Literary Theme Essays (Examples)

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Theme in by Night in Chile

Words: 1489 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26412796

Robert Bolano is the writer of the novel "By Night in Chile" published in 2000. Urrutia is the narrator of the novel and entire novel is narrated in the first person. Starting lines of the novel are "I am dying now, but I still have many things to say," and from this point the novel starts describing how Urrutia was able to enter the Chilean literary world.

The narrator of the novel, Urrutia Lacroix used the image of "the wizened youth," for himself which showed how much he struggled with his conscience, during the time when he was trapped in Opus Dei. The narrator has described his life as distorted because of the struggle he made throughout his life.

Narrator has used different styles to engage the readers. At time it was simple, lofty, intense, and believable however on occasion the narrator used harsh and imposing style to describe the…… [Read More]

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Literary Comparison

Words: 1445 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42370828

Strength of the Human Spirit know why the Caged Bird Sings is an autobiography by Maya Angelou. It is the first book of the five volumes of the author's autobiography covering her life from the early 1930s up till 1970. This particular volume "I know why the Caged Bird Sings" is one of the most popular of the five volumes as it talks about her initial years as a child up to the time when she turns sixteen. The autobiography is based on her life as a black child, teenager and woman; it covers all elements of her family and their trials and tribulations.

Although the book is based on Angelous' life, it basically talks about the development of the human self and the impact of various experiences in life on the strength of the human spirit. As Angelou herself describes the reason for writing this book "somebody needs to…… [Read More]

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Literary Analysis of Macbeth

Words: 2142 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52796347

Shakespeare

Macbeth and the Struggle between Good and Evil

Like all of Shakespeare's tragedies, the action of Macbeth is based around the fatal flaw of the man who would otherwise be a hero. For Macbeth, his flaw is his ambition. He allows his ambition to drive him and this overcomes his reason. In doing so, he chooses the path of evil over the path of good. In the end though, he cannot live with his own choice and his good side becomes his underdoing. In this way, Macbeth is not only the story of a man choosing evil, but also the story of a man who cannot be driven to ignore his good side. This makes Macbeth a unique play because it shows both sides of the struggle between good and evil and makes it a human struggle. This major theme in the play is expressed in several ways. This…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bradley, A.C. "The Witch Scenes in Macbeth." England in Literature. Eds. John Pfordesher, Gladys V. Veidemanis, and Helen McDonnell. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1991: 232-233.

Lamb, M.E. "Engendering the Narrative Act: Old Wives' Tales in The Winter's Tale, Macbeth, and The Tempest." Criticism 40.4 (1998): 529-553.

Shakespeare, W. Macbeth. New York: Penguin, 1999.
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Literary Analysis of Drama

Words: 1299 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15624656

ole of Women in Othello

The Conflicting Female ole in Shakespeare's Othello

In Shakespeare's Othello, women are in a state of turmoil. On the one hand, the women in the play have to remain obedient to the subservient standards of life as a female in the 15th and 16th centuries in Europe. Yet, on the other hand, there are signs of a new, strong and independent female emerging within Shakespeare's characters. In Othello, Shakespeare juxtaposes the characteristics of the traditional, obedient woman with a new, more independent one. Desdemona's willing death at the hand of her husband illustrates Shakespeare's suggestion that strictly following these outdated gender norms will only lead to individual destruction; while Emilia, and her more independent ways stands up against her husband's ill will.

To understand the role of women in the play, it is first important to see how they are viewed by the men in…… [Read More]

References

Evans, Ed. "Gender and Race in Othello." University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2011. Web. http://www.unc.edu/~edevans/othello.html

Shakespeare, William. Othello. Saddleback Educational Publishing. 2011.
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Themes a Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man James Joyce

Words: 401 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42205279

Portrait of the Artist of a Young Man by James Joyce traces the development of Stephen Dedulas as a writer from infancy to young adulthood. While Joyce shows the maturation of Stephen Deduals, he is also painting a vivid image of Dublin, Ireland and Stephen Dedulas' world. One literary device that Joyce uses throughout his novel is the repetitious appearance of numerous images. Stephen's fascination with women, both real and imaginary, is prevalent from childhood and is used by Joyce as a common strain of imagery throughout the novel.

Stephen's main love interest in the novel is Emma Clere. Emma is a girl who has such an effect on Stephen's life that he relates many events of his life back to Emma. For instance, Stephen feels guilty for his involvement with prostitutes not because it is immoral, but because of what Emma would think of him if she found out.…… [Read More]

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Literary Comparison

Words: 1064 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76350127

John esley Before Referencing

Supernatural tales of death and jealousy: Edgar Allen Poe's "Masque of the Red Death" and Robert Olen Butler's "Jealous Husband Returns in the Form of a Parrot"

Both Edgar Allen Poe's "Masque of the Red Death" and Robert Olen Butler's "Jealous Husband Returns in the Form of a Parrot" use supernatural plots to highlight the intense emotions human beings often feel about common and ordinary subjects, namely death and the loss of a loved one to someone else. Poe's tale is written in the style of American Romanticism, and uses highly ornate language and a European setting to create an atmosphere of death, misery and decay. Poe's tale begins strangely, and becomes even stranger as the narrative wears on. The final appearance by death as a masked figure at a costume ball makes the allegorical theme of the story horrifyingly real -- not even the wealthy…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Butler, Robert Olen. "Jealous Husband Returns in the Form of a Parrot." Fiction from Web Del Sol. 22 Feb 2008.  http://www.webdelsol.com/butler/rob-5.htm 

Poe, Edgar Allen. "The Masque of the Red Death." Online Literature. 22 Feb 2008. http://www.online-literature.com/poe/36
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Literary Styles in the Movie the Tin Drum

Words: 2052 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19919811

Shop on the Main Street

Continental European film producers were slow to focus on political and social injustices as the dominant themes after World War II. Heroism in America and Soviet World War II movies was not a significant theme, primarily because, with the exclusion of Switzerland and Sweden, other countries' dwellers either were part of the Nazi regime or collaborated with the rule. Therefore, the filmmakers, when making films, focused on the societies' immersion in the totalitarian ruling systems. Similar to other countries of Europe, excluding Switzerland and Sweden, all other countries in central Europe lived under Authoritarian and totalitarian regimes in the period between the Second World War. However, after the war, the continent split, and this influenced how the filmmakers made films. Germans, Slovaks, Czechs and Hungary embraced the Nazi regime, whereas Austria and three quarters of Germany embraced democracy. This is partly a contributing factor as…… [Read More]

References

Crowther, B. (1966). The Shop on the Main Street (1965). Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=EE05E7DF1730E270BC4D51DFB766838D679EDE 

Votruba, M. (2011). The Shop on the Main Street: The holocaust in context. Retrieved from  http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/11635/3/Martin_Votruba-The_Shop_on_Main_Street_The_Holocaust_in_Context.pdf 

Banovac, S. (2005). JanKadar and Elmar Klos: The Shop on Main Street (Obchod na korze),

1965. Retrieved from  http://www.kinokultura.com/specials/3/obchod.shtml
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Literary Resopnse to World War One

Words: 714 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74317857

Social Activism and Literature

Two of the major themes in 20th century American literature are war and social protest. The United States has been engaged in a steady series of wars since the beginning of the 20th century. With the carnage of the First World War, the horrors of the Second, the futility of Vietnam, many writers and artists contributed to the literature of protest with respect to war, and America's involvement in it.

Amy Lowell's September, 1918 is a good example of how writers reacted to the First World War. Its presentation of a wistful era where there is no war, juxtaposed against the current "broken world," illustrates the yearning that many had for a world without war. The First World War had essentially eliminated any romance that there was of war in society, and its brutality would spark this sort of response across the world. For the first…… [Read More]

References

Parini, J. & Cutter, M. (2009). Themes in Contemporary American Literature. Cengage.
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Homecoming The Principle Theme in Jean Rhys'

Words: 1012 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37015514

Homecoming?

The principle theme in Jean hys' short story, "I Used to Live Here Once," is the prevalence of racism and the accompanying sentiment of elitism that it gives those of European ancestry. This theme was fairly common in hys' writing, which routinely "would explore the tension between the ordered world of colonial life and the seductive world of island sensuality" (Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2004). hys' theme is supported on the strength of a pair of literary elements, foreshadowing and symbolism. A thorough examination of the text demonstrates that the author utilizes these two literary devices to reinforce her theme and indicate to the reader that the seemingly halcyon journey of figurative and literal remembrance is not as innocent as it appears.

hys utilizes copious amounts of foreshadowing to demonstrate that the narrator's journey to a house she used to live in represents more than that which is appears…… [Read More]

References

Savory, E. (2003). "Selective memory: white creole, nostalgia, Jean Rhys, and Side By Side." Journal of Caribbean Literatures. 3 (3): 17-25.

Encyclopedia of World Biography. (2004). "Jean Rhys." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Retrieved from   http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Jean_Rhys.aspx
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Salinger Is an American Literary Treasure Best

Words: 1680 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3900264

Salinger is an American literary treasure, best known for his novella Catcher in the ye. However, Catcher in the ye is but one of many in the canon of Salinger works. Salinger's short stories have recently garnered renewed attention because several unpublished Salinger stories were leaked online in November of 2013, three years after the author's death (uncie, 2013). Salinger died a recluse, and a man of mystery who was as much an American antihero as Holden Caulfield of Catcher in the ye. There have been numerous cultural allusions of Salinger's iconic novel and its quintessentially postmodern protagonist. Although no film has ever been made directly from the story of Catcher in the ye, Morgan (2010) points out that there have been allusions to Salinger stories in films like The Collector (1965) and Six Degrees of Separation (1993). Additionally, a 2013 documentary film about J.D. Salinger promises to reveal the…… [Read More]

References

Gopnik, A. (2010). Postscript: J.D. Salinger. The New Yorker. Retrieved online: http://www.newyorker.com/talk/2010/02/08/100208ta_talk_gopnik

McGrath, C. (2010). J.D. Salinger, literary recluse, dies at 91. International New York Times. Retrieved online: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/29/books/29salinger.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Morgan, K. (2010). Six stories: Salinger inspired cinema. The Huffington Post. Retrieved online:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kim-morgan/six-stories-salinger-insp_b_443099.html 

Runcie, C. (2013). JD Salinger unpublished stories 'leaked online'. 28 Nov 2013. The Telegraph. Retrieved online:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/10480275/JD-Salinger-unpublished-stories-leaked-online.html
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Major Themes in European Literature

Words: 2421 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13929846

contemplated an individual's relationship with his or her environment. In Oedipus Rex and Antigone, Sophocles explores the relationship an individual has with the world and society. In each of these plays, Sophocles juxtaposes divinity and humanity and investigates the role of each within Theban society as well as looks into conflicts that arise when the laws of man conflict with divine laws. Through their narratives, Oedipus Rex and Antigone posit man is intended to serve others, including gods, and that they do not exist to be self-serving.

Oedipus Rex revolves around an eponymous anti-hero who by saving the city of Thebes from a Sphinx inadvertently and simultaneously brought forth a plague upon it. By defeating the Sphinx, Oedipus secured his place upon the Theban throne and as such was not only responsible for ensuring laws were abided, but was also responsible for protecting Thebes' citizens. Because of the plague that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sophocles. Antigone. The Complete Greek Tragedies. Eds. David Grene and Richard Lattimore.

2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1991. pp. 160-212.

-. Oedipus Rex. The Complete Greek Tragedies. Eds. David Grene and Richard

Lattimore. 2nd Edition. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1991. pp. 10-76.
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New Start as a Theme

Words: 2430 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41620170

Thus, the term "a new start" came to embody a lofty ideal and it was considered to be more important from the simple fact that the respective period in history dealt with the particular issues addressed by people such as Thomas Paine. For instance, he tried, through his writing to give a new incentive for the people fighting for the independence from Britain and from this point-of-view he is remembered as an important figure of the era (Philip, 2005).

Without a doubt there are periods in history that are dominated by certain interpretations of the notion of "a new start." This is precisely due to the fact that the American literature, it its attempt to escape the influence and the stereotypes of the British creations, have searched for new sources of inspiration. In this sense, while in the British Isles the romantic view of the world was still predominant, in…… [Read More]

References

Funston, Judith E. (1990) "Authority, Autonomy, and Representation in American Literature, 1776-1865." By Mark R. Patterson. Review. The Journal of American History, Vol. 77, No. 2., pp. 650-651.

Kwok, Gordon. (2001) Civil War Poetry. 13 Feb 2008. http://hometown.aol.com/gordonkwok/cwpoetry.html

Larkin, Edward. (2008). Thomas Paine and the Literature of Revolution. Cambridge University Press.

Outline of American Literature. (2006). Democratic Origins and Revolutionary Writers, 1776-1820. USINFO.STATE.GUV website. 13 Feb 2008. http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/oal/lit2.htm
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Conflict the Theme of Freedom

Words: 2503 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56411818

The choice cannot be repudiated or duplicated, but one makes the choice without foreknowledge, almost as if blindly. After making the selection, the traveler in Frost's poem says, "Yet knowing how way leads on to way/I doubted if I should ever come back" (14-15). And at the end, as one continues to encounter different forks along the way, the endless paths have slim chance of ever giving the traveler a second choice. One can see this as similar to Mrs. Mallard's change. As she looks out into the future, she sees endless possibilities for choice and nothing feels like she would ever return to the determinate state of marriage.

The final two lines of "The Road Not Taken" say, "I took the one less traveled by / and that has made all the difference" (19-20). Unlike in Chopin, the traveler determines to take the path. In Chopin, the path forces…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Carver, Raymond. (1981). Cathedral: stories. New York: Vintage.

Chopin, Kate. (2003). The Awakening and selected short fiction. New York: Barnes & Noble.

Frost, Robert. (1969). The Poetry of Robert Frost: the collected poems E.C. Lathem, Ed. New York: Holt.
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Response to Themes in Barry's Machine Man

Words: 1737 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50319705

Barry's "Machine Man"

Originally published in 2011, Max Barry's futuristic science fiction novel "Machine Man" was first made available to readers as an online serial, before being updated and collected into a full-fledged book. Barry bucked publishing industry protocol and posted excerpts from his "Machine Man" to his personal website, imploring his regular readers to submit criticism and feedback in the hope of collectively shaping his creative vision. As one of the first literary works to be "crowdsourced" in terms of content, the version of "Machine Man" which emerged from this collaborative process is, much like its conflicted protagonist, an amalgamation of various constituent parts which comes together to form a harmonious whole. Barry's thematic thrust with the novel -- which tells the tale of Charles Neumann, a subordinate scientist working for a military research conglomerate known as Better Future -- is humanity's ceaseless pursuit of perfection, and the consequences…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barry, Max. Machine Man. New York, NY: Vintage Books, 2011. Print.

Crerand, Canice E., and David B. Sarwer. "Body dysmorphic disorder." Corsini Encyclopedia of Psychology (2010).
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Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka Theme

Words: 1462 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3680047

Gradually, Gregor discovers how unimportant he really is to the family, and how little they really care about him. He has given them his love and devotion, and they repay him by locking him away when he needs them the most.

Kafka uses the plot to show the increasing disinterest of Gregor's family, and how they have used him for the last five years. His father has grown "fat and sluggish," his mother relied on the servants (that he paid for), and his sister did nothing much at all. He worked like a dog to keep the family together, and in thanks, they lock him away in his room when he becomes an embarrassment. Kafka uses this plot device to add information about the family, all the while showing Gregor's sweet disposition. Gregor's life is meaningless and empty, but he does not blame them for any of it. Instead, he…… [Read More]

References

Bloom, Harold, ed. Franz Kafka's 'The Metamorphosis.' New York: Chelsea House, 1988.

Kafka, Franz. Selected Short Stories of Franz Kafka. Trans. Willa Muir and Edwin Muir. New York: Modern Library, 1952.

Olsen, Eric. "The Labyrinth Within: Franz Kafka and the Predicament of Modern Man." World and I, Volume: 19, Issue: 6, June 2004.
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Exile Literary Characters in Exile Can Be

Words: 1266 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98267995

Exile

Literary Characters in Exile

Exile can be the self-imposed banishment from one's home or given as a form of punishment. The end result of exile is solitude. Exile affords those in it for infinite reflection of themselves, their choices, and their lives in general. Three prominent literary characters experience exile as part of the overall narrative and in that, reveal a great deal about themselves to themselves as well as to the readers. The three narratives in questions are "The Epic of Gilgamesh," "The Tempest," and "Things Fall Apart." All of the main characters of these narratives experience exile as a result of actions taken by the protagonists at earlier points in the story. The protagonist in each respective story are exiled because of their choices and the exile forces each character to face consequences that ultimately bring their inner character to the surface in a more direct manner…… [Read More]

References:

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: First Anchor Books Edition, 1994.

Mason, Herbert. Gilgamesh A Verse Narrative. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2003.

Shakespeare, William. "The Tempest." Ed. Barbara A. Mowat & Paul Werstine. New York: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 1994.

Sutton, Brian. "Virtue Rather Than Vengeance": Genesis and Shakespeare's The Tempest." Explicator, Vol. 66, No. 4, 224-229.
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Minor Characters and Themes Minor Characters in

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81673758

Minor Characters and Themes

Minor characters in any play act as supporting foils and help to advance the plot. Without these foils, it would be impossible for the play to progress in the way that playwright has envisioned. Besides carrying the play forward, they also help in highlighting the major themes of the literary piece. In almost every piece of fiction, whether a play or short story or novel, we come across certain important minor characters that are minor because while they lend support to the plot, they are not directly influenced by the intentions of the author. The people who remain in the forefront and bear the brunt of all action are the major characters, and thus their in the story is obvious and needs little discussion. However it is the minor characters that need to be closely analyzed or discussed to see why they have been placed in…… [Read More]

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Carver's Cathedral an Analysis of Theme and

Words: 1072 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7133761

Carver's "Cathedral"

An Analysis of Theme and Plot in Carver's "Cathedral"

Raymond Carver states that by the mid-1960s he had tired of reading and writing "long narrative fiction" ("On riting" 46). Shorter fiction, he found, was more immediate. Flannery O'Connor states a similar idea in The Habit of Being: for her, the novel was a literary medium that could bog down all of one's creative powers. Turning to a short story was a way of escape: "My novel is at an impasse. In fact it has been at one for as long as I can remember. Before Christmas I couldn't stand it any longer so I began a short story. It's like escaping from the penitentiary" (O'Connor 127). This mode of thought may help us to understand why Carver turned to composing shorter works of fiction like "Cathedral," a work that acts as a brief glimpse into how one man's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carver, Raymond. "Cathedral." 1983. Web. 25 Sept 2012.

Carver, Raymond. "On Writing." Mississippi Review, vol. 14, no. 1/2 (Winter, 1985), pp.

46-51). Print.

O'Connor, Flannery. The Habit of Being. NY, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1979.
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Yin and Yang in Literary Relationships Yin

Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38018024

Yin and Yang in Literary Relationships

Yin and Yang in eastern philosophy constitute two parts of a whole. The one cannot exist without the other. They also represent perfect balance; if one dominates, the balance is disturbed and there is conflict. This idea can be applied to several literary relationships, including Adam and Eve from Milton's Paradise Lost and Gilgamesh and Enkidu from the epic Gilgamesh.

Adam and Eve

The Biblical Adam and Eve begin their lives in perfect wholeness and bliss. God makes them equal, they share everything and they lack nothing. Their love binds them in complete unity and balance. They are also bound together by their obedience and love for God.

The imbalance comes with the arrival of the snake. The snake tempts Eve away from what she knows is right. When she tempts Adam, there is an imbalance between the two of them and Adam attempts…… [Read More]

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Death as a Theme in

Words: 1379 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9771650

Oliver and the other boys at the workhouse are also very nearly 'worked to death'.

Oliver is (again figuratively) 'scared to death', at that key moment in the novel that that turns out also to define his fate (the extra gruel request scene) when he is selected by the other boys at the workhouse for that most terrifying, unpleasant task. Then, moments after he asks, Oliver becomes equally scared that his still not-quite-to-be-believed question has now caused (so-to-speak) 'all hell to break loose' inside the workhouse, among the comfortably well-off, incredulous, poorhouse administrators. These well-fed individuals in fact cannot fathom, at all, how any boy so "lucky" as to be boarded and fed at their workhouse could possibly be so ungrateful as to request more than his daily starvation-level ration of gruel.

hen one day the boys draw lots to see who among them would be designated to ask for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dickens, Charles. Oliver Twist. Gutenberg.org [online text]. Retrieved February

7, 2007, from: www.gutenberg.org/etext/730.html

Donovan, Frank. The Children of Charles Dickens. London: Frewin, 1968. 61-

Dunn, Richard J.. Oliver Twist: Whole Heart and Soul. Twayne's Masterwork
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Christian Themes in Everyman Beowulf

Words: 929 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62954345

Beowulf experiences tough circumstances and because he does the right things, he emerges a hero and can live knowing he did the best he could. Here, responsibility leads to good works and, subsequently, a good life.

In "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," we see Christian values displayed when Gawain accepts his responsibility in much the same way that Grendel does. hen examining the story of Sir Gawain, we cannot overlook the importance of chivalry, which is strongly associated with Christian ideals. Gawain maintain the knight's high ideals even when he under pressure. hen Gawain is traveling to the Green Chapel, he speaks with God, working out his own fear and uneasiness. The result of this conversation is a renewed sense of honor and a urgency to continue. Another example of how the poet intended Gawain to carry these ideals with him is in the pentangle, in which he describes…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beowulf." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol I.M.H. Abrams, ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986. pp. 31-78.

Everyman." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol I.M.H. Abrams, ed. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986. pp. 347-67.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986. pp. 233-87.
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Conflict Themes in Age of Innocence by

Words: 789 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3705053

Conflict Themes in "Age of Innocence" by Edith Wharton

This paper looks at the Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton and discuses certain aspects within the novel, such as the central conflict themes, and the development of certain characters, this paper also looks at in brief the irony and symbolic nature of the time.… [Read More]

Sadly this realistic novel is book set all to well within society that existed then and in many ways exists today, society is in ruin when it is run in such a way as the elite status of the past, this will never end in any society it will only be obscured by the negative aspects of the different society needs.

References

Wharton E (1996) The Age of Innocence; Penguin Books; London
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Imagery and Theme in Frost's Out Robert

Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47774844

Imagery and Theme in Frost's "Out"

Robert Frost's "Out" may appear to be simple in its narrative, straightforwardly telling a story, yet its complex poetic style enables the reader to experience the tragic events that occur through a variety of poetic devices that Frost uses. The poem demonstrates the fickleness of fate and how some things are beyond an individual's control. In "Out," Frost explores the limitations that an individual has over how their life turns out through vivid imagery and its theme.

The poem tells the story of a young boy who accidentally had his hand cut off by a buzz saw and who subsequently died from the shock. "Out" highlights how quickly things can happen and how even a quick response may be futile. Frost establishes a narrative backdrop through imagery and onomatopoeia. For instance, the poem opens, "The buzz-saw snarled and rattled in the yard/And made dust…… [Read More]

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Brendan Behan Contributed Much to the Literary

Words: 2214 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37018897

Brendan Behan contributed much to the literary genre, though his literary achievements often are subordinate to his public recognition as a drunk, disorderly and often amusing or entertaining member of society. Many literary critics fail to recognize Behan for the serious contributions he made to writing, instead choosing to focus on the controversy that exists regarding his work ethic and personal habits.

This paper asserts however that Behan used his writing to voice his disagreement with the notion of cultural nationalism that existed during the time he lived in Ireland. Brannigan (2002) supports this notion claiming that Behan's writing in fact allowed him to "articulate dissident" and contributed to the emergence of revisionist and other critiques of nationalism (Brannigan, 2002).

This paper will also delve into the idea that Behan wrote from a strictly humanistic point, attempting to enlighten his audience with amusing anecdotes about human nature, sharing the notion…… [Read More]

Jasto, K. (2000). "Brendan Behan." [online] October 10, 2004, at http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/behan.htm

Silltoe, A. (1959, August). "Proletarian novelists. Books and Bookmen, 13; from Brannigan, J. (2002). "Belated Behan: Brendan Behan and the cultural politics of memory" Eire-Ireland: A Journal of Irish Studies.

Brendan Behan
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Realism Some Literary Critics and

Words: 3589 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91902381

The other qualities of a superior being remained forbidden thus making the reality of their imperfect world even more difficult to bare.

Borges used the invisible reality in his short stories to speculate on some themes that were on people's minds since the beginning of human civilization. He used his writing skills to create a work of fiction that made the world of existential questions possessing men's minds became real to the contemporary reader.

If the invisible reality in Borges' stories represents the literary translations of the universal questions on people's minds since the beginning of the human civilization, the ghosts in Henry James' Turn of the Screw seem the representation of one's own fears, illusions, repressed feelings and imagination that is allowed to run wild. A potentially gothic story told in the evening of Christmas Eve is full of magic and scary at the same time. It is not…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Borges, Jose Luis. Labyrinths. Slected Stories & Other Writings. Retrieved: Oct 22, 2008. Available at http://www.scribd.com/doc/267621/Borges-Jorge-Luis-Labyrinths

James, Henry. The Turn of the Screw. 1st World Publishing, 2004.

Kafka, Franz. The Metamorphosis. Kessinger Publishing, 2004

Kundera, Milan. The Book of laughter and Forgetting. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 1999
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E A Poe the Themes of

Words: 2475 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54142406

.. They are neither man nor woman- They are neither brute nor human- They are Ghouls..."

Graham's (2003) analysis of "ells" show that Poe intentionally creates different categories of bells in order to illustrate the various emotional states individuals have had experienced in their life. She argues that the poem "not only...powerfully convey emotional effects to...readers, but also makes readers subconsciously convey those effects with facial expressions...," a characteristic found more strongly in Poe's depiction of the Iron and razen bells.

Indeed, through "ells," readers undergo what Poe identifies as 'excitements' that are "psychal necessity" or "transient." Emphasis on these point proves that shifts in emotions ultimately results to restlessness, instability of one's psyche, and ultimately, escape from this instability, which may be achieved by either succumbing to insanity or death. This is the natural state of the human mind that Poe provokes in his poem, a situation similar to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Frank, F. (1997). The Poe Encyclopedia. Westport: Greenwood Publishing Group.

Graham, K. (2003). Poe's "The Bells." Explicator, Vol. 62, Issue 1.

Magill, F. (1998). Notable Poets. CA: Salem Press.

Magistrale, T. (2001). Student Companion to Edgar Allan Poe. Westport: Praeger.
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Joseph Conrad and His Influence on British Literary History

Words: 1426 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84529727

Joseph Conrad and His Influence on British Literary History

Joseph Conrad was born in the Polish-dominated side of Ukraine in the year 1857, and was originally known as Jozef Teodor Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski. He was at sea for twenty years, after which he became an author. He wrote in English, which was the language he learnt third. hat he went through while in Africa, the Caribbean and Southeast Asia, along with all the reading and the knowledge he had about Europe were the bases for his writing. He was listed as the top British author of the 20th Century (Larabee).

He was well-known as a sophisticated and subtle observer of the physical world and the behavior of humans. Conrad was also a renowned literary artist. He had many writings including memoirs, novels and short stories, which are still widely read and studied today. For example, his 1899 story, Heart of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Encyclopedia Britannica. "Joseph Conrad: British Writer." Encyclopedia Britannica, 2016, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Joseph-Conrad. Accessed 23 August 2016.

Larabee, Mark. "Joseph Conrad." Oxford Bibliographies, 30 September 2013, http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199846719/obo-9780199846719-0089.xml. Accessed 23 August 2016.
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Apollonian Is a Literary Concept

Words: 981 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72287513

In this reading, Dobyns' "Counterparts" is his statement of personal philosophy that argues the only way to reach the Apollonian ideals is to work with, and embrace, the Dionysian and thus create a whole, or a yin-yang. This practice of using the Dionysian in order to achieve the Apollonian is a common strategy used in Dobyns' poetry.

Likewise, poet Frank O'Hara also uses Apollonian themes in the majority of his works. Like Dobyns, Frank O'Hara is also an American poet. He is best known as being a key member of the New York School of poetry.

O'Hara is known for his ability to write provocative and provoking poetry that was composed immediately, sometime even over the time frame of a lunch break. Thus, both high and low brow cultural references are common in O'Hara's work, as they are in Dobyns'.

O'Hara was good friends and deeply inspired by numerous leading…… [Read More]

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Moomins by Tove Jansson Literary

Words: 1622 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17672365



In fact, one of the principle facets of Moominpappa's character is to introduce didactic messages to his family, particularly to his children. Doing so is part of his job as a father and as the head of a household. Unfortunately, not all of his methods of teaching his family are as entertaining as his memoirs, as the following quotation from Moominpappa at Sea, in which he warns his family of the dangers of forest fires, proves.

He had warned the family. Time and time again he had explained how necessary it was to be careful in August. He had described the burning valley, the roar of the flames, the white-hot tree trunks, and the fire creeping along the ground underneath the moss. Blinding columns of flame flung upward against the night sky! aves of fire, rushing down the sides of the valley and on toward the sea… (Jansson).

The hyperbolic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jansson, Tove. Moominpappa's Memoirs. London: Square Fish. 2010. Print.

Jansson, Tove. Moominpappa at Sea. London: Square Fish. 2010. Print.

Janson, Tove. Tales from Moominvalley. London: Square Fish. 2010. Print.
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Personal and the Literary in American Literature

Words: 1917 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96749839

Blurring the Gap Between Fiction and eal Life

This is a paper that outlines how modern literature integrates personal experiences of the writers into works of fiction. It has 5 sources.

It is quite interesting to note the means by which eminent writers attract attention to their ideas and literary content. On closer examination, we may come to the conclusion that the means by which public attention may be grabbed has followed a definite pattern through the years. While writers like Shakespeare and his contemporaries used fiction to project their literary geniuses, modern day writers strive to catch the attention of the masses by presenting their own personal conflicts and tragedies to the public. The modern writer has lessened the gap between a literary piece of work and real life. However, literature in the classical period is known for its often unnatural and over-dramatized perspectives on life. Today, the stories…… [Read More]

References

Wright, Richard A., Black Boy, Perennial, September 1, 1998

Williams, Tennessee. The Glass Menagerie, New Directions Publishing; June 1999

Ward, Jerry, M. "Richard Wright-Black Boy," retrieved at  http://www.newsreel.org/guides/richardw.htm . On April 2, 2004

King Thomas, L. Irony and distance in the Glass Menagerie in Tennessee Williams. Ed. Harold Bloom, New York: Chelsea house, 1987, 85-94
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Hawthorne Author Nathaniel Hawthorne's Literary Works Constantly

Words: 1649 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5701055

Hawthorne

Author Nathaniel Hawthorne's literary works constantly reference ideas of the supernatural and the religious ideas of the Puritans who colonized the United States. Of particular interest to Hawthorne is how these two things work together in that time period. Many of Nathaniel Hawthorne's works take place in Colonial times, a good century before the author himself was born. His own ancestors were active participants in Puritan society, even serving as judges during the Salem itch Trials. Scholars have argued that Hawthorne's work heavily features this time because of the guilt he felt over the actions of his relatives. Nathaniel Hawthorne used this historical setting to create moral points about Puritanical society and the hypocrisy of those times, as well as the continued hypocrisy of his own time period. This hypocrisy is linked back to the religious zealousness of the Puritan times where the beliefs of the church superseded all…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Poe, Edgar Allen. "The Minister's Black Veil." 1837.

Poe, Edgar Allen. "Rappaccini's Daughter."

Poe, Edgar Allen. "Young Goodman Brown." 1854.
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Ghosts in Two Literary Works The Spanish

Words: 2201 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81482555

ghosts in two literary works. The Spanish Tragedy and Hamlet each have a ghost which guides and drives the action of the story. The writer works to compare and contrast the ghosts in each story and tell how they relate to the story. There were two sources used to complete this paper.

Throughout history writers have used unusual methods to illustrate points if their work that they want the reader to understand. In two classic works of literature a ghost was used to provide many of the needed details to the story that would have been unknown otherwise. In The Spanish Tragedy and in Hamlet there were ghosts to provide the foundation for many of the stories actions. Without the ghosts much of the things that occurred would not make any sense to the reader. While they each uses a ghost for the purpose of information provision the ghosts and…… [Read More]

References

Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. Barrons Educational Series. 1996

Kyd, Thomas. The Spanish Tragedy. Theatre Communications Group 1997
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Grey Wolf by Sapphire Theme

Words: 1889 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69949871

They have been together so long that they have to reason to leave each other now, but it is clear their lives are no longer satisfying or meaningful. It is good the narrator dies, because she has been dead for a long time anyway, she just will not admit it. She does not seem to have any compassion for Mary Alice either. She describes her cancer as matter of factly as she does her own death, just repeating the facts, but never empathizing with the pain and suffering Mary Alice must feel. Because she has no empathy, she has no real emotion, and that is another element of the story that points to the narrator already being dead inside. She is cold, hard, and not very sympathetic, and it is clear it has not been easy for Mary Alice to live with her. She is the "man" in the relationship,…… [Read More]

References

Sapphire. "The Grey Wolf." 53-56.
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Alcee Laballiere and the Theme

Words: 1170 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5562761

From the narrator of the story, the readers find out that Alcee's family was unconventional in that their living arrangements are peculiar, for his wife and children chose to live in another place instead of with him. In the same manner that Calixta becomes the unconventional mother and wife to Bibo and Bobinot, respectively, Alcee has also achieved freedom by agreeing to the peculiar arrangements of his family right after he has resumed relations with Calixta.

On a nutshell, Chopin extends the message that it is only through Calixta and Alcee's unconventional relationship that their respective families have achieved happiness not only for themselves, but for the characters as well. As a minor character of the story, the author has effectively reflected in Alcee's character every ideology and belief that society holds as deviant or unconventional: his agreement to live separately with his family and his commitment to re-establishing romantic…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chopin, K. (1898). E-text of "The Storm." Available at http://www.geocities.com/short_stories_page/chopinstorm.html.
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Religious to Philosophical and Literary

Words: 1224 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15933850

The evolution of mankind on all levels, and especially the new focus of the modern society on technology and material development, has brought about an estrangement from the spiritual life.

The new world offers "alternatives," as it were, to love, through a complexity of personal, both material and social developments, that seem to been able to replace or fill the spiritual needs.

Although men and women still interact what happens between them seems to be different from what was called love before, and it is often said that more and more isolation and solitude result from these interactions. The pressure of the material complex world and of the various social facts do not allow for the openness required by love. It can be said that the complexity of the modern society influence the emotional sates of the individual and make it impossible for him or her to return to the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alighieri, Dante Divine Commedy translated by Longfellow, Project Gutenberg at http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext97/0ddcl10.txt

Dickinson, Emily Poems Poetry x http://poetry.poetryx.com/

Fromm, Erich The Art of Loving, 2000.New York: Perrennial Classics

D.H. Lawrence Poems, Poetry X http://poetry.poetryx.com/
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How Bronte and Shelley Develop the Theme of Abandonment in Their Novels

Words: 2509 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63849391

Abandonment in Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre: a Comparison

Abandonment is a substantial theme in literature written by women. It appears in the poems of Emily Dickinson, in the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and in the novels of the Bronte sisters -- uthering Heights and Jane Eyre. It is not a theme that is only addressed by women in literature, to be sure, but it is one that seems to be utilized most evocatively by them. This paper will provide a comparative analysis of two literary sources -- Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre -- to show how abandonment can cause depression, deep emotions and despair, but how it can also open up new doors for an individual; it will show how unprofitable it can be and yet how beneficial to one's life it can also prove in the long run.

Jane Eyre is a romantic-gothic novel by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. London: J. M. Dent, 1905. Print.

Linker, Damon. "Terrence Malick's profoundly Christian vision." The Week, 2016.

Web. 2 Apr 2016.

Macdonald, D. L.; Scherf, Kathleen, eds. Frankenstein: The 1818 version. NY:
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Argue Themes in Two Poems

Words: 1348 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25448088

Harlem Dancer" and "The eary Blues"

Times Change, but the Struggle is Still the Same

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural and political movement during the 1920s and 1930s that sought to celebrate African-American culture through literary and intellectual means. Two of the era's prominent poets were Claude McKay and Langston Hughes. Their poetry helped to highlight the struggles that African-Americans were faced with. In "The Harlem Dancer," written by McKay, and "The eary Blues," written by Hughes, the poets use music as a backdrop for the narratives of their poems. Although the blues, as music, are not limited to African-Americans, the style emerged from the experiences of African-Americans. Furthermore, the Harlem Renaissance sought to celebrate these experiences by bringing together the struggles of past generations and juxtaposing them with the struggles that younger generations were going through. "The Harlem Dancer" and "The eary Blues" are depictions of the struggles…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Claude McKay." Poets.org. Web. Accessed 2 April 2012.

Hughes, Langston. "The Weary Blues." Web. Accessed 2 April 2012.

"Langston Hughes." Poets.org. Web. Accessed 2 April 2012.

McKay, Claude. "The Harlem Dancer." Web. Accessed 2 April 2012.
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Feminist Themes in Witi Ihimaera

Words: 1894 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84768691

FEMINIST THEMES IN ITI IHIMAERA'S HALE RIDER

The paper will present arguments to show the relative importance of the book "hale Rider" by Ihimaera. Its importance and possible impact on young girls will be discussed in the paper with special reference to the story of the book. After reading the book and after analyzing the story, the reader would know that the author wrote the book for his daughters. The paper will be technical and argumentative in nature. The paper will also provide a conclusion based on the findings and information.

Prolific Maori writer iti Ihimaera's early works were written with the intention of helping convey Maori heritage and legend to young urban Maori. Much of his fiction is based on fact and has autobiographical elements, exploring what it is to be Maori in New Zealand society. The hale Rider (1987), a mythical work about a young girl whose relationship…… [Read More]

Works Cited

As retrieved from Whale Rider

http://www.computersupply-reviews.com/amazon/cheap-B0000CABBW.html. On May 2nd, 2004

As retrieved from The Whale Rider Witi Ihimaera Harcourt Paperback 168 pages May 2003   http://www.curledup.com/whalerid.htm  . On May 2nd, 2004

As retrieved from The Whale Rider
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Worked Tirelessly to Understand the Literary Works

Words: 1027 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85798613

worked tirelessly to understand the literary works of a variety of authors including poets Pat Mora, Shirley Geok-Lim, John Keats, and Robert Frost, and short-story writer DH Lawrence. As we have compared the works of these poets and determined how common themes are shared, and through a deep reading and literature analysis of Lawrence's short, I have been able to explore different writing and analytical approaches that have allowed me to develop, review, and strengthen my writing style and capabilities.

One of the first assignments we were given was to perform a comparative analysis of two poets: John Keats and Robert Frost. In this paper, Keats' and Frost's individual fears are analyzed through a close reading of "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be" and "The Road Not Taken," by Keats and Frost, respectively. These poems forced me to look beyond what Keats and Frost had written…… [Read More]

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Naturalist and Realist Literary Movements

Words: 2280 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71336904



The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is perhaps the best example of Realism in literature because of how Twain presents it to us. Morality becomes something that Huck must be consider and think out as opposed to something forced down his throat. He knows the moral thing to do would be to report Jim, noting, " "People would call me a low down abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum -- but that don't make no difference. I ain't agoing to tell" (Twain 269). Furthermore, he cannot send Miss atson his letter he because his friendship with Jim trumps the morality he knows. Similarly, Jim wrestles with issues of good vs. bad. This is evident because of they way he decides to escape. He even begins to understand what Huck is going through when Huck does not turn him in. His revelation forces him to realize that Huck is "de bes'…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Crane, Stephen. Maggie, a Girl of the Streets. New York: Random House. 2001.

The Red Badge of Courage. New York: Aerie Books Ltd. 1986.

Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men and Cannery Row. New York: Penguin Books. 1986.

Clemens, Samuel. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Lauter, Paul, ed. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company. 1990.
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Solitude the Theme of Religion

Words: 1586 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27805996

Conclusion

In order to fully understand the religious element in this novel one firstly has to understand the meaning and function of magical realism in the book. This novel explores the foundations of religion and religious experience in an unconventional way through the use of the technique of magical realism. This style reduces the distance that we normally expect between the supernatural and the natural. In other words, the book explores the religious not as a dimension that is outside or beyond the human, but rather an intimate and integral part of human life and experience.

Therefore, we can conclude that the way this novel explores the area of religion and the spiritual is decidedly unconventional. It could also be argued that the view of religion in this book is more 'primitive' or vital and older than the formal and conventional religions of the modern world. This can be seen…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Acts of God." Foreign Policy Mar. 2001: 14.

Johnson C. Religion in One Hundred Years of Solitude and The Lost Steps. November 21, 2009. 1998.

Johnston I. On Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude. November 20, 2009.

Harvey, Graham. Animism: Respecting the Living World. New York: Columbia University Press, 2006.
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euthanasia as the theme of novel amsterdam

Words: 1298 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51334150

Booker Prize-winning novel Amsterdam by Ian Mcewan is not really about euthanasia per se; it is about the twisted relationships between the two main characters, Clive Linley, composer, and Vernon Halliday, newspaper editor. Deeply affected by the death of their mutual friend and lover Molly Lane, Clive and Vernon agree that if they should ever exhibit the symptoms of some deadly illness, that they agree to assist the other in euthanasia. Thus, the two friends initially start out by presenting a view of euthanasia that is strongly ethical; euthanasia is a meaningful and sometimes even necessary means to alleviate unnecessary suffering. After all, life is already filled with enough suffering. Extension of life by a matter of days, weeks, or even years does not necessarily equate with promoting the values inherent to a good quality of life.

As the events of the novel progress, however, Vernon and Clive demonstrate that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McEwan, Ian. Amsterdam. New York: Anchor, 1999.
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Understanding Literary Development With Social Media

Words: 2279 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51989998

changing because of advances in technology. How we communicate with each other has changed dramatically with the implementation of powerful and popular social media platforms, like Facebook. Today, both teams and adults spend a surprising amount of time on the social media sites. The question here is whether or not such activities can actually be a positive potential in regards to the growth of literacy and language development.

Social media is a trend that is only continuing to grow. It is used by most adolescents and young adults, who are still rolling in terms of their literacy and reading skills. This current dissertation aims to explore how we use and prevalence of social media can actually assist in developing literacy skills. As teenagers and young adults spend so much time on social media sites like Facebook, they are bombarded with visual and textual material. The current research was aiming to…… [Read More]

References

Ronda, Natalia Sinitskaya. (2011). Facing the Facebook challenge: Designing online social networking environments for literacy development. Graduate Programme in Language, Culture, and Teaching. York University.
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Literary Comparison

Words: 847 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26540742

Female Freedom

The short stories "The hite Heron" by Sarah Orne Jewett and "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin focus on strong and sensitive heroines who seek to forge some sort of path of autonomy in a world of men. It is without question that men control the worlds that these characters find themselves in, and each protagonist struggles to find some sort of autonomy within those worlds. Both stories depict the successful achievement of liberation from these masculine worlds by the heroines -- though the liberation occurs in dramatically different ways.

Sylvia in "The hite Heron" is accosted with the adult world of men when she encounters the hunter in the forest. However, she doesn't succumb her values to this strange and exciting world. If anything she becomes stronger for it. Sylvia becomes friendlier with the hunter, and he even provides her with a jack-knife as a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jewett, Sarah (2004). A White Heron. New York: Godine Publishers

Chopin, Kate (2010). Story of an Hour. New York: Harper Collins.
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Ann Beattie's Janus Great Literature

Words: 2371 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93600186

6). Beattie, like anyone else, was a product of her times.

She is also, again like anyone else, a product of her own individual circumstances. A further interpretation of the bowl as a symbol of the feminine finds a deeper connection between the circumstances of the fictional Andrea and the real-life Ann Beattie. Though she is not especially forthcoming with personal details, there are some facts with which a correlation can be drawn.

Though (presumably) happily married for many years, Ann Beattie and her husband have no children (Frost, par. 1). Again, she has not shared the reasons for this, nor would it be a reasonable question to pose to her. It is a significant fact to note, however, given the resemblance of the bowl to the female womb. Henningfield suggests an interpretation of the bowl, especially of the husband's turning away from it and Andrea's refusal to let him…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beattie, Ann. "Janus." The Norton Introduction to Literature. Ed. Allison Booth, J. Paul Hunter, Kelly J. Mays. New York: Norton, 2005. 280-283.

Brent, Liz. "Overview of 'Janus.'" Short Stories for Students, Vol. 9, the Gale Group, 2000.

Frost, Adam. "Beattie, Ann." Literature Online bibliography. Cambridge, 2002. ProQuest Information and Learning Company. 12 Mar. 2009. http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl-ctx_ver=Z39.88-2003&xri:pqil:res_ver=0.2&res_id=xri:lion-us&rft_id=xri:lion:ft:ref:BIO006220:0

Henningfield, Diane Andrews. "Overview of 'Janus.'" Short Stories for Students, Vol. 9, the Gale Group, 2000.
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Room of One's Own

Words: 1474 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24366491

Literary realism, of course, focuses on the everyday cultural experience of everyday people who may, within their banal experience, do extraordinary things. The Postmodern movement, as a reaction to a number of 20th century trends, tends to be anti-establishment and looks for meanings hidden in the text, those meanings needing to be exposed and reflected through deconstructing that text (Perkins & Perkins, 2008).But what of the authors who tend to combine both genres -- those who are slightly anti-establishment, allow for deep contextual symbolism, but also find wonder in the everyday? Fortunately, that genre, and the combination of realism and postmodernism, has blossomed globally into a genre called magical realism. For the contemporary reader, magical realism is a genre in which magical, or some would say illogical, scenarios and events appear in a normal setting. The power of this genre seems to be the juxtaposition of the two elements --…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Faris, W. (2004). Ordinary Enchantments: Magical Realism and the Remystification

Of Narrative. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.

Humm, M. (2003). Modernist Women: Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell. Trenton, NJ:

Rose, P. 91986). Women of Letters: A Life of Virginia Woolf. New York: Routledge.
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Sleepy Hollow as Popular Culture

Words: 3045 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46884168



First, evil in Sleepy Hollow is more equating with a satirical view that, in this case, evil is a more benign humor, bumbling, caustic in disrupting the town, and, as it was in Ancient Greek and oman drama, simply more of an irritant than planned destruction. Focusing again on the time period, our first introduction to this theme is one of Dutch New York against Urban New England. The Dutch community is sylvan, nostalgically conceived, changeless, and an Eden for its inhabitants. Ichabod arrives as a Yankee whose spoiling of this Eden simply cannot be tolerated -- and even more, by marrying the daughter of a wealthy and high-ranking community member, becoming part of Eden himself. This simply could not happen to a community that is so "European in nature."

Sleepy Hollow, as a town is clearly Dutch, with Dutch values, culture, and mores, or for riving, "population, manners, and…… [Read More]

REFERENCES and WORKS CONSULTED

Albert, H. (2009). Life and Letters of Edgar Allen Poe, Volume 2. Biblio-Bazaar.

Burstein, A. (2007). The Original Knickerbocker: The Life of Washington Irving.

New York: Basic Books.

Irving. W. (1820). The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Forgotten Books. Cited in:
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Preacher and the Ancient Text This Was

Words: 1168 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89751888

Preacher and the Ancient Text

This was an extremely technical text which offers deeper insights for anyone who desires to have a deeper understanding of all biblical issues and literary themes. This is because this text is able to offer a more nuanced perspective of major biblical pillars in terms of their own historical and literary viewpoint, while interlacing it with strong theological content. One of the deeper insights that were gleaned from studying this text was the fact that this book offers a superb means of explaining some of these more intricate pillars.

One of the more lucid insights that were gained from studying this book was as a result of the fusion developed from the hermeneutics and homiletics and the holistic approach that was engaged in. All insights gain were as a result of the link that Greidanus is able to forge in regards to the different arenas…… [Read More]

References

Greidanus, S. (1988) The Modern Preacher and the Ancient Text. Eerdmans Publishing:

Grand Rapids.
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Children's Literature to Dispel the

Words: 4810 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86965496

16).

In comparing a number of literary elements in one story, Smith and Wiese (2006) contend that at times, when attempting to transform an old story into a modern multicultural version, cultural meanings of the original story may be lost. In turn, the literature does not subject the reader to another culture. For instance, in the story about the fisherman, that Smith and Wiese access, the plot remains similar plot, however, significant changes transform the reported intent to make the story multicultural. Changes included the fisherman's daughter's stated name, being changed from one common to her culture to Maha. Instead of God, as written in the original version, the reference notes "Allah." Other changes Smith and Wiese point out include:

& #8230;The admonition to retrieve the fish or "be sorry" instead of the threatened curse, the reference to the golden shoe as a sandal instead of a clog;

the proposed…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Anderson, Connie Wilson. (2006). Examining Historical Events through Children's Literature.

Multicultural Education. Caddo Gap Press. 2006. Retrieved May 03, 2009 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1229798181.html

Banned Book Quiz. (2009). Retrieved May 03, 2009 from  http://www.shetland-library.gov.uk/documents/BannedBooksWBD09quiz.pdf 

Bottigheimer, Ruth B. (2008). Stories of heaven and earth: Bible heroes in contemporary
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Pride in Literature as a Universally Human

Words: 999 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29629612

Pride in Literature

As a universally human characteristic, pride plays an important part in world literary themes. However, pride can be defined and perceived differently, and the term also has many different definitions. For example, pride can refer to a dignified type of satisfaction, as comes from taking pride in one's work. More often in literature, though, pride is depicted in a negative light and is usually featured as a tragic flaw that, if not overcome, brings about the hero's downfall. Moreover, the implications and meaning of pride in literature has changed over the course of time. Pride was portrayed as a necessary but dangerous trait of powerful leaders in the ancient epics of Greece and Mesopotamia like Gilgamesh, the Iliad, and the Odyssey. The trait of pride reached a sort of thematic culmination in the Old English work Beowulf, in which the title character's pride contributes positively to his…… [Read More]

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Dwellings Body Home City The

Words: 1824 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73452688

If they can change the fundamental beliefs of the tribe, then they can control the natives more easily: "The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. e were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one. He has put a knife on the things that held us together and we have fallen apart" (Achebe 152). Confronted with change, individual members of Ibo society react differently. Those who stand to gain from change -- the outcasts, the oppressed -- welcome it. Those who have risen to positions of authority by following the old way -- Okonkwo, for example -- resist change. The battle between the old and the new is highlighted by the arrival of Christian missionaries and colonial authority. Okonkwo and Obierika recognize that many of their clansmen…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. Anchor, 1994.

2. Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. Dover Publications, 1990.

3. Plato. "Apology." The Collected Dialogues of Plato: Including the Letters. Princeton University Press, 2005.

4. Plato. "Crito." The Collected Dialogues of Plato: Including the Letters. Princeton University Press, 2005.
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Social Web Originally Developed in 1989 the

Words: 2369 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5437511

Social Web

Originally developed in 1989, the World Wide Web has fundamentally changed the way many people shop, work, recreate and receive an education. Likewise, the emergence of e-commerce has had enormous implications for the business world and governments alike, making this innovation one of the most significant in human history. Moreover, tens of millions of new Web pages are added to the World Wide Web every day, and current signs indicate this growth will continue to accelerate into the foreseeable future. One of the more important trends to emerge in recent years has been the use of the World Wide Web for social interaction in what has been termed the "Social Web." To gain a better understanding of the Social Web and its implications, this paper provides a review of the relevant literature, followed by a summary of the research and important findings in the conclusion.

eview and Discussion…… [Read More]

References

Alpert, J. & Hajaj, N. (2008, July 25). We knew the Web was big. The Official Google Blog.

Retrieved from http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2008/07/we-knew-web-was-big.html.

Anklam, P. (2007). Net work: A practical guide to creating and sustaining networks at work and in the world. Boston: Elsevier/Butterworth Heinemann.

Barnes, S. (2007). E-commerce and V-business: Digital enterprise in the twenty-first century.
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Scifi Chadbourn 2008 Believes That

Words: 1118 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83836690

The massive mollusks still do seem fantastical. Several of the irrational elements of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea seemed more outrageous in the 19th century they do now. However, the novel continues to encapsulate the fantasy and science fiction genres because of its willingness to expand the boundary of what is real. Interestingly, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea did not stretch those boundaries much further than hard science has.

On the other hand, novels such as the ones in the Twilight series are more squarely fantastical. Barring any major scientific discoveries, vampires and shape-shifters simply do not exist. Such elements of the absolutely impossible serve various literary functions. For instance, in New Moon Stephanie Meyer uses vampires and shape-shifters to develop the central character, a human being. As in Frankenstein, the impossible becomes the best means to explore human motivations, dreams, desires, and weaknesses.

Moreover, the fantasy elements are not…… [Read More]

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Flower Passage the More I

Words: 1285 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56598454

I am becoming comfortable with the process of organizing my thoughts into an outline, reworking that outline until it is complete and capable of supporting a coherent sequence of thoughts, and then building a rough draft from that outline, before finally adjusting the rough draft and developing a final draft from it. I have a tendency to write sentences that are too long and complex, but I am working on that as well.

In my opinion, good writing starts out with having a thesis and building logical arguments and coherent points that support all the different elements of that thesis. Good writing must guide the reader from point to point in a logical and progressive manner that answers questions or addresses issues in the order that are likely to come up in the mind of the reader. Ideally, by the time a reader finishes a piece of good writing, he…… [Read More]

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Michael Lewis's 2003 Book Moneyball The Art

Words: 955 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88123582

Michael Lewis's 2003 book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game is a compelling narrative about the business of baseball. Yet Moneyball is no ordinary baseball story. Lewis discovered that the 2002 Oakland Athletics managed to compete at the upper echelons of Major League Baseball while maintaining the second-smallest budget in the entire league. The story focuses on the Oakland Athletics management and the strategies they used to win in spite of having a budget lower than average in Major League Baseball.

The story appeals to readers on a number of different levels. From a business standpoint, Moneyball shows how being stuck in outmoded patterns of behavior and thinking can cause failure. On the other hand, taking risks, accepting change and embracing novel ideas into the workplace are keys to success. Moneyball is also an exposition of strong leadership skills, which are a critical component to organizational success. The…… [Read More]

References

Ackman, D. (2003). Book review: Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game. Forbes. May 2003. Retrieved online:  http://www.forbes.com/2003/05/28/cx_da_0528bookreview.html 

Lewis, M. (2003). Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game. W.W. Norton.

Moneyball. Feature film.
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Blade A Conflict of Self

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10160534

Though he has vowed to destroy as many vampires as he can and to protect humankind, he is faced with the paradox of destroying part of his identity while trying to save the other. Blade possesses many qualities of a hero, particularly the qualities imbued by his vampiric semi-transformation and his ability and resolve to be courageous for the betterment of humanity. Mythological heroes, much like Blade, often had a close, but conflicted, relationship with their supernatural adversaries and benefactors. Though Blade possesses characteristics of a classical hero, he is also a Byronic hero, as well as an antihero. Like the Byronic hero, Blade comes from a troubled past, is emotionally conflicted, intelligent, and mysterious, but is also considered an outcast. Because Blade is not human, nor is he demon, he struggles to find his place in the world and is forced to live on the fringe of both societies,…… [Read More]

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Accuracy of Sergio Leone's 'Man

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51769367

In other words, Leone created a surrealistic diorama overflowing with American Western iconography that resembles the historical background of the "real" American West, injected with familiar American cinematic imagery related to costumes, physical attributes, architecture, transportation devices, weaponry and even geophysical patterns, such as deserts, wide-open plains, mountains, and typical urban settings reminiscent of an American Western town.

In essence, Leone's 'Man With No Name' trilogy "expresses the familiar imagery of the Old West based upon myths and legends culled from the pages of an American history primer" (De Claudio, 76), replete with imaginative visions of the 19th century America Southwest resplendent with good, old-fashioned American violence, greed, avarice, self-promotion and self-determination (De Fornari, 124). Leone also creates a very recognizable milieu "rooted in American historical detail but refracted through the looking-glass" of typical Hollywood Western films dating back to the silent era (Cumbow, 214), an abstraction of the "real…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cumbow, Robert C. The Films of Sergio Leone. UK: Scarecrow Press, 2008.

De Claudio, Gianni. Directed by Sergio Leone. Rome, Italy: Libreria University Press,

1990.

De Fornari, Oreste. Sergio Leone: The Great Italian Dream of Legendary America.
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Women in Society

Words: 928 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29341448

Yellow Wallpaper,' the nameless narrator is compelled by those that surround her to spend time in a colonial mansion in order to rest and get well. The opposite happens; we see her descend into madness in a way that is vaguely reminiscent of the main character in 'The Shining.' We are given the sense of a controlled environment, in which a narrator is placed by male figures representing authority and familiarity (doctors: her husband and brother) in a situation where she is condemned to stare at a wall. The response of her subconscious is embodied in the changes she perceives in the character of the wall.

She sees a yellow female woman trying to break free of the wall, which we interpret to represent the constrained parameters of her activity. She is a complete subordinate, dominated by men who possess professional accolades. Her attitudes mirror those we see in Ibsen…… [Read More]

Eastern influences are revealed in 'A Room of One's Own.' There Woolf expresses her concern for unity and balance between the male and female principles. She writes of "two sexes in the mind corresponding to the two sexes in the body" which "require to be united in order to get complete satisfaction and happiness." In each of us, she says, "two powers preside, one male, one female." According to Woolf, "The normal and comfortable state of being is that when the two live in harmony together, spiritually cooperating... Coleridge perhaps meant this when he said that a great mind must be androgynous. It is when this fusion takes place that the mind is fully fertilized and uses all its faculties."

Jean-Charles Seigneuret. Dictionary of Literary Themes and Motifs Vol. 1. Greenwood Press, 1988

Katie Conboy, Nadia Medina, Sarah Stanbury. Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory; Columbia University Press, 1997
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World Masterpieces Literary Works

Words: 1735 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8014581

classic story A&P, John Updike pays tribute to two Greek motifs, the heroic epiphany leading to the emergence of the classical hero and the power of beauty. In this work, Sammy is the hero, trapped in the work-a-day world, who because of beauty's inspiration is motivated to seize the opportunity to act in grand and noble fashion. Like many heroes, especially Paris, in Homer's Iliad, Sammy is inspired to his realization by the appearance and attention of a goddess. In Paris' case, depending on the storyteller, the goddess was Venus or Eros or Aphrodite -- the goddess of love and beauty. In Sammy's case it was a teenage girl in a swimsuit. Updike's portrayal of Venus is actually an echo of an echo, as he gives us a vision of Venus as she is realized in Botticelli's 15th century painting.

As is the case with Venus and Paris, the goddess…… [Read More]

References

Homer. Iliad Translated by Stanley Lombardo Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing 1997

Lightbown, Ronald. Sandro Botticelli. 2 vols. Berkeley: U. Of California P, 1978. Luscher,

McFarland, Ronald. Studies in Short Fiction. Volume 20 (1983): 94-100.

Updike, John. Pigeon Feathers, and Other Stories. New York: Knopf 1962.
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Political Statements and Forms of Expression Poetry and Painting

Words: 3122 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3373897

Art

"Howl" and "Guernica" Outline

The paper demonstrates the ways in which both pieces of art contemplate and express multiple themes, including those of religion, morality, happiness, life-affirmation, and freedom.

"Howl" is a poem that is both a mourning and a celebration of life.

"Guernica" is an expression of pain and war.

oth works of art have many themes and many of the same themes.

Ginserb, the 1950s, and "Howl"

He composed the poem in the middle of the 1950s, one of the greatest decades in history for mainstream America.

He is heavily influenced by previous poets and by his own lived experiences.

Howl" shows readers how they can be connected to spirituality, religion, and what is sarcred or holy with, and without the use of the formal church.

Poetry is another form of storytelling that is best when read/performed aloud.

Howling, Expression, and Jazz

A. If we are howling,…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

1. Raento, P., & Watson, C.J. "Gernika, Guernica, Guernica?: Contested meanings of a Basque place." Political Geography, Vol. 19, Pgs 707 -- 736, 2000.

The authors discuss the many ways to interpret "Guernica." The authors focus upon why and how Picasso created such a dense work of art. The authorts furthermore explore and offer various ways for readers to interpret the painting from a historical and contemporary perspective.

2. Ginsberg, Allen. Howl. City Lights Books: San Francisco. 1956. Print.

This is the entirety of the poem. There is a foreword, preface, and afterword. The majority of the book consists of the poem "Howl," although there are other poems. Some of the other poems in the book are directly related to "Howl" in subject and style, and some are more obtusely related to the title poem.
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Lost City Radio the Debut

Words: 1739 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13318346

These are the places where the people who cannot afford the life in the city live. Therefore, the use of the city setting, and the development of the slums indicates the impacts of war on the development of the personal economic status. The war aftermath does not allow people to rebuild their lives. Alarcon writes, "Nothing builds community like complaining" (Daniel 186). They have suffered huge losses of the property; there are no jobs and thus the income is limited. This is the severity of the conditions of living in the city. Therefore, the description of the city setting and its development in the novel shows the theme of the war and violence effects.

In conclusion, Daniel Alarcon uses the setting of the novel to propagate the various themes. Additionally, he uses the stylistic devices of vivid description and symbolism to illustrate how the various wars and violence incidences affect…… [Read More]

Works cited

Cross, Stephanie. "Review: Books: Lost City Radio Daniel Alarcon Harper Perennial Pounds

7.99." The Observer: 25. May 11, 2008. ProQuest. Web. 30 Apr. 2013 .

Hickling, Alfred. "Review: Paperbacks: Fiction: Lost City Radio, by Daniel Alarcon (Harper

Perennial, Pounds 7.99)." The Guardian: 19. Apr 26, 2008. ProQuest. Web. 30 Apr. 2013.
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American Ethnic Literature Analyzing the Nature of

Words: 1600 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 351419

American Ethnic Literature

Analyzing the Nature of American Ethnic Literature

America has a distinct history: like ancient ome, its inhabitants have come from all over and few of them can truly say to be natives of the place. This fact alone makes American Literature a compelling label: what makes American Literature American? This paper will attempt to answer the question by showing how many ethnicities have converged in one nation allowing various writers with different ethnic, social, political, economical, and social perspectives to define and/or illustrate a time and place.

As Morris Dickstein states, "When America was merely a remote province of world culture, its educated elites were Anglophile, Francophile, or broadly cosmopolitan. Education was grounded in classical learning, a respect for the ancients over the moderns, and a deeply ingrained respect for old Europe's artistic heritage" (p. 155). This type of background made American letters similar to European. What…… [Read More]

Reference List

African-American Literature. (n.d.). Introduction, pp. 1-11.

Asian-American Lliterature. (n.d.). Introduction, pp. 2-12.

Casey, J.G. (n.d.). Canon Issues and Class Contexts. Radical Teacher 86, pp. 18-27.

Dickstein, M. (n.d.). Going Native. The American Scholar.
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Unifies and Permeates an Entire

Words: 1176 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91474170



Short story -- A brief story where the plot drives the narrative, substantially shorter than a novel. Example: "Hills like White Elephants," by Ernest Hemingway.

Allusion -- A casual reference in one literary work to a person, place, event, or another piece of literature, often without explicit identification. It is used to establish a tone, create an indirect association, create contrast, make an unusual juxtaposition, or bring the reader into a world of references outside the limitations of the story itself. Example: "The Wasteland" by T.S. Eliot alludes to "Paradise Lost" by John Milton.

epetition -- The repeating of a word or phrase or rhythm within a piece of literature to add emphasis. Example: The story of Agamemnon in The Odyssey by Homer.

Blank verse -- Unrhymed lines of ten syllables each with the even-numbered syllables bearing the accents, most closing resembling the natural rhythms of English speech. Example: "The…… [Read More]

References:

Wheeler, Dr. L. Kip. "Literary Terms and Definitions." Web.

"Word List of Literary and Grammar Terms." Web.
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Master and Margarita Born in

Words: 1561 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72801960

Although the novel ends with an open-ended question about the fate of the two titular characters, it is clear that Margarita has the power to create her own reality.

Mikhail ulgakov uses three literary elements in the novel the Master and the Margarita: a multiple layered reality, symbolism, and magical realism. Each of these three literary devices helps the author to convey the central themes of greed, corruption, and social control during and after the Russian Revolution. The multiple layers of reality allow ulgakov to explore the central themes from multiple points-of-view and perspectives. The multiple layers of reality also prevent the novel from becoming a didactic commentary on life in Moscow. Symbolism also permits the exploration of greed, corruption, and social control without directly implicating Stalin or Soviet bureaucracy in the degradation of humanity. Finally, magical realism allows the author -- and his readers -- to imagine how human…… [Read More]

Bibliography." Library of Congress: European Reading Room. Retrieved online:  http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/bulgaklc.html 

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. Mikhail Bulgakov. The Master and Margarita (1997). Retrieved online: http://lib.ru/BULGAKOW/master97_engl.txt
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Carver a Different Kind of

Words: 656 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12425414

For instance, in the wife's poem, "she talked about what she had felt at the time, about what went through her mind when the blind man touched her nose and lips." The touching of the nose and lips is juxtaposed against the touching of emotions. Finally, the narrator achieves his epiphany via the sense of touch directly at the end of the story when Robert guides his hand towards a new level of insight. The narrator is literally and figuratively touched.

Finally, the literary elements converge to create irony. After all, the blind man possesses greater insight into the human condition than a sighted man. The blind man intuitively knows that the television is color instead of black and white -- not because he can see it with his eyes but because of what he senses from being around his hosts. The narrator's prejudices about the world are formed in…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Carver, R. (n.d.). "Cathedral." Retrieved online: http://www.misanthropytoday.com/cathedral-by-raymond-carver-weekend-short-story/
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Personal Exploration in Hope Leslie

Words: 2208 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74411107



The narration of Hope Leslie also offers some other insights into the radical nature of the novel. Sedgwick's personal experiences in her home town as well as in New England and Massachusetts helps to add to the realism and beauty of her own descriptions of these very same places within the novel. However, Sedgwick uses these beautiful, serene, and sometimes melancholy characterizations of the landscape to both enhance the novel's themes and underscore the interactions of the many characters as well as literary devices of their own accord (Schweitzer, 100). One excellent example of this is during Everell's captivity, where Sedgwick uses the vivid and sometimes philosophical landscapes as an integral part of the dramatic action that takes place.

In this way, Sedgwick is one of the first novelists to use this sort of technique in a way that both highlights the natural surroundings in the story and how these…… [Read More]

References

Emerson, Amanda. "History, Memory, and the Echoes of Equivalence in Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie." Legacy. Vol. 24, No. 1, 2007, pp. 24-49.

Samuels, Shirley. "Women, Blood, and Contract." American Literary History. Vol. 20, No. 1-2, pp. 57-75

Schweitzer, Ivy. Perfecting Friendship: Politics and Affiliation in Early American Literature. The University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, 2006.

Sedgwick, Catharine Maria. Hope Leslie, or, Early times in the Massachusetts. Harper and Brothers: New York, 1842.
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Master and Margarita in Mikhail

Words: 1487 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67304230

Critic Donald B. Pruitt uses "cold hard fact" from the narrative involving Christ's trial to set those chapters aside from the chapters that are fantasy. Pruitt sees the success that Bulgakov has accomplished by editing St. John's version of Pilate and Christ's discussion, and in truth Bulgakov's version is read-made for creative realism.

In the Gospel According to John, Pilate says to Christ: "Do you not know that I have the power to release you and power to crucify you?" (Pruitt, 1981, p. 2). Christ answered: "You would have no power over me unless it had been given you from above…" (p. 2). In Bulgakov's version, Pilate says something more contemporary and likely more true to what actually took place: "[Your life] is hanging by a thread: know that." Christ answered cryptically: "You don't think, do you, hegemon, that it is you who hung it?" "If you do," Christ continued,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bulgakov, Mikhail. (1967). The Master and Margarita. New York: Harper & Row.

Frank, Margot K. (1981). The Mystery of the Master's Final Destination. Canadian-American

Slavic Studies. Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Thomas J. Schoenberg. Vol. 159.

Detroit: Gale. Retrieved from Literature Resource Center.
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Death Explored in Thanatopsis and

Words: 1518 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79863904

hile "The Raven" is a powerful poem, it reads more like a story and therefore seems less serious and effective than "Thanatopsis." In their uniqueness, each poem realizes the human condition in that we can and are affected by death in different ways. In short, every individual will handle death and the thoughts of death in his or her own way.

orks Cited

Bryant, illiam Cullen. "Thanatopsis." Masterpieces of American Poetry. Van Doren, Mark, ed. New York: Garden City Publishing Co., Inc. 1936.

Eddings, Dennis. "Theme and Parody in 'The Raven.'" Poe and His Times: The Artist and His Milieu. 1990. Gale Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 08, 2008. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Gado, Frank. Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 250: Antebellum riters in New York. 2001. Gale Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 08, 2008. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Poe, Edgar Allan. "The Raven." The Complete Tales of Mystery and Imagination. Minneapolis: Amaranth Press. 1981.

Rio-Jelliffe,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bryant, William Cullen. "Thanatopsis." Masterpieces of American Poetry. Van Doren, Mark, ed. New York: Garden City Publishing Co., Inc. 1936.

Eddings, Dennis. "Theme and Parody in 'The Raven.'" Poe and His Times: The Artist and His Milieu. 1990. Gale Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 08, 2008. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Gado, Frank. Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 250: Antebellum Writers in New York. 2001. Gale Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 08, 2008. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.com

Poe, Edgar Allan. "The Raven." The Complete Tales of Mystery and Imagination. Minneapolis: Amaranth Press. 1981.
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Lizard Who Had the Habit of Dining

Words: 2337 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76342638

Lizard

ho Had the Habit of Dining on His ives"

"the Story of the Lizard ho Had the Habit of Dining on His ives"

Eduardo Galeano

"The Story of the Lizard ho Had the Habit of Dining on His ives" seems to be a short, simple, strange story at first. But if a person looks into Eduardo Galeano's biography, the story makes much more sense and seems to say a lot more than just lizard-eats-women/woman-eats-lizard. The story actually says a lot about "be careful what you wish for," "what goes around comes around," the relationships between men and women, and political symbolism about South America. Maybe even most important is the theme of "rich against poor" because of Galeano's background and Marxist political beliefs.

Analysis

Eduardo Galeano

Analysis of a short story is sometimes helped by studying the author, so this analysis will begin with a look at Eduardo Galeano.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

ABC Radio National - Australia. "Sunday Story | The Story of the Lizard Who Had the Habit of Dining on His Wives by Eduardo Galeano." 2 January 2011. ABC.net.au Web site. Web. 21 March 2012.

Dagerman, Lo. "Annual Award." 2011. Dagerman.us Web site. Web. 22 March 2012.

Galeano, Eduardo. "The Story of the Lizard Who Had the Habit of Dining on His Wives." Halpern, Daniel, (Editor). The Art of the Story: An International Anthology of Contemporary Short Stories. New York, NY: Penguin Putnam, Inc., 1999. 291-294. Print.

Global Exchange. "Three to Be Awarded for Extraordinary Contributions in Human Rights, Community Building and Economic Justice." 26 May 2006. Globalexchange.org Web site. Web. 22 March 2012.
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Shaw's Mrs Warren's Profession When

Words: 1432 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54677169

She protects her from the men, believing her innocent of sex. hen Frank says he has made love to her, Kitty replies, "Now see here: I won't have any young scamp tampering with my little girl" (232). Later Kitty says to Vivie, "hat do you know of men, child, to talk that way about them?" (242). She criticizes her daughter for showing independence and putting on airs (243) and tries to control her, saying, "Your way of life will be what I please, so it will" (243). In sum, this shows a conflicting worldview between mother and daughter, with the experienced mother believing that the innocent daughter is straying from the right path.

After accepting her mother briefly, the end shows Vivie breaking with Kitty completely. Their views of choice and emancipation are different. Kitty feels like she was determined into prostitution, and is proud of having made it so…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gilmartin, Andrina. "Mr. Shaw's Many Mothers." In Fabian Feminist: Bernard Shaw and Woman. Edited by Rodelle Weintraub, 143-55. University Park: Pennsylvania State University, 1977.

Johnson, Katie N. Sisters in Sin: Brothel Drama in America, 1900-1920. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

Shaw, Bernard. Plays Unpleasant. New York: Penguin Books, 1946.

Wasserman, Marlie Parker. "Vivie Warren: A Psychological Study." In Fabian Feminist: Bernard Shaw and Woman. Edited by Rodelle Weintraub, 168-73. University Park: Pennsylvania State University, 1977.
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Veidemanis a High-School English Teacher

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12014392

Second, it provides an excellent introduction "to a unit on the Romantic Era in English literature" with its spirit in line with Coleridge, Wordsworth, Lord yron and Percy Shelley. Third, the novel is truly "the work of a gifted woman writer who merits study and recognition" (62). One aspect of Shelley's life which is quite extraordinary is that she heard Samuel Taylor Coleridge recite the "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" which clearly influenced Shelley's use of the supernatural in her novel.

Fourth, Veidemanis maintains that the novel's central theme, being "scientific aims pursued in reckless disregard of human consequences," has much significance in today's modern scientific age related to biological and genetic engineering and raises the question "Should limits be placed on scientific endeavor?" A reference to Victor Frankenstein and his "reckless disregard" for the possible consequences of his experiments with the dead and the creation of a human monster.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Veidemanis, Gladys V. "Frankenstein in the Classroom." The English Journal. Vol. 75 no. 7 (November 1986): pp. 61-66. {Available at JSTOR online}.
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Alexander Pushkin Is a Story

Words: 1432 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64358659

When meeting the narrator to explain himself, Sylvio clarifies this behavior by saying that he "likes" the main character. The author then uses this meeting as a platform to reveal Sylvio's true story and nature to the reader.

In contrast to the soldiers, Sylvio's character demonstrates a large amount of depth and critical thinking. His emotions do not rule his actions, which is one of the traits that make him such an excellent shot. This is a different code of valor from those of the general soldiers and officers who share his table. It is also indicative of his superior maturity, not only in years, but also in perspective.

As for the narrator, Sylvio professes to "like" him, despite the fact that the narrator appears the least willing of all the soldiers to forgive the former's perceived cowardice. Ironically, this refusal to forgive is precisely the trait that sets him…… [Read More]