John Brown Essays (Examples)

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The raid itself was an act deemed a form of terrorism, a term not then used but one that has been applied to Brown since. In some ways, the term fits, for he attacked in order to provoke an incident and to create fear in order to generate support for a wider war. Like many terrorists, he had a strong moral conviction and a belief in the rightness of his actions, though that in itself does not mean they were right. For those who believe that Brown helped spur the Civil ar, his actions might be considered justified, while for those who see his attack as an aberration that had little real effect on subsequent events, his crusade was misdirected and foolish. hat is certainly clear is that assessments of Brown do not exist in a vacuum and that how one views the man may depend on how one….

Many of the historians will suggest that the John Brown's raid over Harper Lee and his quick execution leaded to the inevitable civil war.
Why would the South turn almost permanently to secession after 1859?

Despite of all the support John Brown gains from the Northern abolitionist writers, his actions were violent, terroristic and heinous. Even Abraham Lincoln who was trying to assuage Southern and Northern parts to solve out the issue of abolishing slavery in a peaceful manner mentioned John Brown as a misguide fanatic (eynolds 2005, John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil ights).

One can compare the violent and brutal raid by John Brown on Harper Lee with the September Eleven attack on Twin Towers in 2001. A terrorist attack, irrespective of the motives behind it cannot be tolerated, it should not be tolerated. The rift between Southern and Northern block….

John Brown: Was he a murderer or a martyr?
The actions of John Brown raise many uncomfortable questions about how we view terrorism in modern society. It is often said that 'one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter' and that expression certainly holds true with John Brown in his raid on Harper's Ferry. Even before the Harper's Ferry raid, Brown was a "leader of antislavery guerillas" in Kansas and "fought [against] a proslavery attack against the antislavery town of Lawrence. The following year, in retribution for another attack, Brown went to a proslavery town and brutally killed five of its settlers. Brown and his sons would continue to fight in the territory and in Missouri for the rest of the year" ("John Brown," 1998). Brown was not above killing civilians and regarded brutality inflicted upon African-Americans as an evil that could be eradicated only with violence. On one hand, the….

John Brown Trial 1859 the
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ith Brown's plans found at the location, it had been clear that the rebellion had been premeditated. This meant that Brown had committed a capital offense, making it impossible for him to be charged with murder in second degree. It did not take more than an hour for the jury to find Brown guilty, sentencing him to death by hanging in December 2, 1859.
John Brown did not live to see his dream of a Union in which freedom reigned, and, most of his contemporaries considered him and his actions to be purely fanatical. However, his struggle later paid off, with abolitionists having been influenced by his actions to pursue their principles, even if it meant to start the American Civil ar.

It would be difficult to say whether or not John Brown's actions had been right, as some would tend to believe that it is always right to fight for….

John Brown's Harper's Ferry raid on the abolition of slavery. Brown has variously been referred to as a madman, terrorist, and murderer; others have called him a saint, hero, and a martyr. Regardless of one's opinion of Brown the human being, his place in history and his impact on ending slavery cannot be denied. Deranged or no, Brown was a driven man who lived the courage of his convictions.
There can be little doubt that Brown's raid advanced the cause of abolition by escalating the debate over slavery that was already taking place in a polarized nation. Anti-slavery arguments ran the gamut from the political to the economic to the religious. At one time considered a fringe movement, by the mid-1800s abolition had taken center stage in American politics. A number of anti-slavery organizations had existed in America for years, but it was not until the 1840s that such organizations….

John Brown's Raid lead to the Civil ar?
In 1859, John Brown led an attack on a federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry in Virginia with the hope of arming slaves for a revolt against their masters. The plot failed and Brown was captured and hanged. Northern abolitionists such as illiam Lloyd Garrison,

Horace Greeley, and Frederick Douglas hailed Brown as a martyr, but Southerners viewed him as a crazed lunatic. The fanatical and probably mentally unstable Brown confirmed the South's worst fears of radical abolitionism when he made this attempt to galvanize a slave uprising. This was the most noted attempt at a genuine slave revolt since Nat Turner's revolt of 1831. This "act of war" enraged the South. Newspapers throughout the South were crying for John Brown's death. The Mobile Register wrote,

The ark of covenent has been desecrated. For the first time the soil of the South has been invaded….

Ralph aldo Emerson famously declared that John Brown's execution would "make the gallows as glorious as the cross." (Quoted by Reynolds 127) Other historians have opined that Brown's martyrdom was the single most important event that "sparked the Civil ar" and ultimately ended slavery. During his lifetime, Brown's uncompromising, radical ideas were often considered dangerous even by such anti-slavery politicians as Abraham Lincoln. In death, Brown became a symbol of courageous opposition to slavery. Union soldiers during the Civil ar marched to the tune of the song, "John Brown's Body," and its heady chorus about Brown "mouldering in the grave" while "his soul keeps marching on." (Reynolds, 136). Some scholars, rather exaggeratedly, have even expanded the scope of his influence to the civil rights movement in the 20th century.
Negative Influence

John Brown's political contribution has a negative side too. He has often been depicted as a forerunner of anarchists, and….


Overall, it can be concluded that John Brown was and remains a controversial figure in the history of the United States. His personality has been the subject of debate, as well as his intentions to incite the American people to rebellion against the system. However, probably the most important question his existence raised was over the actual legitimacy of the use of violence in attaining one's goals, no matter their moral justification.

eferences

Buchanan, Patrick J. "One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter." Information Clearing House. April 2004. 13 Nov. 2007. http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article5873.htm

Chowder, Ken. "The father of American terrorism." The American Heritage. Mar. 2000, vol. 51, issue 1. 13 Nov. 2007. http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/ah/2000/1/2000_1_81.shtml

Davis, John. "John Brown: Terrorist or martyr?" The Dailey.. 25 May, 2005. http://www.decaturdaily.com/decaturdaily/books/050529/book1.shtml

Fleming, Thomas. "Verdicts of History: The Trial of John Brown." American Heritage. Online. 1967. Vol 18, issue 5. 11 Nov.2007 http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/ah/1967/5/1967_5_28.shtml

Jenkins, P. A history of the United States. New….

John Brown's Raid On Harper's Ferry
John Brown and his raid at Harper's Ferry have a symbolic importance, as he himself was well aware, to suggest that not all white people counted themselves complicit in the persistence of slavery within the antebellum United States. In other words, Brown was engaged in what old-style Marxist revolutionaries used to refer to as "propaganda of the deed." His letters from prison were consciously intended as propaganda, as he asked for them to be circulated (and indeed published): "Please let all our friends read my letters when you can; & ask them to accept of it as in part for them."(Earle 98). And although his stated intention at Harper's Ferry -- to seize the weaponry there, arm the slaves of western Virginia, and thus begin Spartacus-style uprising -- failed, Brown craved martyrdom as justification, claiming: "I have now no doubt but that our seeming disaster:….

John F Kennedy
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John F. Kennedy
In contemporary times, John F. Kennedy is known for many things; winning a Pulitzer Prize, however, is not one of them (Coleman). Kennedy's awarding of the Pulitzer in 1957 -- a full four years before he was elected president of the United States -- for the biographical Profiles in Courage was one of his few achievements that he made prior to his election that did not directly involve his equally famous and influential family, including two brothers who also ran for president (Miller Center). Such a statement in no way detracts from Kennedy's prowess as a politician or as a leader. Yet it is highly difficult to extract his success as president from the intrinsic relationship between his family and his political life. In fact, there is a good deal of evidence that indicates that Kennedy's ensuing success as the commander-in-chief (for which he, of course, is chiefly….

John Updike & Nathaniel Hawthorne
John Updike and Nathaniel Hawthorne are two of the most well-known writers to have contributed to the body of American Literature. Updike, the more recent writer of the two, has been considered one of America's most prestigious writers, often honored by collegiate bodies and authoritative figures. Likewise, Nathaniel Hawthorne in his time was recognized and respected, having come from a background commanding some respect. Both authors however, during their life struggled with negative issues; Updike for example struggled with separation and health problems that plagued him since he was a child. Hawthorne struggled with his ancestry who embodied a rigid Puritanical belief system, and also struggled with the poverty of his family that he was never quite able to overcome during his lifetime.

The works of both Updike and Hawthorne tend to have some autobiographical notes. Each author draws from experiences within their own lives. Negativity, feelings….

John 5 13-21 Passage -- John
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Gnostics believed that they belonged to the "true church" of an elect few who were worthy; the orthodox Christians would not be saved because they were blind to the truth.
Part E -- Content - if we then combine the historical outline of the "reason" for John's writings with the overall message, we can conclude that there are at least five major paradigms present that are important in a contextual analysis of John.

John 5:13 - I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life. This seems to point that John saw a clear difference between those who believed in Jesus as the Son of God, but were unsure about eternal life. However, if we look back at other parts of his Gospel, we do find repetition of this theme. In John 1:5-7, for….

As Spong has closed his career as a formal minister, retiring from the bishop position in 2000 have has become even more controversial than ever before:
Spong believes in a transcending reality at "the very heart of life" that presses toward life and wholeness. He describes God as the "Ground of Being" and "universal presence" that undergirds all life and is present in all that is. He regards heaven as a symbol standing for "the limitlessness of Being itself," describes Jesus as "a God presence" whose burning awareness of God made him a doorway to divine reality, and believes that the divine source of life calls human beings to live fully, love wastefully, and have the courage to be. Spong describes his project in classic liberal terms -- walking the "razor's edge between orthodox overbelief and losing the 'Christ experience'..."I do so not because I reject the church, but because….

These conditions were evident in a letter to his wife, where inthrop described wintertime as "weather being cold and the waters perilous," and the difficulty of finding logs to burn for warmth.
The Puritan colonies survived, due in large part to inthrop's efforts at both instilling this culture of discipline, and in addressing any growing factionalism within the ranks. Such actions have indeed been a double-edged sword, for they planted the seeds for suffering, they also ensured that the colony endured and later, flourished. In this way, inthrop played a largely forgotten role in the founding of this country.

orks Cited

Bremer, Francis J. 2003. John inthrop: America's Forgotten Founding Father. New York: Oxford University Press.

Morgan, Edmund S. 1958. The Puritan Dilemma: The Story of John inthrop. New York: Little, Brown and Company.

inthrop, John. 1630, "A Model for Christian Charity." Hanover Historical Text Project. Available online at http://history.hanover.edu/texts/winthmod.html

inthrop, Robert C. 1869. Life….

John ommel Case Study
Why would John be considered a deviant? What social foundations of deviance appear to be evident in this case study?

Deviance is defined as the recognized violation of cultural norms. Social deviance is defined as any behavior that violates the social norms within a culture or greater community. This behavior can be criminal but does not necessarily need to violate a law to qualify. Criminal acts such as theft or assault are common types of social deviance, but so are incidental behaviors like lying, excessive drinking, or nose picking. The theory of social deviance is the foundation of the study of criminology and splinters into three classes of deviant behavior: conflict, structural functionalism, and symbolic interactionism.

2.Examine the three theoretical foundations of deviance (structural-functional, symbolic-interaction, and social-conflict). Determine which foundation applied to John's situation, and why. Give specific examples.

British sociologist A.. adcliffe-Brown developed the structural-functionalism theory, a perspective on….

Harriet Tubman has always been a great choice for an essay topic because her life story is dynamic, interesting, and incredibly inspiring.  Born into slavery, Tubman not only escaped, but also risked her own freedom returning to the South in order to help others escape from slavery using the Underground Railroad.  She deserves respect as one of the country’s leading freedom fighters, but it took decades for her story to be fully told.  A full-length movie describing her life was only released in 2020 and while most people recognize her as a....

Certainly! Here are five potential essay topics related to Harriet Tubman:

1. The Leadership and Activism of Harriet Tubman: Explore the ways in which Harriet Tubman's leadership and activism contributed to the abolitionist movement and the fight for civil rights.

2. Harriet Tubman's Role in the Underground Railroad: Analyze Harriet Tubman's contributions to the Underground Railroad and the impact her actions had on the lives of enslaved individuals seeking freedom.

3. Harriet Tubman and the Women's Rights Movement: Discuss Harriet Tubman's involvement in the women's rights movement and her advocacy for gender equality in addition to racial equality.

4. The Legacy of Harriet Tubman:....

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6 Pages
Term Paper

American History

John Brown Was an Abolitionist

Words: 1842
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

The raid itself was an act deemed a form of terrorism, a term not then used but one that has been applied to Brown since. In some ways,…

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4 Pages
Research Paper

American History

John Brown's Raid in Harper'

Words: 1361
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Many of the historians will suggest that the John Brown's raid over Harper Lee and his quick execution leaded to the inevitable civil war. Why would the South turn…

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2 Pages
Essay

Health - Nursing

John Brown Health Information Privacy

Words: 840
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

John Brown: Was he a murderer or a martyr? The actions of John Brown raise many uncomfortable questions about how we view terrorism in modern society. It is often said…

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5 Pages
Thesis

Criminal Justice

John Brown Trial 1859 the

Words: 1581
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Thesis

ith Brown's plans found at the location, it had been clear that the rebellion had been premeditated. This meant that Brown had committed a capital offense, making it…

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4 Pages
Essay

American History

John Brown's Harper's Ferry Raid on the

Words: 1467
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

John Brown's Harper's Ferry raid on the abolition of slavery. Brown has variously been referred to as a madman, terrorist, and murderer; others have called him a saint,…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Military

John Brown's Raid Lead to the Civil

Words: 959
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

John Brown's Raid lead to the Civil ar? In 1859, John Brown led an attack on a federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry in Virginia with the hope of arming…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

American History

Political Contributions of John Brown

Words: 2056
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Ralph aldo Emerson famously declared that John Brown's execution would "make the gallows as glorious as the cross." (Quoted by Reynolds 127) Other historians have opined that Brown's…

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5 Pages
Term Paper

American History

John Brown's Raid at Harper's

Words: 1822
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Overall, it can be concluded that John Brown was and remains a controversial figure in the history of the United States. His personality has been the subject of debate,…

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4 Pages
Essay

American History

Jim Brown's Raid on Harper's Ferry

Words: 1231
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

John Brown's Raid On Harper's Ferry John Brown and his raid at Harper's Ferry have a symbolic importance, as he himself was well aware, to suggest that not all white…

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8 Pages
Research Paper

Government

John F Kennedy

Words: 2637
Length: 8 Pages
Type: Research Paper

John F. Kennedy In contemporary times, John F. Kennedy is known for many things; winning a Pulitzer Prize, however, is not one of them (Coleman). Kennedy's awarding of the Pulitzer…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Literature

John Updike and Nathaniel Hawthorne

Words: 1596
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

John Updike & Nathaniel Hawthorne John Updike and Nathaniel Hawthorne are two of the most well-known writers to have contributed to the body of American Literature. Updike, the more recent…

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10 Pages
Research Paper

Mythology - Religion

John 5 13-21 Passage -- John

Words: 3508
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Gnostics believed that they belonged to the "true church" of an elect few who were worthy; the orthodox Christians would not be saved because they were blind to…

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13 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

John Shelby Spong New Christianity

Words: 3631
Length: 13 Pages
Type: Term Paper

As Spong has closed his career as a formal minister, retiring from the bishop position in 2000 have has become even more controversial than ever before: Spong believes in…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Mythology - Religion

John Winthrop Founder of Puritanism

Words: 1737
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

These conditions were evident in a letter to his wife, where inthrop described wintertime as "weather being cold and the waters perilous," and the difficulty of finding logs…

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2 Pages
Case Study

Sociology

John Rommel Case Study Why Would John

Words: 718
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Case Study

John ommel Case Study Why would John be considered a deviant? What social foundations of deviance appear to be evident in this case study? Deviance is defined as the recognized violation…

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