Medical Field Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Medical Errors Are Preventable Adverse

Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70782223



Conclusions - by the very nature of culture and humanity, humans tend to be group animals -- they thrive in groups, coalesce into groups, indeed, the very process of moving from hunter-gatherer to cities was part of a group behavior. Group norms are internal rulings that are followed by individuals so that the synergistic effect of the group will be more efficient. These values usually focus on the way members of that group look and behavior towards themselves, and the hierarchical structure they tend to set up to "police" their efforts. Norms help groups solve problems, define and address new situations, make better decisions, and even process their daily work. Groups, in this case members of the medical community, join these groups in order to reflect specific notions and values associated with the overall group. Normative behavior in the medical field is covered by a willingness to help, to "do…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Physicians Want to Learn from Medical Mistakes. (2008, January 9). Retrieved November 2010, from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: http://www.ahrq.gov/news/press/pr2008/errepsyspr.htm

Error Disclosure. (2009, March). Retrieved from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: http://psnet.ahrq.gov/primer.aspx?primerID=2

Improving America's Hosptials. (2010, March). Retrieved November 2010, from the Joint Commission's Annual Report on Quality and Safety: http://www.jointcommission.org/NR/rdonlyres/D60136A2-6A59-4009-A6F3-04E2FF230991/0/2010_Annual_Report.pdf

Dewar, D. (2010). Essentials of Health Economics. Philadelphia, PA: Jones and Bartlett.
View Full Essay

Medical Teams

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85959818

Tiffan, B.; (2014) The art of team leadership, American Journal of Health -- System Pharmacy, Vol. 7, Issue 10

Credibility -- Author Analysis

Bill Tiffan is a Principal with T2 Management Consultants which he and his wife co-founded in 2000. According to the company website, Tiffan "provides management consulting, team development, executive coaching and facilitation services to organizations that want to improve the effectiveness of individual leaders and executive teams" (T2, 2009). Tiffan previously spent 12 years with and international transition consulting firm where he was Regional Vice President of Sales. Bill also writes a bi-monthly column for the ACPE's professional journal; the focus of his column is executive career development. Tiffan also serves on the Board of Global Partners for Development. Tiffan recently wrote an article for the Medical industry espousing his beliefs concerning medical professionals as they pertain to team leadership, an area in which he has displayed…… [Read More]

Works Cited

T2 (2009) Principals, accessed at  http://www.t2-consultants.com/sitepages/principals.htm , on October 12, 2014

Tiffan, B.; (2014) The art of team leadership, American Journal of Health -- System Pharmacy, Vol. 7, Issue 10, pp. 799 -- 801
View Full Essay

Medical ID Theft and Securing Ephi Medical

Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73255136

Medical ID Theft and Securing EPHI

Medical Identity Theft

Medical information can be stolen by 1) the bad guys getting sick and using a victim's information to obtain services, 2) friends or relatives use another friend's or relative's information to obtain treatment, 3) when professionals, such as physicians, fabricate services that did not exist, 4) organized crime, and 5) innocent or not so innocent opportunists (Lafferty, 2007). ad guys that get sick can take a victim's insurance information to obtain services for treatment. Professionals can fabricate false claims to cover medical errors. Opportunists have access to patient data and the ability to steal, use, or sell that information.

Effective security requires clear direction from upper management (Whitman). Assigning security responsibilities and access controls with audit controls to organizational elements and individuals helps to place accountability on individuals. They must formulate or elaborate security policies and procedures based on the organizational…… [Read More]

Bibliography

HIPAA Security Series. (n.d.). Retrieved from HHS.gov: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/securityrule/techsafeguards.pdf

Hoffman, S. & . (2007). SECURING THE HIPAA SECURITY RULE. Journal of Internet Law, 10(8), 1-16.

Lafferty, L. (2007). Medical Identity Theft: The Future Threat of Health Care Fraud is Now. Journal of Healthcare Compliance, 9(1), 11-20.

Whitman, M. & . (n.d.). Case B: Accessing and Mitigating the Risks to a Hypothetical Computer System, pages B1-B24 .
View Full Essay

Medical Use of Marijuana Increasing Use of

Words: 814 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30556120

Medical Use of Marijuana

Increasing use of medical marijuana

Having looked at the various areas that medical marijuana has been brought into use and the various forms in which marijuana is administered, it is also important to take note of the various challenges that come with it. There have been various researches that have been conducted that covers the medical as well as the ethical side of the medicinal marijuana, and there have been a dilemma in the balance of the two sides on whether to institutionalize the drug or to stop it, and even on whether the medicinal use can be made to work without the proneness to abuse as is the case at the moment.

Medicinal marijuana has neither medical nor ethical standing within the contemporary society where drug abuse is one of the biggest worries of governments across the world and the alternative medicines that medical research…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Medical Companies How Do These Companies Provide

Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50519400

Medical Companies

How do these companies provide care?

Aetna provides care by being a health insurance company that offers a range of services in the field of medical, pharmaceutical, dental, behavioral group, long-term care, and plans for those who are disabled. Humana is also a health insurance company that offers its services in numerous states. United Health Group operates two businesses, known as United Healthcare and Optum, and similar to the two aforementioned companies, it offers health insurance to individuals, which includes seniors.

What types of plans do they have?

Aetna offers various types of plans under its various insurance, which as mentioned before, include medical, dental, vision, medicare, disability, pharmacy, life, student, behavioral health, health expense funds, and wellness products and discounts. Under medical insurance, a person can get a quote via state, which may include individual HMO health benefits plan or QPOS individual advantage health benefits and health…… [Read More]

References

Aetna - Health Insurance, Dental, Pharmacy, Group Life and Disability Insurance. (n.d.). Aetna - Health Insurance, Dental, Pharmacy, Group Life and Disability Insurance. Retrieved December 19, 2011, from http://www.aetna.com

HUMANA - Guidance when you need it most. (n.d.). HUMANA - Guidance when you need it most. Retrieved December 19, 2011, from http://www.humana.com/

UnitedHealth Group - Featured News - Products & Services. (n.d.). UnitedHealth Group - Featured News - Products & Services. Retrieved December 19, 2011, from  http://www.unitedhealthgroup.com
View Full Essay

Medical Case Study Florence F Is a

Words: 1951 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33192255

Medical Case Study

Florence (F) is a 43-year-old woman who is two days post-operative, following an appendectomy. She has a history of arthritis, and currently takes 10mg of prednisone daily. She is allergic to penicillin. She weighs 46 kg (101.5 lbs.) and is 168cm tall (5'6"). This puts her slightly underweight for her age and height, at least 18-25 pounds (Height and Weight Chart, 2010). While doing a route in dressing change, nurse notice a yellow discharge emanating from the wound.

Identify and discuss the importance of obtaining information during a nursing admission in relation to post- operative assessment. In modern healthcare, a nurse must first and foremost try to understand and utilize a systematic and synergistic model of data collection and assessment. Human beings are complex creatures, and the more data one has, the easier it will be to ensure that a proper diagnosis is made. A systematic assessment…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Height and Weight Chart. (2010). HealthCheck Systems. Retrieved from:

 http://www.healthchecksystems.com/heightweightchart.htm 

Prednisone and Other Corticosteroids: Balance the Risks and Benefits. (2011). The Mayo

Clinic. Retrieved from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/steroids/HQ01431
View Full Essay

Medical Writing Boon and Bane'

Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36094312

These examples highlight that technology is always a tool, a way of enhancing human judgment -- we must not mistake it as a replacement for good nursing practice.

After all, the use of a computer is no substitute for a medical education. Anyone who works in a hospital can see this -- the increased accessibility of information through the Internet also means that patients often come in, convinced that they are suffering from a serious illness, allergy, or condition, based more upon a diagnosis Googled on WebMD, rather than upon the fact that they saw a doctor! If a computer alone was required to diagnose, everyone would have a degree!

Don't get me wrong -- I use technology every day in my life, and thank my lucky stars, and my patient's lucky stars, that it is so ubiquitous. When health care providers wish to communicate, the use of cell phones…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Medical Nursing Education

Words: 3350 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49965165

Medical/Nursing Education

Nurses are required to make many immediate decisions in their assigned duties. Unfortunately, in recent years, patient care has often been compromised as a nursing shortage crisis has escalated to epic proportions. Increased patient loads have resulted in often hasty nursing decisions as responsibilities and hours worked have increased. Although precious time must be spread thin to accommodate higher numbers of patients, nurses must exercise their morals through consistency in ethical behaviors. According to Peggy Chinn (1), "Many ethical issues, such as end-of-life decision making, have increased in complexity. Other issues, such as advocacy and choice, have changed in certain respects but are more clearly centrally situated within nursing's ethical domain."

As a result, nurses are held accountable for a variety of decisions in nursing practice and in many instances, a patient's life depends on such decisions to survive. Gastmans (496) states that "Generally, the goal of nursing…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. (2001). Nursing and ethics: the maturing of a discipline. Advances in Nursing Science

Erlen, J. (2001). Moral distress: a persuasive problem. Orthopaedic Nursing 20(2): 76-80.

Erlen, J. (2001). The nursing shortage, patient care, and ethics. Orthopaedic Nursing 20(6):

Gastmans, C. (2002). A fundamental ethical approach to nursing: some proposals for ethics education. Nursing Ethics 9(5): 494-507.
View Full Essay

Medical Skills Needed to Be

Words: 2203 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74711001



According to the work of Fulford (1994) in an Oxford Practice Skills Project eport "Three elements of practice (ethics, law and communication skills) are approached in an integrated teaching programme which aims to address everyday clinical practice. The role of a central value of patient-centered health care in guiding the teaching is described. Although the final aim of the teaching is to improve the actual practice, we have found three 'sub-aims' helpful in the development of the programme. These sub-aims are: increasing students' awareness of ethical issues; enhancing their analytical thinking skills, and teaching specific knowledge. (Hope, 1994)

In the work of Miles, et al. (1989) entitled "Medical Ethics Education: Coming of Age it is stated that "medical ethics education is instruction that endeavors to teach the examination of the role of values in the doctor's relationship with patients, colleagues and society. It is one form of a broad curricular…… [Read More]

References

Fryer-Edwards, PhD (2005) Tough Talk: Helping Doctors Approach Difficult Conversations - Resources for Teaching- Domains for Small Group Teaching Prelude 3 Department of Medical History and Ethics University of Washington School of Medicine.

Siegler, Mark MD (2001) Lessons from 30 Years of Teaching Clinical Ethics AMA Journal 2001 October.

St. Onge, Joye (1997) Medical Education Must Make Room for Student-Specific Ethical Dilemmas" Canadian Medical Association Journal 15 Apr 1987, 156(8).

Hicks, L. et al. (2001) Understanding the Clinical Dilemmas that Shape Medical Students' Ethical Development: Questionnaire Survey and Focus Group study. BMJ Journal 2001;322-709-71- 24 march 2001.
View Full Essay

Professional Fields That Confirm Through Studies and

Words: 1511 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35854087

professional fields that confirm, through studies and other means, the effective use of evidence-based practices. The field of education, business, technology, and especially the medical field all, to varying degrees, use the concept of evidence-based practices to improve the manner in which solutions to problems are sought and implemented. It is important that studies are conducted that allow for quantitative and qualitative methodologies to confirm that the practices being touted are acceptable to the audience to which they are presented.

One such study was recently published in a peer-reviewed publication; the objective of the study was to make evidence-based recommendations to medical professionals. The study specifically targeted those physicians, medical professionals, nurses, and administrators that in one form or the other deal with patients diagnosed with cancer, or cancer related diseases. The study wished to affirm and confirm the importance of effective communications between the medical personnel and the patient…… [Read More]

References

Duong, L.M.; Wilson, R.J.; Ajani, U.A.; Singh, S.D.; Eheman, C.R.; (2011) Trends in endometrial cancer incidence rates in the United States: 1999 -- 2006. Journal of Women's Health (15409996), Vol. 20, Issue 8, pp. 1157-1163

Nicholls, K.; Chapman, K.; Shaw, T.; Perkins, A.; Sullivan, M.M.; Crutchfield, S.; Reed, E.; (2011) Enhancing response rates in physician surveys: The limited utility of electronic options, Health Services Research, Vol. 46, Issue 5, pp. 1675-1682

Rodin, G.; Zimmermann, C.; Mayer, C.; Howell, D.; Katz, M.; Sussmann, J.; Mackay, J.A.; Brouwers, M.; (2009) Clinician-patient communication: Evidence-based recommendations to guide practice in cancer, Current Oncology, Vol. 16, Number 6, pp. 42 -- 49

Simpson, M.; Buckman, R.; Stewart, M.; et al. (1991) Doctor-patient communication: The Toronto consensus statement, BMJ, Vol. 303, pp. 1385-1387
View Full Essay

Sociology -- Medical Dominance on the Profession

Words: 1671 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93462251

Sociology -- Medical Dominance on the Profession of Nursing and How is the Profession of Nursing Challenging Medical Dominance in Australia

In the context of medical practice, the contemporary medical society is representing a change in the increasing issues of domination between medical professions. The focus of each practice's attention is on exploring its goals in providing integral contributions and impact to the framework of health care services. Each dimension of medical interest, specifically the doctors and nurses, are developing their respective paradigm and uniqueness to establish skills and authority in the field of health service.

This paper aims to do an informative research on medical dominance over the profession of nursing in Australia. As the industry of medicine progresses, the issue of domination among medical doctors and nurses in health care institutions are associated with competencies and authority over the other. The power and privileges of the profession is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Andrews, I., Hale, A. (2000). The Division of Labour in Health Care Delivery.

Retrieved Sept 23, 2003, from Faculty of Health Sciences. The University of Sydney.

Web site: http://www2.fhs.usyd.edu.au/bach/1107/topic9.htm

Duffy, E. Evolving Role and Practice Issues: Nurse Practitioners in Australia.
View Full Essay

Radiation Therapy Medical Dissymmetry My Program

Words: 329 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62516865

My education consists of a Bachelors degree in Radiological Science, I also maintain a high grade point average (gpa), and pride myself on the care given to my study and work history.

Although I already have a bachelors degree in the field of radiology, that is not enough. I wish to obtain a higher understanding of the subject matter, addition hands on experience, and the opportunity to use all the resources that will be afforded to me by continuing education to a higher level. I realize the need to continue in education if I want to work in the medical field working more extensively within the realm of radiology. Thank you in advance for the opportunity to express my desire in the field of radiology and what I hope to do upon being given the opportunity to continue at the graduate level.… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Advances in Digital Medical Imaging

Words: 1416 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81044696

Advances in Digital Medical Imaging

Origin

In the past few decades advances in healthcare have emerged, as new forms of technological integration are implemented as part of the overall healthcare management system. Healthcare providers, doctors and patients require more technological integration into the system providing real time data analysis and the possibility of enhancing medical knowledge. Sharing that knowledge can lead to what many describe as "digital medicine" where stored clinical data can generate medical knowledge which can be widely distributed, incorporated into decision support systems, and lead to more effective medical practices (ouler & Morgenstern, 2005). Digital medical image processing within the healthcare area has its origins in the 1970's when computed tomography was introduced as the first digital modality. In the decades that followed, advances in digital medical imaging technology have dramatically affected the planning and design of diagnostic interventional radiology facilities. Soon after the advent of computerized…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bang, C. (2005). Digital Imaging Drives Health Care Design. Building Operation

Management, July.

Becker, S. (1994). Costs and Benefits of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems.

Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, vol. 1, no. 5: 361-371.
View Full Essay

Health Care Situation Medical Error Due to

Words: 2468 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27484220

Health Care Situation: Medical Error Due to Doctors' Bad Handwriting

Identify a health care news situation that affects a health care organization such as a hospital, clinic or insurance company.

I have identified the following health care news situation as the topic of my paper: "Poor Handwriting of Doctors and its implied risks for the Patient, Hospital and Medical Malpractice Insurance." Poor handwriting of physicians resulting in poor legibility of entries into patients' medical records carries very dramatic risks for all above-mentioned interest bearers. It can result in severe health danger for the patient and - in extreme situations - even cause a patient's death. Doctors' bad penmanship has long been seen a problem within organized medicine and the patient safety movement. Three American Medical Association (AMA) policies dating back to 1992, urge doctors to "improve the legibility of handwritten orders for medications" and review all orders for accuracy and…… [Read More]

References

Berwick, Donald M. & Winickoff, David E. (1996). The truth about doctors' handwriting: a prospective study. BMJ Vol. 313 (21-28 December 1996). 1657-1658. www.bmj.com/content/313/7072/1657.full, accessed 21 August 2011.

Bruner, Anne & Kasdan, Morton.L. Handwriting Errors: Harmful, Wasteful and Preventable.

1-4. www.kyma.org/uploads/file/.../Harmful_wasteful_and_preventable.pdfSimilar, accessed 22 August 2011.

Gallant, Al. (22 November 2009). For a secure electronic health record implementation, user authentication is key. 1-2). searchhealthit.techtarget.com/.../User-authentication-is-critical-for-pl.., accessed 24 August 2011.
View Full Essay

Culturally Competent Nursing This Order Require Medical

Words: 1691 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55279173

Culturally Competent Nursing

This order require medical field, preferable. A egistered Nurse case management experiences, a Doctor, ODE: I requesting a 5 pages, paper written DOUBLE SPACED, APA format, excluding Title eference Page make total 7 pages.

Culturally competent transcultural nursing:

Case management when dealing with Mexican-Americans

The concept of case management in nursing is used to "monitor the utilization and quality of health-care services and intervene as necessary" (Case management, 2012, Medi-Smart). A nurse case manager can be defined in three different ways: as a utilization review manager who reviews "charts for the use of interdependent hospital systems, timeliness of service as well as safe and appropriate 'utilization' of service;" a quality manager who "is accountable for the overall quality of care being delivered" and as a discharge planner who "coordinates all the facets of a patient's admission/discharge" (Case management, 2012, Medi-Smart). In all three capacities, the concept of…… [Read More]

References

Case management. (2012). Medi-Smart. Retrieved:

http://www.medi-smart.com/nursing-articles/nursing-careers/profile7

Jirwe, M., Gerrish, K., & Emami, A. (2010). Student nurses' experiences of communication in cross-cultural care encounters. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 24(3), 436-444. doi:10.1111/j.1471-6712.2009.00733.x

Maier-Lorentz, M. (2008). Transcultural nursing: its importance in nursing practice. Journal Of
View Full Essay

American Medical Association The Writer

Words: 803 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66952427

ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

Some of the principles of ethics that physicians are expected to abide by include:

dedication providing competent medical care, with compassion and respect for human dignity and rights (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

Upholding the standards of professionalism, be honest in all professional interactions, and strive to report physicians deficient in character or competence, or engaging in fraud or deception, to appropriate entities (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

especting the law and also recognize a responsibility to seek changes in those requirements which are contrary to the best interests of the patient (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

especting the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals, and shall safeguard patient confidences and privacy within the constraints of the law (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

In addition physicians are expected to maintain regular educational hours to remain on top of the latest breakthroughs in medical science so that they…… [Read More]

References

Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)
View Full Essay

Lack of Creativity in the Medical Profession

Words: 1345 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24606197

intended public audience for this opinion piece includes stakeholders in the healthcare industry, including educators, researchers, nurses, physicians, and hospital administrators. One of the goals of this opinion piece is to persuade members of the healthcare industry to embrace a new paradigm in which creative thought is welcomed and encouraged, rather than shunned and mistrusted as it currently is. Consumers who are willing to pressure their physicians to improve quality of care are also a primary target demographic, as all Americans will at some point in their lives avail themselves of medical services. All Americans are likely to have had, at some point or another, a negative experience using medical services. Therefore, my goal is to persuade the audience of consumers to demand a higher standard of care.

The popular television show House helped draw attention to the need for, and resistance to, creativity in the medical practice. A lack…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Medical Association. "E-2.072 Ethically Sound Innovation in Medical Practice." Retrieved online: https://www.ama-assn.org/ssl3/ecomm/PolicyFinderForm.pl?site=www.ama-assn.org&uri=/resources/html/PolicyFinder/policyfiles/HnE/E-2.072.htm

Jones, Orion. "Why Creativity is Essential to Practicing Medicine." Big Think. 2015. Retrieved online: http://bigthink.com/ideafeed/why-we-must-return-creativity-to-the-medical-practice

Morse, Gardiner. "Ten Innovations That Will Transform Medicine." Harvard Business Review. 8 March, 2010. Retrieved online: https://hbr.org/2010/03/health-care-of-the-future

Parkinson, Jay. "What Happens to Doctors Who Think Outside the Box?" Retrieved online: http://blog.jayparkinsonmd.com/post/4024600220/what-happens-to-doctors-who-think-outside-the-box
View Full Essay

Electronic Medical Record EMR Ventors

Words: 480 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74621497

records are being replaced with electronic records in all fields. This is especially important in the medical field, where stores information is useful when a patient or doctor must access it in seconds. Computerized systems, however, have not achieved the same degree of utilization in the medical field as in other business fields, for instance, either in the Western world or elsewhere.[footnoteRef:1] However, as mentioned above, these systems can be vitally important. According to some, Electronic medical record systems lie at the center of any computerized health information system. Without them other modern technologies such as decision support systems cannot be effectively integrated into routine clinical workflow. The paperless, interoperable, multi-provider, multi-specialty, multi-discipline computerized medical record, which has been a goal for many researchers, healthcare professionals, administrators and politicians for the past 20+ years, is however about to become reality in many western countries.[footnoteRef:2] Thus, though there are problems, these…… [Read More]

"With the federal government poised to spend $20 billion or more on healthcare IT as part of the economic-stimulus bill now before Congress, it's a good time to get to know these companies."[footnoteRef:3] [3: Hamilton, D. (2009). The Top Ten Electronic Medical Record Vendors. CBS Interactive Business Network. Retrieved October 30, 2011, from . ]

According to this, the striking thing is the concentration within the sectors. The study further states, "Meditech, a privately held Boston-area company, holds more than a quarter of the market; McKesson and Cerner, numbers 2 and 3 on the list, control another 27%. All told, the top six companies -- excluding in-house systems -- are responsible for three-quarters of the EHR installations in hospitals around America."[footnoteRef:4] [4: Hamilton, D. (2009). The Top Ten Electronic Medical Record Vendors. CBS Interactive Business Network. Retrieved October 30, 2011, from .]

The paper thus provides a ranging of the top ten vendors, which can be useful and which is as follows[footnoteRef:5]: [5: Hamilton, D. (2009). The Top Ten Electronic Medical Record Vendors. CBS Interactive Business Network. Retrieved October 30, 2011, from .]
View Full Essay

Swedish Medical Center Case Study

Words: 3071 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34419998



omen's Health -- Focused on prevention and care for breast health, mammography, etc.

Transplant Programs - Swedish is one of seven kidney transplant centers and one of just four liver transplant centers serving the entire Pacific Northwest. The Organ Transplant Program at Swedish is at the forefront of new advances in transplantation surgery, including pancreas transplants and transplants between unrelated living organ donors and recipients (Swedish Medical Center, 2011).

Service design, operational activities, strategic decisions- Swedish is nothing but on the move -- strategically and tactically. In October, 2011, Swedish opened a new full-care facility with a 550,000 square foot campus in the city of Issaquah, southeast of Seattle city proper. This new facility was designed to be an entirely new hospital experience. Some of the operational innovations include a new Childbirth Center with eight new Labor/Delivery/Recovery rooms that include sleeping areas for partners, iPod access and a hotel room…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arnold, E. (2007). Service-Dominant Logic and Resource Theory. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Sciences, 36(1), 21-24.

Crosby, J. (2011, November). Human Resource - Swedish Hospital.

Institute of Medicine. (2000). To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

King, D. (2008). Designing the Digital Experience: How to Use Experience Design. Medford, NJ: Information Today Press.
View Full Essay

Rise of Advanced Technologies in the Medical

Words: 1474 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44926912

rise of advanced technologies in the medical field, especially those that sustains life, has brought issues in the ethics and morality of those involved in the field of medicine. Most significant to these issues is the practice of Euthanasia on patients diagnosed to have no chance of surviving and regaining life after any treatment has been implemented. In view of the issues on Euthanasia, this paper aims to present a discussion of this medical practice by analyzing the stands and views of Ned Cassem, James Rachel, Sidney Hook, and Leon R. Kass. This paper also aims to explain the meaning of "good death" as mentioned by Ned Cassem.

On many medical books and dictionaries, "euthanasia" or "mercy-killing" is defined as ending a life of a terminally ill patient by ways such as removing life support machines or stopping treatments that somehow prolongs life. The basic reason why euthanasia is performed…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chung, Ken. On James Rachels and "Active and Passive Euthanasia."

Publish.Uwo.Ca. 28 Dec. 2002. http://publish.uwo.ca/~kchung23/rachels.htm

Hook, Sidney. "In Defense of Voluntary Euthanasia.."

The New York Times (1 Mar. 1987).
View Full Essay

Privacy and Ethics in Medical Testing

Words: 772 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78003301

Ethics

Incidental findings are fairly common in the course of medical testing, occurring in around one-third of all tests (Ofri, no date). Yet, the medical field is torn about what the ethical implications of such findings are. In particular, it can be difficult to determine whether reporting such findings is important, and therefore medical practice seeks to establish a threshold of what should and should not be reported. This particular finding, that the son is not the biological son of the father, does not appear to be medically relevant. First, it is not relevant to the question at hand, which is whether the people in the family have the marker for Huntington's Disease. The child could or could not, and his parentage is not relevant to that question. Second, who is or is not his biological father is not a matter of medical health, and especially not an immediate matter.…… [Read More]

References

Illes, J. & Kirschen, M. (2014). Unexpected findings. Monitor on Psychology. Vol. 45 (3) 54.

Meiser, B. & Dunn, S. (2000). Psychological impact of genetic testing for Huntington's disease: An update of the literature. Journal of Neuroology and Neurosurgery Psychiatry. Vol. 69 (2000) 574-578.

Ofri, D. (no date). Ethical implications of incidental findings. Danielle Ofri. Retrieved April 2, 2016 from http://danielleofri.com/ethical-implications-of-incidental-findings/
View Full Essay

Therapeutic Relationships Within the Medical

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86828533

The goals are what the client hopes will happen because of the care needed -- and the bond the specifics that need to be met in order to meet those goals (iddowson, 2010, 83).

The Transference/Countertransference Section -- ithin this section of the therapeutic relationship, transference and countertransference are phenomenons in which feelings between the client and caregiver are directed and redirected to one another. This has been part of clinical psychology since Jung, and may be both harmful or positive. ithin the caregiver model, it is usually heightened empathy for the patient, with the client, a feeling of greater emotional bonding to the caregiver than that of a professional relationship (iener, 2009).

The Real Relationship -- This is the ideal outcome, the real or personal relationship between client and caregiver. It may, of course, include deception on the part of the caregiver or therapist depending on the actuality of…… [Read More]

Watson, J. (1997). The Theory of Human Caring: Retrospective and Prospective. Nursring Science Quarterly, 10(1), 49-52.

Widdowson, M. (2010). Transactional Analysis: 100 Key Points and Techniques. New York: Taylor and Francis.

Wiener, J. (2009). The Therapeutic Relationship: Tranference, Countertranference. Austin, TX: Texas a&M Univeristy.
View Full Essay

Medical Records System Definition of

Words: 3005 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30994463

The master patient index (MPI) value was mainly liked by the personnel in the medical record section.

The Golden 90s

Equipped with MPI and record-keeping growth, software designers sustained to generate and progress with a new emphasis on individual hospital sections. Auxiliary department purposes, for example radiology and laboratory showed to be fairly adaptive to software that is fresh and innovative, and computer healthcare applications start to show on the market. Patient test outcomes that instigated in the laboratory and radiology department now too were obtainable via computers nonetheless again with limit as the outcomes were separate and were not linked to one another, or to any other software for instance that being done with the patient registration. A lot of these applications had basically been marked as "source" governments, and they were not courteous to assembly athwart the healthcare aptitude. This is the state that mechanization in healthcare found…… [Read More]

References:

Holden, R.J. (2011). Cognitive performance-altering effects of electronic medical records: An application of the human factors paradigm for patient safety. Cognition, Technology & Work, 13(1), 11-29.

Kaliyadan, F., Venkitakrishnan, S., Manoj, J., & Dharmaratnam, a. (2009). Electronic medical records in dermatology: Practical implications. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, 75(2), 157-61.

Kochevar, J., Gitlin, M., Mutell, R., Sarnowski, J., & Mayne, T. (2011). Electronic medical records: A survey of use and satisfaction in small dialysis organizations. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 38(3), 273-81.

Kurbasic, I., Pandza, H., Masic, I., Huseinagic, S., Tandir, S., Alicajic, F., & Toromanovic, S. (2008). The advantages and limitations of international classification of diseases, injuries and causes of death from aspect of existing health care system of B&H. Acta Informatica Medica, 16(3), 159.
View Full Essay

Medical Marijuana Growing in Butte County

Words: 2199 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24923351

Introduction

Medical marijuana has increasingly been in the news as a growing number of states throughout the U.S. have passed measures or at least put on the ballot an initiative to legalize either medicinal or recreational marijuana usage.  The history of marijuana in the U.S. is one that goes back as far as the country itself:  hemp (a type of marijuana plant) was used for rope, paper and a number of other purposes because of its strong fibrous tissue.1  It was not until the Prohibition Era of the 1920s that marijuana began to be prohibited by law in the U.S.—and within a decade, it was regulated among most states under the Uniform State Narcotic Act.2  Thus, from its very first days as a crop grown by the Virginia Company for exporting to England by decree of James I—and in fact from the days of the first President of the U.S.…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Medical Model and Learned Helplessness

Words: 1083 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78154146

Lobotomy is a popular medical procedure introduced in curing mentally ill individuals, which requires the removal of the prefrontal lobes of the cortex of the brain, the part of the brain wherein aggressive and violent behavior is triggered. However, in the movie, lobotomy is shown to have disastrous results: McMurphy's violent behavior is indeed abated, but as illustrated in the movie, the lobotomy had turned him into a 'vegetable' neither responding to his ward mates' call for attention nor displaying his usual rowdy, obnoxious, McMurphy self.

This instance in the movie is considered as patterned after the medical model of abnormal psychology, wherein "mental disorders are described as medical diseases with a biological origin" (450). ecause this is the prevalent thinking in medical science during the time the movie (and novel) was made, Nurse Ratched decided, in order to "treat" McMurphy, to let him undergo lobotomy. Subsistence to the medical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Santorck, J. (2001). Psychology. NY: McGraw-Hill Book Co.
View Full Essay

Medical Disorders Face Recognition

Words: 1892 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81215349

Prosopagnosia

According to A.J. Larner's book, "A Dictionary of Neurological signs," prosopagnosia is a neurological condition, "a form of visual agnosia characterized by an inability to recognize previously known human faces or equivalent stimuli (hence a retrograde defect) and to learn new ones (anterograde defect)" (Larner, 2010). Larner further distinguishes between two forms of prosopagnosia: apperceptive and associative agnosia. This "category-specific recognition disorder," as G, Neil Martin calls it in his "Human Neuropsychology" is often, but not always, associated with other forms of visual agnosia such as alexia or achromatopsia.

Prosopagnosia can be congenital or developmental, or a consequence of brain damage, following a stroke, a brain injury, or caused by a degenerative disease (Kinai, 2013) . There are two types of prosopagnosia: apperceptive prosopagnosia and associative prosopagnosia. This form of visual impairment has various degrees of manifestation, from mild to severe and can or cannot be associated with other…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bowles, Devin C. McKone, Elinor. Dawel, Amy. Duchaine, Bradley. Palermo, Romina. Schmalzl, Laura. Rivolta. Davide. Wilson, Ellie. Yovel. Galit.

Cognitive Neuropsychology, "Diagnosing prosopagnosia: Effects of ageing, sex, and participant-stimulus ethnic match on the Cambridge Face Memory Test and Cambridge Face Perception Test." Available at:  http://www.faceblind.org/social_perception/papers/Bowles%2009%20CN.pdf 

Sperry, Roger Wolcott. Ed.Trevarthern, Colwyn B. 1990. Brain Circuits and Functions of the Mind: Essays in Honor of Roger Wolcott Sperry, Author. Cambridge University Press

Newman, Nancy J. Miller, Neil R. Biousse, Valerie. 2008. Walsh and Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-ophthalmology: The Essentials. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
View Full Essay

Medical Evacuation Evolution In the US

Words: 738 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19433058

How Medical Evacuation Evolved from Post Civil War to Present
1st Historical Interest Timeline: 1877 to 1910
Medical advances during this period were more in organization and technique and not in medical breakthroughs. Jonathan Letterman is credited with creating a highly organized system of ambulances and trained stretcher bearers that were designed to evacuate the wounded quickly. This was a great improvement from the previous methods. It was also during this period that sanitary conditions for medical care were improved upon. Previously surgeons did not wash their hand before attending to a patient and their equipment was not sanitized. This resulted in the number of deaths occurring from medical care increasing and the mortality rate was two soldiers died out of disease and infections as compared to one who died from injury or gunshot wound in the battlefield. Organized trauma care was also suggested and practiced in the late 19th…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Medical Experiments

Words: 946 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75410058

Ethical Dilemma: case study of clinical trial on a child

The field of medicine and research has been surrounded by issue of experiments in order to have the conclusive result of the effectiveness of a drug or otherwise. These results can only be obtained if the drugs are at times used on human beings with the real medical problem that the experiment seeks to find solution to. The problem of ethical dilemma often comes in at such stages on whether to go ahead to experiment on the effectiveness of the new drug or not.

Ethical dilemma refers to the situation that is deemed complex since it involves some element of mental conflict between moral imperatives that is one goes ahead and obeys one, it will mean the transgression of another (Braunack-Meyer A.J., 2001). The individual does not have a clear cut direction on which option to go for, despite there…… [Read More]

References

Braunack-Meyer A.J., (2001). What makes a problem an ethical problem? An empirical perspective on the nature of ethical problems in general practice. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from http://jme.bmj.com/content/27/2/98.full

Pier B.K., (2007). Children, Gillick Competency and Consent for Involvement in Research. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from http://jme.bmj.com/content/33/11/659.abstract

Spriggs M., (2010). Understanding Consent in Research Involving Children: The ethical Issues. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from http://www.mcri.edu.au/media/62539/handbook.pdf
View Full Essay

Field Analysis

Words: 1315 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79722353

Wake Up; Take a Shower; Take Breakfast With Other Family Members

Arrive at the bank; pick a waiting ticket; interaction with service staff; a member of staff in the next counter is having a difficult time with a customer

9:00 am: Arrive at my girlfriend's house; help her with laundry and other household chores; watch a movie together

12:30 pm: Having lunch with my girlfriend in a restaurant; in an adjacent table three women are talking about their dating experiences with men in different cultures

2:00 pm: At the parking lot a beggar stops me; he tells me he has no home or family

7:00 pm: Watching evening news -- robbery at a local store and unnecessary shooting of an innocent Black man by a White police officer

Application

Sociology demonstrates that people's daily lives are shaped and constrained by the society (Dillon, 2010). By interacting with and/or watching other…… [Read More]

References

Dillon, M. (2010). Introduction to sociological theory: theorists, concepts, and their applicability to the twenty-first century. UK: John Wiley & Sons.

Hurst, C., Gibbon, H., & Nurse, A. (2016). Social inequality: forms, causes and consequences. 9th ed. New York: Routledge.

Williams, C. (2003). Sky demands: the demands of emotional labour in the airline industry. Gender, Work & Organisation, 10(5), 513-550.
View Full Essay

Medical Coding

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5515484

health information technology occupation and conduct a search of the Internet, consult professional

Thorough Job Details: Although there are not an abundance of qualifications that an individual must have to earn a position as a professional medical coder, there are several different avenues to pursue them. Candidates typically must have graduated high school or earned the equivalency of a high school diploma. Once they have completed this step, they can satisfy the general education requirements in a couple of different ways: either by earning an associate's degree or a postsecondary certification in health information technology or in a related field. Certificate programs typically last less than a year, whereas associate's degree programs are generally two years of full time study. The completion of these courses usually qualifies individuals to begin working within the field of medical records and health information technology as a medical coder. It is also permissible for…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014). Medical records and health information technicians. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm 

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014). Medical and health services manager. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm
View Full Essay

Medical Care Policies

Words: 717 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89251074

Healthcare Policies

Health care policy usually is developed to address health care cost, quality, or access, or a combination of the three. Due to the nature of their interaction with patients, nurses are well situated to be effective, knowledgeable advocates for their patients. The impact of health policy and regulation when it comes to the nursing profession is not something that can be ignored. Healthcare issues are very complex and they involve the fields of economics and medicine and affecting the rights of individuals as well as accessing healthcare. Consumers' main concern is quality while the individual and corporations providers are mainly concerned about the economic survival (Heller, Oros, & Durney-Crowley, 2009).

One public policy that is influencing my nursing practice and I is the Medicaid policy. This is a social health program meant for families and individuals that have low income and resources. This is an insurance program by…… [Read More]

References

Coffman, J.(2010). Evaluation Based on Theories of the Policy Process. Retrieved July 16, 2014 from  http://www.hfrp.org/evaluation/the-evaluation-exchange/issue-archive/advocacy-and-policy-change/evaluation-based-on-theories-of-the-policy-process 

Heller, B., Oros, M & Durney-Crowley, J.(2009). Impact of Health Policy. Retrieved July 16, 2014 from http://www.nursezone.com/Student-Nurses/student-nurses-featured-articles/Impact-of-Health-Policy_18566.aspx
View Full Essay

Paperwork for Medical Billing

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28869666

Medical and Billing Claims

I certainly do not agree with Tina's way of filling out an insurance claim. In fact, her method appears extremely suspect and potentially noxious to the company that both she and Tim are working for. The reason that I do not agree with Tina's way of filling out an insurance claim form is because she leaves far too much room for error. The fact that she would rather make an educated guess about the veracity of a claim based on unclear handwriting or terms she is ignorant about certainly does not bode well for her career -- or the degree of business that the company she is working for has. The billing and coding specialist position in the medical record field leaves little room for error.

There are a couple of rules or guidelines I would suggest Tina adhere to when attempting to fill out a…… [Read More]

References

Hobbes, T. (1651). Leviathan. www.Oregonstate.edu Retrieved from http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/texts/hobbes/leviathan-contents.html

Machiavelli, N. (2006). The Prince. Project Guttenberg. Retrieved from http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1232/1232-h/1232-h.htm
View Full Essay

Ethics Case Study Medical Law and Ethics

Words: 1239 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95526411

Ethics Case Study: Medical Law and Ethics

Jerry McCall is Dr. William's office assistant. He has received professional training as both a medical assistant and an LPN. He is handling all of the phone calls at the office while the receptionist is at lunch. During this period of time, a patient calls and says he must have a prescription refill for Valium, an antidepressant medication, called in right away to his pharmacy, since he is leaving for the airport in thirty minutes. The patient notes that Dr. Williams is a personal friend and always gives him a small supply of Valium when he has to fly. No one except Jerry is in the office at this time.

Does Jerry's Medical Training Qualify Him to efill the Order?

While Jerry's medical training qualifies him to receive a prescription order and transcribe it accurately for other nurses or physicians to implement or…… [Read More]

References

Lloyd, H. (2010). Workers' compensation: a brief history. Florida Department of Financial Services. Web. Retrieved from: http://www.myfloridacfo.com/wc/history.html on 1 November 2011.

Minnesota Board of Nursing. (2010). Nurses and prescribing. Web. Retrieved from:

http://www.state.mn.us/mn/externalDocs/Nursing/NURSES_AND_PRESCRIBING_090904125323_Prescribing%20FAQ2.pdf on 1 November 2011.

Nowicki, M. And Summers, J. (2004). Reducing your credibility liability. Healthcare Financial Management, 58.4: pp. 94-97. Web. Retrieved from: ProQuest Database.
View Full Essay

Ruchi Tomar Advantages of Electronic Medical Records

Words: 3264 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74105747

The issue of misplaced or lost patient files is also gotten rid of. These advantages aid in producing a marked rise in the health connected security of patients and the welfare of patients (Ayers, 2009). Furthermore, electronic medical records and patient care are identical in that such systems effortlessly permit restrictions to be placed upon end users' admission to specific information of the patient. This personal security feature is likewise significant to meeting a patient's confidentiality anxieties.

Figure 4 Electronic medical records and their advantages with patients (Slaughter, 2000).

The Benefits of access that is easy to each patient's comprehensive medical information, and the ability for physicians to rapidly take part in medical records and organize patient care. Even though every department at SMG utilizes the EM, it is particularly valuable in the Urgent Care Center when rapid admission to a patient's material can make all the change in medical…… [Read More]

References:

Angst, C.M., Agarwal, R., Sambamurthy, V., & Kelley, K. (2010). Social contagion and information technology diffusion: The adoption of electronic medical records in U.S. hospitals. Management Science, 56(8), 1219-1241.

Ayers, D.J., Menachemi, N., Ramamonjiarivelo, Z., Matthews, M., & Brooks, R.G. (2009). Adoption of electronic medical records: The role of network effects. The Journal of Product and Brand Management, 18(2), 127-135.

Berner, E.S., Detmer, D.E., & Simborg, D. (2005). Will the wave finally break? A brief view of the adoption of electronic medical records in the United States. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 12(1), 3-7.

Brooks, R., & Grotz, C. (2010). Implementation of electronic medical records: How healthcare providers are managing the challenges of going digital. Journal of Business & Economics Research, 8(6), 73-84
View Full Essay

Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 3042 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30529280

Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMH) are often confused as being actual "homes" for patients to be admitted in and given medical treatment and care. PCMH is actually a health care model based on which health care is provided to patients, under the supervision of physicians. The PCMH model of health care provides patients with continuous, comprehensive medical care, in order to increase the chances of achieving the goal of benefitting the patient with as much attention and medical care in order to maximize his/her health outcomes.

Over the years the PCMH model of health care has become widely adopted and preferred. This is because of the philosophy and approach that the model adopts in organizing and delivering the health care initiatives. The PCMH model is based upon delivering medical care and attention to patients with team-based health and medical experts that are focused strongly on the quality and the safety…… [Read More]

Bibliography

109-432, P.L. (2006, December 20). TAX RELIEF AND HEALTH CARE ACT OF 2006. Public Law 109-432 (109th Congress) .

Backer, L.A. (2009). Building the Case for the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Family Practice Management 16 (1), 14-18.

De Geest, S., Moons, P., Callens, B., Gut, C., Lindpaintner, L., & Spirig, R. (2008). Introducing advanced practice nurses/nurse practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis. Swiss Medical Weekly (138), 621-628.

NASHP. (2013, April). Medical Home & Patient-Centered Care. Retrieved from The National Academy for State Health Policy: http://www.nashp.org/med-home-map
View Full Essay

Counsultation in the Field of Counseling Is

Words: 3937 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10541403

Counsultation in the field of counseling is a concept by which a person is able to consult with a counselor in order to develop a better sense of self. There is often a biblical aspect to this type of counseling, but that is not a requirement. People can also be counseled by those who address financial concerns, tax implications, or other types of personal and professional issues. Anytime someone sees a counselor for a counsultation on his or her status in some aspect of life, this type of activity takes place. Often, a counsultation takes place as the first line of defense in treating a mental health issue. A counselor can look over information provided by the patient as well as any past medical history in order to make some determinations about patient care and potential problems. At that time, there can be a counsultation appointment scheduled that will allow…… [Read More]

References

Belkin, L. (1999, October 31). Parents blaming parents. New York Times Sunday Magazine, p. F61.

Benner, D.G., & Hill, P. C (1999). Baker Encyclopedia of Psychology & Counseling. Grand Rapids.

Boss, P. (1999). Ambiguous Loss: Learning to Live with Unresolved Grief. Harvard University Press, MA.

Bowlby, J. (1977). The making and breaking of affectional bonds, I and II. British Journal of Psychiatry, (130), 201-210, 421-431.
View Full Essay

Scientific Medical Translation Personal Statement

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28591398

" here, I worked part-time as a translator and interpreter. It was indeed a magnificent experience to work with members of this demanding theatrical profession. Every day was a constant surprise and a constant challenge to my linguistic abilities. I had to put works of great emotion, the off-stage as well as the on-stage monologues, of these fine actors into comprehensible form, structure, and prose for the delight and edification of others and for audiences of all ages.

his constant, daily, living act of translation also highlighted for me the delicate balance between subjectivity and objectivity in the art of translating another's words and thoughts into another language and cultural system of ideas. Beyond decoding the meaning of the source text or voice, and recoding it into the language and meaning of another text and voice, I learned that in the immediacy of life there is always an element between…… [Read More]

This is even more important for someone in a specific field, as in medical and scientific translation, as often words have a different meaning in the technical lexicon of the profession or a discipline then they do in more colloquial usage. For much as I enjoyed my tenure with the theatrical company, for me, even more gratifying than making the arts understandable is the ability to make the often difficult and frightening world of medicine and science comprehensible. To see my knowledge of a language bring comprehension, the understanding of the 'yes, I see,' or the 'a-ha' in the eyes of another is as satisfying as landing a well-spiked volleyball over the net, another of my favorite leisure time pursuits, or of hearing applause while standing on the stage.

My knowledge of technical subjects and fluency in the language of scientific technology has been honed through my computer knowledge and my proficiency in technical languages. I am fluent in Windows98, Windows 2000, and Windows XP. Microsoft Applications such as Word, Excel, Access, Explorer, FrontPage, PowerPoint, Publisher, Photoshop, and I have a good knowledge of HTML programming and the languages involved in web design.

Translation, regardless of the language and the lexicon -- scientific, computer, medical, or artistic -- is about the conveyance of meaning as perfectly as possible into a language and a manner understandable to another person's language and lexicon. To be a translator is to be the human facilitator in the process of creating meaning and bridges between cultures. It is a skill I have performed in the past, and one that I hope to further sharpen and perfect, in school and in my professional life.
View Full Essay

Human Resource Issues in Health Field

Words: 1627 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8292223

Human esource Issues in Health Field

The field of health human resources in the health field deals with issues such as planning, performance, management, development, information, retention, and research on human resources in the health sector Successful realization the mission and goals in this field is determined by the dedication and skills that the specialists possess. This study identifies various issues that often arise and bedevils this field. Current trends relating to technological advancements affecting the success and performance of employees in this field are also identified (Fried, & Johnson, 2002). Therefore, in order to improve service delivery in the health sector and consequently promote a healthy society, it is critical to identify and analyze the various challenges facing human resources in the health sector. This will provide a basis for developing various interventions aimed at dealing with the identified challenges and consequently improving the quality of service delivery in…… [Read More]

References

American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration. (2012). American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration ... membership directory. Gainesville FL: Naylor.

Fried, B., & Fottler, M.D. (2011). Fundamentals of human resources in healthcare. Chicago: Health Administration Press.

Fried, B., & Johnson, J.A. (2002). Human resources in healthcare: Managing for success. Washington, DC: AUPHA Press.

Kabene, S.M. (2011). Human resources in healthcare, health informatics and healthcare systems. Hershey, PA: Medical Information Science Reference.
View Full Essay

Philosophy Field Research Report Moral

Words: 1941 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37120908

If the account does this it has exhausted what matters to the person in constructing the agent's well-being. Thus a person could not care about anything beyond the extent to which it serves her interests. Self-sacrifice would be impossible." (Sobel, 1998)

But, I understand that it is important to know going in that our healthcare system and all the world around us is in a state of constant change. As important is the fact that there is a need for reevaluating systems and the enacted laws and policies that empower these systems. The notion and concept of Family Health Centers of Southwest Florida, Inc. puts to rest any preconceived notions about the healthcare system.

I felt that the professional employed at Family Health Centers of Southwest Florida, Inc. would be unique and totally different than any other medical professional. I thought that financial gain would be the only driving factor…… [Read More]

References

Falikowski, Anthony (1998). Moral Philosophy for Modern Life. Prentice Hall: Scarborough, Ontario.

Family Health Centers of Southwest Florida, Inc. (2005). Home Page. Retrieved on March 20, 2005, at  http://www.fhcswf.org/ 

Sobel, David. (1998). Well-Being as the Object of Moral Consideration. Retrieved on March 20, 2005, at http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/phil/faculty/sobel/wbasobject.html

Thottam, Jyoti (2005). Thank God it's. Time, Vol.165 No. 3, p. A58.
View Full Essay

Improving Computer-User Interface in Medical Care the

Words: 1618 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28090900

Improving Computer-User Interface in Medical care

The use of computer information systems in the field of medicine has revolutionized the way patients receive medical care. Computer information systems have assisted medical practitioners to capture and transfer information quickly saving the time taken to treat patients. Storage of information has also been automated such that the medical personnel do not have to manually input and store the data. The management of medical organizations has been able to improve on the time take to diagnose an ailment and the accuracy of diagnosis. The presence of electronic health records in an organization improves the way the organization collects patient's information. The collection of debt is thus automated and accurate thus the medical organization can collect all its debts.

Computer user interface refers to the method used the organization to connect o the computer information system. This interface needs to be improved to ensure…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Nanomedicine the Healthcare Field Is Certainly a

Words: 1154 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23522188

Nanomedicine

The healthcare field is certainly a tricky topic to discuss, considering that it is riddled with debates regarding things like insurance, pharmaceutical use and the safety of many medical procedures. However, in the last ten years, the field of biotechnology has emerged as a force to be reckoned with in the realm of healthcare and economics. Several groundbreaking innovations have been made that have rattled the pre-existing constructs of these vital fields. Topics like laser surgeries and stem cell reproduction have become regular parts of every citizen's vocabulary, yet they still seem to been engulfed in quite a bit of controversy. Nevertheless, the lifesaving potential of these revolutionary endeavors cannot be overlooked. In fact, this massive potential has given way to the revolutionary amalgamation of nanotechnology and medicine: a field that is now referred to as nanomedicine. Research in this field is currently being conducted with some radical goals…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bloomberg Businessweek. (2011). The Nanomedicine Laboratory. Retrieved November 23, 2011, from http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/snapshot.asp?privcapId=108448530

Diaz, J. (2010, March). This Is the Future of the Fight Against Cancer. Retrieved November 23, 2011, from  http://gizmodo.com/5501103/this-is-the-future-of-the-fight-against-cancer 

Eaton, M. (2009). Nanomedicine: Industry-Wise Research. Journal of Nature Materials, 6 (1), 251-253.

Moghimi, S.M., Hunter, A.C., & Murray, J.C. (2005). Nanomedicine: Current Status and Future Prospects. The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, 19 (3), 311-330.
View Full Essay

Audits in the Field of Nursing Both

Words: 663 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15456071

Audits

In the field of nursing, both qualitative and quantitative data are useful and needed. The qualitative approach comes much from the patient and/or stakeholders. How does the patient "feel," what are some not quantittiative things one notices. Often, though, in charting a patient, a medical professional is able to quantify some of the qualitative data (e.g. complexion pale or wan; skin temperature, palor, attention span, etc.). The quantitative data are data that can be easily measured and work in tandem to provide a way to make a cogent diagnosis for the patient. Qualitative data is also part of the nurse's ability to make judgments about the quality and morality of situations, indeed, taking the principles of nursing ethics (beneficence, autonomy, etc.), many of those decision types are qualitative based. Some of this is, of course, related to secondary data sets from other research studies outside the purvue of patient-care,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Information on Charting. (2011). AHIMA. Retrieved from:  http://www.ahima.org/ 

The How's and Why's of Chart Audits. (2005). Duke University Medical Center. Retrieved from:  http://patientsafetyed.duhs.duke.edu/module_b/chart_audit.html 

Medical Chart Audits. (2011). AAPC Physician Services. Retrieved from:

 http://www.aapcps.com/services/audit-services.aspx?gclid=CKWTkpL3p6sCFRRSgwodkF4E4w
View Full Essay

Schneck Medical Center The Baldrige Award Schneck

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64899259

Schneck Medical Center: The Baldrige Award

Schneck Medical Center: Overview

The Schneck Medical Center according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology -- NIST (2011) "is a 93-bed nonprofit hospital providing primary and specialized services to the residents of Jackson County, Ind., and surrounding communities." The facility as NIST (2011) further points out, offers a variety of primary care services including but not limited to cancer care, noninvasive cardiac care, and joint replacement.

Established in 1911, the facility was amongst four organizations selected by the President and the Commerce Secretary in 2011 to be awarded the Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. This particular award in the words of NIST (2011) is "the nation's highest Presidential honor for performance excellence through innovation, improvement and visionary leadership." It is important to note that apart from the Baldrige Award, Schneck Medical Center has been a recipient of several other awards including the Outstanding…… [Read More]

References

Greene, A.H. (2012). HIPAA Compliance for Clinician Texting. Retrieved May 28, 2013, from:  http://library.ahima.org/xpedio/groups/public/documents/ahima/bok1_049460.hcsp?dDocName=bok1_049460 

Hester, D.M. & Schonfeld, T., (Eds.). (2012). Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hernandez, S.R. & O'Connor, S.J. (2009). Strategic Human Resources Management in Health Services Organizations (3rd ed.). Clifton Park, NY: Cengage Learning.

Lyer, P.W., Levin, B.J. & Shea, M.A. (2006). Medical Legal Aspects of Medical Records. Tucson, AZ: Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company.
View Full Essay

Patient Centered Medical Home

Words: 598 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48381367

Healthcare

Patient Centered Medical Home

PCMH model leads to reduced cost of care, improved population health" is a medical report authored by Katie Sullivan Published on FierceHealthcare. The report is a summary of the general findings of a report carried out by the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative. According to the research report, the Patient Centered Medical Home has resulted in reduced unnecessary emergency room (ER) and hospital visits, costs of care, and improved population health.

The research methodology employed is the review of literature released between August 2012 and December 2013. This means that a panel of experts reviews all the articles before they accepted for publication. The report achieves quality and merit by restricting the literature to peer review articles that can be relied for scholarly and official use. However, there is no indication of the section process used in identifying the literature to be used. August 2012 to…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Diagnostic Medical Sonography What Do

Words: 308 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25869489

They have a great deal of responsibility for selecting the images during the scan that provide the most comprehensive picture for diagnostic purposes, as well as recording their own preliminary findings.

Why did you apply to this health program?

I have worked three years as a 401K plan analyst. I enjoy making the complex financial services industry comprehensible to clients, but I am seeking a job that is more meaningful and hands-on that still makes use of detail-oriented personality. The field of medical sonography is fascinating and likely to be more and more important in the future because of its ability to quickly provide a portrait of a patient's state of well-being. Working in the field will allow me to be in close contact with patients and to give them meaningful comfort, advice, and care during diagnostic procedures.… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Standard Construction of Modern High Field Magnets

Words: 1882 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63254444

Standard Construction of Modern High Field Magnets Used in Modern Nuclear Magnetic esonance Devices

Nuclear magnetic resonance devices are playing an increasingly important role in healthcare and research today. As the term implies, magnets, specifically high field magnets, are an essential part of these sophisticated devices with important implications for a wide range of valuable healthcare and research applications. To gain additional insights into how these devices operate, this paper provides a discussion concerning the standard construction of modern high field magnets used in nuclear magnetic resonance devices, including a detailed graphic illustrated the different components of a representative magnet. An examination of the effects of transitions to higher magnet strengths on cooling systems is followed by an analysis of the superconducting materials used and a brief description of magnet construction. A discussion concerning the differences between shielded magnets and non-shielded magnets and innovations in technology that may allow room…… [Read More]

References

Carlisle, R. (2004). Scientific American Inventions and Discoveries: All the Milestones in Ingenuity -- From the Discovery of Fire to the Invention of the Microwave Oven. Hoboken,

NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Depalma, A. (2003, August 25). 'Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics.' The Scientist, vol. 17, no.

16, pp. 44-47.
View Full Essay

Police Field Now or Within

Words: 1104 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47309033



Subsequently, the primary focus of this editorial is to urge Police Magazine, individual law enforcement offices across the country, as well as law enforcement officers themselves, to implement these type of measures (which allowed for such a coordinated response from these disparate entities) across the country. The benefits of implementing programs such as the Metropolitan Medical Response System in cities and states throughout the U.S. would certainly be manifold, as it would dramatically assist in the work efforts of the aforementioned departments were they previously familiarized with working together in the face of adversity.

I do realize, of course, that the coordination of this type of municipal cooperation would require a substantial amount of training for the various employees involved, which would ideally be an addition to the training necessary for the respective jobs in these organizations. I am also aware that such organization would require a significant amount of…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Beneficence the Field of Nursing Is Shaped

Words: 1580 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57082843

Beneficence

The field of nursing is shaped by a range of ethical principles; while all of these concepts are important, one could argue that perhaps the most crucial ethical principle is that of beneficence. "Beneficence is the obligation to do good and avoid harm. Nurses help others to gain what is beneficial to them, which promotes well-being and reduces the risk of harm" (Young et al., 2009, p. 75). Having a clear understanding of beneficence is important as nurses are often presented with a range of complex ethical situations and dilemmas and they need strong principles to help guide their actions and nursing practice. As Young and colleagues explain, avoiding the harm that comes to a patient involves balancing this against the perceived amount of benefit. Other theorists see this concept in a slightly different perspective: "Beneficence is the principle of promoting the legitimate and important aims and interests of…… [Read More]

References

Addington-Hall, J.M., Bruera, E., Higginson, I.J., & Payne, S. (2007). Research methods in palliative care. Oxford: Oxford Publishing.

Cedar, S.H. (2006). Stem cell and related therapies. Nursing Ethics, 13(292),

Hitchcock, J.E., Schubert, P.E., & Thomas, S.A. (2003).Community health nursing: Caring in action. Clifton Park: Delmar.

Randall, F.M. (1999). Ethical issues in palliative care. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand, 43(9), 954-6.
View Full Essay

Why I Want to Work for Delray Medical Center

Words: 544 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92410704

Delray Medical Center

A particular level of personal achievement, drive and professionalism are expected from the individuals who make up the nursing team at Delray Medical Center. Due to the reputation that comes with being both a Level One Trauma Center and a hospital recognized as one of the top 50 in the United States, the nursing staff has to meet a strict standard. So, those applying for a staff position and seeking to join the Graduate Registered Nurse Program being organized, must exceed those leadership and professionalism criteria expected from other nurses. The goal of this essay is to familiarize the Delray Medical Center recruitment staff with my qualifications and to provide proof that I do have the accumulated personal achievements, professional credentials and drive to not only succeed but thrive in this learning and working environment.

Many nursing students come to the profession after working the first few…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Observing and Reporting Surroundings at a VA Medical Center

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38485416

Experiential Exercise: Observing and Reporting Surroundings at a VA Medical Center

To satisfy the requirements of this assignment, the author recently volunteered at a local Department of Veterans Affairs medical center (VAMC) and the results of this experience are related below.

Date and address of where the experience took place

October XYZ, 20XX, in Anytown, Ohio.

Length of time you were there

Four hours (including lunch).

Brief description of the setting

The VAMC visited for this assignment is a major tertiary healthcare facility that provides medical, surgical, dental and mental health services to eligible veterans in its catchment area. The volunteer services department is located on the VAMC's first floor, immediately inside the main entrance. A young female receptionist behind a glass window greets volunteers with and without appointments, but a sign below the window recommends making an appointment to ensure volunteers' services are needed on a specific date. Besides…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Abnormal Psychology Is a Field in Psychology

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15792418

Abnormal psychology is a field in psychology that addresses dysfunctions in behavior which are determined abnormally by standards of behavior .These standards have been established by clinical professionals in the field such as medical doctors, psychiatrists and psychologists. Behaviors considered to be abnormal are; schizophrenia, depression, attention deficit disorder, eating disorder, sexual deviance, obsessive compulsive disorder and anti-social disorder (Cherry, 2012). These disordered function outside the normal parameters of the functional behaviors considered to be standard. The paper will look at the origins of abnormal psychology and challenges when it comes to the classification and definition of normal and abnormal behavior. It will also look at how abnormal psychology has evolved into a scientific discipline. It will finally look at the theoretical models that have led to the advancement of understanding psychopathology.

Origins of Abnormal psychology

Abnormal psychology has been undergoing tremendous changes and progress. It is a very controversial…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2012).What is Abnormal Psychology? Retrieved May 10, 2013 from http://psychology.about.com/od/abnormalpsychology/f/abnormal-psychology.htm

Crawford, O. (2010). Psychopathology Analysis: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives of Abnormal Behavior and Psychopathology. Retrieved May 10, 2013 from http://voices.yahoo.com/psychopathology-analysis-6147988.html
View Full Essay

True Are Claims That the Medical Profession

Words: 2593 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58457062

True Are Claims that the Medical Profession Exercises Undue Dominance Over Health Professionals and Patients?

The objective of this study is to answer the question of how true the claims are that the Medical Profession exercises undue dominance over health professionals and patients? Toward this end, this study will conduct a review of literature in this area of inquiry. ) According to the work of Willis, et al. (2008) the rationale that doctors use for the maintenance of autonomy and control over their working conditions is derived in part from "the importance our society attributes to the relationship between the doctor and their patient. This is referred to as the patient-practitioner relationships." (Willis, et al., 2008) Stated to be an important part of the role of the doctor is the "obligation to provide the best available evidence-based care for patients." (Willis, et al., 2008) This has been termed as 'personalized…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bahnisch, M. (2012) Medical Dominance and the Continuing Robustness of Professional Cultures in Healthcare. CMEDRS/DME Research Rap. 7 Aug 2012. Retrieved from:  http://www.slideshare.net/mbahnisch/bahnisch-research-rap-070812 

Crinson (2008) Concepts of Health and Illness: Section 2: Sociological Conceptualization of Medical Knowledge and Power. Health Knowledge. Retrieved from:  http://www.healthknowledge.org.uk/public-health-textbook/medical-sociology-policy-economics/4a-concepts-health-illness/section2 

D. Armstrong, 'The Decline of the Medical Hegemony: A Review of Movement Reports During the NHS', Social Science, and Medicine, vol. 10, nos 3-4 (March-April 1976), pp. 157-63.

Henly and S. Harrison, 'Lines of Accountability', Health and Social Services Journal 22 April 1982), pp. 506-8.
View Full Essay

Healthcare -- Legal Issues Medical

Words: 2029 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70244625

1993). Within medical settings in particular, physicians and supervisors are often too over-burdened with their myriad formal responsibilities to take note of minor irregularities in protocols and procedures. Because coworkers are often in the best possible situation to notice inadequacies, it is important for all levels of employees to be equally involved in the overall CQI process.

Optimal implementation of an effective CQI process also requires a culture of openness to suggestion and confidentiality with respect to reporting more serious issues such as those that result from negligence or willful misconduct on the part of co-workers.

11. The textbook states that "an organization's most vital component in costly resource is its staff." With this being the case, the human resource function plays a very important role. Should the human resource function be part of the senior management team?

In terms of policy implementation and organizational philosophy, the human resources function…… [Read More]

References

Horine, P.D., Pohiala, E.D., Luecke, R.W. (1993) Healthcare Financial Managers and CQI: Implementing Continuous Quality Improvement; Healthcare Financial Management.

Humphry, D. (1991) Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying. Secaucus: Carol Publishing

Russell-Walling, E. (2005) Fifty Management Ideas You Really Need to Know. London: Quercus
View Full Essay

Delays in medicating new admissions leading to Discharge against Medical Advice

Words: 1434 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94902064

Introduction
Factors related to hospitals and the patient population influence incidents of discharge Against Medical Advice, also known as AMA (Karimi et al., 2014). There is a high rate of discharges against the doctor’s advice after admission into emergency units. There is a need to probe the reasons behind such a trend (Shirani et al., 2010). It should be noted with concern that AMA is a healthcare institutions’ problem across the world because, in cases where children are discharged in such a manner, the blame cannot fall on these children. Children do not contribute to such decisions (Mohseni et al., 2013). Figures show that out of every 65 to 120 discharges from general hospitals across the world, one is a case of AMA. Such action is prone to dire consequences including litigation (Devitt et al., 2000). The scenario is a challenge to physicians across the globe (Taqueti, 2007). It is…… [Read More]