Intervention Program Essays (Examples)

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Program Planning Classical Naturalistic and

Words: 593 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92286438

In the case of a sexual harassment education seminar, assessments would consist of both short-term and long-term investigations of the organizational culture. If necessary or possible, dramatic shifts in the organizational culture could prepare the future workforce for a harassment-free environment. The need for more females in positions of power remains one of the greatest stumbling blocks to eliminating sexual harassment. A naturalistic approach to educational intervention would emphasize how females in the workplace could overcome obstacles such as unequal pay and inequitable distributions of power.

However, the approach most suitable for an educational intervention focusing on gender in the workplace would be a critical one. A critical intervention strategy focuses on the "political and ideological activity connected with social inequalities in society as a whole," ("The Nature and Context of Program Planning" p. 4). Given that large-scale transformations of organizational culture are outside the realm of the current educational…… [Read More]

References

Cookson, Knowles, Nadler & Nadler. "Prototypical Program Planning Models."

The Nature and Context of Program Planning."
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Intervention Strategy for Grief Long

Words: 2367 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63088772



Utay and Miller (2006) described a study in which researchers observed over 100 individuals with unresolved grief reactions. There were three phases of treatment employed with these individuals. The first stage of treatment involved cognitive structuring for the decision to grieve again and for procedure clarification. The second stage involved guided imagery for reliving, revising, and revisiting the scenes at which the loss occurred. The third and final stage involved future-oriented identity reconstruction. The researchers reported that the reliving of the event through guided imagery effectively changed the client's view of reality, and furthermore helped along their grief resolution (Melges & DeMaso (1980), as cited by Utay & Miller, 2006). Moreover, Guided imagery has been established as a versatile and effective intervention.

The importance in assisting the children's mother with the grief process lies in the fact that bereavement is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it…… [Read More]

References

Elliott, K. (2000). Long QT syndrome. Alberta RN, January/February.

Firth, Hurst (2005). Clinical Genetics, New York: Oxford University Press, 378-9.

Gravitz, MA. (2001). Perceptual reconstruction in the treatment of inordinate grief. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 44(1), 51-5.

Joffrion, L.P., Douglas, D. (1994). Grief resolution: faciliatating self-transcendence in the bereaved. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 32(3), 13-9.
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Interventions for Delinquent Youth Are

Words: 1119 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50766934

Competency development in the balanced approach emphasizes the need for a broader concern with maturational development, especially by means of acquiring the survival skills required for daily living (p. 485).

Interventions that emphasized the balanced approach do look at the deficits and dysfunctions of the individual, but also identify family and community strengths, to draw upon. Not only would this intervention increase competency in the delinquent youth, but also help ensure public safety. Mentoring with a parental education and community organization approach, coupled with an effective sanctioning guidelines with meaningful consequences, is one intervention that would fulfill this criteria.

This type of intervention differs significantly from the interventions commonly utilized in the current system. Most interventions are geared to address a singular facet of delinquency, and regretfully ignore the others. As an example, the Boys and Girls Clubs of America offer a wide variety of programs to help counter risk…… [Read More]

References

Education and career. (2009). Retrieved April 20, 2009, from http://www.bgca.org/programs/education.asp.

Ek, A. (Mar 2008). Cluster profiles of youths living in urban poverty: Factors affecting risk and resilience. Social Work Research, 32(1). Retrieved April 20, 2009, from CINAHL Plus database.

Leve, L. & Chamberlain, P. (Jun 2005). Association with delinquent peers: Intervention effects for youth in the juvenile justice system. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 33(3). Retrieved April 20, 2009, from PubMed Central database.

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. (Aug 1997). Balanced and restorative justice for juveniles. Retrieved April 20, 2009, from http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/framwork.pdf.
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Intervention Division of Department of Health Mental

Words: 1913 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22901498

Intervention, Division of Department of Health Mental Hygiene to implement NYEIS

New York Early Intervention System (NYEIS)

The topic is the NYEIS and its subsequent elimination of rank & file employee positions as the automation of the system forces economic displacement in the form of > capital, < labor. The NYEIS, according to the New York State Department of Health, is "a centralized, Web-based, state-of-the-art system that electronically manages Early Intervention Program (EIP) administrative tasks and provides for information exchanges." (NYSDOH-NYEIS, 2011)

The expectation is there will be turnover i.e. attrition due to the nature of the new system and its ability to streamline operations and reduce excess waste. The excess waste in this case, is the administrative waste or bureaucratic processes, which are eliminated from the processes chain. The elimination of the basic function within the data entry position is the expected route when engaging a new technological system.…… [Read More]

References

EBRD Retrenchment Guidance. Retrenchment and restructuring -- labour and community issues, a brief guide (2010)  http://www.ebrd.com/downloads/about/sustainability/retrenchment.pdf 

McNamara C. Basic Guidelines for Reorganizing a Current Organization. (2011) http://managementhelp.org/orgnzing/basics.htm

New York State Department of Health. Implementation Status. (2011) http://www.health.state.ny.us/community/infants_children/early_intervention/system/implementation_status.htm

New York State Department of Health. New York Early Intervention System (NYEIS). (2011) http://www.health.state.ny.us/community/infants_children/early_intervention/system/
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Program Planning for Target Population

Words: 1362 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72044731

health issues facing the differed populations of the United States today, and these health concerns differ between males and females, income levels, and races. As such, it is important, prior to discussing any particular health concern, to first establish the target age cohort for which information is to be presented. Once this cohort is established, creating programs targeted to a specific population becomes a much simpler task.

This paper discusses the top five leading causes of death for African-American women age 25 to 44 in the United States in the year 2001. Additionally, this paper will focus on one particular cause of death for this population, and will outline an existing prevention program, aimed at this target age cohort. Finally, this paper will present data from studies on this prevention effort, to determine if the effort is succeeding.

As stated, the age cohort to be analyzed in this paper is…… [Read More]

References

Center for Disease Control (CDC). (2004). LCWK3: Percent of total deaths; and death rates for the 15 leading causes of death in selected age groups, by race and sex; United States, 2001. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.

Lauby, J, Smith, P, and Stark, M. (2000, Feb,). A community level HIV prevention intervention for inner city women: results of the Women and Infants Demonstration Project. American Journal of Public Health, 90(2): 216-220.

Liebman, T, Bond, P, Smith, D, and Tunstall, C. (1999, April). The Women and Infants Demonstration Project: an integrated approach to AIDS prevention and research. AIDS Education and Prevention, 2(107): 107-121.

O'Leary, A. (2005). HIV-risk reduction interventions for women: how far have we come? New York, NY: American Foundation for AIDS Research.
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Intervention and Prevention Strategies

Words: 1735 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23857459

Teen Pregnancy

Description

Teenage pregnancy is described as being pregnant or being a mother below 20 years of age in most of the conducted researches. Only two researches considered had an age limit of 20 years, while another one had a limit of 21 years (Noll, Shenk, & Putnam, 2009).

The rate of teenage child birth differs by a 10 factor in case of first world nations. Netherlands on one hand has a negligible rate of 12 infants per 1,000 teenagers each year while Russia on the other hand has a rate of 100 infants per 1000 teenagers. During the 1990's United States of America spiked with teenage pregnancies which was the same in 1980's as well. Japan and European nations have controlled pregnancy rates (40 infants per 1,000). England peaks the European bloc with teenage pregnancy. One research in 2000 concluded that annually in England, around 90,000 child births…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Amoran, O. (2012). A comparative analysis of predictors of teenage pregnancy and its prevention in a rural town in Western Nigeria. Amoran International Journal for Equity in Health, 2-7.

Dickins, T., Johns, S., & Chipman, A. (2012). Teenage Pregnancy In The United Kingdom: A Behavioral Ecological Perspective. Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 344-359.

Fonseca, L., Araujo, H., & Santos, S. (2012). Sexualities, teenage pregnancy and educational life histories in Portugal: experiencing sexual citizenship? Gender and Education, 647-664.

Hoggart, L. (2012). I'm Pregnant...what am I going to do? An examination of value judgments and moral frameworks in teenage pregnancy decision making. Health, Risk and Society, 533-549.
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Program Proposal and Evaluation Plan

Words: 2874 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40516326

This in turn adds more pressures on the Australian social and economic structure, making diabetes the seventh most fatal disease in the country. The diagram below proves that fact.

Diabetes deaths, 1984-2004

Objectives:

The main objective of this research included:

An increase in the consumption of fruits and vegetables amongst the sample within the six months allotted for the program. The percentage aimed at was at least 80%

To record decrease in the overall body mass and weight of the participants within six months

To record increase in the overall physical activities of the participants within six months, either through engaging in riding or running (National Physical Activity Guidelines for Adults 1999)

To follow up on the research and make sure that the participants are doing well and still implementing what they learned in the program

Strategies for the Friends with Diabetes Program, Derived From the Ottawa Charter for Health…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006, Diabetes in Australia: A snapshot, 2004-05,

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2009, National Health Survey: Summary of results, 2007-2008,

City of Onkaparinga 2006, Individual incomes, 2006,

City of Onkaparinga 2006, SEIFA index of disadvantage,
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Program Budget and Cost Analysis

Words: 4858 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97749747

Program Budget and Cost Analysis

Line-Item Budget for an in-Service Dementia Care Training Program

Florida now requires all direct-care staff working with dementia patients to receive specialized training. The curricula offered must be vetted by the Training Academy of the University of South Florida's Policy Exchange Center on Aging, otherwise assisted living facilities, nursing homes, adult day care, and hospices will be unable to accept patients with dementia into their facilities. In order to meet these statutory requirements and improve patient care, an in-service training program in dementia care will be instituted for a hospice facility located in Florida.

The Hospice House in Cape Coral, Florida maintains 36 beds for patients with terminal illnesses. On average, a little over 60% of the residents suffer from dementia at any one time, which is consistent with national trends (Williams, Hyer, Kelly, Leger-Krall, and Tappen, 2005, p. 98). The number of patients tends…… [Read More]

References

CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services). (n.d.). Hospice Center. CMS.gov. Retrieved 13 Mar. 2012 from www.cms.gov/Hospice/Downloads.2011_Aggregate_Cap.pdf.

Goyder, Judith, Orrell, Martin, Wenborn, Jennifer, and Spector, Aimee. (2012). Staff training using STAR: A pilot study in UK care homes. International Psychogeriatrics, published online ahead of print, p. 1-10. Retrieved 13 Mar. 2012 from http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8473487.

Hobday, John, V., Savik, Kay, Smith, Stan, and Gaugier, Joseph E. (2010). Feasibility of internet training for care staff of residents with dementia: The CARES® Program. Journal of Gerontology Nursing, 36, 13-21.

Hyer, Kathryn, Molinari, Victor, Kaplan, Mary, and Jones, Sharmalee. (2010). Credentialing dementia training: The Florida experience. International Psychogeriatrics, 22, 864-873.
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Program Development the Program That

Words: 1895 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7602836

So, in those regards the curriculum is slowly catching up with the times. Personally, I would like to see additions such as a playing of the movie, "The Business of Being Born" at one of the sessions or as homework.

The second way that the curriculum should change within the next three years is to begin allowing more nurses to become certified teachers. Currently, it is easier for a parent to become a coach than it is for a nurse. The reason, according to Bradley, is that the parents have direct experience, whereas nurses only have book-related experience. In fact, Bradley does offer the option for nurses to become a teacher, but additional reading and exam requirements must be met.

Personally, I find it to be in the best interest of Bradley to offer their curriculum with open arms to nurses for one simple reason: the more nurses who know…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Halfon, Saul (2010). Encountering Birth: Negotiating Expertise, Networks, and My STS Self. Science as Culture, 19(1), 61-77.

Hathaway, Marjie; et al. (2007). The Bradley Method Student Workbook. American Academy of Husband Coached Childbirth.

Lake, Rikki (2008). The Business of Being Born. Barranca Productions.

Lieberman, Adrienne (1992). Easing Labor Pain: The Complete Guide to a More Comfortable and Rewarding Birth. The Harvard Common Press, Boston.
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Program Design for Childhood Obesity

Words: 1348 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14043348

Program Design on Childhood Obesity

Childhood obesity has become a very serious epidemic today, it is estimated that about 16.3% of children all over the world are obese.in the past four decades the rate of obesity for children that are aged between 6 and 11 years has gone up by more than four times.it is a serious pandemic since obese children are likely to suffer health consequences not only in their childhood and adolescence but also throughout their lives as adults. They are at risk for problems of joints and bones, sleep apnea, psychological and social problems, health diseases, type II diabetes, cancer, osteoarthritis, and stroke. Childhood obesity is an epidemic that cuts across the lines of ethnicity, family income, and race however, there are certain populations that are at a higher risk as compared to others. Some of the populations that are at risk include Latinos, African Americas, Native…… [Read More]

References

Digate, N.(2010). Preventing Childhood Obesity. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from  http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/preventing-childhood-obesity 

Segal, E. (2009). Fighting Obesity: What Works, What's Promising. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from  http://www.sparkpe.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Fighting-Obesity-Report.pdf 

Pekruhn, C. (2010). Preventing Childhood Obesity a School Health Policy Guide. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/web-assets/2009/01/preventing-childhood-obesity-

WHO. (2014). What can be Done to Fight the Childhood Obesity Epidemic. Retrieved April 10, 2014 from  http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/childhood_what_can_be_done/en/
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Interventions for ED Students Interventions

Words: 2681 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20386765



Realty therapy, which was developed by psychiatrist illiam Glasser during the 1960's, requires those working with a student with emotional disturbance to develop a positive, friendly relationship, especially with those particular students who do not want such a relationship (ong 2004). Realty therapy differs from other psychological models because it urges everyone who works with the student to enter into a counseling relationship with them, not simply the psychologist (ong 2004).

Research on the use of reality therapy for students with emotional disturbance has demonstrated a positive effect on student behavior. According to Glasser, "Counseling is just one human being helping another with a problem. This is not hard to do, if the person with the problem wants to be counseled" (ong 2004). However, students with emotional disturbance may be defensive and resistant to counseling, thus the school psychologist's job is to motivate them to participate in counseling and to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harris, Karen M. (2002, June 22). A school, family, and community collaborative program for children who have emotional disturbances. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Nelson, Ron J. (2003, September 01). Status of and trends in academic intervention research for students with emotional disturbance. Remedial and Special Education. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sabornie, Edward J. (2004, September 22). Characteristics of emotional disturbance in middle and high school students. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Retrieved November 11, 2006 from HighBeam Research Library.

Sugai, George. (2000, September 22). A Self-Management Functional Assessment-
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Intervention & Addiction Therapy Theory

Words: 3133 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96162245

.

The two hypothetical systems working on an individual's brain during the experience of addiction are complementary within and between system changes. The first counteradaptation results in a decrease in the transmission of dopamine and serotonin release during withdrawal phases of the cycle (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively, dopamine and serotonin transmission is artificially increased beyond the normative range during drug use, then virtually stopped once the drug has left the body. This intensifies not only the "come down" feeling but also the preoccupation anxieties associated with substance abuse as well as the existing emotional, environmental, or social vulnerability which lead to the initial lapse. Sensitization is the component of addiction which compels an individual to continually seek greater quantities of the substance (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively once the brain has been exposed to a chemical which alters neural transmission, the body attempts to return to a homeostatic state.…… [Read More]

References

1. Nesse, R. (1994). An evolutionary perspective on substance abuse. Ethology and Sociobiology, 15, 339- 348.

2. Robinson, T, & Berridge, K. (2001). Mechanisms of action of addictive stimuli incentive- sensitization and addiction. Addiction, 96, 103- 114.

3. Koob, G., & Le Moal, M. (1997). Drug abuse: Hedonic homeostatic dysregulation. Science, 278, 52- 58.

4. Brown, J.M., & Miller, W.R. (1993). Impact of motivational interviewing on participation and outcome in residential alcoholism treatment. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors,7, 211-218.
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Program Development and Evaluation for HIV MSM Population

Words: 1523 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51735174

Program Development and Evaluation

The proposed program is intended for, and targets the students of both secondary and tertiary institutions. The program is known as "MSM Initiative for Colleges." "

The ability of this program to use ICT as a way of helping the aggregate is one important technique that will give the program a new edge. This is to help develop an effective combination of avoidance intervention that will be able to deliver BCC-behavioral change in communication. These behavioral changes in communication can be in the form of products, services, messages, as well as referrals, as a way of promoting and improving the use of condoms and condom-compatible lubricants, HIV tests, reporting cases of violence, and using complementary services. This inventive online 'cyber educator' MSM intervention, virtually provides a one-on-one HIV and BCC counseling, and test referrals (Adams, Klindera, Walsh, & Wold, 2014).

Interventions for the Aggregate

Distribution of…… [Read More]

References

Adam, D., kinder., K., Walsh, C.S., & Wold, R.C (2014), November 14). Innovative programmatic approaches to HIV prevention and care services for gay men, other men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender persons using information and communication technology (ICT). Digital Culture & Education (DCE). Retrieved from Digital Culture and Education: http://www.digitalcultureandeducation.com/uncategorized/v6_i3_editorial_html/

Cohen, L. M., & Gelbrich, J. (2015, October 16). Sample Educational Philosophy Statements . Retrieved from Oregun State University: http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/ed416/sample.html

PEPFAR (2011).Technical Guidance on Combination HIV Prevention. The U.S. President's Emergency plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).
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Intervention of Diabetes and Hypoglycemic Control

Words: 985 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63063965

Intervention for the Improvement of Hypoglycemic Control

Diabetes complication is one of the top health problems in the United States, and the ADA (American Diabetes Association) recommends that people suffering from diabetes should control their hypoglycemic and maintain A1C to < 7% to avoid diabetes complications. To achieve this objective, the "diabetes self-management education (DSME)"(Ni coll, aiser, Campbell, ET AL. 2014 p 207) is an effective tool to enhance hypoglycemic control and improve patients' outcomes. The DSME is an on-going educational process to facilitate the skill, knowledge, and ability of patients to carry out a diabetes self-care. I am a diabetic educator working in the diabetic outpatient clinical setting. My experience has made to understand that patients struggle to manage and control their diabetes after being educated because patients are not allowed to set their goals in order to manage their diabetes. (American Diabetes Association; 2013).

Objective of this paper…… [Read More]

Reference

American Diabetes Association (2013). Standards of medical care in diabetes -- 2013. Diabetes Care 36 (Suppl. 1):S11 -- S66, .

Funnell, M.M. Brown, T.L. Childs B.P. Et al. (2010). National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education. Diabetes Care. 33: 589-596.

Nicoll, K.G. Ramser, K.L. Campbell, et al. (2014).Sustainability of Improved Glycemic Control After Diabetes Self-Management Education. Diabetes Spectrum 27 (3): 207-211.

Norris, S.L., Lau, J., Smith, J.,et al. ( 2002). Susan Sundae, N.L Norris elf-Management Education for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes meta-analysis of the effect on hypoglycemic control.
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Intervention in Child Abuse and

Words: 2291 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73057886

By the 1970s most states had mandatory child abuse reporting laws. These laws aimed at identifying abused children and setting in motion legal procedures to investigate the child's situation and either to provide services for them in their own home or to remove them from their home and place them in a safer environment (Melli, 1998).

Historically, the laws and regulations of the present are the children and grandchildren of the laws that were pioneered in the 1960s and 1970s. Certainly, experience makes any process better and smoother, but essentially, the system of three to four decades ago would have been very similar to today. hat would not have percolated down to teachers, principals and other team personnel yet would have been the knowledge of the new legal system and how to function in it. This uncertainty would have undoubtedly have slowed the intervention as wary professionals move cautiously, balancing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crosson-Tower, Cynthia. (2010). Understanding child abuse and neglect. 8th ed. Upper

Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson-Prentice Hall.

Educators' role in child abuse and neglect prevention. (2010). Retrieved 30 July 2010

from http://www.enotalone.com/article/9974.html
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Intervention Conflict Resolution & Transformation

Words: 2027 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13753716

Furthermore, it is the balance between the needs and requirements for peace and the application of intervention methods and techniques that will be critical focal point of this evaluation.

This also refers to various studies that discuss the limitations of various conflict resolution attempts. A study by Saner and Yiu entitled External Stakeholder Impacts on Third-Party Interventions in Resolving Malignant Conflicts: The Case of a Failed Third-Party Intervention in Cyprus, serves as initial example. This study explores the potentially positive and negative impact of intervention in terms of the influence of the effect that multiple and competing external stakeholders, such as foreign powers, supranational institutions and NGOs, can have on third-party peace building initiatives. The article describes a Swiss NGO-initiated intercommunal project in Cyprus and evaluates the failure of this confidence-building project by looking at the role of external stakeholders in the intervention.

4. Conclusion: the importance of the research…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dale C. ( 2009) CONFLICT TRANSFORMATION AS STRATEGY FOR NATION

BUILDING IN A PLURALISTIC SOCIETY: In Search for Alternative Solution for Iraq after U.S.-UK Occupation. Retrieved November 19, 2009, from http://myresponsability.wordpress.com/2009/10/27/conflict-transformation-as-strategy-for-nation-building-in-a-pluralistic-society/

Dudouet V. ( 2006) Transitions from Revisiting Analysis and Violence to Peace

Intervention in Conflict Transformation. Berghof Report Nr. 15. Retrieved
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Response to Intervention Effectiveness

Words: 3002 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26765077

Intervention Effectiveness

esponse to instruction and intervention TI2 is reported as a general approach in education to closing the gap in achievement. TI2 methods are constructed upon the esponse to Intervention (TI) model that was an option for schools under the 'Building the Legacy, Idea 2004 reauthorization of the individuals with Disabilities Education Act IDEA. (California Department of Education, 2011) TI and the expanded TI2 are reported as being based upon "17 years of practice that has refined continuous progress monitoring as a strategy for keeping students on a path toward success." (California Department of Education, 2011) TI is reported as a strategy that moves all students through the steps set out in the learning standards and is further more stated to be an approach that views both academic and behavioral achievement of students.

Tier 1-3

Tier 1 included the 'Universal Interventions' which include "preventive, proactive, universal intervention in all…… [Read More]

References

Benchmark interventions -- reinforcement (2011) Department of Education. Retrieved from:  http://pubs.cde.ca.gov/tcsii/ch2/bnchmrkrnfrcmnt.aspx 

Case Study: El Rancho Unified School District in Pico Rivera, California (2011) International Reading Program. Retrieved from: http://www.reading.org/downloads/resources/rti0707_implications.pdf

Case Study: Pella Community School District, Iowa (2011) International Reading Program. Retrieved from: http://www.reading.org/downloads/resources/rti0707_implications.pdf

Implications for Reading Teachers in Response To Intervention (RTI) (2011) International Reading Program. Retrieved from: http://www.reading.org/downloads/resources/rti0707_implications.pdf
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School-Based Bullying Prevention Programs the

Words: 9042 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8170287

They predict age and gender variations relate to bullying concerns. Of the 25 cartoons implemented in the study, two depict characters with different shades of skin color where skin color appeared to be an issue. One cartoon relating to sexual orientation was not used in several countries. Smith et al. report Olweus to assert bullying to be characterized by the following three criteria:

1. It is aggressive behavior or intentional "harmdoing"

2. which carried out repeatedly and over time

3. In an interpersonal relationship characterized by an imbalance of power. (Smith et al., 2002, p. 1120)

In their study, Smith et al. (2002), participating researchers in the 14 countries to completed the following

1. Listed and selected bullying terms as well as social exclusion in the applicable language.

2. Used fundamental focus groups with participating children to confirm usage and extensive comprehensive of terms.

3. Using cartoons, sorted tasks to…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Anti-Bullying programs for schools. (2009). NoBully.com. Retrieved March 3, 2010 from http://www.nobully.com/index.html

Beaty, L.A., & Alexeyev, E.B. (2008). The Problem of School Bullies: What the Research Tells Us. Adolescence, 43(169), 1+. Retrieved March 3, 2010, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5026476147

Beran, T.N., Tutty, L. & Steinrath, G. (2004). An evaluation of a bullying prevention program for elementary schools. Canadian Journal of School Psychology. Vol. 19, Iss. 1/2, p. 99

116 . Retrieved March 3, 2010 from http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1188387401&Fmt=4&clientId=9269&RQT=30
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Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in

Words: 1671 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20268537

" (Mattaini and McGuire, 2006)

Results reported on the Olweus program for Scandinavia are as follows:

(1) impressive: reductions of 50% or more in bullying problems, with reductions increasing over time -- at least for 2 years;

(2) reductions in other forms of antisocial behavior; and reported improvements in school climate. Several replications support the utility of the approach (U.S. Surgeon General, 2001 in: Mattaini and McGuire, 2006).

Summary and Conclusion

The Olweus program is cited in the literature as being the only bullying prevention and intervention program that has produced empirical results and that has been replicated in studies. Furthermore, the Olweus program is the only bullying prevention program that has received recognition as a national model and a lueprint Violence Prevention Program by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Olweus program follows federal requirements in its involvement of all actors…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Boyle, D.J. (2005) Youth Bullying: Incidence, Impact and Interventions. Journal of the New Jersey Psychological Association, 55(3), 22-24. Online available at: http://www.umdnj.edu/vinjweb/publications/articles/bullying.pdf

Lead & Manage My School: Exploring the Nature and Prevention of Bullying (2009) Federal Criteria for Identifying Effective Programs. U.S. Department of Education. Online available at: http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/training/bullying/bullying_pg22.html

Mattaini, Mark a. And McGuire, Melissa S. (2006) Behavioral Strategies for Constructing Nonviolent Cultures with Youth. Behavior Modification. Vol. 30 No.2 March 2006. Sage Productions. Online available at:  http://njbullying.org/documents/behavstratmattainimaguire3-06.pdf 

Exploring the Nature and Prevention of Bullying (2009) Day 3 -- Bullying Prevention Strategies. Leading & Manage My School. U.S. Department of Education. Online available at: http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/training/bullying/bullying_pg17.html
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Detection and Intervention in Childhood Mental Health

Words: 10566 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97642961

detection and intervention in childhood mental health help prevent mental health problems in adult life?

Disregarding the mental well-being requirements of children is an intolerable violation of our basic undertaking to protect their well-being. Unfavorable mental disposition amidst our children is a less acknowledged difficulty that influences their literary, societal, and emotional enhancement. Mental well-being is a wide attribute to be analyzed. The mental well-being requirements of children and youth demand introspection. There is prevalent refuting that mental well-being is comprehensive of the influence on the children -- amidst all age distinct ions, variety of cultural sections, and all income sections. Such miscomprehensions are recurring, and involvement and care are unlikely to be found. Many people have the belief that children having mental well-being difficulties are just under the impact of a particular passing cloud. (Promoting Access for Children to Mental Health Screens and Assessments in Medicaid and the Children's…… [Read More]

References

AAMR. "Mental retardation: Definition, classification, and systems of supports," 9th edition (1992).

Caplan G. "Principles of Preventive Psychiatry," Basic Books, New York, 1964

Children's Mental Health: Current Challenges and a Future Direction Traditional Mental Health Services for Children: Current Arrangements and Challenges." Retrieved at http://www.healthinschools.org/mhs3.asp. Accessed on 12/08/2003

Children, Youth and Mental Disorders." The Primer May, 2003
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Adolescent Treatment Interventions and Youth

Words: 1358 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81074068

This research considered this by looking at a key constituent of low self-control which is the risk seeking tendency in order to decide its constancy and change throughout early childhood, its influences on changes in criminal behavior, and its receptiveness to a complete delinquency lessening program. These matters were looked at with information from the Children at isk (CA) program, an arbitrarily allocated interference that looked at early youth. The examination exposed considerable reliability in risk seeking, but there was proof of change as well, and these alterations were connected with contemporary alterations in delinquency. isk seeking alterations were not a consequence of contribution in the CA program, in spite of that program's achievement at dropping some appearance of delinquency (Hay, Meldrum, Forrest and Ciaravolo, 2010).

Part II: Assessment of the main strengths of the reading with particular emphasis on its utility for understanding adolescent development or social work intervention.…… [Read More]

References

Arthur, Michael W., Hawkins, J. David, Brown, Eric C, Briney, John S., Oesterle, Sabrina and Abbott, Robert D. (2010). Implementation of the Communities that Care Prevention

System by Coalitions in the Community Youth Development Study. Journal of Community Psychology, 38(2), p. 245 -- 258.

Hay, Carter, Meldrum, Ryan, Forrest, Walter and Ciaravolo, Emily. (2010). Stability and Change

in Risk Seeking: Investigating the Effects of an Intervention Program. Retrieved December 6, 2010, from  http://yvj.sagepub.com/content/8/2/91
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School-Based Intervention Trials for the

Words: 14493 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7664904

, 1999). In many areas of the country this may be very accurate.

Another problem that comes into the picture where obesity in children is concerned is that many parents must work very long hours today to pay bills and have money for what their family needs (Mokdad, et al., 1999). ecause of this, many children are latchkey kids and are not watched as closely by their parents as they used to be (Mokdad, et al., 1999). Children used to come home from school and go and play with others, but many now live in neighborhoods where this is unsafe or where there are no children their age so they remain inside watching TV or playing video games and snacking on whatever is available (Mokdad, et al., 1999).

If there is healthy food in the house this is often not a problem, but many households are full of potato chips,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, J.G. (1987). Structural equation models in the social and behavioral sciences: Model building. Child Development, 58, 49-64.

Arlin, M. (1976). Causal priority of social desirability over self-concept: A cross-lagged correlation analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 33, 267-272.

Averill, P. (1987). The role of parents in the sport socialization of children. Unpublished senior thesis, University of Houston.

Bandura, a. (1969). A social-learning theory of identificatory processes. In D.A. Goslin (Ed.), Handbook of socialization theory and research (pp. 213-262). Chicago: Rand McNally.
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Gang Prevention Program Gangs Contain

Words: 5590 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76787344



George Knox, director of the National Gang Crime esearch Center, teaches law enforcement officers how to search WebPages to pick up on gang member's lingo, territories, and rivalries. He also asserts it is crucial for officers to learn how to "read between the lines" when searching gang members' WebPages. Time on the Web, similar to time on the streets, gives gang investigators the ability to read the hieroglyphics of wall graffiti, and understand Web clues. In addition, "gang identifiers, such as tattoos, graffiti tags, colors and clothing often are embedded in each site" (Gutierrez, 2006, ¶ 27). According to Gutierrez, by studying gang blogs for several hours, one can pick up on subtle word choices, which the gang members consider to be almost holy words. Knox contends that some gangs use the Internet to recruit new members.

Other Efforts to Deal with Gangs

Suppression techniques may be one of the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

ARISE as a gang prevention program. (2007). ARISE Foundation. Retrieved November 6, 2009

from http://www.ariselife-skills.org/Home/Gangs.aspx ARISE foundation. (2009). Retrieved November 6, 2009 from http://www.ariselife-skills.org/Home/Home.aspx

ARISE life-management skills program. A five-year evaluation. (N.d.). University of Miami.

Retrieved November 10, 2009 from http://www.ariselifeskills.org/docs/pdf/5yearevalexecsummary.pdf
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Quiet Time Program in Hospitals Medical Professionals

Words: 591 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71556651

Quiet Time Program in Hospitals

Medical professionals and healthcare practitioners have practiced and committed their profession to one ultimate goal: to ensure that patients' health state would improve from worse to better. In the hospital setting, a myriad of factors operate and influence patients' perception of the quality of care they received during their confinement. There exists both physical and social factors -- external factors that result to either the worsening or continued improvement of the patient. The hospital staff and medical practitioners, and the kind of interaction between staff and patient make up for the social component of the hospital environment. Physical factors, meanwhile, include ambience, cleanliness and noise level of the hospital, which form part of the hospital's physical environment and inevitably, factors that lead to the determination of patients' improvement and perceived quality of care received in the hospital.

The role that physical environment, particularly noise level,…… [Read More]

References

Fontana, G. (2010). "Sleep deprivation among critical care patients." Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 1.

Gardner, G. (2009). "Creating a therapeutic environment: A non-randomised controlled trial of a quiet time intervention for patients in acute care." International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 46.

Robinson, S. (2005). "The Sh-h-h-h Project: Nonpharmacological interventions." Holistic Nursing Practice, Vol. 19(6).
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Prevention Programs

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42904281

According to Greenwood (2008), researchers have recognized 12 "established" delinquency-prevention programs that have shown remarkable improvement in their participants. They also identified an additional 20-30 that demonstrated promise. Shifting towards evidence-based practices derived from information gathered from successful programs can help increase the likelihood of success in other programs through implementation of effective standardized practice. Evidence from school-based programs show remarkable prevention in many areas. "Successful school-based programs can prevent drug use, delinquency, anti-social behavior, and early school drop-out" (Greenwood, 2008, pp. 185).

Greenwood also highlights community-based programs, much like school-based programs, can deter first-time delinquents from added happenstances with the justice system by providing skill development and personal development. As evidence suggests, the most effective community programs stress family communications and provide services and incentive to the adults who oversee and instruct the child. Much like St. Leo University, whose core beliefs include acquiring and learning skills, interconnectedness, and…… [Read More]

References

Borduin, C.M., Mann, B.J., Cone, L.T., Henggeler, S.W., & Al, E. (1995). Multisystemic treatment of serious juvenile offenders: Long-term prevention of criminality and violence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63(4), 569-578.

Connor, D.F., Saxena, K., Ferziger, R., Daniolos, P.T., Chang, K.D., Carlson, G.A., et al. (2006). Juvenile maladaptive aggression: a Review of Prevention, Treatment, and Service Configuration and a Proposed Research Agenda. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 67(05), 808-820.

Greenwood, P. (2008). Prevention and Intervention Programs for Juvenile Offenders. The Future of Children, 18(2), 185-210.
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Afro-Caribbeans What Works Best Adherence Intervention for

Words: 2415 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95302816

Afro-Caribbeans

WHAT WORKS EST

Adherence Intervention for Afro-Caribbeans

Recent improvements on prescription medications are beneficial only if patients adhere to them faithfully. Non-adherence is common and results in adverse conditions (Ho et al., 2009). This is a problem both to patients and heir care providers as well as the healthcare system itself. The solution consists of identifying the causes and motivations of non-adherence and the design and implementation of better interventions to improve adherence (Ho et al.). The following studies present and suggest more effective interventions for a variety of health conditions among Afro-Caribbean people who have been reported to have a high level of non-adherence to therapy.

Literature Review

Culture-Specific Interventions

Many health providers contend that more effective interventions in reducing risks for diseases, especially HIV / AIDS, through greater adherence need to culturally conform to the specific culture of the subject population (Archibald, 2011). This study used a…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Adams, O.P. And Carter, A.O. (2010). Diabetes and hypertension guidelines and the primary health care practitioners in Barbados: knowledge, attitudes, practices and barriers -- a focus group study. Vol 11 # 96, BMC Family Practice: BioMed Central.

Retrieved on February 1, 2013 from http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/11/96

Archibald, C. (2011). Cultural tailoring for an Afro-Caribbean community: a naturalistic approach. Vol 18 # 4, Journal of Cultural Divers: Pubmed. Retrieved on January 27,

2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408883
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Afam Autism Interventions Amongst African-Americans the Rise

Words: 759 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66517273

AfAm Autism

Autism Interventions Amongst African-Americans

The rise in diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders amongst wide swaths of children in the developed world has led to many complex and unique problems for parents, physicians, and children. Understanding and properly addressing autism and its impact on learning, family, and the community in specific ethnic, religious, and cultural contexts requires accurate and comprehensive knowledge of how the problem and potential solutions are perceived by individual cultural community. The following pages provide a brief overview of research related to autism in the African-American community, with special attention paid to specific intervention programs and methods that are successful in addressing autism amongst African-Americans. From this analysis, it can be seen that well-defined problems exist when confronting autism and other mental disorders in this cultural group, and that particular frameworks need to be implemented in order to achieve truly effective results.

Autism Interventions for African-Americans…… [Read More]

References

Dyches, T., Wilder, L., Sudweeks, R., Obiaker, F. & Algozzine, B. (2004). Multicultural issues in autism. Journal of Autism and Development Disorders 34(2): 211-22.

Mandell, D. & Novak, M. (2005). The role of culture in families' treatment decisions for children with autism spectrum disorders. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Review 11(2): 110-5.

Yoder, P. & Stone, M. (2006). Randomized comparison of two communication interventions for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 74(3): 426-35.
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Scholastic's Read 180 Instructional Program

Words: 438 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7612699

However, forty percent, or 2.4 million of these students are enrolled in special education programs for the sole reason that they have not learned to read. According to Scholastic, "Read 180 is proven effective in accelerating reading achievement for all students- including those in Special Education."

Read 180 takes an approach to special needs students that focus on providing multi-functional support. These support systems include universal access provisions, multi-model approaches, individualized software and reports, pre-teaching methods in order to improve understanding, instructional routines that promote active participation of special education students, and an instructional model that sets a routine and repetitive structure for learning.

The question thus becomes whether this approach actually works for students with special needs? Although Scholastic argues that there is data that proves it does, this data has to be questioned in that it is provided by the company selling the product. Therefore, it is unknown…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Scholastic Homepage. Read 180 Product Information. www.scholastic.com.

Taberski, Sharon. On Solid Ground: Strategies for Teaching Reading K-3. New York: Heinemann, 2000.
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Impact of Title I On HIV AIDS Programs in Dade County

Words: 2097 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67184641

programs and actions taken by health agencies to support cities and communities in their fight against the spread of HIV and AIDS virus. It will also discuss the demographic information of cities with high rate of HIV / AIDS, as well as other statistics in relation HIV / AIDS. Particular in this study is a discussion on one of the HIV / AIDS major areas - Miami.

Moreover, this section will provide the reader with an overview of the benefits that the health programs provide in different states and what they bring to communities of HIV / AIDS. It will explore on the success of such programs in terms of combating the disease.

A combat against HIV and AIDS, through an increased funding for health centers and services, is the main objective of this study. This specifically focuses on areas where most of the HIV / AIDS patients are financially…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Miami-Dade County Neighborhood Profiles.

Miami-Dade County Health Department. 25 May 2004. http://www.dadehealth.org/hiv/HIVprofiles.asp

Health Education and Risk Reduction Program.

Miami-Dade County Health Department. 26 May 2004. http://www.dadehealth.org/hiv/HIVed.asp
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Assessment or Response to Intervention

Words: 503 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56887818

Intervention

Early identification of learning disabilities in children is critical to the development of a child's abilities. Identification allows for tailored interventions sooner, which optimizes outcomes (ilkinson, 2010). Unfortunately, a wide array of problems exists in attempting to identify a disability. Difficulties include the family's denial of problems and an incomplete evaluation. The authors discuss several approaches for identification of learning disabilities with a detailed discussion of each one (National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities [NJCLD], 2007). After a discussion of risk indicators that may be linked with learning disabilities and protection factors linked with the lack of learning disabilities, the authors note that these indicators are not conclusive (NJCLD, 2007). The authors support systematic observation and comprehensive evaluation to assess learning disabilities (NJCLD, 2007). Finally, the authors conclude that tailored intervention for students and professional development for those involved in special education are critical for interventions (NJCLD, 2007).

The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fuchs, D. & Fuchs, L. (2009). Responsiveness to Intervention: Multilevel Assessment and Instruction as Early Intervention and Disability Identification. Reading Teacher, 63(3), 250-252.

National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (2007). Learning Disabilities and Young Children: Identification and Intervention. Learning Disability Quarterly, 30(1), 63-72.

Wilkinson, L. (2010). School-age children with autism spectrum disorders: screening and identification. European Journal of Special Needs Education 25(3), 211-223.
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Parenting Program for Women and

Words: 41621 Length: 150 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12171638

There are many of these individuals, and it is time that this is changed.

Parents often look away from these kinds of problems, or they spend their time in denial of the issue because they feel that their child will not be harmed by parental involvement with drugs or alcohol. Some parents have parents that were/are addicts themselves, and some are so busy with their lives that they do not actually realize that their child has any kind of problem with the lifestyle of the parent until it becomes so severe that it cannot be overlooked, or until it is brought to their attention by police, the school, or someone else that has seen it first hand. Parents are not the only ones that overlook this issue, though.

Sometimes siblings and friends also see problems that they ignore, do not understand, or do not talk to anyone about, and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aleman-Padilla, L. 2002. Babies First gets last word on infant care Hundreds recognize groups contribution at fourth annual event. The Fresno Bee.

Anderson, D. 2004. Funding cuts impact health services. Precinct Reporter.

Anderson, S.A. (2000). How parental involvement makes a difference in reading achievement. Reading Improvement.

Baker, P.L. (2000). I didn't know: discoveries and identity transformation of women addicts in treatment. Journal of Drug Issues, 30, 863-881.
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Gap Early Childhood Intervention and the Development

Words: 6336 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82658447

Gap: Early Childhood Intervention and the Development of the Disabled Child

Children with special needs include those who have disabilities, developmental delays, are gifted/talented, and are at risk of future developmental problems. Early intervention consists of the provision of services for such children and their families for the purpose of lessening the effects of their condition. Early intervention may focus on the child alone or on the child and the family together. Early intervention programs may be center-based, home-based, hospital-based, or a combination. Early intervention may begin at any time between birth and school age; however, there are many reasons for it to begin as early as possible. Early Intervention is the key to achieving the most positive outcome in aiding the disabled child to develop as normally as possible.

There are three primary reasons for intervening early with an exceptional child: to enhance the child's development, to provide support…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bayley, N. (1970) "Development of mental abilities." In P.H. Mussen (ed) Carmichael's manual of child psychology, 1, New York: Wiley.

Bayley, N. (1955) "On the growth of intelligence," American Psychologist, 10, 805, Dec.

Burts, Diane C.; Hart, Craig H.; Charlesworth, Rosalind; DeWolf, D. Michele; Ray, Jeanette; Manuel, Karen; & Fleege, Pamela O. (1993). "Developmental appropriateness of kindergarten programs and academic outcomes in first grade." Journal Of Research In Childhood Education, 8 (1), 23-31. EJ 493-673.

Cooper, J.H. An Early Childhood Special Education Primer. Chapel Hill, NC: Technical Assistance Development System (TADS), 1981.
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Psychosocial Smoking Cessation Interventions for Coronary Heart

Words: 3420 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23044103

psychosocial smoking cessation interventions for coronary heart disease patients effective?

The association with smoking and coronary heart disease (CHD) has been well documented. To prevent further heart attacks, as well as to preserve their life, smokers have been consistently and strongly advised to quit smoking, and associations such as the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Task Force have drafted recommendations and reams of advice to assist patients in doing so. Nevertheless, many patients diagnosed with CHD continue to smoke despite the possibility of interventions and programs (many of them free) helping them to stop. Mortality can be reduced by as much as 36% if smokers with CHD determine to stop smoking 3-5 years after diagnosed (Critchley, 2003) aside from which dramatic reductions in cardiac attacks have been discovered when smokers have stopped smoking for as short a time as a year (Quist-Paulsen, & Gallefoss, 2003). The Coronary…… [Read More]

References

Barth, J., Critchley, J., & Benget, J. (2008). Psychosocial interventions for smoking cessations in patients with coronary heart disease, Cochrane Heart Review.

Critchley JA, Capewell S. Mortality risk reduction associated with smoking cessation in patients with coronary heart disease. J Am Med Ass;290:86 -- 97.

Frothingham, S. et al., (2006). How much does smoking cessation cut CHD risk? Clinical Inquiries, 57, 10, 675-679

Huey-Ling W., Harrell, J & Funk, S (2008). Factors Associated With Smoking Cessation
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Social Work Macro Social Intervention

Words: 1411 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75262864

The GEMS effort was to create a social environment that encouraged healthy eating and exercise, and expanded health literacy in a fun manner, and was accessible to young girls.

It is easier to change health-related behaviors in the young, and the program tried to address the unique and often more acute problem of obesity in African-American young girls. The entire community and family units were incorporated into the program effort. Positive aspects of the African-American community, such as strong social support, were used by the study designers, also in line with social cognition theory. Existing support structures and social learning were combined: for example, the families in question were often not educated in how to properly read food labels, but once they were, the desire to help their daughters become healthier would hopefully reinforce the need to engage in proactive steps to improve dietary health. During Family Nights, families of…… [Read More]

References

Marvella E. Ford, Barbara C. Tilley, & Patricia E. McDonald. (1998). Social support among

African- American adults with diabetes. Journal of American Medicine. 90 (6) 361-365.

Retrieved July 9, 2010 at  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2568240/pdf/jnma00165-0047.pdf 

Story, Mary, et al. (2003, Winter). "An after-school obesity prevention program for African-
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Community-Based Intervention Public Health Planning Community-Based Intervention

Words: 970 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42419314

Community-Based Intervention

Public Health Planning

Community-Based Intervention Programs Improve Child Vaccination ates

Improvements in the rates of childhood vaccinations has, until recently, depended largely on remind/recall strategies employed by provider- and community-based programs (reviewed by Findley, Sanchez, Mejia, Ferreira, Pena, Matos, et al. 2009; Szilagyi, Schaffer, Shone, Barth, Huminston, Sandler et al. 2002). Unfortunately, such programs have failed to erase the racial and economic disparities that leave communities of color more vulnerable to preventable infectious diseases. In an effort to improve the rates of up-to-date child vaccinations in these communities, a group of researchers and clinicians designed and implemented a community program that added tracking and outreach activities to already established programs promoting child vaccination (Northern Manhattan Start ight Coalition; Findley, Irigoyen, Sanchez, Guzman, Mejia, Sajous, et al., 2004). When compared to national averages for all racial groups (74.8%) the improvements were significant, increasing from 65 to 88% for children…… [Read More]

References

Findley, Salley E., Irigoyen, Matilde, Sanchez, Martha, Guzman, Letty, Mejia, Miriam, Sajous, Michelle et al. (2004). Community empowerment to reduce childhood immunization disparities in New York City. Ethnicity and Disease, 14, S1-134 -- S1-141.

Findley, Sally E., Irigoyen, Matilde, Sanchez, Martha, Stockwell, Melissa S., Mejia, Miriam, Guzman, Letty et al. (2008). Effectiveness of a community coalition for improving child vaccination rates in New York City. American Journal of Public Health, 98(11), 1959-1962.

Findley, Salley E., Sanchez, Martha, Mejia, Miriam, Ferreira, Richard, Pena, Oscar, Matos, Sergio et al. (2009). REACH 2010: New York City: Effective strategies for integrating immunization promotion into community programs. Health Promotion Practice, 10(2), 128S-137S.

Fu, Linda Y., Cowan, Nuala, McLaren, Rosie, Engstrom, Ryan, and Teach, Stephen J. (2009). Spatial accessibility to providers and vaccination compliance among children with Medicaid. Pediatrics, 124, 1579-1586.
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Efficacy of Unexpected Interventions

Words: 918 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24803293

Psychological Interventions Chronic Pain

Medical science is increasingly aligning with a biopsychosocial treatment perspective that understands pain and symptoms as coming from multifaceted experience characterized by the complexity that is inherently human (oditi & obinson, 2011). Many vectors come together in this biopsychosocial perspective: the physicological and emotional state of the individual tend to dominate, garnering most of the medical attention these variables align with conventional medical and behavioral training (oditi & obinson, 2011). In addition, the influence of culture, ethnicity, and society on the interpretation of health and disease are important considerations (oditi & obinson, 2011). The literature on mind-body connection provides strong evidence of the impact that an individual's emotions can have on their behavior and, interestingly, provides findings that the reverse can also be true (oditi & obinson, 2011).

Chronic pain is considered to be an illness from a biopsychosocial perspective, and not a disease (oditi &…… [Read More]

References

Bishop, S.R. (2002). What Do We Really Know About Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. Psychosomatic Medicine, 64:71-84.Bishop, (2002).

Elkins, G., Jensen, M.P., & Patterson, D.R. (2007). Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain. Int J. Clin Exp Hypn, 55(3):275-287.

Guzman, J., Esmail, R., Karjalainen, K., Malmivaara, A., Irvin, E. & Bombardier, C. (2007). Multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social rehabilitation for chronic low-back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2.

Goossens, M.E.J.B., Vlaeyen, J.W.S., Hidding, A., Kole-Snijders, A. & Evers, S.M.A.A. (2005). Treatment Expectancy Affects the Outcome of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions in Chronic Pain. Clinical Journal of Pain, 21(1): 18-26.Kjellgren, A., Bood, S.A., Axelsson, K., Norlander, T. & Saatcioglu, F. (2007). Wellness through a comprehensive yogic breathing program -- a controlled pilot trial. BMC Complimentary and Alternative Medicine, 19, 7: 43.
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Antipoverty Programs on Children's Cumulative

Words: 1627 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25551882



6. Describe the practical implications:

a. How is it useful?

The results of this study are useful for evaluating the impact of incentive programs that encourage low-income families to work. Many welfare systems have previously penalized individuals who do attempt to work. The programs in this study provided incentives to those who worked, thus allowing individuals to move out of poverty more quickly. The researchers were not simply interested in the impact of these programs on the reduction of poverty, but also on the indirect impact on child outcomes with respect to behavior problems and school performance. The usefulness of this study can predominantly be found in its ability to provide support for future work-incentive programs aimed at helping to ameliorate the impact of poverty child outcomes.

b. How is it important?

Child behavior problems and school performance can have lifelong implications with respect to later quality of life. esearch…… [Read More]

References

Gassman-Pines, a. & Hirokazu, Y. (2006). The Effects of Antipoverty Programs on Children's Cumulative Level of Poverty-Related Risk. Developmental Psychology, 42(6), pp.981-999.
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Healthcare Service Programs Have Been Continually Evolving

Words: 2092 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12998037

healthcare service programs have been continually evolving to meet the needs stakeholders. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), is focusing on helping those individuals who are suffering from these conditions. They are conducting an evaluation study to determine the best way to provide various kinds of solutions to the public. This is designed to offer everyone with services that are meeting their social, health and human resource needs. (Chen, n.d.)

To achieve these objectives there is a focus on conducting a study on its Information esource Center (IC). This was achieved by completing a number of steps in the process. The most notable include: understanding the political / organizational environment, defining the relationship between evaluator / sponsor, determining the levels of evaluation, gathering reconnaissance, engaging stakeholders, describing the program and concentrating on what lessons were learned. These different areas are providing executives with an understanding of how to achieve the…… [Read More]

References

Chen. (n.d.). Program Evaluation to Help Stakeholders.
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Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health Reach 2010 Program

Words: 3356 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11181704

acial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (EACH 2010 Program)

The health objectives for the United States for the 21st century have been described in The Federal Initiative to Eliminate acial and Ethnic Health Disparities and Healthy People 2010. The national interest in the areas of racial and ethnic disparities has been renewed with the public health initiatives with the leadership for the discussion being taken by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The overall health of the nation has improved a lot, but the members of the minority groups in the ethnic and racial areas have not been benefited. This includes the African-Americans, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Asian-Americans, Hispanic-Americans and Pacific Islanders.

This segment of our population is more likely to have poor health and premature deaths than the white Americans. During 1992 to 1998, the deaths from breast cancer have come down noticeably, but there are more…… [Read More]

References

Author Unknown) (n.d) Chronic Diseases, Risk Factors, and Preventive Services, Alabama. Retrieved at http://www.4woman.gov/owh/reg/4/overview.htm. Accessed on 15/10/2003

Author Unknown) (n.d) Health Disparities and Non-insulin Type 2 Diabetes. Retrieved at  http://www.medicalnewsservice.com . Accessed on 15/10/2003

Author Unknown) (n.d) HHS Awards more than 65 Million to eliminate health disparities. Retrieved at http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/BurdenBook/DeathCause.asp?state=alAccessed on 15/10/2003

Author Unknown) (n.d) Overview of Region lV. Retrieved at http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/exemplary/racial.htm. Accessed on 15/10/2003
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RTI Program Content Literacy Brozo

Words: 379 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78100995



Even though a child may process the ability to decode written text this does not necessarily mean the child understands the content of the text.

Using informational texts in the primary grades will reduce the need for Tier 2 and Tier 3 supports for most students.

Content learning and content literacy are inseparable.

Language arts curriculum should be premised on reading to learn.

Increase the number of student encounters and experiences with print informational texts

Comment

This article presents a common sense approach to teaching reading. I appreciate the fact that "all reading is learning" and the content in many basal readers is unappealing to a curious mind. Basing the teaching of reading solely in literature is a disservice to many learners who yearn for more diverse content. Utilizing a wide range of informational texts in the classroom in the primary grades serves the purpose of building a child's repertoire…… [Read More]

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Psychosocial Academic Interventions for Children With ADHD

Words: 3151 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40596143

Academic Outcomes of Children With ADHD

ADHD Literature eview

Improving the Academic Outcomes of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Improving the Academic Outcomes of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2014) Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental condition recognizable by attention deficits, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that manifest across multiple settings. The most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V) describes ADHD as consisting of inattention, and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity, severe enough to interfere with day-to-day functioning and development. Common symptoms of inattention include poor listening skills, frequent mistakes, disorganized, avoidance of mentally challenging tasks, distracted, and forgetful. Hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms include fidgeting, inappropriate physical activity, excessive talking, interrupting others, and an inability to play quietly. Children suffering from ADHD would therefore have a difficult time succeeding academically.

If ADHD were rare this would not be a significant…… [Read More]

References

CDC. (2013). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Data & statistics. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/data.html .

CDC. (2014). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Symptoms and diagnosis. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/diagnosis.html .

Dang, M.T., Warrington, D., Tung, T., Baker, D., & Pan, R.J. (2007). A school-based approach to early identification and management of students with ADHD. Journal of School Nursing, 23(1), 2-12.

DuPaul, G., & Power, T.J. (2008). Improving school outcomes for students with ADHD: Using the right strategies in the context of the right relationships. Journal of Attention Disorders, 11(5), 519-21.
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Searching for the Best Interventions for Troubled Youths

Words: 1454 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16157412

Juvenile Delinquency

Are individual factors or family factors more important when providing interventions for delinquent youths?

This paper will answer the question first, and then provide the backup for the decision on which factor plays a leading role. Obviously individual factors play an important role in determining why a youth offends; and peer influences play a strong role as well. But deeper research reveals that it is the family situation, including what happens when the child is in the womb and through its early growth period, that is more important to take into consideration when determining what intervention is potentially more appropriate.

According to a report on delinquency prevention and intervention -- commissioned by the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) -- there are four risk factors that have an influence on whether a juvenile will engage in delinquent behaviors. The first two -- individual risk factors and family risk…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Flores, J.R. (2003). Treatment, Services, and Intervention Programs for Child Delinquents.

Child Delinquency Bulletin Series. Retrieved August 8, 2015, from  http://www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org .

National Conference of State Legislatures. (2009). Delinquency Prevention & Intervention /

Juvenile Justice Guide Book for Legislators. Retrieved August 8, 2015, from http://www.ncsl.org.
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Intervention the Notion of 'Intervention' Has the

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5840526

Intervention

The notion of 'intervention' has the literal, Oxford English Dictionary meaning of "stepping in or interfering in any affair, so as to affect its course or issue." But its connotative meaning within contemporary culture is more resonant and multivalent in nature. The television show Intervention exemplifies the positive, pop psychology notion of an 'intervention,' in which an individual is saved from an addiction by group of outsiders (usually friends, family, and treatment staff). But many 'interventions' have a negative resonance: more traditional notions of intervention raise questions of sovereignty and legitimacy. At the heart of the conflict between 'good' and 'bad' notions of intervention is the question of autonomy. When is it acceptable and appropriate to impinge upon the autonomy of a human being or of the state? Is it ever moral to not intervene?

Awareness of injustice has increased in the era of Internet-based social networking and communication.…… [Read More]

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Program Is to Dramatically Increase

Words: 2615 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74641994

Five thousand flyers will be distributed to local synagogues and churches. Another major distribution channel is through the public education system, Brooklyn College is located within the Midwood community, it has now become a strong community meeting point for both students and adults. Pamphlets distributed through the school will be able to attract large audiences. ADA provides a series of seminar and workshops called the "Diabetes Awareness Program." Using the DAP as the basis for creating local interest; this series will be launched through the community as a public forum for understanding diabetes. Such a forum will be targeted to two distinct audiences. The first will be public speaking engagements for local health care professionals to increase their awareness of diabetes within their community and prepare for the flood of questions to come. Information sessions for the general public will take the form of public rallies or seminars staged through…… [Read More]

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Programs That Are Aimed at

Words: 1708 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42608809

The program was instrumental in illustrating the importance of preschool on the reduction of crime in this country and now serves as a spoke in the wheel of government funding for preschool programs throughout the nation.

eferences

Epstein, Ann S. (1999) Pathways to Quality in Head Start, Public School, and Private Nonprofit Early Childhood Programs.(Statistical Data Included)

Journal of esearch in Childhood Education

Program Outcomes (accessed 10-20-06)

http://www.ncjrs.gov/html/ojjdp/2000_10_1/page2.html

eynolds, a.J., Temple, J.A., obertson, D.L., & Mann, E.A. (2002). Age 21 cost-benefit analysis of the Title I Chicago Child-Parent Centers. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 24: 267-303.

obin, K.B., Frede, E.C., & Barnett, W.S. (2006). Is more better? The effects of full-day vs. half-day preschool on early school achievement. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Stellar, Arthur (2003) Long-Term Studies of Preschool: Lasting Benefits Far Outweigh Costs.

Phi Delta Kappan

Long-Term Study of Adults Who eceived High-Quality Early Childhood Care and Education Shows…… [Read More]

References

Epstein, Ann S. (1999) Pathways to Quality in Head Start, Public School, and Private Nonprofit Early Childhood Programs.(Statistical Data Included)

Journal of Research in Childhood Education

Program Outcomes (accessed 10-20-06)

http://www.ncjrs.gov/html/ojjdp/2000_10_1/page2.html
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Program for the Mentally Ill Homeless Population

Words: 2708 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42928624

Program for the Mentally Ill Homeless Population

This research project is an attempt to determine if a community-based program serving the mentally ill homeless population has met its goal of reducing hospitalizations for acute psychiatric episodes. An attempt to identify the elements that define the difference in this program will be identified and evaluated. The literature shows that treating the mentally ill homeless population is especially difficult in terms of building lasting relationships based on trust. The population tends to move from one area to another within the city and become elusive when they are looked for. This program will be evaluated for its effectiveness in preventing hospitalizations for acute psychiatric episodes, the usefulness of case managing, including ensuring clients have and are taking their medications and whether this program has been more successful than traditional programs in finding permanent housing for it's clients.

Problem and Purpose

Homelessness is on…… [Read More]

Reference List

Aday, L. (1993), At risk in America: the health and health care needs of vulnerable populations in the Unites States. San Francisco, California.

Alter, C., Hage, J. (1993), Organizations working together. Newbury Park, California, Sage.

American Journal of Psychiatry. (1993), Treatment of homeless men who are mentally ill.

Bolland, J., Wilson, J. (1994), Three faces of integrative coordination: a model of in interorganizational relations in community-based health and human services. Health Services Res.
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Program Implementation in Phoenix

Words: 997 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87651000

program proposal like this would require an amount of $700,000. There would be at least three main positions: a field manager, an accountant, and a grant coordinator to ask the government to fund such a program. It would be centered in a city close to the southern border like the city of Phoenix. Law enforcement considers Phoenix, in recent years, to be a major distribution center for human smuggling and narcotics activity operations. This is due to the city's close proximity to the border between the U.S. and Mexico. In fact, the American government considers Phoenix to be the "Kidnapping Capital" within the U.S. with Mexico City being a close second. Therefore, the program will focus on observations and lookouts to determine if criminal activities are taking place within Phoenix. The people responsible for such criminal activity are known to wear police insignias, are dressed in tactical gear, and are…… [Read More]

References

Maxfield, M., & Babbie, E. (2014). Research methods for criminal justice and criminology (7th ed.). Belmont, Calif.: Cengage Learning.

Orr, S. (2013). Environmental policymaking and stakeholder collaboration (p. 73). CRC Press.

Wong, K., Meadows, L., Webb, F., & Young, S. (2013). The development and year one implementation of the Local Justice Reinvestment Pilot. Ministry Of Justice, 1. Retrieved from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-development-and-year-one-implementation-of-the-local-justice-reinvestment-pilot
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Interventions for Childhood Obesity

Words: 888 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86157104

Doctors of nursing practice have an ethical and professional obligation to disseminate findings that emerge from relevant and timely research. One area of ongoing concern is the near-epidemic levels of childhood obesity that have emerged in recent years due in large part to increasingly sedentary lifestyles and poor eating habits among young people. This paper provides an assessment and reflection on the success of the program design for disseminating the results of childhood obesity research, the challenges that were encountered, and the ethical considerations that may warrant additional attention. A summary of the research and important findings concerning these issues are provided in the conclusion.

Assessment and eflection

Over the past several weeks, my understanding of the national health-promotion and disease-prevention issue has become far more acute. The extent of the childhood obesity problem in this country became increasingly apparent as study after study confirmed the existence of the problem…… [Read More]

References

Berkowitz, B. & Borchard, M. (2009, January). Advocating for the prevention of childhood obesity: A call to action for nursing. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 14(1), 37-41.

Cawley, J. (2006, Spring). Markets and childhood obesity policy. The Future of Children, 16(1),

69-75.

Hannan, M. (2014, April 1). Setting the standard. National Recreation and Parks
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Programs to Eradicate Gangs in LA

Words: 1477 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20656491

Gang Prevention Programs in Los Angeles

The issue of gangs and the gang related deaths and violence has been a thing of concern across the nation and in Los Angeles in particular due to the alarming high levels of gang activities within the city. Los Angeles City has been described severally as the "gang capital" of the nation, due to the numerous gangs that are in existence as well as the long history of these gangs, going back to 50 years ago. Los Angeles Police Department (2016) there are approximately 450 active gangs in Los Angeles with a membership exceeding 45,000 members. The membership of these gangs has continued to increase over the last five years due to the lucrative narcotics trade. Over the last three years, it is documented that 16,398 violent crimes were associated to gang activities, 491 of these being homicides and 7,0478 being felony assaults, 98…… [Read More]

References

A Better LA, (2016). Funded Programs: R.A.C.E. Retrieved April 29, 2016 from http://www.abetterla.org/programs/

Basheer A., (2016). B.U.I.L.D. Brotherhood for Independent Leadership through Discipline. Retrieved April 29, 2016 from http://www.streetgangs.com/homicides/build.html

H.E.L.P.E.R Foundation, (2016). HELPER: Our Mission. Retrieved April 29, 2016 from http://www.helperfoundation.org/

Los Angeles Police Department (2016). Gangs. Retrieved April 29, 2016 from http://www.lapdonline.org/get_informed/content_basic_view/1396
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Interventions for Human Resources

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72310341

Human Resource Management Models

The performance management model is one of the four major human resource management interventions deployed throughout organizations in contemporary times. The others include talent and career development interventions, work diversity dimensions and interventions, and stress management diagnosis and intervention. The performance management model is predominantly concerned with motivating employees to increase their performances. This model hinges on business strategy, employee involvement, and workplace technology -- which are utilized to maximize the performance of both individuals and groups of employees. From these sources, an organization is able to devise reward systems, goal setting, and evaluation of performances to help improve performance efficacy.

The performance management model is pivotal to understanding the sort of leadership styles and attributes in place at Procter & Gamble and Colgate-Palmolive, respectively. Understanding how these organizations choose to motivate their employees -- particularly when viewed through the lens of the aforementioned model --…… [Read More]

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Interventions and Their Impact on Stakeholders

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92743461

Future esearch

Implications for practice (i.e. what practitioners can learn from these findings in order to enhance their practice)

The findings from the research are showing that there are a number of effects which are directly related to interventions. However, the reality is that certain amounts of flexibility must be applied throughout the process. To achieve these larger objectives a number of different areas are recommended. The most notable include:

Interventions are important by identifying the significance of major transformations and how they can be introduced. This helps someone to learn how to understand the individual and the best ways to encourage them to change. These practices can be utilized in a professional or educational environment.

The data is showing that these programs help the person to grow and become more involved in work / school.

Interactions are formed with faculty and mentors forging a strong bond.

Analyzing the program…… [Read More]

References

Newman, P. (2012). Bracketing Qualitative Research. Qualitative Social Work, 11 (1), 80-96.

Wiles, R. (2011). Innovation in Qualitative Research Methods. Qualitative Research. 1 (14), 41-60.
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special education theory and intervention

Words: 1358 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88553409

intervention (RTI) like targeted individualized interventions and regular progress monitoring are occasionally missed due to the lack of fidelity to best practices and recommended guidelines based on evidence-based instructional strategies. As a future director of special education, I would ensure that RTI is responsive and responsible, first by developing standard procedures for progress monitoring. Research on specific learning disability shows that the tiered structure of RTI can be especially helpful but only when RTI is defined specifically because vagueness leads to inconsistent and unreliable results with children (Hauerwas, Brown & Scott, 2013). There is no "clear national definition of what specific RTI data a local multidisciplinary team must have in hand to make a determination of" specific learning disabilities (Hauerwas, Brown & Scott, 2013, p. 102). Stahl (2016) also found that schools "were implementing RTI on their own without the support of a research team or external funding," leading to…… [Read More]