influence how things are done -- be a residual from the days when keeping to one's tribal practices meant greater survival rates? Scientists who study social collectivism and individualism have observed that the further away from the equator one goes, the more individualism increases and collectivism decreases. Their conclusion: equatorial environments are saturated with pathogens and colder environments are not. These researchers have attributed this difference to the
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Pulmonary Therapist the Health Care

Words: 633 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53887971



For example, Dr. Gutierrez took me around to the different departments and allowed me to meet and talk with Dustin Bowman, one of his patients. He is 23-year-old, was in the U.S. Air Force and just transferred to Haley Hospital about a week ago. He had a Cervical 1 injury, and his left lung was deflated, which completely affected his entire body. He needs a great deal of respiratory care. With this patient and others that Dr. Gutierrez told me about during my observations at the hospital, I clearly came to see how respiratory therapist must know the patient's entire medical condition to fully provide effective treatment.

Respiratory therapists have to be knowledgeable and skillful about cardiopulmonary therapy, but beyond this, they must have the necessary understanding about human physiology, anatomy, and body chemistry to best understand the holistic condition of their patients. For example, to evaluate patients, the respiratory…… [Read More]

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Mold Spore Analysis and Toxicity

Words: 4404 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11291106

Mold Spore Trapping

Current Scientific Knowledge

People are exposed to aeroallergens in a variety of settings, both at home and at work. Fungi are ubiquitous airborne allergens and are important causes of human diseases, especially in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. These diseases occur in persons of various ages.

Airborne spores and other fungi particles are ubiquitous in nonpolar landscapes, especially amongst field crops, and often form the bulk of suspended biogenic debris. The term mold often is used synonymously with the term fungi. A more precise definition would specify that molds lack macroscopic reproductive structures but may produce visible colonies. Respiratory illness in subjects exposed to rust and dark-spored imperfecti fungi was described more than 60 years ago, and physicians worldwide now recognize a sensitization to diverse fungi.

Since fungus particles commonly are derived from wholly microscopic sources, exposure hazards are assessed largely through direct sampling of a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brinton, W.T., Vastbinder, E.E., Greene, J.W., Marx, J.J., Hutcheson, R.H., Schaffner, W. (1987). An outbreak of organic dust toxic syndrome in a college fraternity. Journal of the American Medical Association 258:1210-1212.

Ceigler, A., & Bennett, J.W. (1980). Mycotoxins and Mycotoxicoses. Bio-Science 30:512-515.

CDC. 1994. Acute pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis among infants -- "Cleveland, January 1993-November 1994. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) 1994; 43:881-3.

CDC. 1997. Update: Pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis among infants -- "Cleveland, Ohio, 1993-1996. MMWR 1997; 46:33-35.
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Psychology Criminal Behavior Has Been

Words: 1023 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42256803

As explained by Gelles and Strauss in their works, "With the exception of the police and the military, the family is perhaps the most violent social group, and the home the most violent social setting, in our society. A person is more likely to be hit or killed in his or her home by another family member than anywhere else or by anyone else." (Gelles & Straus, 1985, p. 88). Therefore it is evident from this theory that the social connections and settings can impact upon a person's conduct and emotions and could force them to act violently, proving this theory to be true in explaining the biological connection with criminal behavior.

Another biological theory mentions that the gender differences, especially in cases of men, generate strings of violent reactions to the opposite gender. This theory argues that the natural superiority instincts in men push their brain functions to act…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barkow, J., Cosmides, L., & Tooby, J. (1992). The Adapted Mind. New York: Oxford University Press.

Bartol, C.R., & Bartol, a.M. (2007). Criminal Behavior: A Psychosocial Approach (8th Edition). Prentice Hall.

Dawkins, R. (1986). The Blind Watchmaker. Harlow, UK: Longman.

Gelles, R.J., & Straus, M.A. (1985). In Crime and the Family. Springfield, U.S.: Thomas.
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Fantastic Voyage

Words: 1379 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44263757

Fantastic Voyage

[hs130, section: ____ ]

Today, on the twentieth of August, I will take you on a trip inside the gastrointestinal tract, and beyond in the human body to observe the process of digestion and excretion. As simple as it may seem, this process is more than just moving down a hollow tube. To understand this more deeply, let's begin our journey!

EVIEW OF THE VIDEO TAPE:

Being reduced to eight microns in a hamburger holds the possibility of being chewed, grinded and dissolved in gastric acid. Even though I used special shield defenses, the slight possibility can still be a scary thought. Despite the risk, I felt motivated enough to allow myself to be amazed by the human body.

In about a moment, I was in the mouth of a 55-year-old man. Mixed with me, were fries, meat, lettuce, cheese, burgers and bear. Staying away from the teeth…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Barrett, K., Heddwen, B., Boitano, S., & Barman, S. (2010).Ganong's review of medical physiology. (23 ed., pp. 451-489). Philadelphia: McGraw Hill.

Hansen, J.T., Koeppen, B.M., & Netter, F.H. (2002). Netter's atlas of human physiology. (5th ed., p 246 -249) Teterboro, N.J: Icon Learning Systems.

Kumar, V., Abbas, A., & Fausto, N. (2010) Robbins Basic Pathology. (8th ed., p 25-60) Philadelphia: Saunders.

Leonard, R., & Kendall, K. (2008). Dynamic swallow studies: Measurement techniques. (2 ed., pp. 292-294). San Diego: Plural Publishing.
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Fantastic Voyage

Words: 1266 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77807088

Fantastic Voyage

[hs130, section: ____ ]

I walked into my office at 8:00 AM with an empty mind. I was worried about the transmission that I needed to air in two days. When my boss asked me that morning about what the transmission would be, I lied and said, "Let that be a surprise!" I quickly logged online for ideas. Just then, I was interrupted by a man who wanted to speak to me. Annoyed at his persistent nagging, I grabbed my camera and decided to follow him to where he wanted to take me. During our ride, he asked me the most bizarre question, "can you film inside a patient? The doctors can't seem to understand what's going on in her body." My reaction was rather quick and loud, "Are you insane?" He pointed to a medium sized box in his backpack, "Whenever you're ready!"

He escorted me to…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

Hansen, J.T., Koeppen, B.M., & Netter, F.H. (2002). Netter's atlas of human physiology. (5th ed., p 246 -249) Teterboro, N.J: Icon Learning Systems.

Kumar, V., Abbas, A., & Fausto, N. (2010) Robbins Basic Pathology. (8th ed., p 25-60) Philadelphia: Saunders.
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Mrs Mansfield Is Being Handed Over to

Words: 1948 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87175716

Mrs. Mansfield is being handed over to care from the operating theatre nurse. We would require an update chart information. She has had an ovary removal (bilateral salpingo-oophrectomy) and is currently on an IV infusion of .8% Normal Saline. In order to continue her care, we would need previous vitals, lab work, and any details on her condition. We know she has a bellovac drain insitu and a PCA along with O2 via nasal prongs. We would need the orders on the PCA and the physician's assessment of pain medications. There would likely be instructions on wound draining, as well as potential additional fluids and/or blood transfusion information (part of vitals in chart). Post-operative care instructions would be mandatory -- including diet, hourly rounding instructions and additional materials to assist with her post-operative care condition (Fogel & Woods, 2008 p. 428).

Q2 -- esearch shows that unrelieved pain has a…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Beattie, S. (2008, June 1). Beside Emergency: Wound dehiscence. Retrieved from Bedside Emergency: Wound dehiscence: http://www.modernmedicine.com/modern-medicine/news/bedside-emergency-wound-dehiscence

Chumbley, G., et al. (2004). Pre-Operative information and patient-controlled analgeisa. Anaesthesia, 59(4), 354-8.

Common Postoperative Complications. (2013, April). Patient.co.uk. Retrieved from patient.co.uk: http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/common-postoperative-complications

Doctor QA.com. (2009, April). Compression Socks. Retrieved from doctorqa.com:  http://www.doctorqa.com/vein/procedures/compression-socks
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Skyscraper and the Airplane Humanity

Words: 1259 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31330761

Goodheart does this by including early reactions to the elevator. Although most now take the contraptions for granted, humans are still "required to entrust their lives, on a daily basis, to technologies whose inner workings [remain] a mystery" (190). By including this segment, Goodheart has established the skyscraper as something far more than a cold, mechanical tower of glass and steel. Instead, he associates the building with humanity, not only physiological and sexual humanity, but also spiritual humanity. Established as a location where one must entrust one's life to technology, the building has the spiritual consistency of a cathedral or burial ground instead of the cold, emotionless consistency of a modern, mechanical building. Seen in this vein, the Twin Towers are now seen as additional casualties of the September 11th attacks, symbols of the passions of humanity rather than technological milestones. This interpretation of Goodheart's work is similar to Stein's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Stein, Howard F. "Days of Awe: September 11, 2001 and its Cultural Psychodynamics."

Journal for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society. 8.2. (2003): 187-199.

Goodheart, Adam. "The Skyscraper and the Airplane." The Norton Reader. Ed. Linda

Peterson and John Prereton. New York: Norton, 2008. 187-193.
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Perception Smell Taste and Sight

Words: 2825 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64663348

In the same way, if one were to intentionally color the inside of a piece of apple a dark brown color, a color that is generally associated with rotten apples, then one would not taste it. In essence, this means that at times, one sense would effectively overwhelm the others, so that eventually, this sense would overtake the others. (Fields, 2004)

In this particular case of the brown apple, the sight of the brown color in the apple would overwhelm the other senses of smell and taste, until such time that one would feel tempted to throw the apple away rather than take a risk and taste it. This means that the sense of sight can prove invaluable to a person as far as tasting the food is concerned; it is the sense of sight that one may rely on to warn us that the food has gone bad, or…… [Read More]

References

Aitkin, Thomas Johnstone. (1838) "Elements of physiology"

Scott, Webster and Geary.

Brillat-Savarin, Jean; Brillat-Savarin, Anthelme. (2002) "The Physiology of taste"

Courier Dover Publications.
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Immune Biopsychology Interactions of the

Words: 4188 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47766172



An interesting view of the immune system with particular implications for the current review and collation of information is provided by the field of computer science. The immune system makes many series of continual trade-offs, distributing resources in a way that necessarily leaves certain vulnerabilities in the system as a whole while providing greater comprehensiveness in coverage and protection when necessary (Hofmeyr 1997). This makes the immune system an adaptive and continually evolving and self-improving system; with little outside direction it is capable of assessing changing needs, and altering itself not only in particular instances but even in some of its general responses in order to provide greater long-term efficacy for the task of protecting the human organism from disease (Hofmeyr 1997). This view of the immune system as a contained and self-informing system is not entirely accurate, but it is a very useful perspective for our purposes herein.

The…… [Read More]

References

Buske-Kirschbaum, a. (2009). "Cortisol Responses to Stress in Allergic Children: Interaction with the Immune Response." Neuroimmunomodulation 16, pp. 325-32.

Coe, C. & Laudenslager, M. (2007). "Psychosocial influences on immunity, including effects on immune maturation and senescence." Brain, behavior, and immunity 21(8), pp. 1000-8.

Dugdale, D. (2008). "Immune response -- overview." University of Maryland medical center. Accessed 22 May 2010. http://www.umm.edu/ency/article/000821.htm

Dunigan, J.; Carr, B. & Steel, J. (2007). "Posttraumatic Growth, Immunity and Survival in Patients with Hepatoma." Digestive diseases and sciences 52(9), pp. 2452-9.
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Biological Basis for Language Has

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21125049

The only part of the human body that can really be said to be devoted to speech in a way totally unique to humans is the brain. There are language centers in the human brain that researchers have yet to find any analogs for in other animals. This supports Noam Chomsky's assertion that language did not simply evolve from animal calls. There are, it is true, all of the biological mechanisms required for speech in many other animals, but language is capable of much more than simply making sounds or even communicating. Language can imagine the future, and express ideas that do not necessarily pertain to the current situation. The difference between the language of humans and the communication abilities of animals, as it is not physically based, must be neurologically based, and research both into human and animal brains and a careful examination of language supports this theory.

Chomsky,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Duke University Neurobiology. http://www.duke.edu/~pk10/language/neuro.htm
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Motor Control and Motor Learning

Words: 888 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39263005

new branch of science called Sports Science that respectively makes use of motor learning and motor control in the sports industry.

Sports Science

Motor learning and motor control is a field of science that is being studied from a sports point-of-view. Motor learning is connected to all the processes and conditions that affect one's ability to acquire skills, while motor control ascertains neuromuscular performance of individuals. Many people are taking great interest in the learning of motor skills and expertise, and the development of coordination. This new field of sports is based on the use of the knowledge base in the movement and sport sciences, cognitive sciences, and also physical therapy.

Sports science is a new area of study that is forcing people to explore the scientific explanation for David Beckham's superb soccer skills, and even wondering what would Wimbledon be like if say Pete Sampras had to use an…… [Read More]

References

Computational Learning and Motor Control Lab, available at http://www-slab.usc.edu/,accessed on: November 20, 2003

Graduate Programs: Masters in Motor Control, available at http://www.indiana.edu/~kines/ms_motor.html, accessed on: November 20, 2003

JCU - Motor Learning and Motor Control, available at: www.jcu.edu.au/school/phtm/ises/lev3sub/sp34hbk.html, accessed on: November 20, 2003

Motor Behavior Specialization - Doctoral Degree Program, available at http://www.hhp.ufl.edu/ess/grad/motrbeh1.htm, accessed on: November 20, 2003
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Educational Intervention on the Balance

Words: 9613 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34346457



Literature eview

1. The dilemma of Obesity

Mokdad et al., (1999) in his study found that the issue of unhealthy weight, overweight and obesity are perhaps one of the rising concerns for the Americans in the 21st century as more and more U.S. citizens become vulnerable to the circumstantial risks and dangers of the phenomenon (Mokdad et al., 1999). It is usually the body mass indexes (BMI) that indicate whether a person is actually overweight or not. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) carried out a study for the years 1999 to 2002 using the BMI phenomenon and concluded that about 65% of U.S. citizens in the adulthood years were categorized under the overweight group because of their BMI (Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2005).

To understand the phenomenon of obesity and its rise, it's important to understand…… [Read More]

References

Adam Drewnowski and S.E. Specter (2004), Poverty and Obesity: The Role of Energy Density and Energy Costs, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 79, no. 1: 6-16.

Akande, a. & Akande, B.E. (1994). On becoming a person: Activities to help children with their anger. Early Child Development and Care, 102, 31-62.

Akande, a. Wyk, C.D.WV. And Osagie, J.E. (2000). Importance of Exercise and Nutrition in the Prevention of Illness and the Enchancement of Health. Education. 120: 4.

Alexander, M.A., & Blank, J.J. (1988). Factors related to obesity in Mexican-American preschool children. Image, 20(2), 79-82.
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Hermann Von Helmolhtz The Acoustics

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68628569



After determining the resonance of the vowel sounds, Helmholtz set about reproducing them. He was no less clever here than he was in figuring out how to analyze the pitches of human speech. After completing this analysis, he combined the sounds of various combinations of pitchforks until he achieved the same resonance as the human vowel. No one before had ever mechanically reproduced human speech sounds in such a conscious and accurate manner before, nor thought of vowels as purely interactions of different pitches. Helmholtz combined a very objective mind and ear to a fantastic and precise knowledge of the physics of sound in order to develop these reproductions. His knowledge and research into physics was essential to his study, as sound is ultimately a physical phenomenon. But his research into the human biological ability to produce sound was also groundbreaking, proving the breadth of his knowledge and worth as…… [Read More]

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Allopathic Medicine Outweigh the Risks

Words: 4631 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37148611

" Prescription drugs invade the markets today only to mask the symptoms of disease instead of preventing disease from happening. In this back-end approach to fighting disease instead of preventing it from occurring in the first place, pharmaceutical companies have profited at the expense of society." (Karel M.)

There is therefore also the feelings and the growing suspicion that prescription drugs are controlled by large pharmaceutical corporations and these influence practitioners and the health care industry. Modern medical practitioners are also "... subject to persuasion from drug manufacturers and rely on them for their information, despite their obvious bias to use their drugs." (Karel M.) This is an area that has been severely critiqued in allotropic health care; namely the fact that modern medicine is dominated by large drug companies which to a large extent are more concerned with their profit margins than with the quality and the ultimate effectives…… [Read More]

References

Bawaskar H.S. Non- allopathic doctors form the backbone of rural health.

Retrieved March 8, 2007, at http://www.issuesinmedicalethics.org/044ed112.html

Death by Modern Medicine. Retrieved March 8, 2007, at http://www.ashtreepublishing.com/bookshop/carolyn-dean.php

Definition of Allopathic. Retrieved March 6, 2007, at http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=33612 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5010938986
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Why Do the Japanese Live Longer

Words: 2874 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63437076

Japanese Nutrition

Japanese

WHY DO THE JAPANESE LIVE LONGE?

NUTITIONAL BENEFITS OF SOY:

As an annual Asian legume (meaning that it grows in a pod), soy is one of the most amazing members of the bean family, due mostly to its significant health benefits. Many studies done by nutritionist worldwide have confirmed that a plant-based diet is the most healthful choice. Soybean and its extracts, such as soybean oil, provide high-quality protein that is equal to that found in poultry, milk and other animal-based foods. However, not all soyfoods are low in fat, but most of them are cholesterol-free. An added bonus is that soybean and its byproducts do not contain saturated fat unless it is added during the processing stage or is combined with other ingredients containing saturated fat.

Because many forms of soy are low or modest in total fat, a person's overall diet will be inclined toward…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Davidson, Alan. (1989). The Oxford Companion to Food. New York: Oxford University Press.

Ling, Wen Hua, et al. (2001). "Black and Red Rice Decreases Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation and Increases Antioxidant Status." Journal of Nutrition. Vol. 131. 1421-26.

London, Sheryl. (1992). The Versatile Grain and the Elegant Bean. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Marks, Leonard S., et al. (2004). "Prostate Cancer in Native Japanese and Japanese-American Men: Effects of Dietary Differences on Prostatic Tissue." Urology. 64. 4. 765-71.
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Temporal Monthly Distribution of Death

Words: 1847 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52329987



In the first instance there were no control groups or references to studies that showed possible alternative results from the same sample group. The argument can therefore be criticized for being far too spurious and general with little clear definition of terms.

Furthermore it must be mentioned that the argument itself is not always clear and well expressed and there is very little effort to show consistency between some of the findings. For example the connection between geophysical aspects and both homicide and suicide is based on a very little reference to other studies or to any factual and consistent evidence.

Summary and Conclusion

The above article has both positive and negative aspects. From a positive point-of-view the investigation of a rather unorthodox theory about extreme human behavior is to be applauded. There is some proof and evidence that geophysical aspects can and do have an influence on human behavior.…… [Read More]

References

Stouple et al. (2005) Suicide-Homicide Temporal Interrelationship, Links with Other Fatalities, and Environmental Physical Activity. Crisis. Vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 85-89.

O'Shea R, (2002) Writing for Psychology: An Introductory Guide for Students. Harcourt Brace: Sydney.

Burton, L.J. (2002) an interactive approach to writing essays and research reports in psychology. John Wiley & Sons, Milton, QLD
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Brain States and Conscious

Words: 697 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56390111

Dreaming

The topic of sleep and dreaming is interesting to me because of the complex nature of the brain. It seems we know so much about human physiology, yet the brain is still mysterious. e know about neurochemicals, for instance, but do not really understand how memory is stored, accessed, or how dreaming affects our abilities during waking life. e know that a chemical upset, even minor, can make a huge difference in our state of consciousness, or our ability to perform in daily activities. Dreaming is fascinating to me because we know that the brain is a machine, and like any machine, it must be maintained (through nutrition) as well as rest and sleep. I find it personally interesting that dreams can be so vivid, unreal, frightening, pleasurable, and yet still mysterious.

Dreaming is part of sleep -- and a recurring stage in which our state of consciousness is…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Obringer, L. (2012, October). How Dreams Work. Retrieved from How Stuff Works: http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/life/inside-the-mind/human-brain/dream3.htm

Osterweil, N. (2010). The Health Benefit of Dreams. WebMD. Retrieved from:  http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/the-health-benefits-of-dreams 

Zhang, J 2004, Memory Process and the Function of Sleep, Journal of Theoretics, 6 (4): 14-21.
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Analyzing Letter to Stakeholders

Words: 1404 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42842469

Evidence-Based Design in Healthcare Facility Planning

This Letter to Stakeholders aims to help the recipients appreciate the importance of evidence-based design in the planning of Healthcare Facilities.

Dear Sir / Madam

I feel happy to share with you the letter that explains about the upcoming healthcare renovation project. There are a lot of disruptive changes happening in the healthcare landscape and the application of evidence-based design (EBD) is prominent among them. It is essential that we understand the features of the model before taking a final decision. I have put my perspective on why adopting the EBD model for our renovation project is important.

History of Healthcare Facility Design

The original idea that Florence Nightingale had of a hospital was a place that would have abundant fresh air, view of nature and light. This idea sought to substitute deep plan hospitals that rose after World War II which were more…… [Read More]

References

Burpee, Heather (2008). 'History of Healthcare Architecture'. Integrated Design lab Puget Sound.

Gormley, Tom (2010). 'The History of Hospitals and Wards'. Healthcare Design. Extracted from  http://www.healthcaredesignmagazine.com 

Kroll, Karen (2005). 'Evidence-based design in Healthcare facilities'. Building Operating Management. Extracted from http://www.facilitiesnet.com/

Becker, Franklin and Kelley S. Parsons (2007). 'Hospital Facilities and the role of evidence-based design'. Journal of Facilities Management Vol. 5 No. 4, 2007 pp. 263-274
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Penicillin Slinn Judy 2009 Penicillin

Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74508683

The promulgation of penicillin, for instance, is part of the story of the 1950s. America, fresh out of a World War and looking towards technology to save humanity -- the Atomic bomb, the Age of Plastics, new innovations for the kitchen, and then turning towards science to provide the fundamental answers that change and shape society.

Additionally, the story of penicillin is the story of economics. Once the synthesis of the cillians occurred, the larger pharmacological industry needed millions of dollars to produce the drug to the level needed. This author, in fact, believes that the cost of penicillin had a negative effect on the fall of the British Labour Party in the mid-1950s. The real tragedy, though, is that due to the overuse of the cillans, modern culture has actually changed the evolutionary nature of bacteria. The resistant strains now have a life of their own, and even though…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bellis, M. (2010). "The History of Penicillin." About.Com -- Inventors. Cited in:

http://inventors.about.com/od/pstartinventions/a/Penicillin.htm

Slinn, Judy. (2009). "Penicillin: Triumph and Tragedy. -- Review of Robert Bud

Book." Medical History. 53 (1): 2009. 133.
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Nazi Holocaust Pictures in Germany

Words: 1490 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33272090

Nazi Holocaust

The picture presents a monster tattooed with communist symbols. He is destroying a city that is equipped with electricity and other modern embellishments of civilizations. People are running for their life. On its face value, the picture can be taken as the criticism of communism. However, associating communism and Jewish origin with destructivity is not a naive gesture at all. It has an evil nature in itself showing hatred and intolerance for others in the society.

The descriptive text for the picture tells us that it is a propaganda poster depicting a stereotyped Jewish communist who is in the act of destroying Germany. Do we need to know more? This shows the hatred one cherishes against the Jew and the communists. This becomes crystal clear that the propaganda poster delineates the anti-Semitic as well as anti-communist mentality of the Nazis while this particular poster makes a caricature of…… [Read More]

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Technology in Learning of Elementary

Words: 10688 Length: 39 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41639691



For the purposes of this review, Web-based instruction is considered to be any educational or training program distributed over the Internet or an intranet and conveyed through a browser, such as Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator. Java applet-based instruction is a special form of Web-based instruction.

Although there is very little research on comparing the effectiveness of Java applet-based instruction to the traditional face-to-face offering. However Web-based instruction has received enough attention that many studies are now available in the research literature.

Comparing the learning effects of Web-based learning with traditional face-to-face teaching and learning is emphasized in the research on the Internet as a medium in higher education. However, these research studies always produce conflicting results. esearchers found significant differences, positive or negative, in using different Internet-based approaches to facilitate teaching and learning.

This literature review explores three dominant themes: impact on student performance, student attitude, and student satisfaction.…… [Read More]

References

Rajshree Agarwal, a Edward Day. (1998). The impact of the Internet on economic education. Journal of Economic Education, 29(2), 99. Retrieved November 14, 2008, from ABI/INFORM Global database. (Document ID: 28501331).

Al-Jarf, a. & Sado, R. (2002). Effect of online learning on struggling ESL college writers. San Antonio, TX: National Educational Computing Conference Proceedings. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 475-920).

Anthony Basile, Jill M. D'Aquila. (2002). An experimental analysis of computer-mediated instruction and student attitudes in a principles of financial accounting course. Journal of Education for Business, 77(3), 137-143. Retrieved November 17, 2008, from ABI/INFORM Global database. (Document ID: 115217377).

Carey, J. (2001). Effective student outcomes: A comparison of online and face-to-face delivery modes. Retrieved November 14, 2008, at http://www.ed.psu.edu/acsde/deos/deosnews/deosnews11_9.asp
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Stem Cell Website Stem Cell

Words: 1215 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11919197

However, we can immediately see that their purposes are distinct from one another.

From a design standpoint, one grievance with Sanford Burnham is the shortage of active links to immediately usable information. First and foremost, it is of note that in a page with several eye-catching graphics pertaining to particular site destinations (the Center for Nanomedicine, Sanford Burnham's blog) none of these photographs is used as an active link. This is a missed opportunity for site usability that may be perceived as being of marginal importance but in reality can have significant impact on how long a visitor remains on a site and how many pages said visitor is inclined to click-through. This is a shortcoming easily resolved but does impact the site's relative dynamism.

The importance of such a matter is highlighted in a comparison between the two sites, with Research America ultimately compiling a site that is a…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Research America: http://www.researchamerica.org/stemcell_issue?gclid=COuYj67at5sCFQuU7QodsmBAAg

Sanford Burnham:

http://www.burnham.org/default.asp?contentID=79
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Homeostatis a Term Which Refers to the

Words: 511 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26236364

Homeostatis, a term which refers to the maintenance of the internal state of a given body that is quite distinct from the external environment in an effort of defending it against perturbation is an important element of every male and female on the planet. In this paper we attempt to explain how homeostatic mechanisms affect the homeostasis of the eproductive system.

How homeostatic mechanisms affect the male reproductive system

The hypothalamus produces the hormone gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnH) which controls the anterior pituitary gonadotropins. The anterior pituitary gonadotropins then releases Folicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing hormone (LH).The Folicle stimulating hormone (FSH) then indirectly stimulates spermatogenesis by simulating sustentacular cells to effectively release andogen-binding protein (ABP).The andogen-binding protein (ABP)

then prompts the spermatogenic cells to effectively bind while also concentrating testosterone which then stimulates spermatogenesis.

The Luteinizing hormone (LH) effectively binds to the interstitial cells which then secretes testosterone and a…… [Read More]

References

Atkins, JA (2006). GNRH-induced Ovulation and Gonadotropin Surge in Beef Heifers: Effect of Day of the Cycle. University of Missouri - Columbia

Chrousos, GP. Stress and disorders of the stress system. Nat. Rev. Endocrinol. 5, 374 -- 381 (2009); published online 2 June 2009; doi:10.1038/nrendo.2009.106

Sherwood, L (2012). Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems. Cengage Learning

Figure 1.
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Constructivist Methods in the Social Studies Classroom

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12636453

Constructivist Methods in Social Studies

Kaiser, C. (2010, February). edrawing the boundaries: A constructivist approach to combating student apathy in the secondary history classroom. The History Teacher, 43(2), 223-232.

Kaiser argues that there is really nothing terribly tidy or accurate about the divisions that teachers use to teach and study history. The author suggests that teachers need to know both why and how the divisions in the study of history occur -- this lends a level of self-consciousness to history as a discipline. Kaiser proposes using alternative perspectives for the study of history that capitalize on the individual interests of adolescent students. Kaiser suggests that each student should select a unique perspective -- a stand-alone thematic approach -- for the study of history for the duration of the coursework. Being able to unpack the traditional divisions in history will help me explain to my history students what my assignment is…… [Read More]

References

Kaiser, C. (2010, February). Redrawing the boundaries: A constructivist approach to combating student apathy in the secondary history classroom. The History Teacher, 43(2), 223-232.

Scheuerell, S. (2010). Virtual Warrensburg: Using cooperative learning and the internet in the social studies classroom. The Social Studies, 101, 194-199.

Yilmaz, K. (2008, December/2009, January). A vision of history teaching and learning: Though on history education in secondary schools. The High School Journal, 37-46.
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Health Blind Spot

Words: 2386 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51485764

Health and Blind Spot Enlargement in Non-Athletes

Everyone has a blind spot in the visual field caused by an absence of nerves on the retinal wall where the nerve ganglia enter. Our brains "correct" for this blind spot and fill-in the missing information so that we do not notice the blind spot in normal daily activity. As the blind spot represents a physical structure, there has been little study concerning it. There have been a few studies conducted to determine how the brain compensates for the phenomenon.

Recently, there have been studies indicating that in certain people seeking chiropractic treatment that they have unequal blind spots as a result of muscoloskeletal misalignments. This research has been controversial, however, brings up several interesting questions. There are conditions that can damage the retina and this can cause blind spots in the visual field. It is generally assumed that athletes maintain a better…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ballantyne, R. About that Squinty Eye. [Online]

 http://www.ballantyne.com/rjb_resume/Squinty.html  accessed March 2003.

Cai, R.H., & Cavanagh, P. (2002). Motion interpolation of a unique feature into stimulus gaps and blind spots Journal of Vision, 2(7), 30a, http://journalofvision.org/2/7/30 / accessed

Fletcher WA, Imes RK, Goodman D, Hoyt WF. Acute idiopathic blind spot enlargement: a big blind spot syndrome without optic disc edema. Arch Ophthalmol. 1988;106:44-49.
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Reference List Formatting Assistance

Words: 497 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67655911

assistance fomatting 15 efeences/Citations APA fomat.

Revised Fomat - Refeence List

Alasdai, G & Yellin, J, (2010). Spots Wellness Exegaming Innovation, Human Physiology. Heiot-Watt, PA: Rodale. In-text efeence: (Alasdai, 2010)

Andeson, JM. MD. (2000, June). Whole Gain Foods and Heat Disease Risk. Reseach Nutitional Science: Nutitional Sciences Collective Metabolics. Division of Biostatistics, VA Medical Cente, Univesity of Lexington, Kentucky. (Vol. 19, No. 3 pp. 501-508). In-text efeence: (Andeson, 2000)

Boihie, Kitty, MS, RD. (2006, Apil 9). Small Indulgences. Food Pocessing Magazine, Aticle Review, 28-31. In-text efeence: (Boihie, 2006)

Flegal, K.M., & Caoll, C.L., MD. (2002). Pevalence and Tends in Obesity Among U.S. Adults. JAMA 288:1723-7. 2002. Retieved Decembe 17, 2013 fom http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hestat/oveweight/oveweight_adult.htm

In-text efeence: (Flegal, 2002)

5. Gomley, James. (2008, Decembe 28). Diet Sodas Contibute to Childhood Obesity.

Ameican Jounal of Public Health, 128-131. In-text efeence: (Gomley, 2008)

6. Geenstein, Rachel. & Cunnius, E.L. (2010). Poceedings fom NPD Council 2010:…… [Read More]

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Houdini Was Able to Modulate His Normal

Words: 1748 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33544989

Houdini Was Able to Modulate His Normal Physiology During His Stunts

The objective of this study is to examine how Houdini was able to modulate his normal physiology during his stunts.

Harry Houdini caused the world to marvel at his skill in escaping the bondage of handcuffs and was referred to as the 'handcuff king' and as well Houdini performed many other magic tricks that required more than merely illusion but instead required that he be able to alter his own body's physiology. The modulation of physiology enabled Houdini to accomplish great feats and to capture the imagination and attention of a large base of fans across many years. Houdini is well-known for having spent a great deal of time and effort to invalidate individuals who were so-called mediums communicating with the dead because he detested this type of trickery.

Modulation of Physiology

The modulation of physiology is similar to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Randi, James (2001) My Heroes, The Pale Blue Dot, Houdini's Last Stunt. SWIFT. Online Newsletter of the JREP. 28 Dec 2001. Retrieved from: http://www.randi.org/jr/122801.html

Shermer, Michael (2001) Houdini's Skeptical Advice: Just Because Something's Unexplained Doesn't Mean It's Supernatural. Scientific American. 4 Feb 2011. Retrieved from: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=houdinis-skeptical-advice

Seabourne, Tom Dr. (nd) Breathing and Heart Rate Control. Universal Nutrition. Retrieved from:  http://www.universalnutrition.com/features/breathingheartrate.html
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Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Systems Integrated

Words: 2173 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56960433

Integration of Cardiovascular/Gastrointestinal Systems

Integration of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems within the human body

The integration of the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems allow for nutrients to be introduced, broken down, and absorbed by body to maintain and promote healthy bodily functions. Independently, these systems serve separate functions, but when working in conjunction, help to transport necessary nutrients throughout the body, while maintaining and promoting homeostasis within the systems. Any imbalance within these systems will greatly affect the body, as a whole, and can lead to potentially fatal results.

Integration of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems within the human body

The gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems of the human body help to breakdown and transport items that are ingested, such as food and medication, to the necessary parts of the body, expelling wastes that are not needed. Separately, the gastrointestinal and cardiac systems have different functions, but when the systems work in conjunction…… [Read More]

References:

Bowen, R 2002, Salivary glands and saliva, Colorado State University, viewed 14 September 2011,  http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/pregastric/salivary.html 

Cleveland Clinic 2005, The structure and function of the digestive system, viewed 29 September 2011, http://www.cchs.net/health/health-info/docs/1600/1699.asp?index=7041

Cotterill, S 2000, The cardiovascular system (heart and blood): medical terminology for cancer, Department of Child Health, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, viewed 14 September 2011,  http://www.cancerindex.org/medterm/medtm8.htm 

Gregory, M n.d., The circulatory system, Clinton Community College, State University of New York, viewed 15 September 2011, http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu/faculty/michael.gregory/files/Bio%20100/Bio%20100%20Lectures/Organ%20Systems/Circulatory%20System/Circulatory%20System.htm
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Electromyography Biopac Exercise Discussion This

Words: 1205 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33751831

The authors were trying to develop a system of estimating and indexing muscle fatigue rates during static muscle contraction. The results of this study indicated that estimations were reasonably successful with some limitations that were noted. One limitation was that the study neglected muscle recovery since the experiment was performed in a lab under controlled conditions and the muscles were able to fully recover. However, in the real world muscles move in a dynamic environment thus making muscle recovery rates a challenge in producing an accurate estimate of fatigue.

Another study looked at the efficacy of treatments in patients who suffer from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). The study conducted research using 111 patients who suffer from CTS. They compared the standard conservative treatment (SCT) with other forms of treatment available that also propose to alleviate symptoms associated CTS. They found that SCT, which includes local steroid injections, was effective as…… [Read More]

References:

Yewguan Soo; Sugi, M.; Nishino, M.; Yokoi, H.; Arai, T.; Kato, R.; Nakamura, T.; Ota, J.;, "Quantitative estimation of muscle fatigue using surface electromyography during static muscle contraction," Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2009. EMBC 2009. Annual International Conference of the IEEE, vol., no., pp.2975-2978, 3-6 Sept. 2009

doi: 10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5332521

URL: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=5332521&isnumber=5332379

Ay-e N. Bardak, Mehmet Alp, Belgin Erhan, Nurdan Paker, Betul Kaya and Ay-e . Onal,;, "Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of conservative treatment in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome," Advances in Therapy, Publisher Springer Healthcare Communications, ISSN 0741-238X (Print) 1865-8652 (Online), Issue Volume 26, Number 1 / January, 2009
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Healthy Heart vs Coronary Disease

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61031010

hen an heart needs more oxygen, such in times of exercise, stress or pharmacological stimuli, blood flow is increased to fulfill this demand. However, the physiological narrowing of arteries due to plaque build up found in coronary disease restricts blood flow to the heart, especially in times of when an increase in myocardial oxygen is needed. These restrictions mean a lessened CFR for the individual, which can lead to coronary ischemia, cardiac infarction, and several other dangerous effects. This physiological change in the coronary system, through the build up of plaque, occurs for several reasons. Lack of physical activity and poor nutrition, with the consumption of certain fats and cholesterols, can facilitate plaque build up. High blood pressure, obesity, depression, and anxiety are also contributing factors (Pazoki, Nabiour, Seyednezami, and Imami).

There are different treatment options for coronary artery disease. Two treatment clinical options include lifestyle modification and revascularization. Lifestyle…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kern, Morton, Amir Lerman, Jan-Willen Bech, Bernard De Bruyne, Eric Eeckhout, William Fearon, Stuart Higano, Michael Lim, and Martjin Meuwissen. "Physiological Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory ." American Heart Association Journal 114 (2006): 1321-1341. American Heart Association. Web. 16 Nov. 2010.

Pazoki, Raha, Iraj Nabipour, Nasrin Seyednezami, and Seyed Reza Imami. "Effects of a community-based healthy heart program on increasing healthy women's physical activity: a randomized controlled trial guided by Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR)." BMC Public Health 7 (2007): 216-220. Print.

Rub, M., Cremer, J., Krian, a., Meinertz, T., Werdan, K., & Zerkowski, H. "Different Treatment Options in Chronic Coronary Artery Disease." Deutschs Arzteblatt International 106.15 (10 Apr 2009): 253-261.

Shirato, Susan, and Beth Ann Swan. "Women and Cardiovascular Disease: An Evidentiary Review." MedSurg Nursing 19.5 (2010): 282-306. Print.
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Pathogens and Diseases Pathogens Are Common Characteristics

Words: 1909 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65625701

Pathogens and Diseases:

Pathogens are common characteristics of everyday environment as soil contains huge number of bacteria per cubic centimeter while air contains fungal spores. The existence of pathogens in everyday environment emanates from the fact that microorganisms are deposited through touching of various surfaces like tables. Pathogens can be described as disease-causing agents such as infectious microbes, and parasites. While the infectious microbes include viruses and bacteria, parasites include protozoa and fungi. Notably, microbes are only considered as pathogens if they cause harm or diseases since not all microbes are harmful (Koo, 2009). There are opportunistic pathogens, which are organisms that are normally part of the natural flora of the body. These organisms become harmful or pathogens after an invasion like the occurrence of an accidental injury or surgery.

Spread of Pathogens:

Since pathogens are common disease-causing agents, they spread in various ways to cause harm or illnesses. Some…… [Read More]

References:

ABPI -- Bringing Medicines to Life (n.d.), How Pathogens Cause Disease, The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, viewed 17 April 2012,

ABPI -- Bringing Medicines to Life (n.d.), Pathogens Cause Disease, The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, viewed 17 April 2012,

Canadian Committee on Antibiotic Resistance (2007), Infection Prevention and Control Best

Practices, Canadian Committee on Antibiotic Resistance, viewed 17 April 2012,