Immigration Reform Essays (Examples)

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Immigration Fallacy the Existential Fallacy Behind Arizona's

Words: 866 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29221574

Immigration Fallacy

The Existential Fallacy Behind Arizona's Immigration Policy

Few issues currently featured in American public debate are clouded by as much emotional bias, invective and distortion as that of immigration reform. Particularly as this concerns America's shared border with Mexico, immigration is a discussion which carries significant political ramification, clear racial overtones and distinctions in ideology where American openness is concerned. As a result, many political figures have been moved to comment or drive policy on the issue-based less on the support of fact than on the employment of inflammatory rhetoric. And quite frequently, this rhetoric is presented with little concern for the logical fallacies which may underlie is basic formative claims. Rarely has this been evidenced with more vitriol or determination than in the state of Arizona over the last several years. In the context of our discussion, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer is particularly noted for her steady…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Biggers, J. (2011). How Arizona wrote the GOP's immigration platform. Salon.com.
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Immigration in America

Words: 3216 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34642223

Immigration in America: The Benefits and Costs of a Polarizing Problem

Introduction

As Suarez-Orozco, Rhodes and Milburn (2009) point out, immigrants need “supportive relationships” in order to succeed in the foreign country that they move to (p. 151). However, when that foreign country is determined to address immigration issues—not only illegal immigration but also legal immigration—it can become a difficult problem for both sides of the political aisle. For a nation like the United States, that is especially true. After all, America was founded by immigrants. The early Spanish and French missionaries came in the 16th century seeking converts to Christianity. The Puritans and English followed. The Germans and Italians and Irish and Polish all came to America in the wake of Industrialization. Over time, America was host to so many different populations and groups of people that it was referred to as the melting pot in 1909 (Higgins). However,…… [Read More]

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Immigration - Drawing the Line

Words: 7210 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49580604

There is no question, however, that immigration issues will remain in the forefront of our national policy debates.

Deportation Factors and Crimes Involving Moral Turpitude

Research indicates that since the late 1980s, Congress had been tightening the substantive provisions of the immigration laws, to make it far less likely that a convicted criminal alien can find a way to be relieved of expulsion. For many years the basic statutory pattern was that a crime involving moral turpitude rendered a person deportable, if it was committed less than five years after the person's entry and resulted in a sentence of one year or more confinement. A later-committed crime or one that drew a lighter sentence did not result in deportation. If the person committed two such crimes that were not part of a single criminal scheme, they could render the person deportable no matter when they were committed. A drug offense…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Calavita, Kitty. Immigration, law and marginalization in a global economy: Notes from Spain. Law and Society Review (1998).

Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/chinex.html (26 Apr. 2005).

Immigration Act of 1907. http://www.multied.com/documents/immigrationact.html (26 Apr. 2005).

Levinson, Peter. The facade of Quasi-Judicial Independence in Immigration Appellate Adjudications.  http://www.rightsworkinggroup.org/files/peter_article.pdf .(26 Apr. 2005).
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Immigration Ethics and Social Responsibility Immigration and

Words: 2435 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71959597

Immigration

Ethics and Social esponsibility:

Immigration and Amnesty in the United States

The question of immigration, especially in this country, is ever-present. From our past, and well into our future, the United States will be a nation of immigrants. However, as political candidates raise a number of questions relating to immigrants south of the border, one must wonder about how immigration has grown into such a hotly debated issue, and how it is separating this country. Though it is true that the United States needs immigration reform, one must also look at the traditions of the country, and how they can protect the less fortunate, especially in the area of immigration. The reason this must happen is because most come here with notions of a better place, where they can live safely and freely, and prosper as individuals. This nation ought to offer that to all individuals, for that is…… [Read More]

References

Amnesty International. "USA must fight anti-immigration sentiments in nine states" (2010). Amnesty International. <  http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/press-releases/usa-must-fight-anti-immigrant-sentiment-in-nine-states >.

Baier, K. (1990). "Egoism" in A companion to ethics, Ed., Peter Singer. Blackwell: Oxford.

Cox, A., & Posner, A. (2007). The second-order structure of immigration law. 809,

822-23.
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Immigration and Customs Enforcement the

Words: 2506 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46700134

These measures included laws, which denied services to undocumented residents, alerted police to assume ICE functions, penalized for employers who hired the aliens, and made English the official language. In Arizona, ordinary citizens were encouraged to report businesses, which hired suspicious foreign-looking persons. Hispanics were the major targets of this xenophobia because they were believed to be the major law violators. Statistics showed that there were approximately 12 million undocumented immigrants, most of them Latinos or Hispanics, in the U.S. The national bias against them showed up in studies, which considered only them in determining how much they were costing the country in services. ut did they really drain the economy? A spokesman for the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission did not think so. A 2004 study on "foreign-born" citizens of Virginia alone concluded that Asians outnumbered Hispanics. The Commission found that these "foreign-born" citizens were not a huge…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Galuszka, P. (2008). Hispanics bearing the brunt of xenophobia. Diverse Issues in Higher

Education: Cox, Matthews & Associates. Retrieved on March 24, 2009 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mWMX/is_1_25/ai_n2491956?tag=content;col1

ICE (2008). About ICE. Immigration and Customs Enforcement: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Retrieved on March 24, 2009 from http://www.ice.gov/about/index.htm

Marcucci, M.R. (2007). Marchers call for immigration reform. Oakland Tribune: ANG
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Immigration the United States Is

Words: 1021 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87446990

Even European immigrants experienced discrimination in the 19th century. As Vellos (1997) points out, "American society did not accept the Irish Catholics and Germans, and movements to limit immigration began to form." The Chinese Exclusion Act established anti-Asian sentiments and was not repealed until as late as 1943. For the first time in American history, immigration was "seen as a threat to the United States economy, and Congress began expanding the list of 'undesirable classes' hoping to upgrade the quality of immigrants and to limit overall entry," (Vellos 1997).

In spite of having to live in squalid inner city tenement buildings, new waves of immigrants relished the idea of the American Dream. The American Dream provides the ideological and psychological incentive for new immigrants to a pursue a path of upward social mobility. Upward social mobility was most likely unavailable in the home country, whereas the United States has been…… [Read More]

Reference

"A Historical Look at U.S. Immigration Policy." (1995). Retrieved online: http://web.missouri.edu/~brente/immigr.htm

Center for Immigration Studies (n.d.). Immigration history. Retrieved online:  http://www.cis.org/ImmigrationHistory 

Colorado Alliance for Immigration Reform (2010). U.S. Population and Immigration Data, Projections and Graphs. Retrieved online: http://www.cairco.org/data/data_us.html

Diner, H. (2008). Immigration and U.S. History. America.gov. Retrieved online: http://www.america.gov/st/peopleplace-english/2008/February/20080307112004ebyessedo0.1716272.html
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Immigration Into the U S Bears

Words: 2108 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37524940

In the most extensive study till date including nearly 3,000 people, Prof Vega has revealed that acculturation to U.S. customs has a damaging impact in the U.S. He found double the rate of mental disturbance in U.S. compared to the latest happenings of immigration or Mexicans who stayed in their country. Prof Vega along with his team of associates found that U.S. born Mexican-American, the lifetime threat of being detected with any mental disorder was analogous to that for non-Hispanic whites which is 48.1% that roughly one in two people. However, in case of new immigrants and Mexican citizen, the rate dropped down to 24.9%. Besides, they found out that the rate of psychological effect went up progressively after immigration in such a measure that Mexicans who had stayed in the country for more than 13 years had roughly identical rate as who were born in U.S. (as Mexican Immigrants…… [Read More]

References

Causes and Consequences of California's Latin American Origin Immigration" Retrieved at http://clnet.ucla.edu/challenge/ccorigin.htm. Accessed on 4 May, 2005

Chac n, Oscar; Rodr'guez, Aide; Shannon, Amy. (June, 2004) "Latino Immigrant Leaders Push for Immigration Reform: Background on Immigrant-Led, Community-Based Organization." Citizen Action in the Americas, No. 10; Americas Program, Interhemispheric Resource Center (IRC) Retrieved at http://www.americaspolicy.org/citizen-action/series/10enlaces_body.html

Huntington, Samuel P. "The Special Case of Mexican Immigration" the America Enterprise online. Retrieved at http://www.taemag.com/issues/articleid.12114/article_detail.asp. Accessed on 4 May, 2005

Marti, Dinerstein. (September, 2004) "Social Security 'Totalization' - Examining a Lopsided Agreement with Mexico" Retrieved at http://www.cis.org/articles/2004/back904.html. Accessed on 4 May, 2005
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Immigration the United States Is

Words: 1929 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29790676

Advocacy groups, whether private or government-sponsored, ease transition from home to America but being uprooted poses severe psychological and sociological problems that are not easy to fix.

The United States remains one of the only nations to openly welcome immigrants as a national policy; Canada is another. For centuries the United States has relied on immigrant labor to fuel industry and add nuance to the nation's cultural fabric. The United States is no longer viewed as a melting pot because of the increased pride among immigrants in their native cultures and languages. Balancing assimilation with preservation of culture is still the most difficult task for immigrants, many of whom hope for a more stable life in the new world while still retaining the values and lifestyles of their ancestors.

Refugees continue to hold a unique social, economic and political status in the United States. As Tumulty notes, the Hmong assimilated…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Branigin, William. "Immigrants Shunning Idea of Assimilation." The Myth of the Melting Pot. Washington Post. May 25, 1998. Retrieved Jun 14, 2008 at  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/national/longterm/meltingpot/melt0525a.htm 

Clemetson, Lynette. "Bosnians in America: A Two-Sided Saga." The New York Times. April 29, 2007. Retrieved Jun 15, 2008 at http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/29/us/29youth.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&adxnnlx=1213585920-/U4w96yxQS4h7/bEHNl%20Ug

Federation for American Immigration Reform. "How Mass Immigration Impedes Assimilation." Retrieved Jun 15, 2008 at http://www.fairus.org/site/PageServer?pagename=iic_immigrationissuecenters641a

The Great Immigration Panic." The New York Times. June 3, 2008. Retrieved June 15, 2008 at http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/03/opinion/03tue1.html
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Immigration in the U S There

Words: 1168 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68457631

Pastor categorizes the last century (ending in the 1980s) as falling into several categories, with regard to immigration policy, which he also notes is open for debate, as it is usually done in public debates in Congress and between the executive branch and congress.

While policy during this period may be categorized in many ways, a Latin American perspective suggests four useful divisions...: Defining Limits, 1875-1921; the Classical Special elationship, 1921-1964; From Special elationship to Global Policy, 1965-1978; and the Special Case -- Illegal Migration.

1984, p. 37)

The shift associated with immigration from, European sources to Latin America, and namely Mexico is well documented and determinant of many social issues, including those designated with the legal immigration sphere as well as those designated illegal, by virtue of the manner in which immigration is done. This was also a shift, in that there had been significant movements during and following…… [Read More]

References

Borjas, G.J. (2001). Does Immigration Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market. 69.

Briggs, V.M. (1995). Mass Immigration, Free Trade and the Forgotten American Worker. Challenge, 38(3), 37.

Briggs, V.M. (1996). Immigration Policy and the U.S. Economy: An Institutional Perspective. Journal of Economic Issues, 30(2), 371.

DeSipio, L., & De la Garza, R.O. (1998). Making Americans, Remaking America: Immigration and Immigrant Policy. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
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Immigration in the U S An

Words: 1537 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98850727

hen economic conditions plummet, as they did in 2008, anti-immigrant sentiment may increase even more. Blaming immigrants is a popular pastime but it doesn't change the facts.

Conclusion

As America braces for a bruising round of political debate on the immigration issue, having a sense of which facts are accurate and which are myths will help both citizens and policy-makers. elfare reform and immigration reform policies can change the process for obtaining public benefits and obtaining legal status, respectively. But these differences will impact the economic sector only in minor ways. The bottom line is clear. Immigrants benefit the American economy in many ways, both obvious and subtle, both long-term and immediate, both as workers and as consumers. Those who favor a strong economic engine in the U.S. would do well to welcome our neighbors from around the world.

orks Cited

American Civil Liberties Union. 2002. Immigrants Rights: Immigrants and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Civil Liberties Union. 2002. Immigrants Rights: Immigrants and the Economy.

Available at: http://www.aclu.org/immigrants-rights/immigrants-and-economy

Anrig, Greg and Tova Wang. 2004. Immigration, Jobs, and the American Economy. The Century Foundation. Available at:

http://www.tcf.org/list.asp?type=PB&pubid=491
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Immigration the Impact of Immigration

Words: 10109 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4946572

e can see that minority status has far less to do with population size, and instead seems very much to be inclined by race, ethnicity and political power instead. This label of minority status is in many ways used as a tag by which certain groups are detained from political unity or effectiveness.

To a large degree, this is a condition which relates to the nature of the Hispanic demographic, which in spite of its cultural diversity, is typically perceived by the larger American public as a single unified entity. This is both untrue and reflects the ethnocentric qualities of the white American political body that have tended to relegate the Hispanic population to representation that is not proportional to its true presence here. Indeed, "although Mexican-Americans continue to be the largest group within the Latino population, increasing immigration from other Latin American means they are perhaps the most culturally…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Agencia EFE. (2009). Hispanics ask Obama for More Key Government Posts. Hispanic Business. Ret. Feb. 13, 2010 at http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/politics/2009/4/30/hispanics_ask_obama_for_more_key.htm

Auerbach, a.J. & Oreopoulos, P. (1999). Analyzing the Fiscal Impact of U.S. Immigration. The American Economic Review, 89(2).

Bernstein, R. (2008). U.S. Hispanic population surpasses 45 million now 15% of total. U.S. Census Bureau News.

Borjas, G. (1995). The Economic Benefits from Immigration. The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 9(2).
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Immigration -- the Challenge Illegal

Words: 1132 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48972794

Scores of illegal Latin Americans work in the hospitality industry, construction, meatpacking, agriculture, and landscaping sectors. In fact, in some of the states it is said that almost half of the construction workers are from Latin America. There are arguments that if all these illegal immigrants were removed these jobs would improve the unemployment situation for the American citizens. It is also generally argued that the pay scale for low skilled jobs would also increase. Also, most of the illegal aliens utilize healthcare, education and other services without paying taxes causing significant drain for the government.

The above points are clearly valid but there are both positive and negative effects of illegal immigration. Economists feel that totally eliminating illegal workers would only marginally improve the pay scale for high school dropouts and would not have any significant impact for workers with higher qualifications. Furthermore, illegal immigration contributes positively as Americans…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Michael Barone, 'Living with Illegals', U.S. News and World Report, April 3rd 2006.
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Immigration in to the U S

Words: 1517 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71270605



Conclusion

The population concerns, and the amount of finance drained towards the social welfare of the immigrants pose threat to the U.S. economy. It is therefore important for the government to focus more towards the employment of the local population, and the immigration to the applicants should be granted on the basis of available job opportunities. The government has so far failed to deliver the economic grievances of the local population, therefore the amount sanctioned for the social welfare of the immigrants can be diverted towards the well-being of the local population the allocation of the funds towards security along the borders is justified because in many of the cases the immigrants have been associated with practices that are responsible for unethical and terrorist activities.

eferences

Gordon Howard Hanson. Why Does Immigration Divide America? Public Finance and Political Opposition to Open Borders Peterson Institute. 2005. pp. 51

Gary Scott Smith.…… [Read More]

References

Gordon Howard Hanson. Why Does Immigration Divide America? Public Finance and Political Opposition to Open Borders Peterson Institute. 2005. pp. 51

Gary Scott Smith. Faith and the Presidency: From George Washington to George W. Bush. Oxford University Press U.S.. 2006. pp. 425

Reed Ueda. A Companion to American Immigration. Blackwell Publishing. 2005. pp. 142

U.S Department of Homeland Security. Office of Management and Budget. 2006
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Immigration the Author of This Report Is

Words: 1155 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12996967

Immigration

The author of this report is asked to watch, summarize and assess the implications and points made by the documentary titled The Other Side of Immigration by Roy Germano. In addition to that, the author is asked to offer opinions and analysis of whether or how reform in the United States should be structured, how the a guest worker program should be structured, what is slowing down immigration reform in ashington and whether there is a negative impact caused by illegal immigration in the United States. Lastly, the author will point to the portrayal of the immigrants in the movie and whether there is a bias involved with the documentary.

Review of Film

In watching the film, the basic premise and summary of the film is that the illegal or even legal immigrants from Mexico and the struggle they face as well as the reasons why the keep trying…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Foley, Elise. "Buck McKeon: Terrorists May 'Mingle In' With Latinos To Cross Border." Breaking News and Opinion on The Huffington Post.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/09/buck-mckeon-border_n_3733082.html  (accessed October 8, 2013).

Murray, Shailagh, and Lori Montgomery. "House passes health-care reform bill without Republican votes." The Washington Post: National, World & D.C. Area News and Headlines - The Washington Post.  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/21/AR2010032100943.html  (accessed October 8, 2013).

NPR. "A Reagan Legacy: Amnesty For Illegal Immigrants: NPR." NPR: National Public Radio: News & Analysis, World, U.S., Music & Arts: NPR. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128303672 (accessed October 8, 2013).

NPR. "A Reagan Legacy: Amnesty For Illegal Immigrants: NPR." NPR: National Public Radio: News & Analysis, World, U.S., Music & Arts: NPR. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128303672 (accessed October 8, 2013).
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Immigration Has Stalemated Over the

Words: 429 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19293398



The weak part of the argument was that I found that Noorani and Belanger (2009) generalized. He seemed to show subjectivity and bias in his rancor when for instance he complains that "Immigration hard-liners will use the hook of immigration enforcement in an effort to derail just about anything progressive tilt the Congressional leadership tries to accomplish" (ibid.) Not all immigration hardliners are like that; their reasons may not be because of their opposition to immigration; and the argument would have been more convincing had Noorani and Belanger (2009) stated the specific policies that hardliners resent and the reasons for their disproval . The succeeding sentences continue to malign the so-called hardliners turning Noorani and Belanger (2009)'s otherwise level-headed argument into one that sounds suspiciously partisan and, therefore, less strong in its power to persuade.

The author urges Obama's government to continue with their immigration stance and to ignore these…… [Read More]

Reference

NOORANI, ALI, and MAURICE BELANGER. 2009. "The Need for Progressive immigration Reform." Social Policy 39, no. 1: 12-14. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed November 29, 2012).

http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy2.apus.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&an=43984430&site=ehost-live
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Immigration and Nationality Act INA

Words: 2750 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17235579

The 'euniting Families Act' would also try to increase the current per country limit of 7% to 10% for the issuing of green cards. This bill, if passed, would also permit widows, widowers and children of those persons who die before the completion of the immigration process to get LP status. (Shank, Michael Honda to Announce Key Component of Comprehensive Immigration eform: euniting Families); (euniting Families Act-2009); (Honda, The euniting Families Act (H.. 2709))

euniting Families Act also attempts to stop discriminatory clauses in other immigration rules which prevent permanent same-sex partners to reunite with their families. From the perspective of illegal immigrants, section 245(i) would be more suitable as they will not have to return to their home country before filing a petition for a change of status because if they do return, they might face a possible ban ranging from 3 to 10 years barring them from entering…… [Read More]

References

Butterfield, Jeanne A. AILA on 245(i) Provisions.



Dinan, Stephen. Senate Democrats propose amnesty for some illegals. The Washington Times, 10

May, 2002. p. A4.
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Immigration and Its Policies One of the

Words: 697 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13952462

Immigration and its Policies:

One of the major recent controversial topics that have attracted huge debates in the United States is illegal immigration into America. The heated debate in the Congress involved two main political parties i.e. epublicans and Democrats prompting various immigrant supporters to hold peaceful demonstrations in the entire nation. The controversy was exacerbated by the calls for a comprehensive immigration reform approach by the president. The main reason behind the controversy in this topic is the significance of increased immigration for the spiritual and economic health of the United States. With the large number of immigrants in the United States, there is need for comprehensive reforms of the current immigration policies.

The immigration topic has become a subject of huge debate because 1 out of every 9 U.S. residents is an immigrant. In areas where the number of immigrants is growing or high, this debate has attracted…… [Read More]

References:

Gabaccia, D.R. (2006, November). Today's Immigration Policy Debates: Do We Need a Little

History? Retrieved November 23, 2011, from http://www.migrationinformation.org/usfocus/display.cfm?ID=488

Modarres, A. & Kitson, J. (2006, June). Toward an Immigration Policy Debate. Retrieved November 23, 2011, from http://www.patbrowninstitute.org/documents/publications/PolicyBrief-3.pdf

"The Immigration Debate: It's Impact on Workers, Wages and Employers." (2006, May 17).
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Immigration Economics

Words: 1102 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17177548

Macroeconomics

Factors that lead to Growth

There are several factors that lead to economic growth. They are physical capital, human capital, natural capital and technological change. Physical capital refers to the infrastructure that a nation has, for example transportation and communication infrastructure, and manufacturing capacity. Human capital refers to the number of people, and their skill level. Natural capital reflects natural resources that can be exploited. Technological change reflects the increases in productivity and opportunity that come from innovation.

In his article, Hanson is focused on human capital and the benefits of technological innovation in particular. The two are closely linked, since nations with better human capital are more likely to be innovation leaders as well. Hanson argues that immigration reform should take into account the role that immigrants play in economic growth. The U.S. has many technology companies, and is a leader in most technology fields. That leadership depends,…… [Read More]

References

Downie, M. (2010). Immigrants as innovators boosting Canada's global competitiveness. Conference Board of Canada. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from  http://www.conferenceboard.ca/e-library/abstract.aspx?did=3825 

Hanson, G. (2012). Immigration and economic growth. Cato Institute. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from  http://object.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/serials/files/cato-journal/2012/1/cj32n1-3.pdf
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Politics Immigration

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56523065

Immigration reform, once seeming close under President Bush after the introduction of the Comprehensive Immigration eform Act of 2007, has completely stalled since that point. That bill died in the Senate (Marre, 2007), and there has been little action on immigration reform since then, despite the support for the ideas of CIA by both Presidents Bush and Obama. There are few reasons why immigration reform has stalled. The first reason is that the economy went swirling down the porcelain. This shifted the priorities towards the end of the Bush Administration and for the first couple of years of the Obama Administration. Both presidents were forced to address economic issues, orchestrating bank bailouts and other measures to stabilize the economy. Immigration reform, while still viewed as important at the time, was simply viewed as less important. While Democrats had the clout to pass an immigration reform bill, they were concerned with…… [Read More]

References

Marre, K. (2007). 46-53 immigration bill goes down in the Senate. The Hill. Retrieved November 12, 2014 from http://thehill.com/homenews/news/12430-46-53-immigration-bill-goes-down-in-defeat

Smith, D. (2007). Senate kills Bush immigration reform bill. Reuters. Retrieved November 12, 2014 from http://www.reuters.com/article/2007/06/29/us-usa-immigration-idUSN2742643820070629

Foley, E. (2014). Conservatives warn that GOP must act on immigration, not just attack Obama. Huffington Post. Retrieved November 12, 2014 from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/10/republicans-immigration-reform_n_6128980.html
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How Immigration Contributes to U S Economy

Words: 4118 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87111303

Immigration contributes to U.S. Economy

How immigration contributes to U.S. economy

Popular Press

Giovanni Peri

30, August, 2010

The Effect of Immigrants on U.S. Employment and Productivity

The article by Peri narrates the effects of immigration over the total population of the country. He says that the statistical analysis proved that the economy expanded and became more productive after the immigration and the investment also went up. He narrates another opinion that the foreign born U.S. citizens are decreasing the job opportunities for the U.S. born citizens yet there is a consent that output actually increased. He discussed that there is no significant evidence that the jobs grew or dropped for U.S. born workers because of the immigrants. Thus, this means that U.S. workers did not lose jobs because of the immigrants rather new jobs were created for the immigrants that were great for the overall economy.

Peri stated that…… [Read More]

References

Aguilar, L.A. "The Important Role of Immigrants in Our Economy," (2013), Retrieved from:

http://www.sec.gov/News/Speech/Detail/Speech/1365171515736#.UnfZSWzTmYE

Borjas, G.J. "Native Internal Migration and the Labor Market Impact of Immigration."

Journal of Human Resources 41(2), pp. 221 -- 258. (2006)
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How to Address the Problem of Immigration

Words: 2380 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70255499

Immigration in America

Education is important in American society because it is a pathway by which success is achieved. The traditional theories that attempt to explain academic success can be divided into various groups, such as deficit thinking, which suggests that the reasons one succeeds or does not succeed are found within the person; other theories are based on economic conditions, social conditions, or a combination of both. Then there are also theories that look at the role of the method of education that is used and its function in academic success. These theories highlight the role that various factors play in whether one is successful or not in academics -- in short, all of them shed light on parts of the issue but individually, they all come up a bit short in explaining the whole phenomenon. Thus, it is important to take critical approaches to the idea, and to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Higley, John. Immigration and the Financial Crisis. UK: Edward Elgar Limited, 2015.

Print.

Lee, Jennifer; Zhou, Min. The Asian-American Achievement Paradox. NY: Russell

Sage, 2015. Print.
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US Government Should Limit the Level of Immigration

Words: 1424 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50031092

Immigration to America

An Introduction and Claim

Over the years, the issue of immigration in America United States has raised complex demographic issues. Elements of population increase and cultural change on the native societies in the United States are evident characteristics of immigration. The social, political, and economic components of immigration cause controversies on issues of employment, settlement patterns, ethnicity, and economic benefits for non-immigrants. The government works on developing social mobility, reducing crime, and controlling voting behavior. This paper intends to outline the negative issues surrounding immigration in the U.S. The United States has fewer immigrants on per capita consideration comparable to half the OECD countries. Policies had developed before 1965 focused on establishing a working formula for limiting naturalization and immigration opportunities for persons without native claim.

Background

The exceptional economic status of America makes it a haven for immigrants (David & Okazaki 887). However, globalization is fast…… [Read More]

Works Cited

David, Richards, and Okazaki Stephens. Activation and automaticity of colonial mentality. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40.4(2010), 850 -- 887. Print

Mossakowski, Kilchenmann. Are immigrants healthier? The case of depression among Filipino Americans. Social Psychology Quarterly, 70.3(2007), 290 -- 304. Print

Picot, George. Hou, Farou., & Coulombe, Silva. Poverty dynamics among recent immigrants to Canada. The International Migration Review, 42.2(2008), 393 -- 424. Print

Stickels, Jackie. The Victim Satisfaction Model of the Criminal Justice System, Criminology and Criminal Justice Research and Education, 2.1 (2008), 1-19. Print
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Immigration Policy Typically American Textbooks

Words: 591 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16766382

Much of the difference in assimilation patterns between this group of Latins and previous European and Asian groups surrounds the restructuring of the American economy and the sheer volume of immigrants. Contemporary immigrants face a dichotomous situation: "either they maintain their cultural and communal distinctivness, thus selectively acculturating while keeping some distance from the mainstream, or they will be forced into the position of racial minorities, imposing great disadvantages on themselves and their children" (Alba, 2006, p. x).

America would not be America without immigrants; several innovations, changes in cultural history, even politics would not have occurred. The crux of the matter is that we are indeed a nation of immigrants. We have told the world for over 200 years that they have the potential of life, liberty, and the pursuit of actualization in a country that welcomes everyone to its shoes. We now have many legal immigrants coming to…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Immigration Surge Called Highest Ever. (December 12, 2005). The Washington

Times. Cited in:  http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2005/dec/12/20051212-110459-2662r/ 

Alba, R. And Nee, V. (2006). Remaking the American Mainstream. New Haven, CT:

Canelos, P.S. (November 11, 2008). Obama Victory Took Root in Kennedy-
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Immigration and Society Views From

Words: 3458 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92184928

Alien Nation is organized onto fifteen chapters, divided into three parts:

(1) Introduction;

Part I: Truth: (2) the View from the Tenth Circle; (3) the Pincers; (4) How Did it Happen? (5) Why Did it Happen? (6) So What?

Part II: Consequences: (7) Immigration Has Consequences: Economics; (8) Immigration Has (More) Consequences: Economics II; (9) Immigration Has Consequences: Cultural, Social, Environmental...; (10) Immigration Has Consequences: Political Power; (11) Immigration Has Consequences: A Less Perfect Union; (12) Immigration Has Consequences: The War against the Nation-State; (13) Doing the ight Thing? The Morality of Immigration;

Part III: Shipwreck and Salvage: (14) What, Then, Is to Be Done? (15) Conclusion: The Bowels of Christ?

Brimelow commences his book by seeking the genesis of the immigration problem and finds that it is linked to the massacres conducted by totalitarian regimes. To better explain, the author of Alien Nation… believes that the rulers of the…… [Read More]

References:

Brimelow, P., 1995, Alien Nation: Common Sense about America's Immigration Disaster, Random House

Lind, M., 1995, the Next American Nation: The New Nationalism and the Fourth American Revolution, Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group

Reilly, J.J., the Next American Nation: The New Nationalism and the Forth American Republic, http://www.johnreilly.info/tna.htm last accessed on September 1, 2009

1995, Alien Nation: Common Sense about America's Immigration Disaster, National Vanguard Magazine, Edition of November-December, No. 115
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Immigration Education in California

Words: 720 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24710740

Immigration Education in California

Few issues create long-lasting controversy, the type of controversy that engages nearly every member of society regardless of their economic, ethnic, intellectual, political, religious, or social background. Examples of such issues are abortion, crime, the death penalty, racism, rape, etc. Another example of such an issue is immigration education in California. hile California has traditionally embodied the "melting pot" image that the United States so ardently embraces, the issue of immigration education in California has created (and continues to create) quite a stir.

This paper analyzes and examines the multitude of issues related to immigration education in California. Part II discusses the materials and methods utilized. In Part III, the problem of immigration education in California and the probable causes is outlined. Part IV examines the research methods employed. Lastly, this paper concludes with recommendations and potential solutions.

II. MATERIALS AND METHODS

This study was conceived…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hayne, Sarah. "Immigration News: California Proposes Higher Education for Immigrants." 6/29/01. Retrieved at http://www.usvisanews.com/memo1345.html. On November 12, 2002.

FactBook 2002: Immigration Status of Students- Proposition 187 of 1994 and Welfare Reform Act of 1996." Retrieved at http://www.cde.ca.gov/resrc/factbook/immigstatus.htm. On November 12, 2002.

Immigration Education Issues Pathway: Immigration Policies and Laws." Retrieved at http://eric-web.tc.columbia.edu/pathways/immigrant_issues/impol.html. On November 12, 2002.

Immigration News: California Won't Keep Bilingual Education Programs." 12/30/99. Retrieved at http://www.usvisanews.com/memo825.html. On November 12, 2002.
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Immigration in America the Purpose of This

Words: 1767 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53031324

Immigration in America

The purpose of this paper is to introduce, discuss, and analyze Bharati Mukherjee's essay, "Two Ways to Belong in America." Specifically, it will discuss the position that immigrants who legally come to this country should become citizens of this country, because they have enjoyed all the benefits the country has to offer, and they should be loyal to the country that has given them success and a new life. Immigrants who come to this country to live and work as legal immigrants certainly are not bound to become American citizens. However, as author Mukherjee notes in her essay, many immigrants are grateful to the country that has given them so much, and so, they do not want to take it for granted, or turn their back on it. Immigrants who do not become citizens have a place in American society, but if that is their choice, then…… [Read More]

References

Mukherjee, Bharati. "Two Ways to Belong in America." Writer's Presence: A Pool of Readings, 4th Edition. New York: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Salins, Peter D. "Toward a New Immigration Policy." Commentary Jan. 1997: 45+.

Schuck, Peter H. Citizens, Strangers, and In-Betweens: Essays on Immigration and Citizenship. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1998.

Susser, Siskind. "Why Become a Citizen?" VisaLaw.com. 4 Feb. 2004. 22 Nov. 2004.
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History of Immigration in the

Words: 1811 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63539687

The debate on the immigration should be stopped and sober legislation is needed to curb the influx. American must work together to achieve this objective as we reflect our values and aspiration which bond us as a nation. it's also necessary for the state to assist the illegal immigrants who are still under shadow to come out. This would the government tot document all the immigrants which would be benefit the country economically. Assist refugees both from within and outside to help them build themselves strong economically, socially and politically. Most importantly, the protection of our borders should be more vigilant to prevent more illegal immigrants from entering the country.

Conclusion

Many studies have shown that immigrants play a very important role for the economic, social and political development of the United States. Therefore the immigration issues which affect5 the country should be handled with a lot of sobriety to…… [Read More]

Ray Marshall, Immigration for Shared Prosperity; Economic Policy Institute http://www.epi.org/publication/book_isp / (November, 2009, 14-25)

Hilda L. Solis, Immigrants and America's Future; the U.S. labor secretary offers a blueprint for immigration reform,  http://www.americasquarterly.org/node/2419  (January, 2011, 20-30)

Jay Corney, Fixing the Immigration System for America's 21st Century Economy: http://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/fixing-immigration-system-america-s-21st-century-economy (September, 2012, 1-5)
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Early Immigration 1892-1920 Hard Journey America Reasons Problems Faced

Words: 939 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20781910

American Immigration

Globally, the United States has been known as "a nation of immigrants" almost from its inception. Beginning in the 1600s with English Puritans and continuing today, America is a melting pot of culture and ethnicity. In fact, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, immigration was the major source of U.S. population growth. Looking over our 200+ years we find that to clearly be true, with approximately 1 million immigrants coming to America during the 17th and 18th century. Almost 3 million arrived during the 1860s, and another 3 million in the 1870s. In the next four decades, the number of immigrants rose to over 25 million people, most from various European nations, most arriving in New York or one of the Eastern seaports (Damon, 1981). Despite the politicization, as of 2006, the United States actually was the number one country globally to accept legal immigrants into…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Anderson, S. (2010). Immigration. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Brooks, P. (2004). Immigration. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Library.

Damon, A. (1981, December). Immigration: A Look at the Record. AmericanHeritage.com.

Retrieved from: http://www.americanheritage.com/immigration/articles / magazine/ah/1981/1/1981_1_50.shtml
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Circles Is That of 'Immigration'

Words: 1356 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38883900

(Heer, 22)

What need to be understood is the fact that the immigration problem today is a part of the general environment in which it is found, and that the traditional immigration law enforcement strategies are actually encouraging an increase in the immigrant population, rather than discourage it. When a citizen of the U.S.A. thinks of an illegal alien, with images provided by the media, in previous years, it was that of a hardworking laborer. However, after the September 11 debacle, more people than ever before see an illegal alien as a prospective terrorist. The official policy of the INS now called the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement or the BICE is to target the employers of illegal aliens. This is in order to understand and act upon the reason as to why the illegal aliens come to the United States, because it is a well-known fact that many…… [Read More]

References

Cullingworth, Barry J; Cullingworth, JB; Caves, Roger W. Planning in the U.S.A., policies, issues and processes. Routledge (UK). 2003.

Heer, David M. Undocumented Mexicans in the U.S.A.

Cambridge University Press. 1990.

House passes Bill to tighten Immigration Laws. USA Today. 17 December, 2005. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2005-12-15-immigration-usat_x.htm. Accessed 2 August, 2006
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U S Immigration Into the United

Words: 1442 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41839915

S. House that would make it a felony to be in the country illegally; the rally was just angry backlash by a criminal elements for increasing the penalties of this criminality, in their view (AP 2006). Whether or not illegal immigrants are assets to a society, if they are illegal then there must be punitive consequences for breaking this nations laws -- this is the argument that is becoming increasingly popular in anti-immigration circles.

More recently, controversy over immigration has been stirred up due to the passage of an Arizona law making being in the country illegally a state crime as well as a federal one, and requiring state and local law enforcement to take certain actions regarding verifying the legal status of immigrants that many people fear will lead to racial profiling. In addition, many public figures and politicians feel that the law itself is illegal, as it attempts…… [Read More]

References

AP. (2006). "Immigration issue draws thousands into streets." Associated press. Accessed 11 June 2010. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11442705/

CNN. (2006). "Thousands march for immigrant rights." Accessed 11 June 2010. http://www.cnn.com/2006/U.S./05/01/immigrant.day/index.html

Norwood, C. (2003). "Should state or local governments enforce federal immigration laws? Yes." ProCon.org: Illegal Immigration. Accessed 11 June 2010.  http://immigration.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=000800 

Saenz, T. (2010). "Should state or local governments enforce federal immigration laws? No." ProCon.org: Illegal Immigration. Accessed 11 June 2010.
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Anti-Immigration Policies

Words: 2898 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10045978

Sociology: Anti-Immigration Policies

-California Proposition 227 and Proposition 187-

The purpose of this paper is to research Anti-immigration policies in the United States and to further discuss California's Propositions 227 and 187 and in the critique of the literature to compare and contrast these policies while at the same time to interject originally and critical thinking from the perspective of underlying assumptions, potential weaknesses in the argument of methodological approach and further to analyze their potential value in really grasping an understanding in the immigration issue as to "second generation."

Early roots in anti-immigration sentiment were expressed in the two-dollar a head tax of immigrants in 1903 and in 1997 moving upward to four-dollars a head. "Anti-immigrant sentiment is a result of ignorance of the value of immigrants throughout the history of the United States," pointed our Michael Lin, National President of the Organization of Chinese-Americans (OCA)

During the year…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Griswold, Daniel T. (2002) Trade Policy Analysis no. 19, 2002 Oct 15 Key Points: "Willing Workers: Fixing the Problem of Illegal Mexican Migration to the United States" http://www.freetrade.org/pubs/pas/tpa-019es.html

Moore, Kenneth

Reyhner, Jon (1993) American Indian Language Policy and School Success

The Journal of Educational Issues of Language Minority Students, Volume 12, Special Issue III, Summer 1993, pp. 35-59.
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U S Immigration and Jobs

Words: 2300 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47887463

"

It is also believed by some that there are particular parts of the country, population areas or other niches where immigration is more problematic than others. However, studies have also found this to mostly untrue. Even in particular areas of the economy, the evidence of a negative effect of immigrants on natives is limited. An overview of studies by Passel of the Urban Institute (1994) found that "The majority find no more evidence of displacement than is revealed by the aggregate data. Even studies of more highly skilled occupations, (e.g., registered nurses), find no strong evidence of displacement."

In the future, in fact, the immigrant population will be even more advantageous to the American labor market. Immigrants will fill niches at the high and low ends of the spectrum. As the U.S. population continues to age, many skilled workers and professionals will retire and leave openings for employers to…… [Read More]

References

Bean, F., E. Telles, and B. Lowell. "Undocumented migration to the United States: perceptions and evidence." Population and Development Review. 13.4: (1987), 676-90.

Brookings Institute. Immigrants meet the area's labor needs.

Issue No. 15: (September 2000), Washington,.D.C.

Center for Governmental Services at Auburn University. 2004, October.
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Homeland Security Issue of Immigration

Words: 2233 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96169092

Workplace enforcement includes the scrutiny of the I-9 form and the attached documents, in an attempt to discover identity fraud, fraudulent documents, and illegal workplace activities.

Illegal firearms.

Another aspect of illegal immigration is weapons. Illegal immigrants bring guns and other weapons across the border, but there is also a growing trade in illegal firearms, obtained in the United States, traveling back into Mexico and being used in criminal activities there, especially by powerful drug cartels. The annual report states, "ICE launched Operation Armas Cruzadas in FY08 to provide a targeted law enforcement focus on arms smuggling between the United States and Mexico" (Torres, 2009). The problem has gotten so bad that the U.S. issued warnings to travelers to stay away from the country during the recent spring break season. The agency has had some success with stopping cross-border smuggling activities, but they have not had as much success as…… [Read More]

References

Cox, A.B., & Posner, E.A. (2007). The second-order structure of immigration law. Stanford Law Review, 59(4), 809+.

Dillin, J. (2006). How Eisenhower solved illegal border crossings from Mexico. Christian Science Monitor.

Green, T.C., & Ciobanu, I.M. (2006). Deputizing - and then prosecuting - America's businesses in the fight against illegal immigration. American Criminal Law Review, 43(3), 1203+.

Headley, B. (2006). Giving critical context to the deportee phenomenon. Social Justice, 33(1), 40+.
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Padilla v Kentucky and Immigration What Does the Future Hold

Words: 4247 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48812001

Padilla v. Kentucky: Implications for U.S. Immigration

This paper provides a review of the relevant literature concerning the case, Padilla v. Kentucky,[footnoteef:1] discussing citizenship, and similar predicaments in other countries. It is this paper's thesis that the decision in Padilla has significant implications for defense lawyers who must now become familiar with the complexities of immigration law or retain counsel to assist them in this area. Established in Strickland v. Washington, the test for ineffective assistance of counsel is comprised of two parts: (1) defendants must first show that their counsel was constitutionally deficient and (2) show that the deficiency prejudiced the result of their case.[footnoteef:2] In addition, cases involving guilty pleas require defendants to demonstrate that in the absence of deficient counsel, they would have insisted on a trial.[footnoteef:3] Furthermore, defendants also enjoy the Due Process Clause protections that require judges and defendants to engage in a conversation concerning…… [Read More]

References

Atkins, K. (2010). Defense Counsel's Duty to Warn About . . . Everything? Lawyers Weekly USA, November 8.

Borden, Jeremy Immigrants Take Guilty Pleas without Lawyers, Face Deportation, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, A-6, (February 3, 2013).

Brief for States of Louisiana et al. 2009: 9; Padilla v. Kentucky.

Brink, Malia A Gauntlet Thrown: The Transformative Potential of Padilla V. Kentucky. 39 Fordham Urban Law 1, 39 (November 2011).
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Immigration Essay

Words: 3539 Length: Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: Array

Opening Paragraph:

In this Immigration essay, we will offer some sample titles, topics, an outline, and structure that you can use to improve your writing. The start of any good essay is an interesting topic statement followed by a succinct and descriptive thesis statement. The Thesis statement acts as the direction from which a reader takes when examining the body and conclusion. Body paragraphs should include a background on the topic and sub topics addressing each part of the thesis statement. The conclusion is a brief recap of what was covered.

Titles:

Immigration in the United States
Past and Present Immigration Patterns in the United States
Lost and Found: Immigration in the United States
Selected Title: The Birth of a Nation: Immigration

Topics:

History of Immigration
Immigration Patterns in the United States
Contemporary Immigration
Effects of Immigration

Outline:

I.  Introduction
II.  Body
     1. Background  
     2. Immigration…… [Read More]

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Immigration Welfare Policy

Words: 1153 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58565067

Immigrant Welfare Policy Summary & Critique

Immigration into the United States has historically come in waves, with the current upward trend beginning in 1965 and gaining steam through the 1980s, to the point where nearly one million immigrants a year, on average, have been admitted to the United States throughout the 1990s and the current decade. any of these newer immigrant gained legal status as U.S. citizens through back or side doors, such as entering the country with a temporary visa and then applying for citizenship, or even seeking citizenship after living as an illegal immigrant for some years. Such side-door entry has had a significant impact not only on the number of immigrants made citizens each year, but also on the ability of these immigrants to adequately provide for themselves and their families without depending on federal assistance.

This has inextricably tied the issue of immigration to that of…… [Read More]

Martin and Midgley (2006) do not really present an argument in their paper, but rather an overview of the current immigration situation. The same is largely true of Currie's article concerning Medicaid (1997). Both of these articles detail the complexities ofteh problems this country is facing, but fail to provide any sense of appropriate direction. Martin and Midgley especially merely detail the trends that have been observed in immigration, without offering any real solutions on how to deal with the ongoing immigration explosion. In suggesting that we could be experiencing a historical immigration peak before dipping into the trough the follows, the authors reaffirm their own conclusions without providing any immediately useful value judgments. The converse, however -- that is, behaving as though this were not a peak but simply a new trend in immigration -- renders the rest of their historical argument moot.

Currie provides somewhat more useful exploration and analysis of the conclusions he draws from his hard data. Yet while clearly suggesting that Medicaid reform is necessary in regards to immigrants, if only to make the program more equitable across regional, familial, and ethnic lines, he fails to note the added costs of medical care for children and other immigrants who are either not eligible for or are not receiving Medicaid benefits. There is a brief mention in the editor's note of emergency costs outstripping preventative care, but more in depth explanations and analyses are needed to make this argument logically viable (which it certainly is).

The shorter articles that comprise this reading deal with specific areas of the immigration aid issue in similarly quantitative ways, while rarely mentioning the qualitative aspects or making recommendations. The logic used is impeccable, but the scant number of real conclusions drawn in these articles does not make this especially impressive. For instance, while Ku (2001) and Capps et al. (2005) respectively note the lower rates of heath insurance amongst immigrants and the lower success rates of immigrant children in the No Child Left Behind Act, neither provides information regarding a response to these issues other than suggesting that reform is necessary. The same is true of Ruby's (2004) article concerning the need to ensure success for children in the early years of formal schooling. Few would argue that things like health insurance and adequate education are less beneficial or necessary to immigrants than they are to U.S. citizens; the questions is who ought to -- and who is wiling to -- pay for these things. This country has always had an interesting relationship with the concept of taxation, and this issue lies at the heart of the matter.
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proposed immigration bill

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28247557

Introduction

A lot gets lost in the current debates over immigration in the United States. When we regurgitate what we hear on the news or on Facebook, we fail to think deeply or critically about the issues. This nation is a settler nation; of that there is no doubt. European settlers displaced, forcibly removed, betrayed, and in many cases killed indigenous people whose land this was for centuries before.

Those same Europeans cultivated a sense of entitlement to these lands, pushing farther and farther west until they hit yet another ocean. And they did not even stop there. They pressed onwards, eventually taking over the Polynesian kingdom of Hawaii. During the era of Manifest Destiny, Americans also encroached upon and had war with Mexico, and it would appear that many Americans have forgotten that much of our southwestern lands were once Mexican territories too. This is reality. This is history.…… [Read More]

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history of immigration in united'states

Words: 1035 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95923964

American immigration policy and population patterns have changed in response to labor demands and economic forces, as well as shifts in American identity and social norms. Global forces have also shaped immigration patterns over the past hundred years. Anti-immigration sentiments have also strongly influenced immigration policies, with the most notable examples from a century ago being the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the Nativist movement of the 1920s (Young 1). Similar Nativist sentiments bubbled to the surface during the Trump administration, clouding constructive discourse on the role and status of immigrants in the United States, and the fundamental functions of immigration policy.

Although the United States was always a settler nation, immigration trends changed in the early 20th century. Immigrants from Southern Europe and Eastern Europe started to pour in before the First World War, pushed by economic uncertainties and outright poverty and pulled by the promise of readymade…… [Read More]

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National'security Impact of Immigration Policy

Words: 2727 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39707617

Immigration Policies as a Tool for National Security

Of late, societal apprehension towards immigrants, criminal behavior, and terrorism have intensified, giving rise to concerns regarding the American migrant system’s efficacy in maintaining the safety of the nation’s people. Recent events revolving around crimes, weaponry crossing national boundaries and foreign- born people has triggered a series of reactions with the most intense ones demanding a sealing of borders, barring migration for individuals hailing from high- risk foreign territories, and putting a stop to refugee resettlement.

Theory of Migration

Migration represents mankind’s story from the outset to the current age. It has its roots in mankind’s adventure- seeking spirit and quest to follow one’s dreams. The growth in individuals undertaking perilous, cross- border journeys across the globe dates back to the world’s Stone Age. Statistical figures reveal several millions continually moving from their motherland in search of more superior living conditions and opportunities at performing…… [Read More]

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Rand Paul on Immigration as

Words: 1897 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92795109



Rather than violating the rights of medical practitioners, is it not a better idea simply to break the trusts that make health care so unaffordable? I agree there should be real reform -- but we should not be satisfied with phony reform.

Rand Paul's policy on health care puts the issue in a singular light. First, he draws distinction between real health care reform and phony reform. Real reform, he states would emphasize free market economics and would allow consumers to buy health insurance from providers from a wider spectrum rather than from the artificially manipulate market that we see today. As Paul says, state and federal laws place restrictions and exactly who can buy what from where -- and this is the real heart of the problem because it allows health insurance companies to charge higher and higher premiums and places greater and greater restrictions and demands on medical…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Tenant, Michael. "Rand Paul. Right to Healthcare is 'Slavery'." The New American.

2011. Web. 3 Apr 2012.

Paul, Rand. "Can Healthcare Reform Affect the Economy?" Rand Paul U.S. Senate.

2009. Web. 3 Apr 2012.
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Canadian Immigration Issues Canada's Immigration

Words: 1785 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21325209

Moreover, multiculturalism is alive and well in Canada today; to wit, foreign-born Canadian citizens are "over-represented in the fields of mathematics and physical science, the health professions, sciences and technologies," Thompson concludes, as well as in the fields of engineering and applied sciences.

orks Cited

Boyd, Monica. 1976. Immigration Policies and Trends: A Comparison of Canada and the United States. Demography 13 (1): 83-104.

Canadian Council for Refugees. 2001. A hundred years of immigration to Canada 1900-1999:

chronology focusing on refugees and discrimination. Retrieved March 20, 2007 at http://www.web.net/~ccr/history.html.

CIC Canada. 2001. The Role of Transportation in Canadian Immigration 1900-2000. Retrieved March 20, 2007 at http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/transport/chap-3b.html.

Patrias, Carmela. 2000. The Making of the Mosaic: A History of Canadian Immigration Policy

By Ninette Kelley; Michael Trebilcock. The American Historical Review 105 (2): 532-533.

The Canadian Encyclopedia. 2003. Immigration. Retrieved march 20, 2007 at http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com.

Thompson, John Herd; & einfeld, Morton. 1995.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boyd, Monica. 1976. Immigration Policies and Trends: A Comparison of Canada and the United States. Demography 13 (1): 83-104.

Canadian Council for Refugees. 2001. A hundred years of immigration to Canada 1900-1999:

chronology focusing on refugees and discrimination. Retrieved March 20, 2007 at http://www.web.net/~ccr/history.html.

CIC Canada. 2001. The Role of Transportation in Canadian Immigration 1900-2000. Retrieved March 20, 2007 at http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/transport/chap-3b.html.
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American Healthcare Reform There Are

Words: 537 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87854178



Second, the fact that medical costs are billed to health insurance companies is responsible for an industry-wide culture of financial irresponsibility where little concern is given to avoiding unnecessary or duplicated costs of healthcare services (Kennedy, 2006; eid, 2009). Unfortunately, political opposition to healthcare reform throughout 2009 made it impossible for the Obama administration to achieve this essential goal but it is likely that the current system cannot be sustained without bankrupting the nation.

One of the main reasons that there is so much political opposition to meaningful healthcare reform in the U.S. is precisely because current laws permit excessive influence by special interest groups in Washington (Kennedy, 2006; eid, 2009). Specifically, the private for-profit health insurance industry alone accounts for as many as 5 industry lobbyists per elected government legislator in Washington. By pledging financial support to political campaigns in return for opposition to any legislative reforms that could…… [Read More]

References

Kennedy E. (2006). America: Back on Track. Viking: New York.

Reid T. (2009). The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care. New York: Penguin Group.
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Illegal Immigration Amnesty for Illegal

Words: 1751 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88949512

Many peoples' lives, destinies, and hopes for the future, and not only American ones, depend and will depend in the future on this taking place sooner rather than later, and now more than ever before in America's history.

orks Cited

Illegal Immigration." ikipedia. 4 May 2007. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_immigration.html>.

Espenshade, Thomas J. "Unauthorized Immigration to the United States" Annual

Review of Sociology. 21 (1995). 195-200.

Flores, illiam V. "New Citizens, New Rights: Undocumented Immigrants and Latino Cultural Citizenship" Latin American Perspectives. 2003. 30(2). 87-

http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=b2579269c3c901ad0ae85bd42dd2920d" Love Unites Them, La Migra Separates Them." El observador, 30 Nov. 2006. http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id= b2579269c3c901ad0ae85bd42dd2920d.html>.

Morgan, Edmund S. The Puritan Dilemma: The Story of John inthrop. New York: Longman 2nd Edition, November 20, 1998.

Snyder, Tanya. http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.elsalvador11jan11,0,460257.story?coll=bal-oped-headlinesTo Slow Immigration from El Salvador, Understand its Causes."

Baltimore Sun, 11 Jan. 2007. http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion oped/bal-op.elsalvador11jan11,0,460257.story?coll=bal-oped-headlines.

Young Migrants Risk All to Reach U.S." ashington Post. 28 Aug 2006.

A http:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08

27/AR2006082700771.html>.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Illegal Immigration." Wikipedia. 4 May 2007. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_immigration.html>.

Espenshade, Thomas J. "Unauthorized Immigration to the United States" Annual

Review of Sociology. 21 (1995). 195-200.

Flores, William V. "New Citizens, New Rights: Undocumented Immigrants and Latino Cultural Citizenship" Latin American Perspectives. 2003. 30(2). 87-