King Lear Essays (Examples)

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Truth and Lies in King

Words: 1520 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69578117

e may look at King Lear and see a bunch of messed up people but those people are some of the most realistic characters Shakespeare ever created. The best piece of advice to be gleaned from the play is to simply not allow any amount of wealth to blind one from truth. This is difficult because wealth attracts all kinds of people who feign affection. However, Lear illustrates that we can see beyond money and, if we try hard, we can do so and not have to lose our fortunes. People reveal who they actually are over time. The smartest thing anyone can do is pay attention and remember things. King Lear and Gloucester also show us that we are never too old to learn valuable lessons. e should never believe we know everything or even enough. An open mind and a bit of skepticism goes a long way when…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bradley A.C. "Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on 'Hamlet,' 'Othello,' 'King Lear,'

'Macbeth.'" 1904. Site Accessed July 29, 2010.. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Shakespare, William. King Lear. The Complete Works. New York: Barnes and Noble Books.

1994. Print.
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Worlds Depicted in Shakespeare's King

Words: 1124 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58951819

As the king finally dies, Edgar speaks to him and Kent admonishes him, wishing to "let him pass" (V.iii.377). Kent understands that the tragedy s over now and King Lear can finally have the peace that he deserves. It should also be noted that in death, Lear also receives the justice he deserves as well. Edgar is still hanging onto the man and does not want him to die just yet but Kent sees the relief in death, noting, He hates him/That would upon the rack of this tough world/Stretch him out any longer" (V.iii.377-9). The two comment on how the king "endured so long" (V.iii.381) his painful life on earth. They knew what it was that the king realized in his final hours. His attitude toward family and material things had been reversed. The king taught them the meaning of value, which was exhibited in the previous scenes with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. King Lear. New York: Washington Square Press. 1969.
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Hamlet Othello Lear in His

Words: 708 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45346346



Dissidence for Sinfield is the element in a text that seeks to contradict the dominant ideology of the text, or of the culture in which the text was produced (Sinfield agrees with Marx that these are the same thing). Subversiveness is similar, perhaps even identical in objective; the difference is that to be subversive, a text must be successful in its dissidence. For that reason, one must consult the historical impact of a text to determine whether it was subversive or merely dissident. In Othello, one could say that Othello was dissident in his challenge of racial assumptions, where Iago was subversive in overthrowing the hierarchy that supports Othello.

3.

In his article "The Breakdown of Medieval Hierarchy in King Lear," Alessandro Serpieri locates in the tension between the hierarchical system and those who are exiled or exile themselves from that system a mirror for the falling away of the…… [Read More]

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Love and Duty in Lear and Screwtape

Words: 2031 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10733643

Screwtape and Lear: hat Both Say About Duty and Christian Love

The underlying perspective that both King Lear and The Screwtape Letters share may be called a Christian perspective, in which duty, humility and sacrifice are indirectly valued as the best ideals, though, of course, Screwtape also notes that "duty comes before pleasure" (Lewis 21). hile Cordelia represents Christ in Lear, the ordeals of ormwood's patient resemble the crisis of identity that Lear suffers. The relationship between sanity and goodness is established in both works, and that relationship serves to underscore the main theme which is the greatness of Christian living and the tragedy and violence that results from unchristian living. The texts thus serve to complement one another and both agree on man's place in society (which is that he should subordinate himself to God rather than to Self or appetite or Satanic pride, etc.). So while the material…… [Read More]

Works Cited

White, David Allen. "Shakespeare." MN: St. Thomas Aquinas Seminary, 1996. Print.

Lewis, C.S. The Screwtape Letters. Bartleby. Web. 29 Apr 2015.

Lincoln, Abraham. "First Inaugural Address." Bartleby. Web. 29 Apr 2015.

New Testament. BibleHub. Web. 29 Apr 2015.
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Power Is Depicted in William Shakespeare's King

Words: 772 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47357493

power is depicted in William Shakespeare's "King Lear," Book I of John Milton's "Paradise Lost" and Francis Bacon's "Of Plantations" and "The Idols" from his "Novum Organum."

Shakespeare's depiction of power in King Lear shows how cunning, ruthless people come to gain political power at the expense of those that show qualities that one would desire in a leader: nobility, honesty and integrity. Shakespeare's key focus is the transition of power from one king or leader to his progeny. In King Lear, the title role decides to abdicate the throne and divide his kingdom equally between his three daughters: Goneril, Regan and Cordelia. Whereas the first two flatter him, Cordelia is honest and is ultimately punished for it: she loses her inheritance. In another part of the story, two brothers fight for control of a dukedom.

Here Shakespeare illustrates a contradiction between well-meaning, honest people and manipulative, power-hungry people. One…… [Read More]

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Daughters in Literature Requires a Thorough Analysis

Words: 1924 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52079961

Daughters in literature requires a thorough analysis of gender roles and norms. The concept of daughter is directly linked to gender roles, as being a daughter entails specific social and familial responsibilities. Daughters' rights, roles, and responsibilities vis-a-vis their male siblings can therefore become a gendered lens, which is used to read literature. This is true even when the daughters in question are not protagonists. For example, Sonya in Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment is not a protagonist but her supportive role has a tremendous impact on main character Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov. Likewise, no one of King Lear's three daughters is the play's protagonist but they nevertheless propel the plot of the play and are central to its outcome. Virginia oolf's To the Lighthouse barely features any of the Ramsay daughters, and yet there are ample textual references to the role of daughters in families and correspondingly, the role of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. Edited by James Kinsley. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.

Dostoevsky, Fyodor. Crime and Punishment. Translated and annotated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. New York: Vintage Books, 1993.

Shakespeare. William. King Lear. Edited by Stephen Orgel. New York, N.Y: Penguin Books, 1999.

Woolf, Virginia. To the Lighthouse. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. [1981], c1955.
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Myths - The Other Side of Wonder

Words: 1529 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35257919

Myths - "The Other Side of Wonder"

Like the empty sky it has no boundaries, yet it is right in this place, ever profound and clear.2

So run the lines from Cheng Tao, describing signifying, identifying myths - always there explaining existence and every facet of life, explaining the reason behind every man's actions:

So, myths.

For what is a myth? Lillian Hornstein3 describes it best. "A myth is the traditional tale common to the members of a tribe, race, or nation, usually involving the supernatural and serving to explain some natural phenomena. Given as an example is the tale of Persephone, daughter of Demeter, abducted by Hades and brought to the underworld but allowed to return to earth and visit her mother for six months. Thus, we have the varied alternations of the season on earth.

Shall we consider the social-cultural effects of myths positive or negative?

To the…… [Read More]

13 Mervill pp. 8-9

14 Mervill on Aristotle, pp. 25-30

15 Beehler, Roger and Alan, Drengson. The Philosophy of Society. London: Methiren and Co., 1978
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Obscurity of Real Feeling and Intentions in

Words: 368 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66415522

Obscurity of Real Feeling and Intentions in King Lear and Hamlet

"Nay madam, I know not seems," says Hamlet to his mother Gertrude. (Act 1.2) By this he means he is not pretending to mourn his beloved father. Hamlet's mourning suit of inky black fabric truthfully expresses his feelings. However, Hamlet does deploy language later in the play to both obscure and reveal his true feelings. After he learns the truth about Claudius, he pretends to be mad to apparently divert suspicion from himself. However, although his madness is a simulation, he often uses the cover of madness to tell the truth, such as when he calls Polonius a fishmonger, or a pimp, as Polonius 'pimps' his daughter Ophelia for his own political gain.

In contrast, Claudius' display as a king is always a lie -- he pretends to love Hamlet in Act 5, even while he has arranged the…… [Read More]

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Speak What We Feel Not What We

Words: 339 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77708334

Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say.

The beginning of the play "King Lear" depicts a society based upon an intricate network of verbally expressed falsehoods, within the context of the royal family. King Lear asks his three daughters to speak about their love for their father, in exchange for a portion of the kingdom he is dividing up. Goneril and Regan are practiced in deceptive language and praise their love for their father beyond all measure. However, Lear's youngest daughter Cordelia refuses to flatter her father. Rather, she merely speaks that she loves her father as she is bound to, as a daughter should, and no father is all to a daughter -- what of her sister's husbands, she points out?

But rather than see Goneril's and Regan's mendacity, Lear is outraged at this refusal of his favorite daughter to speak as he wishes her to…… [Read More]

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Antiquity and Renaissance

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73456817

Confessions of Augustine, The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila by Herself, "On the Oration and Dignity of Man," Petrarch's poetry, and Shakespeare's drama "King Lear" are both products of societies in which the dominant religious ethos was Christian rather than pagan. However, although all texts share this similar historical feature, fundamentally opposing views of the self are articulated through the theological texts in contrast with the works of lyric and dramatic poetry.

This may seem counter-intuitive to a casual reader, as both Augustine's Confessions and "King Lear" makes use of pagan and Christian modalities of selfhood. A closer reading suggests that while the former does so to validate the Christian concept of the supreme value of the inner life of the self as illuminated by God, the latter does so in a way that ultimately expresses a view of human inner life that is nihilistic, confusing, and cannot necessarily…… [Read More]

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Dying Is William Faulkner's Story

Words: 1409 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29016597

But since their sense of righteousness is flawed, their plans fall apart and the ending is quite disastrous as owe explains: "When they reach town, the putrescent corpse is buried, the daughter fails in her effort to get an abortion, one son is badly injured, another has gone mad, and at the very end, in a stroke of harsh comedy, the father suddenly remarries" (138).

Addie and Cora represent two different versions of right. For Cora faith is on lips all the time and she expresses righteousness through words, for Addie, actions are more important and thus she appears vain compared to Cora but has a deeper and more accurate sense of right and wrong. While Cora appears with utterances such as "I trust in my God and my reward" (70) and "Riches is nothing in the face of the Lord, for e can see into the heart." (7) Addie…… [Read More]

Howe, Irving. William Faulkner: A Critical Study. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1975.

William, Faulkner. As I Lay Dying. New York: Random House, 1985.

John Gledson, the Deceptive Realism of Machado de Assis (Liverpool, UK: Francis Cairns, 1984).
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Samuel Johnson Marks Himself as a Man

Words: 1944 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6087925

Samuel Johnson marks himself as a man of keen sensitivity when he acknowledges in his review of Shakespeare's King Lear that he was "so shocked by Cordelia's death, that I know not whether I ever endured to read again the last scenes of the play till I undertook to revise them as an editor" (1765). This may seem like a fair assessment from the man who gave the English language of the first and greatest and wittiest dictionaries of all time; but upon a second examination, it may perhaps reveal something about Johnson and his age that is so foreign to the ideas which Shakespeare presented in King Lear that he could do nothing but recoil in horror. Johnson was, after all, an Anglican -- of the Church that persecuted Campion (Jesuit priest) and Lyne (the woman martyred for harboring Catholic priests during the Protestant takeover and memorialized in Shakespeare's…… [Read More]

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Explication Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 When Love Swears Made Truth

Words: 969 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42031261

Shakespeare is often revered as one of the world's greatest authors. His works, which have now become legend, are the subject of intense study and review. In many instances, many of today's popular motion pictures, dramas, and movies have used elements of Shakespeare's work. Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the 16th century. He then wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest works in the English language. Many of these tragedies have been adapted for modern viewing. Hamlet, Othello, and Macbeth, for instance, have seen multiple motion picture releases and have captivated generations. In addition, many of Shakespeare's tragedies have become common works on Broadway, further justifying their importance in English literature.…… [Read More]

References:

1) Booth, Stephen, ed. Shakespeare's Sonnets. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977, p. 457- 476.
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Presidential History

Words: 1459 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12034932

Shakespeare structures his play King Lear, the first scene reveals how frustrated Lear is with his younger daughter Cordelia, who cannot find the words on command to express her love for him.

This sets Lear up to place his trust in her two older and conniving sister, Goneril and Regan.

In the second scene, a similar situation begins to develop for the Earl of Gloucester, who has two sons.

His situation is more complicated.

All three of King Lear's daughters are born legitimately (within marriage) to him.

However, the Earl has one legitimate and one illegitimate son.

The legitimate son, Edgar, stands to inherit his father's title and property.

Edmund, as a bastard son, is not likely to inherit anything.

The Earl has not denied Edmund's parentage, but Edmund is painfully aware, and resentful of, his second class status.

As Scene ii of Act I opens, Edmund is in his…… [Read More]

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Shakespeare's Play Macbeth Women Play Influence Macbeth

Words: 1277 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61334348

Shakespeare's play Macbeth, women play influence Macbeth a brave vibrant soldier, ready die king, a murderer? Discuss witches predictions portrayed Jacobean era ambitious Lady Macbeth husband deranged.

illiam Shakespeare's play Macbeth provides an intriguing account involving concepts like greed, the influence women have on men, and the overall idea of human nature in dubious circumstances. Macbeth is the central character and he comes to employ deceiving attitudes as he becomes more and more overcome by greed. hile it is actually normal to see a person being obsessed with power and coming to act in disagreement with principles he or she previously believed in, Macbeth is also significantly influenced by women who he interacts with and it is only safe to say that they play an important role in making him commit regicide.

Macbeth is somewhat dependent to women, not from a sexual point-of-view, but from a point-of-view involving him wanting…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Andersen, Richard, "Macbeth," (Marshall Cavendish, 2009)

2. Bloom, Harold, "Macbeth," (Infobase Publishing, 2005)

3. Bloom, Harold, and Marson, Janyce, "Macbeth," (Infobase Publishing, 2008)

4. Bradley, A.C., "Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth," (Echo Library, 2006)
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Printing Press and the Internet

Words: 6637 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64054291

)

"Sonnet 130" by Shakespeare and "Sonnet 23" by Louis Labe both talk about love, as so many sonnets do. Their respective techniques however, differentiate them from each other. Shakespeare uses a rhyme scheme that became known as Shakespearean rhyme scheme or English rhyme. He writes about love in a sarcastic manner though. He is mocking the traditional love poems and the usual expressive manner in which women are often compared to. It is ironic in a way because Shakespeare himself also uses the very techniques in his previous writing when he is writing from a man's point-of-view and describing a woman. But in this sonnet he uses the technique of mocking this exaggerated comparison. Usually women are compared to having skin as white as snow, however, in reality, Shakespeare points out, women don't really fit this description, "If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun."

Louis Labe…… [Read More]

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Sight Verus Blindness Be Sure

Words: 1828 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53434591

Look with thine ears: see how yond / justice rails upon yond simple thief. Hark, in / thine ear: change places; and, handy-dandy, which / is the justice, which is the thief? Thou hast seen / a farmer's dog bark at a beggar?"(IV. vi. 166-171) Lear's words are very interesting: he urges Gloucester thus to listen inwardly to his deeper sense of perception and not trust merely his eyes. By a sort of re-imagining process he would thus be able to "change the places" of the thief and the justice in his mind and realize who is the real villain. Thus, Lear finally realizes that insight comes from closing one's eyes on mere appearance and looking beyond the gilded surface. The metaphor of the glass eyes that he tells Gloucester he should find for himself is also significant: he must judges by having insight and not by merely seeing: "Get…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. King Lear. New York: Oxford University Press, 1972.
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Shakespeare's Insistant Theme Imagery Use

Words: 1891 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34796416

he's gone forever! / I know when one is dead, and when one lives; / he's dead as earth." (King Lear V.iii.256-260)

Titus Andronicus is the central figure and tragic hero of the homonymous play by William hakespeare. He is a General of Rome and father to Lavinia and Lucius. He is a brave solider of Rome who has spent the last ten years of his life fighting Rome's enemies. Although very successful and praised for his heroic acts, Titus Andronicus now feels incapable of assuming the role his country had envisioned for him. Moreover, despite the fact that in the beginning he is seen as a model of piety, and praised for his adherence to tradition and custom, it is precisely this inflexibility - "For now I stand as one upon a rock / Environed with a wilderness of sea, / Who marks the waxing tide grow wave by…… [Read More]

Shakespeare, William. King Lear. Literature Center.  http://www.online-literature.com/shakespeare/kinglear/ 

Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. The Oxford Shakespeare. Internet.  http://www.bartelby.com/70/index41.html 

Shakespeare, William. Titus Andronicus. Literature Center.  http://www.online-literature.com/shakespeare/titusandronicus/3/
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Media and War The

Words: 1110 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10869707

In the novel, Howad is foced to seve as an U.S. secet Agent by the Blue Faiy, a caee that eventually led to his own death.

Mothe Night epesents the fictional memois of Howad W. Campbell J., an Ameican who seved as a secet agent fo the Ameican Amy duing the Second Wold Wa. Giving that the actual autho of the novel seved himself as a soldie duing the same wa, the question of whethe o not the autho esembles the potagonist in the novel is undestandable. Pehaps one of the visions they shae is the eality of facts, Mothe Night being Vonnegut's only novel that does not featue fantastic elements. Vonnegut wote "We ae what we petend to be, so we must be caeful about what we petend to be," as the final moal fo his novel and one thing Campbell and Vonnegut shae afte all is thei vocation…… [Read More]

references to such stories like "Jack the Giant Killer" and uses the image of some demons and serpents to create the background. The tone of the play is quite humourous and ironic, thus explained by the existence of the Fool. However, the King himself is quite intelligent, even though Shakespeare uses his insanity to address nonhuman objects. Like in many of his other writings, Shakespeare's style of writing is poetic, using iambic rhythms and free verse.

Therefore, it is quite interesting to observe that such aspects of human nature depicted in King Lear resemble other works like that of Vonnegut's and his Mother Night. The technique used by the later is ultimately different from that of Shakespeare's, less dramatic, but tragic nonetheless, written in a first-person journal style. This confessional style is bound to credit the protagonist-narrator because we only get his version of the events. Interesting enough though, it seems as though Campbell discovers more things about himself as the story unfolds than does the reader.
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5 Of Shakespeare S Works

Words: 1190 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72848533

literacy -- that which is mastered only by Prospero and Miranda, and sought after by Caliban who is considered illiterate in comparison to the pair. Caliban's antagonistic relationship with Prospero is one which the author believes is waged over this literacy and which is so crucial because it is both literal and figurative. Literally it represents the smoothness of language which the aforementioned pair possess; figuratively it involves the books that Prospero has which endow him with magical abilities to cast spells and actuate spirits such as Ariel. The author buttresses this opinion by ascribing significance to Caliban's attempts to counteract Prospero's powers by destroying his books, thereby making Prospero's literacy on par with his own illiteracy.

The most interesting aspect of this article is that its focus on literacy is one which is only shared between the previously denoted three characters (and perhaps Ariel) whose fate is linked to…… [Read More]

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Cordelia and Portia Two Characters in Shakespeare Who Shine

Words: 1389 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80641172

Women in Shakespeare

In The Merchant of Venice, the life of Antonio is saved by Portia, who disguises herself as a male lawyer in order to confront the Jew Shylock and turn the tables on him in a witty and discerning exploitation of legalism. Similarly, in King Lear, it is Cordelia, the despised daughter of Lear who alone of all his daughters remains loyal to the King and, in the end, saves his life even though it costs her own. Thus, in these two plays Shakespeare shows not only that women are equal to men in a world that declared them unequal but that in many respects the patriarchy that existed could not have existed without the help and, ultimately, saving actions of the women. This paper will show how Dusinberre is correct in assessment that Shakespeare viewed the sexes as equal by providing examples from Lear and Merchant of…… [Read More]

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William Shakespeare's Macbeth Introduction to

Words: 4155 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27566347

She declares that a man who snatches what he desires is actually a true man. Lady Macbeth burdens herself by seducing his husband into committing the murder afterall. Although, initially she has the strength and potential to deal with the task of abetting in a murder and thinks she will be able to forget all about it once she becomes the Scottish Queen but eventually conscience overpowers her vices. She dies of guilt and anguish.

(iii) Banquo

Like Macbeth, Banquo, is also a nobleman of Scotland and a general in rank.To some extent through Banquo and Macbeth, the writer has offered a comparison of choices made by men in similar circumstances. When Macbeth was foretold of his rule on Scotland, so was Banquo made aware that his descendants would one day be wearing the crown. Like Macbeth, Banquo is a man of high rank and status and hence of an…… [Read More]

References

Bradley, a.C. Shakespeare: Macbeth: A Casebook (J. Wain Ed.). London: MacMillan. (1968).

Chandler, D. The Essence of Shakespearean Tragedy.Retrieved from  http://www.lcurve.org/writings/Tragedy.htm . May 2, 2013.

Elliott, G.R., & Shakespeare, W. Dramatic providence in Macbeth: Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (1960).

Goddard, H.C. The meaning of Shakespeare (Vol. 2): University of Chicago Press. (1951).
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Shakespeare Tragedies

Words: 2554 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36157028

Shakespeare Never Read Aristotle?

Or, the dynamic forms of catharsis and tragic flaws in Shakespeare's plays

Shakespeare's most beloved plays are his tragedies. If one were to list his best and most popular plays: Othello, Romeo & Juliet, Hamlet, King Lear, and so forth, one would find the list comprised almost entirely of tragedies. So it would not be amiss to say that much of the modern literary conception of theatrical tragedy is shaped and influenced by Shakespeare. At the same time, the definitions of the tragic form as understood at the roots of theatrical history (in Greco-Roman times) continue to be part and parcel of the official comprehension of tragedy. Many critics have sought to fore Shakespeare into the mold of tragedy defined in Aristotle's Poetica, and many others have rightfully protested that he was not cast from that mold, and that in fact he owes little to it.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aristotle. Poetica. Trans. W.H. Fyfe. http://www.noncontradiction.com/ac_works_b38.asp

Charlton, H.B. "Humanism and Mystery" Shakespeare The Tragedies. Ed. Alfred

Harbage. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1964. 10-18.

Harbage, Alfred. "Introduction" Shakespeare The Tragedies. Ed. Alfred Harbage.
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Shakespeare Richard III

Words: 1093 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29200252

Duke of Gloucester

Shakespeare's ichard III, The Duke of Gloucester, may not bear much resemblance to the real king in character and appearance but in this play, he is certainly the most dominant and a fully developed figure that serves as both the protagonist and villain of the play. For critics, it is hard to decide whether ichard III can actually be called a tragedy because here the protagonist appears less a tragic figure and more a vain, cruel and malicious king who was ruthlessly ambitious and killed people not for the love of his country, as most other tragic kings did, but advance his own objectives.

It is widely believed that Shakespeare's ichard III was based on Sir Thomas More's description of the king. Other historians have often described him as a courageous and warm king, a description widely different from the image we get from Shakespeare's play. In…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

1) Sir Thomas More, The History of King Richard III, ed. By R.S. Sylvester (1963), pp. 7-8

2) Harrison, G.B., ed. Shakespeare: the complete works. New York: Harcourt, 1968

3) Donna J. Oestreich-Hart "Therefore, since I Cannot Prove a Lover." Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900. Volume: 40. Issue: 2. 2000. 241.
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Reversal of Nature in Macbeth

Words: 1468 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64154266

"(Bloom, 41) Any act of evil is seen thus to change the basic structure of the universe and to transform nature into a desolated chaos.

It is not only the natural, physical environment that becomes extremely chaotic through evil, but the human nature as well. All through the play, Lady Macbeth calls upon the forces of evil to keep at bay the "compunctious visitings of nature." It is thus plainly shown that there can be no enactment of malignancy without a reversal of human nature: "The raven himself is hoarse / That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan / Under my battlements. Come, you spirits / That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, / and fill me from the crown to the toe top-full / of direst cruelty! make thick my blood; / Stop up the access and passage to remorse, / That no compunctious visitings of nature /…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold ed. William Shakespeare's Macbeth. New York: Chelsea House, 1987.

Paul a. "Macbeth and the Gospelling of Scotland." In Shakespeare as Political Thinker, edited by John E. Alvis and Thomas G. West, pp. 315-51. Wilmington: ISI Books, 2000.

Coursen, H.R. Macbeth: A Guide to the Play. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1997.

Lowenthal, David. "Macbeth: Shakespeare Mystery Play," in Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philology. 1989 (Spring), p. 311-57.
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Globe the Development of the

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86806383

hen the lease expired for the original location, the Burbages reassembled the theater on the South Bank of the Thames in 1599. This was considered to be one of the 'seedier' districts of London. As well as play-going (a disreputable practice in and of itself), bearbaiting, bull-baiting, and prostitution, were other popular spectator sports on the South Bank (Cummings 2003). hen the first Globe burnt down in 1613 "an auditor whose breaches were on fire" was "doused with ale," given that "liquid refreshments" at the tavern were always nearby at the Globe (Burgess 80).

Shakespeare had a financial interest in the theater, as well as acted with and wrote for the Burbage's company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men. Shakespeare and four other investors and actors, including John Heminges, Augustine Phillips, Thomas Pope and ill Kemp, owned the remaining 50% in equal shares and Shakespeare profited as much from owning the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burgess, Anthony. Shakespeare. First Published 1970. Da Capo Press, 2002.

Cummings, Michael. "Globe Theater." Cummings Study Guide. 2003. 1 May 2008.  http://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/xGlobe.html 

Greer, Germaine. Shakespeare's Wife. New York: Harpers, 2008.

James Burbage." Elizabethan Era. 1 May 2008.  http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/james-burbage.htm
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Paul's Case Faust -- in

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86568737

Paul is rather lazy. He does not like to flatter other people, since he sees himself as superior to others, thinking he possesses greater refinement and culture. In contrast to another young man in the story, the young man who marries a serious woman to discipline his appetites, Paul has no desire to do so.

"It was at the Theatre and at Carnegie Hall that Paul really lived; the rest was but a sleep and a forgetting." (paragraph 29) --The last part of this quotation (in italics) is a sneaky reference to a poem by William Wordsworth, called "Intimations of Immortality." Look up this poem and determine what Wordsworth says about the various stages of life. How does this relate to Paul's story?

Paul lives in a fantasy world, not in the real world. His fantasy life leads to his death. The reference to sleep and forgetting suggests that he…… [Read More]

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Othello the Tragedy of Othello

Words: 2558 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4503798

Simultaneously, he forces a man long upheld as honest in the highest Venetian circles into scheming and manipulations; these are roles which Iago takes on too readily, suggesting a certain familiarity, but it must be preserved that no earlier instance is ever presented to suggest that the notables of Venice were in any way wrong to uphold Iago as honest and true. In fact, those same notables are those that appealed to Othello on Iago's behalf in the question of the promotion. Allowing passion to rule what should be societal decisions is Othello's barbarism cracking through the veneer of his civility. Othello, though a great soldier, is no Caesar nor even a Roman at all. His nature is of the wild, and -- like many tamed, wild beasts -- he retains the inner potential to one day bite the hand that feeds him.

And, even after Othello's barbarian passion has…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Shakespeare, William. "Othello the Moor of Venice." The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature. Ed. Michael Meyer. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin's, 2009. Print.

2. Crawford, Alexander W. "Othello as Tragic Hero." Hamlet, an ideal prince, and other essays in Shakesperean interpretation: Hamlet; Merchant of Venice; Othello; King Lear. Boston: R.G. Badger, 1916. Shakespeare Online. 20 Aug. 2009. 2 May 2010 <  http://www.shakespeare-online.com/plays/othello/othelloessay2.html 

3. Crawford, Alexander W. "Othello's relationship with Iago." Hamlet, an ideal prince, and other essays in Shakesperean interpretation: Hamlet; Merchant of Venice; Othello; King Lear. Boston: R.G. Badger, 1916. Shakespeare Online. 20 Aug. 2009. 2 May 2010 <
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Shakespeare Used Music in His Works William

Words: 1098 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2626142

Shakespeare used Music in his orks

illiam Shakespeare (1564-1616), English playwright and poet, is recognized all over the world as the greatest dramatist of all times. His plays have been performed more times than those of any other dramatist and have been translated in almost every major language. (Kastan) hile many aspects of Shakespeare's plays have been discussed and analyzed, it is perhaps not so widely known that music has also played an important role in many of his plays. In this paper we shall review the historical background of music in the Shakespearian era and discuss how and why music was used in Shakespeare's works. The type of music used by the playwright as well as some examples of music in specific plays shall also be described.

Historical Background of Music in the Shakespearian Era

The 16th century in which Shakespeare was born was a period when England was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lackey, Stephanie. "Shakespeare and his Music." October 12, 1998. Vanderbilt University's MusL 242 Gateway Page. April 25, 2003. http://www.vanderbilt.edu/Blair/Courses/MUSL242/f98/slackey.htm

Kastan, David Scott. "William Shakespeare." Article in Encyclopedia Encarta. CD-ROM Version, 2003

Music in the plays." The Internet Shakespeare Editions. March 1996 (Updated January 26, 2003). April 25, 2003. http://web.uvic.ca/shakespeare/Library/SLTnoframes/stage/music.html

Music of the streets and fairs." The Internet Shakespeare Editions. March 1996 (Updated January 26, 2003). April 25, 2003. http://web.uvic.ca/shakespeare/Library/SLTnoframes/literature/streets.html
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Medieval Castle Comparison of Roscommon

Words: 3226 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19217032

The gatehouse at Harlech contained spacious chambers or halls, with fireplaces and latrines. There is little doubt that the guardhouse was home to the constable of the castle. Master James of St. George, the Harlech's builder, was himself appointed constable of his creation (Williams 2007, p. 7). The gatehouse was also occupied, in this period, by Sir John de Bonvillars, Deputy Justiciar of North Wales. The larger rooms on each level were fitted with tall windows. The most favored rooms faced the courtyard, the chimneys of their fireplaces making an additional architectural arrangement on the roof of the gatehouse (Williams 2007, p. 21). The view from Harlech is particularly impressive. The sea and the mountains of Snowdonia provide a majestic backdrop to the royal castle. It has even been suggested at oscommon that the castle's original location beside a lake and in the middle of an expansive field may have…… [Read More]

References

Barry, T.B., 1988, the Archaeology of Medieval Ireland, London: Routledge.

Brown, Allen, 1970, English Castles, Chancellor Press, 59 Grosvenor St., London.

Curtis, E., 2002,. A History of Ireland: From Earliest Times to 1922, London: Routledge.

Davies, R.R., 1997, the Revolt of Owain Glyn Dwr, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Leadership Approaches Through Literature

Words: 1858 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47332261

representation of leadership in literary works is not identical to the representation of leaders. To take one of the most famous examples in English literature, King Lear may be the highest-ranking leader in the Shakespeare tragedy that bears his name, but his actions are neither wise nor principled; Lear's Fool, the court-jester, arguably displays more leadership over the course of the drama. Examining literary representations of leadership in the past two decades, therefore, will not always entail examining stories about powerful or influential people. In outlining a research proposal to examine how leadership issues are illuminated by recently published works, it is crucial to understand that a proper survey will include a mix of works. Some of these works will examine directly the highest leadership roles, like that of a commander-in-chief, while other works will illuminate leadership from the perspective of the ordinary soldiers who follow that lead. This proposal…… [Read More]

References

Beilin, K. (2012): "The split-screen syndrome": Structuring (non)-seeing in two plays on Abu Ghraib. Comparative Drama 46: 427-450.

Franzen, J. (2010). Freedom. New York: Farrar Straus.

Goodwin, DK. (2005). Team of rivals: The political genius of Abraham Lincoln. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Greenberg, KJ. (2007). Split screens. In McKelvey, T., ed. One of the guys: Women as
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Mental State of Shakespeare's Hamlet

Words: 2164 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44139366

Hamlet's Insanity

Hamlet's sanity has been questioned by critics of the play for centuries: is the Dane merely acting in order to fool the spies following him around the castle? -- or does he actually lose his mind? Part of the difficulty is that both seem possible (Davis 629). The other part is that critics tend to think it an either/or proposition -- as in, either Hamlet is acting or Hamlet is insane. The play, however, provides all the evidence one needs to assert that Hamlet is indeed acting insane initially (feigning madness) but that as the drama unfolds, his grasp on sanity and reason becomes looser and looser until he himself admits that he knows not what he is doing (and his actions essentially become mad). This paper will show how Hamlet is proven to be insane by both referring to the text and to the opinion of scholars.…… [Read More]

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Francis Bacon's Advancement of Learning an Analysis

Words: 2228 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52160734

Francis Bacon's Advancement Of Learning

An Analysis of Bacon's Rationale for riting the Advancement of Learning

hen one analyzes Francis Bacon's Advancement of Learning, he does so by first entering into an era that was primarily dedicated to overthrowing the Learning of the past -- that is to say, it was breaking with the old world and advancing the new. That old world was one of scholasticism, with men like Thomas Aquinas incorporating Aristotelian philosophy into the medieval world and using the pagan to prove the Christian. It was a world where religious truths were accepted on the authority of the Church, and a world where that authority was still in place and still in power. In the 14th century that authority would begin to corrupt (with the papacy's abduction and removal to Avignon) and the natural catastrophe that was the Black Plague. These events (though soon over) left their…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aquinas, Thomas. Summa Theologica. Trans. Fathers of the English Dominican

Province. Thomas Aquinas. Christian Classics Ethereal Library,1998. Web. 22

Feb 2011.

Bacon, Francis. The Advancement of Learning. (Stephen Jay Gould, ed.). NY: Modern
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Oedipus Exemplifies or Refutes Aristotle's Definition of

Words: 2019 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42161407

Oedipus Exemplifies or Refutes Aristotle's Definition of a Tragic Hero

Aristotle's, the Greek philosopher definition of a tragic hero and tragedy has been influential since he set these definitions down in The Poetics. These definitions were viewed as important during the Renaissance, when scores of writers shaped their writings on the works of the ancient Rome and Greece. Aristotle asserted that tragedies follow the descent of a tragic hero or a central character, from a noble and high position to a low one. A tragic hero posse some tragic flaws, which cause his, fall from fortune, or turnaround of fortune, and to some point, the tragic hero realizes that his own mistakes have caused the turnaround of his fortune. Aristotle also noted that the tragic fall of a hero or a central character in a play stirs up fear to the audience or the reader given that the audience sympathizes…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Bloom, Harold. Oedipus Rex. Texas: Infobase Publishing, 2007.

Grene David. Sophocles. Oedipus the king. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010

Kahan Jeffrey . King Lear: New critical essays. New York: Routledge, 2008.

Madden Frank. Exploring literature: Writing and arguing about fiction, poetry, drama and the essay. Pearson Education Canada, 2008
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William Shakespeare's a Midsummer Night's

Words: 1791 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98757717

And while it may seem silly upon first reading or seeing the play, it is clear that a Midsummer Night's Dream also has quite serious ideas. Scholars have noted that the play includes a cultural critique of the Elizabethan era in which it is set (Lamb 93-124). Other critics have noted that the play may contain quite subversive ideas regarding the fluid nature of sexual identity (Green 369-370). Whatever way you choose to interpret a Midsummer Night's Dream, the play's goofy characters, outrageous situations, and rich language have ensured the play's status as a classic work of English literature.

ibliography

Casey, Charles. "Was Shakespeare Gay? Sonnet 20 and the Politics of Pedagogy."

College Literature, Fall 1998. 29 November 2007. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3709/is_199810/ai_n8827074.

Gibson, H.N. The Shakespeare Claimants: A Critical Survey of the Four Principal

Theories Concerning the Authorship of the Shakespearean Plays. New York: Routledge, 2005.

Green, Douglas E. "Preposterous Pleasures: Queer…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Casey, Charles. "Was Shakespeare Gay? Sonnet 20 and the Politics of Pedagogy."

College Literature, Fall 1998. 29 November 2007. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3709/is_199810/ai_n8827074.

Gibson, H.N. The Shakespeare Claimants: A Critical Survey of the Four Principal

Theories Concerning the Authorship of the Shakespearean Plays. New York: Routledge, 2005.
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Saussure's Definition of Sign Every

Words: 757 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57258085

She finds herself in a strange entanglement with her husband's ex-lover, the friendly man, and the young woman who wants "to hold him fast in a re-enactment of the Old Scottish ballad that re-echoes throughout the story" (aterston, 262). However, neither one of these women is able to hold the man fast; "I can't make two women happy," he says (Munro, 103).

The whole idea of "holding someone fast" resonates in different ways throughout the story. Hazel was not able to hold her husband fast and she must come to terms with the fact that she, in some ways, abandoned him before he died -- not "striving toward him" in the past or in the present in memory (Munro, 104).

The song sang in the story is about a young man who is captured by fairies and wants more than anything to go back to human life. The young man…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kakutani, Michiko. "Book of The Times; Alice Munro's Stories of Changes of the Heart." New York Times. August 19, 2010

http://www.nytimes.com/1990/03/09/books/books-of-the-times-alice-munro-s-stories-of-changes-of-the-heart.html

Munro, Alice. Friend of My Youth. New York: Vintage; First Vintage Contemporaries

Edition Edition, 1991.
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Shakespeare's Success as a Playwright

Words: 2400 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12081360



hile Shakespeare attracted his fair share of criticism during his day, it is also clear that many of his contemporaries as well as the general public viewed Shakespeare's work in a positive light. For example, Callaghan (2004) points out that, "hile we do not know how much Shakespeare was paid for the plays he furnished his company, it is clear that the greatest part of the handsome fortune Shakespeare had started to amass as early as the 1590s came from his share in the profits of his company rather than from his plays" (405). This relative affluence apparently helped to provide a sort of comfort zone for Shakespeare that allowed him to write when and what he wanted and for whatever audience he desired in ways that contributed to his ultimate success as a playwright as well as the enduring qualities of his works. For instance, Callaghan adds that, "For…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander, Peter. Shakespeare's Life and Art. London: James Nisbet, 1939.

Blakeley, John. (2009). "Shakespearean Relocations: The Final Scene of John Madden's

Shakespeare in Love." Shakespeare Bulletin 27(2): 249-250.

Blayney, Peter W.M. The First Folio of Shakespeare. Washington, DC: Folger Shakespeare
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Stephen Greenblatt's Will in the

Words: 1227 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84015048



Greenblatt also provides us with some thought into what be hidden in Shakespeare's strange epitaph. Perspective is also gleaned on many of Shakespeare's works, including the Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, Othello, and King Lear IV. He also goes into how Shakespeare only had one rival, Christopher Marlowe until 1957, when Ben Johnson emerged. The two men were similarly in age and envy. The two men "circled warily, watching with intense attention, imitating, and then attempting to surpass each other" (256). Here we see how healthy competition can spur talent. Additionally, Greenblatt delves into some of the mysterious aspects of Shakespeare's life with a convincing perspective. His marriage to Anne Hathaway is viewed fairly. Shakespeare's early marriage years and why he left for London are still elusive but Greenblatt attempts to ferret out some of the more popular theories regarding these issues. That Shakespeare did, for all intents and purposes, abandon…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Greenblatt, Stephen. Will in the World. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 2004.
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Othello One of William Shakespeare's

Words: 1736 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92718959

In the context of Othello, this is not such a reassuring notion because Othello and Iago represent the worst that man can be. The reality of this fact allows us to look upon Othello is disgust and with caution. These two men are known by their first names worldwide not because they are nice but because they are the farthest from it. They are human and they are evil and this combination forces us to see humanity, warts and all. Alvin Kernan agrees with this notion adding that when Shakespeare wrote Othello his "knowledge of human nature and his ability to dramatize it in language and action were at their height" (Kernan xxiii). e love Shakespeare because we can relate to his characters - even if they frighten us.

orks Cited

Bloom, Harold. Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human. New York: Riverhead Books. 1998.

Bradley, a.C. Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human. New York: Riverhead Books. 1998.

Bradley, a.C. Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth. New York: Penguin Books. 1991.

Heilman, Robert. Wit and Witchcraft in Othello." Shakespeare: Modern Essays in Criticism. Dean, Leonard, ed. New York: Oxford University Press. 1977.

Kernan, Alvin. Introduction: Othello. Kernan, Alvin, ed. New York: Signet Classics. 1963.
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Oldboy an Analysis of Chan-Wook

Words: 3330 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65609356



Mise-en-scene

As Gerald Mast states, "Details develop the film's emotional dynamics" (138), and these details are everywhere in the mise-en-scene. The most important aspect of the mise-en-scene, of course, is the acting. Actors are the most obvious props -- and Oh Dae-su provides ample instances of buffoonery that keeps Oldboy from sinking into the mire of its own violence. Despite all the gore, the film harbors a gentleness and affection, thanks to the acting from Oh Dae-su and Mido. Even the villain provides a handsome face and charming smile -- and an affable voice; even he is hard not to like, as he plays cat and mouse with Oh Dae-su.

The low-key lighting also helps provide the audience with the emotional connection necessary for the kind of mystery the film attempts to be. Scenes are shrouded in darkness -- such as when the heroes find themselves working in the Internet…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Axmaker, Sean. "Oldboy story of revenge is beaten down by its own brutality." Seattle

Pi. 2005. Web. 30 Dec 2011.

Berardinelli, James. "Oldboy." Reel Views. 2005. Web. 30 Dec 2011.

Ebert, Roger. "Oldboy." Chicago Sun-Times. 2005. Web. 30 Dec 2011.