Industrial Revolution Essays (Examples)

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Industrial Capitalism and Imperialism Throughout

Words: 2253 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1397342

In the 20th century, both of these tactics were utilized to successfully gain independence for a number of countries. (Conrad 83 -- 149) (Hochschild 101 -- 164) (Gainty)

However, Africans also helped European efforts. This was accomplished by many individuals becoming actively involved in: the political, economic and military structure. Over the course of time, these activities divided entire nations against one another. Once this took place, is when the European powers were able to exercise greater amounts of control over its colonies. (Conrad 83 -- 149) (Hochschild 101 -- 164) (Gainty)

hat was the impact of European colonialism (overseas acquisition up to approximately the mid-1700s) and imperialism (overseas acquisition from the mid-1700s) in Africa?

The impact European colonialism was to exercise direct control over entire regions. This was a part of an effort to increase their access to natural resources. Moreover, many of these colonies were established based upon…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. Hamondsworth: Penguine, 1975. Print.

Duiker, William. The Essential World History. Boston: Wadsworth Learning, 2011. Print.

Engels, Frederic. The Condition of the Working Class in England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Print.

Gainty, Denis. Sources of World Societies. Boston: St. Martins, 2009. Print.
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Revolutions the History of Modern Human Civilization

Words: 925 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88844686

evolutions

The history of modern human civilization reflects the gradual evolution of thoughts, ideas, political reform, and technological progress. At various times, specific periods of change were important enough to have been recorded as revolutions. Some of the most significant of these revolutions contributed to human history and societal development individually as well as in conjunction with other simultaneous or nearly simultaneous changes.

The Scientific evolution was responsible for fundamental changes in the understanding of the physical world, chemistry, biology, and of human anatomy and physiology. The French evolution represented the recognition of the fundamental rights of citizens to fairness and humane consideration on the part of their respective monarchical governments. The Industrial evolution increased the availability of information and provided new modes of transportation and mechanical processes that radically changed the lives of large numbers of people throughout Europe and the North American continent.

The Scientific evolution

The Scientific…… [Read More]

References

Bentley, Jerry H. Traditions & Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past (4th

Edition). McGraw-Hill: New York. 2005.

Kishlansky, Mark; Geary, Patrick; and O' Brien, Patricia. Civilization in the West.

Penguin Academic Edition (Combined Volume) Penguin: New York. 2009.
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Industrial Capitalism in the U S

Words: 653 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62931122



Essentially, parenting styles changed dramatically and began to allow children for relative independence vs. relative inter-dependence that was seen before the implementation of industrial capitalism. This move far from traditional agricultural-based family structures lessened the degree of inter-dependence within the family and more towards individual independence within the larger family structure. Mothers and fathers were off working in the factories, leaving them as much less a part of every element of their children's lives. This left children home alone more often, forcing them to find their own relative independence outside the realm of their parents' supervision. Additionally, when children, when required to work, would work outside the context of the home in factories, where there was less supervision from parents. Thus, there was a greater focus on individual needs and individual lives, rather than the more familial unit thinking that was so prevalent before the Industrial Revolution took place.

This…… [Read More]

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American Society in the Industrial Age

Words: 422 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57250512

Industrial Age, sparked by innovations in technology, estward expansion, and the subsequent discovery of massive amounts of raw materials, dramatically altered the nature of American society. hat was formerly a rural and largely agrarian culture rapidly grew into an increasingly urbanized and industrial one. Improvements in transportation infrastructure through the railroads enabled the movements of goods and of people over long distances. Therefore, one of the key ways industrialization changed American society was by making Americans more interconnected via a network of transportation and communications systems. Small farms gave way to large, cash crop farms as individuals looked to the new factories and to the cities for work. Agricultural produce could be shipped over large distances eliminating the need for each family to have its own farm.

The industrial Age altered gender relations. omen worked on family farms, but after the Industrial Age, many women worked outside the home, in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carnes and Garraty. "American Society in the Industrial Age: Introduction." The American Nation: A History of the United States. 11th Edition. Pearson, Longman, 2005. Retrieved 21 July 2005 online from http://wps.ablongman.com/long_carnes_an_11/0,7137,251699-,00.html

'Industrial Revolution." Wikipedia.com. 21 July 2005. Retrieved online 21 July 2005 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution

"Post-Civil War Industrialism: The New Industrial Age." 2005. U-S-History.com. Retrieved 21 July 2005 online at  http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h860.html
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Looking Into the Revolutions in History

Words: 1333 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97880375

Industrial evolution was one of the momentous eras in history. The Industrial evolution had an impact on all levels of society as it instigated the change from an agriculture-and-handicrafts focused economy to one replaced by industries, machines, and large-scale manufacturing. The positive impacts are evident in the manner the goods and products are manufactured and the improvements in the way of living in all classes of societies across the world. However, it is important to point out is that the Industrial evolution has had negative influences as well. To begin with, the level of pollution increased in magnitude never seen before, affecting the environment adversely. Another shortcoming was the decrease in earnings along with significant deterioration in working conditions. There was also a proliferation of the number of working children and women, which negatively affected family structures.[footnoteef:2] The positives, on the other hand, include great advances in technology, increased level…… [Read More]

References

Hobsbawm, Eric. Age of revolution: 1789-1848. Hachette UK, 2010.

King, Steven., Timmins, Geoferry. Making Sense of the Industrial Revolution: English Economy and Society 1700-1850. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2001.

Overton, Mark. Agricultural Revolution in England: The Transformation of the Agrarian economy 1500 -1850. Canbridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Scheina, Robert L. Latin America's Wars: The Age of the Caudillo, 1791-1899. 2003: Washington: Brassey's, Inc.
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Revolutions Ogburn Identifies Four Social Revolutions That

Words: 618 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82868789

Revolutions

Ogburn identifies four social revolutions that have occurred as the result of new technologies. The first was the move from the hunter-gathered model to pastoralism or horticulturalism, where people settled either to raise animals or to grow plants for food. Technologies for hunting or agriculture made such moves possible. As we were able to learn enough about food production to remain in one place for extended periods, we chose to do so.

The next step was the move to an agrarian society. Using both animals and machinery, we were able to make significant improvements in food production, not just for food but for other uses as well. This allowed for much greater population density, as well as excess production for winter months. The third social revolution was the development of the industrial society. Machinery that dramatically increased productivity brought about industrial society, which incorporated a stronger division of labor.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Boundless.com. (2007). The four social revolutions. Boundless.com. Retrieved April 13, 2013 from https://www.boundless.com/sociology/understanding-social-change/sources-social-change/four-social-revolutions/

Boundless.com. (2007). Ogburn's theory. Boundless.com. Retrieve April 13, 2013 from https://www.boundless.com/sociology/understanding-social-change/sources-social-change/ogburn-s-theory/
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Revolutions of the Early 20th

Words: 1186 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56653730

" The revolution was also responsible for establishing "conditions for an era of economic development. Capitalist development had begun in Mexico prior to the revolution, but it had been constrained by the power of the large landholders and lacked the sponsorship of an active, development-oriented state (MacEwan)."

During the 1920s and 1930s, the modern Mexican state "came to embody the dual heritage of the Mexican revolution, representing and containing the interests of Mexico's working people and also leading a process of capitalist development by actively intervening in the country's economic life, resulting in a highly nationalist state. The revolution had in part been a reaction to the power of foreign investors, and nationalist policies struck a popular chord (MacEwan)."

In order for the country's economy to experience its total growth potential, it was essential that Mexican capital receive "support for the state and protection from foreign competition (MacEwan)."

Russia's Revolution…… [Read More]

Works Cited

MacEwan, Arthur. Banishing the Mexican Revolution. Monthly Review. (1991): 01 November.

The Path to Revolution. (accessed 12 October, 2004). http://www.interknowledge.com/russia/rushis06.htm).

Unknown. India. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. (2004): 22 April.
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Industrial Development in Europe and

Words: 2583 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34483053

But he failed and started cooperating with real leaders - owners of huge industrial monopolies. To get rid of small businessmen organization (SA) Hitler murdered their leader Ernst Rem and some other leaders.

That's why fascists changed their political program.

Any national property was controlled by state, but in fact - rich monopolists. Hitler created extremely effective General department of property (head - Krupp and Siemens).

The largest corporation in the country belonged to German Gering. It was that huge because it received Jews' property and later - property which was captured in states- victims of German foreign policy. German leaders started regulating prices as it was in USSR or USA during New Line.

Agriculture was also controlled by the state. Agricultural production was controlled and every farmer had to sell it to the state (by the way, prices were also regulated by state).

So, all German private property got…… [Read More]

6. Georgi Zhukov From Moscow to Berlin: Marshall Zhukov's Greatest Battles Noontide Pr 1991.

7. Montefiore, Simon Sebag Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar Dixie 1993

8. J.Simon, M. Miller. World Economics WestPrint 1988
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Service Revolution in Comparison to

Words: 379 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79515985

The Service evolution is once again changing the way the world does business.

Just like the Industrial evolution, business will never be the same again. These manufacturing-based economies of the 19th and 20th centuries have been transformed into service-based economies. and, just as during the Industrial evolution, the Service evolution has seen mass-production becoming an integral part of business, however now it is mass-production of services, as opposed to mass-production of goods.

The results will also be the same for this new evolution.

As mentioned, during the Industrial evolution, artisans and craftsmen fell by the wayside. In the Service evolution, firms that have once been masters of building relationships one at a time will fall prey to those who are able to provide high quality service at a greater efficiency and a lower cost.

eferences

Bitner, M., Booms, B., & Tetreault, M. (1990). The service encounter: Diagnosing favorable and unfavorable…… [Read More]

References

Bitner, M., Booms, B., & Tetreault, M. (1990). The service encounter: Diagnosing favorable and unfavorable incidents. Journal of Marketing, 23. Retrieved July 21, 2005, from Business Source Premier database.

Gremler, D., & Gwinner, K. (2000). Customer-employee rapport in service relationships. Journal of Service Research, 3(1). Retrieved July 21, 2005, from Business Source Premier database.

Service revolution in comparison to industrial revolution
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Expectations Change That Led Revolution Compare Contrast

Words: 1395 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39994858

Expectations Change That Led evolution

Compare Contrast Expectations Change Led evolution 1917/Civil War ealities

How the ideological changes that accompanied the revolution shaped the arts/culture of ussia/USS

The social and economic systems experienced tremendous transitions occasioning to stress among the populations of ussia. The great reforms formed a cautious path to modernization and reform. Through emancipation, peasants were allowed to own pieces of land and had the personal freedom to share their pieces of land. However, these peasants were not happy with the settlement programs based on emancipation because they held the belief that they were legal owners of the land. This claim became a major source of discontent leading to the 1917 peasant revolution (Sampson & Marienhoff, 2008).

ussia experienced a turning point at the onset of 1917; the nation was prepared for revolution and indeed, they saw the first revolution, which brought rapid changes and increased social opportunities.…… [Read More]

References

Rossman, V. (2010). Russian intellectual antisemitism in the post-Communist era. Lincoln, Neb:

Sampson, R.J., & Marienhoff, I. (2008). The American economy: Analysis, issues, principles.

Boston: Houghton Mifflin

University of Pittsburgh., & American Political Science Association. (2005). United States political science documents. Pittsburgh: University Center for International Studies,
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Social Implications of the Industrial

Words: 2180 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83223618



On the other hand, one lesson of the Industrial Revolution is that human suffering and exploitation can never be used as a coin with which to pay for material progress or wealth. Likewise, the Industrial Revolution teaches that neither the welfare of the contemporary wealthy and fortunate, nor even the future well-being of subsequent generations is ever justified as the fruits of the suffering of other human beings.

In retrospect, the progression from agrarian to industrial economies need not have required the degree of suffering with which it was, unfortunately, associated, particularly in the nineteenth century. The best evidence for this proposition seems to be the efforts, most of which were successful, on the part of Bismark, in Germany, while workers suffered greater hardships, by comparison, in the rest of the newly industrialized world. Greed and callousness, is, unfortunately, characteristic of many elements of human life, which was not necessarily…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burchell, S.D. (1968) Age of Progress.

Time Life: UK

Faissler, M., Hayes, C. (1966) Modern Times: Mainstreams of Civilization.

Macmillan: New York
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Computer Revolution the Effects of

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76537053

It is safe to say that the computer revolution has so dramatically changed the manner in which academics and novices work. "...the uses of information technology are diverse; as data have to be processed, and as word data are laborious to process, and as several powerful packages for data analysis and processing exist, researchers will find it useful to make full use of computing facilities.

Cohen, Manion, and Morrison 155)

The results of the computer revolution, in their entirety have yet to be fully realized but the manner in which it has changed and continues to change research is fundamental to the way it will continue to change education. Seekers of truth may find it difficult to weed through the massive amounts of information but organizing large volumes of knowledge into relatively small spaces reiterates the vastness of the world and with the right skills and training can revolutionize thought.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Ray C. "The Next Industrial Revolution." Forum for Applied Research and Public Policy 15.4 (2000): 23.

Cohen, Louis, Lawrence Manion, and Keith Morrison. Research Methods in Education. London: Routledge Falmer, 2000.

Halal, William E., and Jay Liebowitz. "Telelearning: The Multimedia Revolution in Education." The Futurist Nov.-Dec. 1994: 21.

Papert, Seymour. The Children's Machine: Rethinking School in the Age of the Computer. New York: Basic Books, 1993.
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Living in the Industrial 21ST Century Society

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30356823

Living in the Industrial (21st Century) Society

One of the most revolutionary events and changes that happened in all of the world's societies is the emergence of the Industrial Revolution during the turn of the 21st century. During this period, human civilization moved from a communal form of living to a highly-industrialized society, wherein commodities and the needs of people became readily available in quantity because of the invention of machineries and the process of mass production. With the growth and development that the Industrial Revolution has brought to the world societies, many people have lived in what now we call as the 'capitalist societies,' and the backbone of most people's living and income comes from the rule of economics and providing people with the means to acquire their wants and needs. This, perhaps, is the most important characteristic that the Industrial or Capitalist society brought to human civilization, that…… [Read More]

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Pre-Industrial & Industrial Europe When

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69481679



Given that the workers, even the women and children, were working long extended hours everyday, resulted to limited family communication with the merely instance that they are all at home was when they went home to rest and sleep after working very hard. There were also instances when several families would need to share lodging with other families that promoted the division of the family as one unit. Consequently, the children were given minimal amount of education, child labor also resulted to make the children experience underdeveloped in height as well as weak and always ill. Children have grown to become rather emotionally unstable, for they were never learned how to behave the right manner. The living conditions were really awful; as mentioned earlier, the working families would often reside in slums with little or no sanitation. On the other hand, there were also positive transformation in Europe during the…… [Read More]

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American Revolution

Words: 2801 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79109

But it certainly was a crucial step in he legitimation of free labor" (141).

eligion in general and revivals especially eased the pains of capitalist expansion in the early 19th century U.S. After Finney was gone, the converted reformers evangelized the working class; they supported poor churches and built new ones in working class neighborhoods. Finney's revival was effective since it dissected all class boundaries and united middle and working class individuals in churches. The middle class went to church, because of the moral obligation to do so; the working classes went, because they were concerned about losing their. Workers who did not become members of churches had more difficulty keeping their jobs. To succeed in ochester, it was astute for the employees to become active churchgoers.

In 1791, not much before the Native Americans began their trek across the country and ochester, New York, was changing its employee/merchant system,…… [Read More]

References

Gilje, Paul a., ed. The Wages of Independence: Capitalism in the Early American Republic. Madison, WI: Madison House, 1997

Johnson, Paul E. A Shopkeeper's Millennium: Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, New York: Hill and Wang, 2004.

McCusker, J.J. And Menard, R.R., the Economy of British America, 1607-1789, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985.

Slaughter, Thomas. R. Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution, New York, Oxford Press, 1986.
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Organization Awards Since the Industrial

Words: 716 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14256811

This suggests that people act fairly in part because of what they think may be the result of other people's reaction to the self-serving behavior. People appreciate distributive equity that further supports their personal circumstances. On the other hand, more recently, social scientists, such as Miller (1999) have argued that people do care about justice and behave with justice-seeking behavior instead of this more selfish self-interest. In other words, there is no overall behavior that is common to all people.

As noted in ischer et al. (2007), what motivates employees has normally been studied in laboratory settings, which is an artificial approach. or, the better alternative, studies have asked employees about their thoughts concerning the company's allocation policies. As noted, it is important to know what employees actually perceive instead of what decision makers intend to do. Thus, ischer's research focused on employees' perceptions of the allocation decisions made by…… [Read More]

Fischer, R., Smith, PB., Richey, B et al. 2007 "How Do Organizations Allocate Rewards?"

Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, vol 38, no 1, pp 3-18.

Miller, DT 1999. "The norm of self-interest," American Psychologist, vol 54, pp.1053-1060.
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Shift From Agrarian to Industrial Society a

Words: 2693 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96774589

shift from agrarian to industrial society a simple substitution of one form of economic behavior for another, hanging up the hat of the farmer to put on the hat of the factory worker. But there was in fact a substantial shift in nearly everything about daily life for those generations caught up in the transition from rural to urban worlds. The most obvious change was in the relationship between people and the land itself. No longer were people defined by their place of birth, by where they had always lived. They were defined - by others as well as themselves - by a series of portable skills.

The magnitude of this change is difficult for those of us who have grown up in a world in which mobility is the norm. But it must have been for those living at the beginning of the Industrial evolution a shattering (as well…… [Read More]

References

Bensel, R. (2001). The political economy of American industrialization, 1877-1900.

Cambridge: Cambridge University.

Carter, G. (ed.). (2000). Empirical approaches to sociology: A collection of classic and contemporary readings (3rd ed.). New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Durkheim, E. (G. Simpson, trans.). (1971). "Social Order and Control Via Close Social Ties: The Example of Suicide" in Suicide: A study in sociology. New York: The Free Press.
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Looking Into the Social Revolution 1945 to 1990

Words: 3077 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21093926

Social Revolution 1945 to 1990

Eric Hobsbawm's writing style was that of a historian. Nevertheless, his objective was always: adding to political action and thought, which he accomplished more effectively through this book than all his other works. Retrospectively, the author discovered that global socialism's challenge to the capitalist idea had a strength which was its opponent's weakness. Also, in truth, a large number of individuals who backed socialism sincerely to the very end held a belief, for long, that socialism's political yzantinism, bureaucratic rigidities, and mass murders would eventually be overcome, and that the above horrors were responsible for ensuring capitalism remained afloat. The weaknesses of the socialist theory were underrated, while those of the capitalist theory were overvalued. In effect, the world was convinced in its belief that capitalism was unable to solve issues, while socialism could tackle their own issues. However, the latter issues were deep-rooted rather…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Araghi, F. A., 1995. Global Depeasantization, 1945-1990. The Sociological Quarterly, 36(2), pp. 337-368.

Berman, S., 2011. Understanding Social Democracy. Columbia University, pp. 2-38.

Freedman, L., 1997. Review of The Age of Extremes: The Short Twentieth Century, 1914-1991. [Online]

Available at: http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/28
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Changes in Warfare from End of French Revolution

Words: 1611 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45292806

New Technology/Changes in Warfare from End of French Revolution/Napoleonic Wars to American Civil War eginning

Warfare Change in Technology

In France, reforms began after the great Seven-Year-long war. The war ended in French calamity in1763. Evidently, it was important to have reforms to field soldiers that could fight for French interests and honor. The government suggested that light infantry should be increased. This later brought about initiatives for conventional infantry training in techniques for light infantry. This training created soldiers that could fight both in open and close order. The multiple gun calibers used by the artillery unit were taken away; and they were left with only four varieties. There were new guns, which were more portable and lighter than the earlier ones. The new guns featured standardized segments and enclosed rounds. Lidell-Hart stated that according to Jean du Teil, "light mobile guns for use in the field when used…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gibson. "Napoleon and the Grande Armee: Military Innovations Leading to a Revolution in 19th Century Military Affairs." Accessed November 9, 2016.  http://www.napoleon-series.org/military/organization/c_rma.html .

History.com. "Civil War Technology." 2010. Accessed November 9, 2016.http://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/civil-war-technology.

Scholastic. "Strategy and Tactics, Military." Accessed November 9, 2016.http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/strategy-and-tactics-military.

Zapotoczny, Walter. "The Impact of the Industrial Revolution On Warfare." Accessed November 9, 2016. http://www.wzaponline.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/docs/Inductrialrevolution.292125935.pdf.
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History of Human Civilization the Scientific Revolution

Words: 2161 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52464720

history of human civilization, the Scientific evolution emerged during the 17th century, which happened right after the enaissance Period. The Scientific evolution is the period in history wherein scientific methods and results where arrived at using experimentation and the use of scientific instruments such as the telescope, microscope, and thermometer (Microsoft Encarta 2002). The Scientific evolution is attributed to Galileo Galilei, who proposed that the universe and its elements can be explained mathematically, while subsisting to the fact the Sun is the center of the solar system. During the enaissance Period, Nicolaus Copernicus had declared that the Sun is the center of the solar system, but his declaration is only descriptive, while Galileo's declaration is verified through experimentation and the scientific method. This important distinction is the main reason why Galileo's time was considered the Scientific evolution, primarily because it uses the scientific method of research and experimentation.

Studies and…… [Read More]

References

Baber, Z. "Canada Research Chair in Science, Technology, and Social Change." 6 February 2003. University of Saskatchewan Web site. 16 April 2003 http://www.usask.ca/crc/profiles/baber.php.

History of Astronomy." Microsoft Encarta Reference Library 2002. Microsoft Inc. 1998.

Kaiser, T. "French Revolution." Microsoft Encarta Reference Library 2002. Microsoft Inc. 1998.

Shaffer, B. "Chaos in Space." 7 February 2003. LewRockwell Web site. 16 April 2003 http://www.lewrockwell.com.
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Sociological Views of the Division of Labor in Nineteenth Century Industrial Capitalism

Words: 1364 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77256521

Marx/Durkheim/Simmel

At the time of the Industrial Revolution, philosophy had already dealt substantially with the notion of "division of labour" although the terminology was slightly different. Our modern sense of the division of labour is, of course, largely derived from nineteenth century industrial capitalism, and it was based on this paradigm that sociological thinkers like Marx, Durkheim, and Simmel would analyze the phenomenon. But we might note by way of introduction that they were inheriting an earlier tradition that emerged from earlier pre-industrial forms of capitalism, what began to emerge in England in the Elizabethan period and thereafter. Thus the Elizabethan idea of a "great chain of being" -- which posited an order and hierarchy to social relationships -- would gradually come to be altered by thinkers like Thomas Hobbes and Bernard Mandeville. By the early eighteenth century, Mandeville would lay down the basic principles of an idea of division…… [Read More]

Works Cited.

Coser, Lewis. Masters of Sociological Thought. Second Edition. Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press, 2003. Print.
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Wine and Fermentation in Pre-Industrial

Words: 946 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83019039

asically, without yeast which creates the alcohol, there would be no wine, at least not with an alcoholic base.

The progress of fermentation can be monitored or controlled in several ways. The most simple method is to observe the activity in the fermentation vessel. Sometimes in a laboratory setting, fermentation is often followed by weighing the fermentation vessel at various intervals which results in a record of the weight of carbon dioxide gas lost and exactly how much sugar remains in the vessel. The most popular form of control is a measurement of the density of a sample of the fermenting juice which can be accomplished by using a hydrometer which measures the remaining sugar's percentage in weight.

As to the taste of wine that results form this complex series of chemical manipulations by a chemist or fermentation specialist, the time required for complete fermentation of grape juice, either white…… [Read More]

Bibliography

History of Wine." Ewineplanet.com. Internet. 2007. Retrieved at http://ewineplanet.

Com/menu.asp?id=1.
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America Revolution

Words: 1417 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98186320

stand on the same level as the French Revolution or the Russian Revolution of 1917, because the changes that it implied were not achieved by the thorough bloodshed that these two encountered, there were many keen to develop the subject of radicalism in the American Revolution, mainly through the changes it implied after its achievement rather than through the means these changes were obtained during the Revolution itself.

In this sense, perhaps the first idea we should be referring to when discussing the Radicalism of the American Revolution is the fact that it was a "catalyst of social change"

The American society up to the Revolution was characterized by the same hierarchical structures that dominated every territory of the ritish Empire. As a colony, the American territories were ruled by the King's representative, who was on top of the pyramid. The aristocracy, mostly ritish, subsequently followed down the line, including…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Gordon S. Wood. The Radicalism of the American Revolution. First Vintage Books Edition. 1993. Quote from the Internet, at  http://www.brothersjudd.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/reviews.detail/book_id/1275/Radicalism%20o.htm 

2.
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Pre-Industrial and Early Industrial Development

Words: 592 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59588164

Pre Industrial and Early Industrial Development

The major theme of the reading entitled "The United States Economy in 1790" is the development of the American economy in this particular year and those which directly preceded them. The author writes at length about the difficulties that the relatively new nation incurred while attempting to stabilize itself financially. It is worth noting that the author also explicates the fact that the relative novelty of the country, and the political instability that characterized its early years, was a significant contributing factor to this theme. The political instability resulted in an economic one which was evinced in a number of different ways.

The author provides a number of different types of evidence to support the aforementioned theme. He issues first hand quotes from notable luminaries (including Thomas Jefferson and the Earl of Sheffield) to reinforce his assertion that the U.S. had little room to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"The Economy 1815-1860 -- An Overview."

"The United States Economy in 1790."
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American Revolution American Victory and

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2051246

In the Continental Army was not just a force that was motivated by its service to a united cause, but by the democratic impulses that differentiated this from the British system of nobility and military rank. As a result, the dedication to cause elicited from the Continental Army solider was inherently more driven by the theoretical opportunities to follow victory. Certainly, for those who took part in the struggle to remove the British from American soil, there would also be an adoption of the view of this as a personal homeland now imposed upon by occupation.

To an extent, this motive may be said to be a greater assurance of eventual victory than military might. In the case of the American war for Independence, the better armed and more resource-wealthy British Imperial forces would be worn down by a commitment to what the Continental Army and militias alike saw as…… [Read More]

Such alliances suggested the more widespread implications of an American victory. While we may stop short of arguing that Britain lost a war -- particularly because many conditions suggest its defeat was inevitable regardless of military tactic -- it may be reasonable to argue that this signaled the beginning of the end of a colonial system which had sustained all European monarchies to this juncture. The power of the British Crown had been tarnished, but the initiation of the Industrial Revolution in both the United States and throughout Europe during the next century was fully dismantle its structural relevance. The type of wholesale occupation through which it had conducted its international presence would no longer be possible for Great Britain on the scale that had been achieved prior to American Independence.

Ultimately though, it seems appropriate to acknowledge these events first and foremost as a victory for the aristocratic leaders of the American rebellion and the working class enlisted men alongside whom they fought. Without too greatly idealizing this relationship, it may be acknowledged as a root to Americas socioeconomic identity today.

Martin, J.K. & Lender, M.E. (2006). A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789. Harlan Davidson, Inc.
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Kingdom of Matthias Market Revolution

Words: 1498 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75106214

Kingdom of Matthias

n the early nineteenth-century America went through a phase of religious revival with many people turning to the religious beliefs in Christendom following the religious instability that took place in the seventeenth-century in England for the reformation of Christians and the community. The most notable event amongst all the momentous events was called the Second Great Awakening, which lasted one year and began in 1830. This year holds a lot of history for a country like America because it was the same year that Americans reached the highest level of consumption of alcoholic drinks, with an average of four gallons per person. This was not only the highest for all the years of American history but also one of the highest in the world. t was in the year that came to be known as 'the spirit-soaked year' when the evangelical preacher Charles Grandison Finney came to…… [Read More]

In this in-depth research, Paul Johnson takes the opportunity to explain and use a small and unknown event to depict an interesting event from an interesting perspective on the city of New York. There are several incidents used to signify the issues of sexual corruption to radical doctrinal innovations. The Burned-Over district in the city of New York, served as the platform for the many religious movements such as Mormonism, Adventism, Christian Scientists, however there are numerous smaller religions and even noteworthy political movements such as Antimasonry that did not leave their mark on American soil to exist till today.

This book is also based on the story of one of those movements. The story begins by introducing Matthias to Kirtland as he goes to visit the Mormon Prophet, Joseph Smith. Although, his visit took place close to the end of the book, or better put close to the end of Matthias's activity of fooling his followers, his ideas were obviously cheated from many of the ideas of Joseph Smith. Even the practice of the washing of feet common to both the followers of Joseph Smith and Ellen White was also used by Matthias for his followers. He believed that the truth of the Gospel had come to the earth following the demise of Christ for another Mormon belief. Another feature common to Smith was the possession of a sword which he claimed was ancient similar to Smith's sword of Laban, as well as naming the Priesthood after the order of Melchezidek. His mentor Mordecai Noah, taught him that the Indians belonged to a branch of the Israelites, as found in the Book of Mormon. These ideas were known before 1830 when Matthias began his practice in the name of religion.

The book doesn't only contain horrid tales about his activities but also contains humorous parts of this periods history is the moments that connect to Matthias' enemies trying to shave off his beard. Johnson did a marvelous job at condensing the most relevant information in this short book. The Kingdom of Matthias is a humorous book and serves as an interesting read for those interested in this period of American religious history.
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Industry Revolution

Words: 448 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66802038

industrialization Civil War influenced U.S. society

Industrialization after the Civil War paved the way for modernizing the United States and giving it the status that it enjoyed for the majority of the 21st century -- that of a global superpower. It did so through the development of a robust economy built on manufacturing, which gave it both political and social clout throughout the world.

Three Major Aspects of Industrialization during 1865-1920

The continued development and completion of the railroad.

The emergence of the factory system and manufacturing industries (particularly steel).

Five Specific Groups Affected by Industrialization

Chinese Immigrants

These workers were brought on to assist with the completion of the railroad.

Their perceived debauchery led to the Exclusion Act of 1882 (Harvard, 2014).

B. African-Americans

These peoples migrated from the South to the North due to the manufacturing industries.

They were frequently used as strike breakers in labor disputes.

C.…… [Read More]

References

Dublin, T. (1986). Rural-urban migrants in Industrial New England. Journal of American History. 73(3), 623-644.

Galbi, D. (1996). Through eyes in the storm: Aspects of the personal history of women workers in the Industrial Revolution. Social History. 21(2), 142-159.

Harvard University Library Open Collection Program. (2014). Chinese Exclusion Act (1882).  http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/ . Retrieved from