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Medical Coding Ethics Ethical Concerns in Health

Words: 1610 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 49219199

Medical Coding Ethics

Ethical Concerns in Health Care Delivery: Focus on Medical Coding and Billing Practices

The objective of this study is to examine ethical concerns medical coding and billing in the physician office. Medical coding and billing has become very complex in light of health care reform. Recently, Christopher Gregory ayne, reported to be "dubbed the Rock Doc" was arrested on a dozen charges of Medicare fraud" when he was accused of fraudulently billing for "physical therapy procedures, such as massages and electrical stimulation, that were not necessary or in some instances had been provided at his prior medical practice in Miami." (eaver, 2013, p.1) It appears that where this doctor failed is billing for physical therapy when his staff was not properly accredited for providing these treatments.

Health Care Coding and Billing Changes

It was reported by Gunderman (2013) that October 1, 2014 is the deadline on implementing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Health Information Management Association Standards of Ethical Coding. (2008) AHIMA House of Delegates. "AHIMA Standards of Ethical Coding. Sept 2008. Retrieved from:  http://library.ahima.org/xpedio/groups/public/documents/ahima/bok2_001166.hcsp?dDocName=bok2_001166 

Know your ethical obligations regarding coding and documentation (2009) Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists, August 4, 2009 HCPro. Retrieved from:  http://www.hcpro.com/HOM-236942-5728/know-your-ethical-obligations-regarding-coding-and-documentation 

Weaver, J. (2013) Miami Beach's 'Rock Doc' busted on Medicare fraud charges. The Miami Herald. Retrieved from: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/09/30/3660611/miami-beachs-rock-doc-busted-on.html#storylink=cpy

Sufficient documentation a major hurdle for ICD-10 (2013) APCs Insider. Retrieved from:  http://www.hcpro.com/HIM-297687-859/Sufficient-documentation-a-major-hurdle-for-ICD10.html
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Records Control in Healthcare One

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 52972135

' Since the paper is only used as 'back up' this means that the files are under lock and key, in a centralized location or in the department generating the data. They do not circulate throughout the facility, ensuring a greater chance of misplacement or security compromises. But even in this instance, errors can occur -- timely record-updating and writing times and dates next to new information when it is added to a patient's file is essential, to ensure that there is not a discrepancy between the patient's data kept in two different locations. In fact, one worker at one of the larger facilities expressed dissatisfaction with the paper back-up method: "Keeping everything together either electronically or on paper not both. Causes too much confusion," she or he wrote.

Unfortunately, in large and small facilities, even with security procedures such as password protections for digital data, safety concerns remain. Concerns…… [Read More]

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Medical Abbreviations How Can Eliminating Abbreviations Reduce

Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23606062

Medical Abbreviations

How can eliminating abbreviations reduce errors?

In the medical profession, time is everything. To make documentation as expeditious as possible, a series of abbreviations have been accepted in records. This has been considered an acceptable practice as much as calling a registered nurse an "RN." The problems occur when people are unclear about the abbreviations mean or if a set of letters can have more than one meaning. For example, there is the abbreviation "CA" which means cancer and then "Ca" which is calcium. Another example is "a" which can mean both "artery" and "before" (Medical 2011-page 1). It is very easy to misread abbreviations when medical staff is in a hurry. Imagine the problem if a "q.w." which is take weekly was confused for a "q.v." which is take as one wishes. If the terms were written out rather than abbreviated, these potentially dangerous situations could be…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Berman, Jules. (2008). "Specified Life." Biomedical Informatics.

Greenall, Julie (2006). "Safe Medication Practices." Hospital News.

"Medical Abbreviations Glossary." (2011). JD-MD.
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Medical Reconciliation and and Attached References

Words: 415 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Chapter Paper #: 37286030

Barnsteiner JH. Medication reconciliation: transfer of medication information across settings -- keeping it free from error. Am J Nurs. 2005;05(3 Suppl):3-6.

This article evaluates the need for proper medication reconciliation across various nursing settings. This article is important as emphasis is placed on error free reconciliation which is very important for proper client service and treatment.

Bullough, Vern L. and Bonnie Bullough. The Emergence of Modern Nursing (2nd ed. 972)

This reference emphasized modern nursing and many of the practices and advances of nursing over the years. This is important as it provides a historical perspective of medical reconciliation. A historical perspective is needed to better understand improvements that will need to be made in the future.

D'Antonio, Patricia. American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority, and the Meaning of Work (200), 272pp

This reference provides further evidence into the history of medical reconciliation and recommendations on improvements that should…… [Read More]

13. Rogers G, Alper E, Brunelle D, et al. Reconciling medications at admission: safe practice recommendations and implementation strategies. Jt Comm J Qual Saf. 2006;32:37-50

14. Snodgrass, Mary Ellen. Historical Encyclopedia of Nursing (2004), 354pp; from ancient times to the present

15. Sullivan C, Gleason KM, Rooney D, et al. Medication reconciliation in the acute care setting: opportunity and challenge for nursing. J Nurs Care Qual. 2005;20(2):95-98
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Medical Retention Laws

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: A-Level Coursework Paper #: 19583759

Health are -- Medical Retention Laws

Medical records retention requirements, whether Federal or State, are apparently aimed at maintaining records for a significant length of time after a patient's discharge. HIPAA does not impose a specific requirement for retention of a patient's medical records and leaves that task to State legislatures. alifornia meets and far exceeds Federal requirements in multiple requirements from multiple laws. Meanwhile, Nevada takes a far simpler tack while still adhering to Federal requirements.

Federal

HIPAA does not impose a length of time for which patients' medical records must be retained (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2009); rather, that requirement is left to the states. However 45 .F.R. §164.530(j) does require that an entity governed by HIPAA must retain its "privacy policies/procedures, privacy practices notices, disposition of complaints, and other actions, activities, and designations that the Privacy Rule requires to be documented" (U.S. Department of…… [Read More]

California's record retention laws are at least as strict as federal law, as required, and are often stricter. Beyond the HIPAA requirements binding covered entities, California has various strict retention requirements stemming from several laws. California's Code of Regulations §70751(c) (22 C.C.R. §70751(c) requires hospitals to keep patients' medical records for a minimum of 7 years after any patient's discharge and, if the patient is a minor, the records must also be retained for a minimum of 1 year after the minor has reached the age of 18 (California State Legislature, 2013). Also, the Welfare & Institutions Code §14124.1 states that the medical records of Medi-Cal patients must be kept by the provider for 3 years after the last date of service rendered under the Medi-Cal Program (California State Legislature, n.d.). In addition, the Health & Safety Code §1797.98e (b) states that providers reimbursed by the Emergency Medical Services Fund must keep patients' records for 3 years after the last reimbursed service was rendered (California State Legislature, n.d.). The Health & Safety Code under §11191 also requires that prescription books with issued prescription copies must be kept for 3 years after the last noted prescription was issued and that a provider who "prescribes, dispenses or administers a controlled substance classified in Schedule II" is required to make and keep a record of each such transaction for 3 years (California State Legislature, n.d.). Furthermore, under California's Code of Regulations §1300.67.8 (28 C.C.R. §1300.67.8), managed care plans governed by the Knox-Keene Act must also retain all "records, books, and papers of a plan" for 2 years, keeping the records available for inspection by the Commissioner of Corporations (California State Legislature, 2009, p. 54.5). California's Code of Regulations §39.5 also requires that in cases of Worker's Compensation, all qualified medical evaluators must retain patients' medical-legal reports for 5 years after the employees' evaluation (California State Legislature, 2013). Finally, regarding its state Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) program, California's Code of Regulations §3204(d) (8 C.C.R. §3204(d) requires that in cases of employees who were exposed to "toxic substances or harmful physical agents," providers must keep medical records for a minimum of the duration of employment plus thirty years (California State Legislature, 2013).

Nevada

Nevada's laws regarding medical records retention
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Medical Reconciliation

Words: 1028 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 80459674

Nursing

Describe briefly your topic of interest (15 possible points):

According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services (2013), medical reconciliation is "the process of comparing a patient's medication orders to all of the medications that the patient has been taking. This reconciliation is done to avoid medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions." The process of medical reconciliation falls within the rubric of electronic medical records, which enable medical reconciliation. Medical reconciliation saves lives, improves the efficiency of hospital administration and of the healthcare team, and is simply necessary for providing quality of care.

#1 Database (or collection) (30 possible points):

Title of source:

"Electronic Health ecord (HE)"

Location of source (UL): http://www.ihs.gov/ehr/index.cfm?module=medication_reconciliation

Owner or publisher:

Indian Health Service

The Indian Health Service (2013) offers an overview of what medical reconciliation is, and how it applies to both individual and community health.…… [Read More]

References

"Electronic Health Record (EHR)," (2013). Indian Health Service. Retrieved online:  http://www.ihs.gov/ehr/index.cfm?module=medication_reconciliation 

"Medical Reconciliation," (2013). Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Retrieved online:  http://www.gbmc.org/body.cfm?id=617 

United States Department of Health and Human Services (2013). Electronic health record (EHR). Retrieved online:
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Records Have Been the Norm

Words: 960 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 66669156

It maintains these features for health information under the authority of "covered" units such as health care centre, plan or provider. Online storages such as Google Health and Microsoft Health Vault do not lie within the bounds of such kinds of units. This implies that their data is not as safe as they expect or assume them to be. The best approach to stay safe is to manage the electronic medical records in an online patient portal which works within the confines of the health care provider's information system. The private data which exists there will be covered by the terms of HIPAA. The level of access can be moderated to comply with the laws of the state. An instance of such a portal is the "PatientSite" created at the eth Israel Deacon Medical Center, oston. This kind of forum provides services such as secure messaging, registering appointments and updating…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Steinbrook, Robert. "Personally Controlled Online Health Data -- The next big thing in medical care" The New England Journal of Medicine, (2008): 1653-1656

"Electronic Medical Records - The pros and cons," healthworldnet.com. 1 March, 2009,

 http://healthworldnet.com/HeadsOrTails/electronic-medical-records-the-pros-and-cons/?C=6238 

McCullagh, Declan, "Q&A: Electronic Medical Records and you," cbsnews.com, 19 May, 2009,
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Medical Coding

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 5515484

health information technology occupation and conduct a search of the Internet, consult professional

Thorough Job Details: Although there are not an abundance of qualifications that an individual must have to earn a position as a professional medical coder, there are several different avenues to pursue them. Candidates typically must have graduated high school or earned the equivalency of a high school diploma. Once they have completed this step, they can satisfy the general education requirements in a couple of different ways: either by earning an associate's degree or a postsecondary certification in health information technology or in a related field. Certificate programs typically last less than a year, whereas associate's degree programs are generally two years of full time study. The completion of these courses usually qualifies individuals to begin working within the field of medical records and health information technology as a medical coder. It is also permissible for…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014). Medical records and health information technicians. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm 

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014). Medical and health services manager. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm
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Paperwork for Medical Billing

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28869666

Medical and Billing Claims

I certainly do not agree with Tina's way of filling out an insurance claim. In fact, her method appears extremely suspect and potentially noxious to the company that both she and Tim are working for. The reason that I do not agree with Tina's way of filling out an insurance claim form is because she leaves far too much room for error. The fact that she would rather make an educated guess about the veracity of a claim based on unclear handwriting or terms she is ignorant about certainly does not bode well for her career -- or the degree of business that the company she is working for has. The billing and coding specialist position in the medical record field leaves little room for error.

There are a couple of rules or guidelines I would suggest Tina adhere to when attempting to fill out a…… [Read More]

References

Hobbes, T. (1651). Leviathan. www.Oregonstate.edu Retrieved from http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/texts/hobbes/leviathan-contents.html

Machiavelli, N. (2006). The Prince. Project Guttenberg. Retrieved from  http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1232/1232-h/1232-h.htm
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Medical ID Theft and Securing Ephi Medical

Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73255136

Medical ID Theft and Securing EPHI

Medical Identity Theft

Medical information can be stolen by 1) the bad guys getting sick and using a victim's information to obtain services, 2) friends or relatives use another friend's or relative's information to obtain treatment, 3) when professionals, such as physicians, fabricate services that did not exist, 4) organized crime, and 5) innocent or not so innocent opportunists (Lafferty, 2007). ad guys that get sick can take a victim's insurance information to obtain services for treatment. Professionals can fabricate false claims to cover medical errors. Opportunists have access to patient data and the ability to steal, use, or sell that information.

Effective security requires clear direction from upper management (Whitman). Assigning security responsibilities and access controls with audit controls to organizational elements and individuals helps to place accountability on individuals. They must formulate or elaborate security policies and procedures based on the organizational…… [Read More]

Bibliography

HIPAA Security Series. (n.d.). Retrieved from HHS.gov:  http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/securityrule/techsafeguards.pdf 

Hoffman, S. & . (2007). SECURING THE HIPAA SECURITY RULE. Journal of Internet Law, 10(8), 1-16.

Lafferty, L. (2007). Medical Identity Theft: The Future Threat of Health Care Fraud is Now. Journal of Healthcare Compliance, 9(1), 11-20.

Whitman, M. & . (n.d.). Case B: Accessing and Mitigating the Risks to a Hypothetical Computer System, pages B1-B24 .
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Medical Writing Boon and Bane'

Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36094312

These examples highlight that technology is always a tool, a way of enhancing human judgment -- we must not mistake it as a replacement for good nursing practice.

After all, the use of a computer is no substitute for a medical education. Anyone who works in a hospital can see this -- the increased accessibility of information through the Internet also means that patients often come in, convinced that they are suffering from a serious illness, allergy, or condition, based more upon a diagnosis Googled on WebMD, rather than upon the fact that they saw a doctor! If a computer alone was required to diagnose, everyone would have a degree!

Don't get me wrong -- I use technology every day in my life, and thank my lucky stars, and my patient's lucky stars, that it is so ubiquitous. When health care providers wish to communicate, the use of cell phones…… [Read More]

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Medical Practice Case Study Summary

Words: 1715 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 80415955

In this case, that power dynamic was only exacerbated by the fact that the entire MSICU nursing team had never received training in management of the type of clinical issues presented and by the fact that they were excluded from any consultation in connection with a post-operative management plan.

Therefore, it is recommended that the institution immediately implement a policy of "see something, say something" according to which all members of healthcare teams are encouraged to speak up irrespective of power differentials. Furthermore, that protocol must include a statement of policy insulating any member of a healthcare team who does voice a legitimate concern in good faith from any retaliation or other negative response that could conceivably deter such diligence. Finally, the record of this case also indicates the immediate need for protocols requiring all members of the healthcare team to identify themselves to other members of the team, especially…… [Read More]

References

Bosk, Charles L. (2003). Forgive and Remember: Managing Medical Failure.

Gawande, Atul. (2008). Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance.

Groopman, Jerome. (2008). How Doctors Think.

Timmermans, Stefan. (2003). The Gold Standard: The Challenge of Evidence-Based
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Medical Case Study Florence F Is a

Words: 1951 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 33192255

Medical Case Study

Florence (F) is a 43-year-old woman who is two days post-operative, following an appendectomy. She has a history of arthritis, and currently takes 10mg of prednisone daily. She is allergic to penicillin. She weighs 46 kg (101.5 lbs.) and is 168cm tall (5'6"). This puts her slightly underweight for her age and height, at least 18-25 pounds (Height and Weight Chart, 2010). While doing a route in dressing change, nurse notice a yellow discharge emanating from the wound.

Identify and discuss the importance of obtaining information during a nursing admission in relation to post- operative assessment. In modern healthcare, a nurse must first and foremost try to understand and utilize a systematic and synergistic model of data collection and assessment. Human beings are complex creatures, and the more data one has, the easier it will be to ensure that a proper diagnosis is made. A systematic assessment…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Height and Weight Chart. (2010). HealthCheck Systems. Retrieved from:

 http://www.healthchecksystems.com/heightweightchart.htm 

Prednisone and Other Corticosteroids: Balance the Risks and Benefits. (2011). The Mayo

Clinic. Retrieved from:  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/steroids/HQ01431
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Medical Nursing Education

Words: 3350 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 49965165

Medical/Nursing Education

Nurses are required to make many immediate decisions in their assigned duties. Unfortunately, in recent years, patient care has often been compromised as a nursing shortage crisis has escalated to epic proportions. Increased patient loads have resulted in often hasty nursing decisions as responsibilities and hours worked have increased. Although precious time must be spread thin to accommodate higher numbers of patients, nurses must exercise their morals through consistency in ethical behaviors. According to Peggy Chinn (1), "Many ethical issues, such as end-of-life decision making, have increased in complexity. Other issues, such as advocacy and choice, have changed in certain respects but are more clearly centrally situated within nursing's ethical domain."

As a result, nurses are held accountable for a variety of decisions in nursing practice and in many instances, a patient's life depends on such decisions to survive. Gastmans (496) states that "Generally, the goal of nursing…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. (2001). Nursing and ethics: the maturing of a discipline. Advances in Nursing Science

Erlen, J. (2001). Moral distress: a persuasive problem. Orthopaedic Nursing 20(2): 76-80.

Erlen, J. (2001). The nursing shortage, patient care, and ethics. Orthopaedic Nursing 20(6):

Gastmans, C. (2002). A fundamental ethical approach to nursing: some proposals for ethics education. Nursing Ethics 9(5): 494-507.
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EMR Organizational Change Plan Introducing Electronic Medical

Words: 1595 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67124950

EM

Organizational change plan

Introducing electronic medical records (EM)

Along with expanding health coverage to more Americans, one of the goals of recent federal policy has been the widespread adoption of electronic medical records (EM) by healthcare providers across the nation. "The federal government began providing billions of dollars in incentives to push hospitals and physicians to use electronic medical and billing records" (Abelson, Creswell, & Palmer 2012). Having EMs can be used by providers to gain swift access to comprehensive information about a patient's health history. Some patients forget their history of diagnoses or the medications they are on; sometimes patients must be treated when they are in a mental or physical state where they cannot be forthcoming with information and their friends and families are not nearby. Also, there is the problem of patients attempting to obtain more pharmaceuticals or drugs which they should not be taking. "Electronic…… [Read More]

Reference

Abelson, Reed, Julie Creswell, & Griff Palmer. (2012). Medicare bills rise as records turn electronic. The New York Times. Retrieved:

 http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/22/business/medicare-billing-rises-at-hospitals-with-electronic-records.html 

Change theory by Kurt Lewin. (2012). Current Nursing. Retrieved:

 http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/change_theory.html
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Health Care Situation Medical Error Due to

Words: 2468 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27484220

Health Care Situation: Medical Error Due to Doctors' Bad Handwriting

Identify a health care news situation that affects a health care organization such as a hospital, clinic or insurance company.

I have identified the following health care news situation as the topic of my paper: "Poor Handwriting of Doctors and its implied risks for the Patient, Hospital and Medical Malpractice Insurance." Poor handwriting of physicians resulting in poor legibility of entries into patients' medical records carries very dramatic risks for all above-mentioned interest bearers. It can result in severe health danger for the patient and - in extreme situations - even cause a patient's death. Doctors' bad penmanship has long been seen a problem within organized medicine and the patient safety movement. Three American Medical Association (AMA) policies dating back to 1992, urge doctors to "improve the legibility of handwritten orders for medications" and review all orders for accuracy and…… [Read More]

References

Berwick, Donald M. & Winickoff, David E. (1996). The truth about doctors' handwriting: a prospective study. BMJ Vol. 313 (21-28 December 1996). 1657-1658. www.bmj.com/content/313/7072/1657.full, accessed 21 August 2011.

Bruner, Anne & Kasdan, Morton.L. Handwriting Errors: Harmful, Wasteful and Preventable.

1-4. www.kyma.org/uploads/file/.../Harmful_wasteful_and_preventable.pdfSimilar, accessed 22 August 2011.

Gallant, Al. (22 November 2009). For a secure electronic health record implementation, user authentication is key. 1-2). searchhealthit.techtarget.com/.../User-authentication-is-critical-for-pl.., accessed 24 August 2011.
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Impact of the Electronic Health Records on Patient Safety in King Khalid University Hospital

Words: 1373 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Methodology Chapter Paper #: 93875701

Electronic Medical ecords (E-SIHI) in King Khalid University Hospital on Patient Safety

The objective of this study is to demonstrate the impact of e-SIHI (Electronic Medical ecords) on patients with regards to their security and safety. The King Khalid University Hospital has implemented the e-SIHI since May 2015 for all departments. Two weeks after the implementation, QMD (Quality Management Department) conducted an audit to measure a compliance for the system and ascertain whether the e-SIHI can improve health and safety of patients. However, the QMD found that there are many areas requiring improvement in the system. The paper discusses the methodology used to evaluate the system to ascertain whether e-SIHI is beneficial to the patient.

esearch Methodology

The research methodology reveals research design discussing the method of data collection, sample population, sample size, and project tool.

Study Design: The team audits the e-SIHI using a checklist to verify whether the…… [Read More]

Reference

AlAswad, A.M. (2015). Issues Concerning the Adoption and Usage of Electronic Medical Records in Ministry of Health Hospitals in Saudi Arabia. School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) the University of Sheffield.

Bowman, S. (2013). Impact of Electronic Health Record Systems on Information Integrity: Quality and Safety Implications. Perspectives in Health Information Management, 10.

Jang, J., Yu, S. H., Kim, C., Moon, Y. et al. (2013). "The effects of an electronic medical record on the completeness of documentation in the anesthesia record, International journal of medical informatics, 82(8):702-707.

Kazley, A. S. & Ozcan, Y. A. (2009). Electronic medical record use and efficiency: A DEA and windows analysis of hospitals, Socio-economic planning sciences, 43(3): 209-216.
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Complying With Health Record Codes

Words: 498 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38988382

Provider Document Guidelines)

Provider Documentation Responsibilities

Summary of Key Concepts

Authentication of patient record entries

All entries in the medical record must contain the author's identification. Author identification may be a handwritten signature, unique electronic identifier, or initials.

Abbreviations used in the patient record

All abbreviations use should be kept to an absolute minimum for effective and safe communication in patient care. Abbreviations should be avoided completely especially in drug prescriptions, operation lists and consent forms -- for example, the laterality of site of operation. Lists of approved abbreviations and their correct meaning should be established along with a list of 'Do not use' abbreviations to be followed by the healthcare professionals.

Legibility of patient record entries

The record must be legible to someone other than the writer. All entries must be legible to another reader to a degree that a meaningful review may be conducted. All notes should be…… [Read More]

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Schneck Medical Center The Baldrige Award Schneck

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 64899259

Schneck Medical Center: The Baldrige Award

Schneck Medical Center: Overview

The Schneck Medical Center according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology -- NIST (2011) "is a 93-bed nonprofit hospital providing primary and specialized services to the residents of Jackson County, Ind., and surrounding communities." The facility as NIST (2011) further points out, offers a variety of primary care services including but not limited to cancer care, noninvasive cardiac care, and joint replacement.

Established in 1911, the facility was amongst four organizations selected by the President and the Commerce Secretary in 2011 to be awarded the Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. This particular award in the words of NIST (2011) is "the nation's highest Presidential honor for performance excellence through innovation, improvement and visionary leadership." It is important to note that apart from the Baldrige Award, Schneck Medical Center has been a recipient of several other awards including the Outstanding…… [Read More]

References

Greene, A.H. (2012). HIPAA Compliance for Clinician Texting. Retrieved May 28, 2013, from:  http://library.ahima.org/xpedio/groups/public/documents/ahima/bok1_049460.hcsp?dDocName=bok1_049460 

Hester, D.M. & Schonfeld, T., (Eds.). (2012). Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hernandez, S.R. & O'Connor, S.J. (2009). Strategic Human Resources Management in Health Services Organizations (3rd ed.). Clifton Park, NY: Cengage Learning.

Lyer, P.W., Levin, B.J. & Shea, M.A. (2006). Medical Legal Aspects of Medical Records. Tucson, AZ: Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company.
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Electronic Certificate of Medical Necessity

Words: 1942 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31829576

Electronic Certificates of Medical Necessity: A Proposal

Medical billing can now become a relatively painless process for the personal in a medical facility through the electronic filing of certificates of medical necessity (e-CMN). Manually filling out paperwork is very time consuming, and is not very cost effective. However, the technological advancements created in the area of medical billing are very efficient. While many offices now fax the CMN's, the incorporation of e-CMN's into the medical office and billing process, decreases overhead costs, reduces paperwork, and helps substantially with the on-going battle to comply with the ever-changing Medicare requirements. While each of the previous reasons is enticing enough to consider incorporating e-CMN's into the office routine, the increase of revenue is certainly a major benefit and is the direct result of the time reduction with the filing process.

Billy Tauzin, chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce, clarified…… [Read More]

References

Bachenheimer, C. (2001, Aug. 1). Something out of nothing. Home Care Magazine. Retrieved April 13, 2004 at  http://homecaremag.com/ar/medical_something_nothing/index.htm .

Business Wire. (2004, Feb. 13). American association for homecare and Trac Medical Solution agree on industry wide ecmn solution. ProQuest Document: 545984641 http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl-url_ver=Z39.882004&res_dat=xri:pqd&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&genre=article&rft_txri:pqd:did=000000545984641&svc_dat=xri:pqil:fmt

McClinton, D. (2001). E-CMN's. Home Care Magazine. Retrieved April 13, 2004, at  http://homecaremag.com/ar/medical_ecmns/index.htm .
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Privacy Violations and Malpractice at the Okc VA Medical Center

Words: 2020 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89366269

Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Today, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) operates the nation's largest healthcare system through the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), including 152 medical centers (VAMCs), 800 community-based outpatient clinics and numerous state-based domiciliaries and nursing home care units (About VA, 2016). As the second-largest cabinet agency in the federal government, the VA's budget exceeds the State Department, USAID, and the whole of the intelligence community combined) with more than $60 billion budgeted for VHA healthcare (Carter, 2016). One of the VHA's largest medical centers that provides tertiary healthcare services to eligible veteran patients is the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center (OKC VAMC) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Like several other VAMCs, the OKC VAMC has recently been implicated in a system-wide scandal concerning inordinately lengthy patient waiting times and misdiagnoses which may have contributed to the deaths of some veteran patients and jeopardized…… [Read More]

References

About the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. (2016). Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. Retrieved from  http://www.oklahoma.va.gov/about/ .

About VA. (2016). Department of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved from  http://www.va.gov  / about_va/vahistory.asp.

Breen, K. J. & Plueckhahn, V. D. (2002). Ethics, law, and medical practice. St. Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Carter, P. (2016). How to fix the VA. Slate. Retrieved from  http://www.slate.com/blogs  / the_works/2016/03/25/slate_s_infinite_scroll_implementation_explained.html.
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Network System Analysis Natividad Medical Center Was

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48270712

Network System Analysis

Natividad Medical Center was established in 1844 (NMC Profile). It is a licensed hospital for 172 beds and employs approximately 800 employees. Natividad Medical Center serves more than 135,000 patients with a wide range of inpatient and outpatient services, including Doctor Clinics, surgery, lab, as well as emergency services, and handles more than 42,000 emergency visits annually. The hospital industry is governed by laws and regulations that require a high amount of security by the facility, employees, and the information system, such as Health Insurance and Accountability Act (HIPAA) (Dennis, 2005). HIPAA requires individual user authentication, access controls, audit trails, physical security and disaster recovery, protection of remote access points, such as individual computers in the hospital, secure external electronic communications, software discipline, and system assessments. The medical record storage and input interfaces are required to maintain high levels of security.

The Hospital Information System supports clinical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dennis, R. (2005, Feb 18). Privacy and Security Regulations and How They Impact Storage Systems. Retrieved from Storage and Search.com:  http://www.storagesearch.com/asnp-art1.html 

Hospital Information System. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.eng.tau.ac.il:  http://www.eng.tau.ac.il/~gannot/MI/HISHL7.ppt 

NMC Profile. (n.d.). Retrieved from Natividad Medical Center:  http://www.natividad.com/about-us/mnc-profile
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Medico-Legal Investigations How Adequate Medical Death Investigative

Words: 1745 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35234598

Medico-Legal Investigations

HOW ADEQUATE?

Medical Death Investigative Systems

Past and Present Systems

Death investigation of some sort has existed in all countries for centuries, but not always performed by medical professionals (Committee, 2003 as qtd in Moldovan, 2008). The link between law and medicine traces back to the ancient Egyptian culture in 3000 .C. This was followed by the English coroner system in around the 12th century. The 194 Articles of Eyre first used the term "coroner" by the English until brought by the first colonists to the New World, America as basis for a legal investigative function. A medical examiner replaced the coroner system in 1890 then functioning in altimore. A medical examiner is a trained medical specialist in pathology. The field of death investigation became more and more sophisticated in cities and States, like New York. The Office of the Medical Examiner was established in 1918. Its main…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

National Academy of Sciences (2003). Medico-legal death investigation system workshop. Committee for the Workshop on the Medico-legal Death Investigation

System. Institute of Medicine: National Academy of Sciences Press. Retrieved on October 12, 2010 from  http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=10792&page=12 

Moldovan, E (2008). The medico-legal death investigator. ProQuest: ProQuest LLC.

Retrieved on October 12, 2010 from  http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/medicalegal/review.php
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Civil War Freedmen Freedmen's Bureau Records in the Aftermath

Words: 1488 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 616322

Civil War Freedmen: Freedmen's Bureau ecords In The Aftermath

In the years following the American Civil war, fought between 1961 and1965, many freedmen lost their homes, got separated from their families, and lost all claim to the little property they had. Although nearly four million slaves were freed, towns and cities in the region lay in ruins and the economy was destroyed. Faced with the challenge of restoring social order and providing assistance to the distressed freedmen, the U.S. government came up with the Freedmen's Bureau, also known as the Bureau of efugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. Established in March 1965 by President Abraham Lincoln, the main aim of this Bureau was to provide relief effort to the former slaves from the south; and to facilitate the social reconstruction that would make the freedmen full citizens. The Bureau also helped them reunite with families, purchase land, establish schools, and even…… [Read More]

Reference

The Valley of the Shadow (1865-1870). Freedmen's Bureau Records: Race Relation, Family, Education. The Aftermath. Retrieved 9 April 2015 from  http://vshadow.vcdh.virginia.edu/fbureau/bureau_topics_race.html
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Individuals Seek Medical Aid Everyday in Order

Words: 1035 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67038691

individuals seek medical aid everyday in order to conceive a child. "Generally, worldwide it is estimated that one in seven couples have problems conceiving, with the incidence similar in most countries independent of the level of the country's development" (National Institute fo Health and Clinical Excellence, 2010). Through new technology, conceiving a child is now possible for individuals who were never able to previously. One such method is through egg donation and bioengineering. This process is for a woman who is unable to contribute a viable egg in order to produce a zygote. Egg donation has become an increasingly popular method of conception. This method should be completely illegal for several reasons.

Egg donation companies supply these eggs through donors. Donors go through a rigorous screening process. This process can include everything from disclosing medical records, meetings with psychologists, medical testing, and signing an informed consent form. Once a donor…… [Read More]

Bibliography

ConceiveAbilities. (2010, December 12). Egg Donor Compensation. Retrieved December 12, 2010, from ConceiveAbilities:  http://www.conceiveabilities.com/donor_pg_4a.htm 

Egg Donation: Legal-Ethical Issues. (2010, October 13). Retrieved December 8, 2010, from Med India:  http://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/egg_donation_issues.htm 

Kara N. Maxwell, I.N. (2008). The incidence of both serious and minor complications in young women undergoing oocyte donation. Fertility and Sterility, 2165-2171.

National Institute fo Health and Clinical Excellence . (2010, March 30). fERTILITY- INFORMATION FOR THE PUBLIC. Retrieved December 10, 2010, from NHS:  http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/index.jsp?action=download&o=29271
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Chief Medical Information Officer Cmio

Words: 2034 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 54960335

The theory has three factors:

Valence

Instrumentality

Expectancy

Equity Theory -- Stated that a person compares their outcomes and inputs with others. Sarah has a meeting to discuss the salary of the whole entire organization. They realized that women were low paid in comparison to the men. Sarah started comparing herself with one of her colleagues saying that she worked harder than him and she has been there longer than him.

Satisfaction performance theory -- Porter and Lawler (1968a) state that it is not a motivational model that had dealt with the relationship between satisfaction and performance. Sometimes any reward that an employee may get is not related and how well he/she performs their job. Although this case does not tell us what type of reward Sarah was getting for her job we can see that her level of satisfaction she had when doing her job. She perceived that a…… [Read More]

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Electronic Health Records Case Study

Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25805890

Health Care continues to undergo fundamental change. Legislation such as the affordable care act has created a much higher percentage of insured citizens. Patent legislation is now allowing for much more competition for popular drugs. Generic drugs in particularly which are cheaper for consumers and much more profitable for producers are now eroding the market share of popular products. Even the use of cloud computing is changing the way care is administered within a facility. Even with these innovations, facilities still struggle with bloated cost structures, inefficient behavior, and lack of staffing. MGH is not different in this regard. It suffers from a large influx of patients with the inability to provide timely care. Below is a description of the issues combined with possible real world solutions.

Describe the current process and identify the specific areas that slow the process.

The current process has is inadequate primarily due to staffing…… [Read More]

References

1) Roukema, J.; Los, RK; Bleeker, SE; Van Ginneken, AM; Van Der Lei, J; Moll, HA (2006). "Paper vs. Computer: Feasibility of an Electronic Medical Record in General Pediatrics." Pediatrics 117 (1): 15-21
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Remote Coding Management Report Medical

Words: 1281 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 82894967

It would then become incumbent on the experienced coder to be able to read through the injuries and determine the accurate code to use. Another issue Kramer, Barancik, and Thode, Jr. (1990) found was that certain areas of the body lacked a code when injured to a very specific area of the body.

The training and education one needs to be a successful medical coder, and in particular a remote medical coder, is extensive. If we examine Figure 1 below, we can understand why this is so:

AAT (alpha-1 antitrypsin) deficiency 273.4

AAV (disease) (illness) (infection) - see Human immunodeficiency virus (disease) (illness) (infection)

Abactio - see Abortion, induced

Abactus venter - see Abortion, induced

Abarognosis 781.99

Abasia (-astasia) 307.9

[7 subitems]

Abderhalden-Kaufmann-Lignac syndrome (cystinosis) 270.0

Abdomen, abdominal - see also condition

Kramer, Barancik, and Thode, Jr. (1990) found

Abdominalgia 789.0

[1 subitems]

Abduction contracture, hip or other joint -…… [Read More]

References

American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). (2011). Quality healthcare through quality information. Retrieved from  http://www.ahima.org/Default.aspx/ .

Kramer, Caroline F., Jerome I. Barancik, and Henry C. Thode, Jr. (1990). Improving the sensitivity and specificity of the abbreviated injury scale coding system. Public Health Reports, Vol. 105, No. 4, pp. 334-40.

Rodecker, Kristy. (2010). Medical billing and coding. Retrieved from  http://www.medicalbillingandmedicalcoding.com/ .

Taylor, JM. (2008). [Emergency Department] Management. Experienced coders help ED create excellence. The Monthly Update On Emergency Department Management, Vol. 20, No. 11, pp. 123-5.
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Electronic Health Record

Words: 657 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 3748359

large number of changes in the healthcare industry, largely due to globalization and technological improvements. Much of the change has been the result of the cost of healthcare and its continual rise. For example, in 1990 the average cost of care per person was $2,800, in 2000 it was $4,700 and then in 2010 close to $8,000. One way to reduce these costs and improve efficiency is to allow healthcare professionals to spend more time with their patients rather than filling out redundant paperwork, to increase information accuracy, and to provide a way for medical professionals in Emergency Rooms or other health care facilities to have access to critical patient information. his can be accomplished through the use of Electronic Medical Record Systems, or ERM systems.

Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases that surround the body's ability to produce and use sugars and efficiently process those sugars. Globally, there…… [Read More]

The conclusions reached seemed robust and showed that the use of EHRs, particularly in the primary care system improves both the process of care and outcomes. This suggests that organizations should immediately implement EHR systems so that decision support, patient care, timing of appointments and efficiency of recording of data and tracking medications and treatment options is actually far more efficient in both monetary and patient centered outcomes. Certainly, room for improvement exists, and as EHRs become more sophisticated, it stands to reason that efficiencies, outcomes and improvements in decision support will also become expected by stakeholders.

REFERENCE

Herrin, J., et al. (2012). The Effectiveness of Implementing and Electronic Health Record on Diabetes Care and Outcomes. Health Services Research, 47(4), 1522-40. doi:10.1111/j.l475-6773-2011-01370.x
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Medical Home Concept and Describe the Principles

Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 56730739

medical home concept and describe the principles (operational characteristics mentioned above) of the PC-MH as defined by these organizations. How does this concept differ from the gatekeeper concept of Managed Care Organizations?

According to the 'gatekeeper' philosophy of health management organizations (HMOs), physicians are intentionally given incentives to reduce access to care. This is based upon the assumption that patients will want to obtain as much care as they can receive and physicians will want to bestow that care to please patients and incur more revenue. HMOs encourage physicians to do the opposite and often financially reward physicians for cost reductions and limiting access of patients to specialists or heroic treatments. In the HMO model, physicians try to restrict access to specialists when they do not deem it necessary.

In contrast, the medical home concept is viewed as a partnership between "individual patients, and their personal physicians, and when appropriate,…… [Read More]

References

Case for change to the PC-MH Model (2011). American Dietetic Association.

Retrieved October 19, 2011 at  http://www.eatright.org/HealthProfessionals/content.aspx?id=7059 

Joint Principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home. (2007). American Academy of Family

Physicians (AAFP). American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). American College of Physicians (ACP). American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
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Record Medical Administration Service for File Rationale

Words: 773 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32324816

ecord

Medical Administration Service for File

ationale in Support of Selection of Heart Transplant ecipient

Because time was of the essence in formulating this decision, this memorandum for the record sets forth the decision-making process and that was used to select the most appropriate candidate for a heart transplantation procedure. It was my responsibility as lead surgeon to select the most appropriate heart transplant recipient from a pool of three candidates, each of whom had suffered from several health-related issues that adversely affected their suitability for the transplant procedure. Therefore, in order to formulate as subjective an analysis as possible in a timely fashion, a utilitarian ethical analytical approach was used to identify the candidate that held the most promise of using the gift of additional life from the heart donor to its maximum advantage. The utilitarian ethical analysis showed that of the three potential heart transplant candidates, the 12-year-old…… [Read More]

References

Andre, C. & Velasquez, M. (1989, Winter). Calculating consequences: The utilitarian approach to ethics. Issues in Ethics, 2(1), 37.

Hollingsworth, J.A., Hall, E.H. & Trinkaus, R.J. (1991). Utilitarianism: An ethical framework for compensation decision making. Review of Business, 13(3), 17-19.

Rosen, F. (2003). Classical utilitarianism from Hume to Mill. London: Routledge.
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Medical Disorders Face Recognition

Words: 1892 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81215349

Prosopagnosia

According to A.J. Larner's book, "A Dictionary of Neurological signs," prosopagnosia is a neurological condition, "a form of visual agnosia characterized by an inability to recognize previously known human faces or equivalent stimuli (hence a retrograde defect) and to learn new ones (anterograde defect)" (Larner, 2010). Larner further distinguishes between two forms of prosopagnosia: apperceptive and associative agnosia. This "category-specific recognition disorder," as G, Neil Martin calls it in his "Human Neuropsychology" is often, but not always, associated with other forms of visual agnosia such as alexia or achromatopsia.

Prosopagnosia can be congenital or developmental, or a consequence of brain damage, following a stroke, a brain injury, or caused by a degenerative disease (Kinai, 2013) . There are two types of prosopagnosia: apperceptive prosopagnosia and associative prosopagnosia. This form of visual impairment has various degrees of manifestation, from mild to severe and can or cannot be associated with other…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bowles, Devin C. McKone, Elinor. Dawel, Amy. Duchaine, Bradley. Palermo, Romina. Schmalzl, Laura. Rivolta. Davide. Wilson, Ellie. Yovel. Galit.

Cognitive Neuropsychology, "Diagnosing prosopagnosia: Effects of ageing, sex, and participant-stimulus ethnic match on the Cambridge Face Memory Test and Cambridge Face Perception Test." Available at:  http://www.faceblind.org/social_perception/papers/Bowles%2009%20CN.pdf 

Sperry, Roger Wolcott. Ed.Trevarthern, Colwyn B. 1990. Brain Circuits and Functions of the Mind: Essays in Honor of Roger Wolcott Sperry, Author. Cambridge University Press

Newman, Nancy J. Miller, Neil R. Biousse, Valerie. 2008. Walsh and Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-ophthalmology: The Essentials. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Medical Antitrust

Words: 1179 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23872766

Federal Trade Commission ruled on charges of anti-trust leveled against the Wisconsin Chiropractic Association. The WCA and its executive director, Russell A. Leonard, had been charged with organizing a conspiracy among members of the WCA, which represent 90% of the chiropractors in Wisconsin, of conspiring to force health care providers to pay higher rates for chiropractic services than they had previously paid.

According to the proceeding records (FTC, 2003) and published statements by the FTC (FTC, 2000a), the plan began when the federal government as well as many insurance companies adopted new billing codes to cover chiropractic treatments. In addition, two other chiropractors, Michael T. erkley, D.C., and Mark A. Cassellius, D.C., settled with the FTC on similar charges (FTC, 2000a).

The final settlement included about 2,800 words of restrictions on the WCA and Leonard, some of them extending to the year 2020 (FTC, 2003).

The FTC alleged that the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brookings Institution. 2002. "The Effect of Antitrust Policy on Consumer Welfare: Assembling the Empirical Evidence." June. Accessed via the Internet 2/27/03.  http://www.ftc.gov/be/seminardocs/antitrustpolicy-consumerwelfare.pdf 

Federal Trade Commission (FTC). 2000. "Wisconsin Chiropractic Association and Its Director Agree to Settle FTC Charges of Price-Fixing." March 7. Accessed via the Internet 2/27/03.  http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2000/03/wischiro.htm .

Federal Trade Commission (FTC). 2000. Docket No. C-3943 Decision and Order.May 18, 2000. Accessed via the Internet 2/27/03.  http://www.ftc.gov/os/2000/05/wisconsin.do.htm 

Federal Trade Commission (FTC). 2003. "HEARINGS ON7 HEALTH CARE and COMPETITION, LAW, AND POLICY." October 1. Accessed via the Internet 2/27/03.  http://www.ftc.gov/ogc/healthcarehearings/031001ftctrans.pdf
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Electronic Database for Records Medical Division

Words: 756 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31752919

Medical Affairs Department: Implementing Electronic Database Record Keeping

Feasibility Analysis:

This project is very feasible as it is a standard updating of record keeping procedures from manual to electronic database -- which is common practice among most records departments today. There is nothing exceptional or impractical about this project and it can be accomplished with relatively little cost, little time devoted to the transition, and few risks.

Technical Feasibility: The project is technically feasible and depends only upon the assistance of the IT division and the training staff/support system to help in the going-online phase of the transition. The database technology is standard for the industry and will be easily obtained and implemented.

Economic Feasibility: The project is economically feasible with systems ranging from low-cost to higher-end or premium packages. A medium-range database system will be sufficient for this project and is within the budget of the Department and can…… [Read More]

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Organizational Performance Management Emergency Medical Services &

Words: 2154 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13153026

Organizational Performance Management

Emergency Medical Services & Pharmacies Long-Term Health Care Physicians' Offices Hospitals This paper written organizations. • Discuss influence regulatory accreditation standards performance-management systems.

Organizational performance management

The main purpose for the health care industry is to serve patients in the most effective, safe, and efficient manner. Each organization in this industry functions differently. However, there are some functions and regulations that the organizations will share. These regulations provide the organizations with a path that they are supposed to follow. egulatory requirements mandate the organization to compliance, and provide a standard performance level that creates the need for the organization to have specialized accreditation and monitoring in order to have quality improvements at various levels Sciences, 2006.

The key component for ensuring that an organization maintains its course in meeting the standards, compliance, maintaining the organization's mission and vision, and meeting regulatory requirements is communication. isk management will…… [Read More]

References

Briner, M., Kessler, O., Pfeiffer, Y., Wehner, T., & Manser, T. (2010). Assessing hospitals' clinical risk management: Development of a monitoring instrument. [Article]. BMC Health Services Research, 10, 337-347. doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-10-337

Bryan, K. (2009). Communication in Healthcare. New York, NY 10006: Peter Lang.

Carroll, R., & Management, A.S.H.R. (2010). Risk Management Handbook for Health Care Organizations: Student Edition. Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774: Wiley.

Coleman, L.A., Kottke, T.E., Rank, B., Reding, D.J., Selna, M., Isham, G.J., . . . Greenlee, R.T. (2008/12//). Partnering Care Delivery and Research to Optimize Health.
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Applying to Medical Schools in the North East

Words: 15719 Length: 56 Pages Document Type: Admission Essay Paper #: 26765557

Essay 2: In what collegiate extracurriculars did you engage? (400 characters)
As Vice President of Phi Kappa Sigma, I co-managed the annual $30k budget, participated in 100+ hours of community service, volunteered for the Rutgers Dance Marathon, raised funds for the Embrace the Kids Foundation, and organized the annual Phi-Esta fundraiser for the Eric Legrand’s Foundation with several other fraternities. I also volunteered for the Leukemia Lymphoma Society.
Essay 3: Did you work for compensation during college during the year or the summer? (300 Word limit)
Yes, every summer I worked full-time. During the summers of my undergraduate career, I worked at Selco Associates, a distribution and warehousing company. There I coordinated with management personnel to provide high quality customer service. I also managed apparel and footwear inventory for major companies and assisted in opening new accounts. This experience helped me to develop communication, organization, and problem-solving skills that I…… [Read More]

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CPT Codes in Medical Offices That Employ

Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 66744667

CPT codes in medical offices that employ Health Information Management professionals. Many current practices are using HIM professionals to help document patient visits and any treatments performed or offered to them. Having well trained HIM personnel can help the practice receive maximum reimbursement for the services that are performed there. This brief review will document the numerical system used for CPT codes that are detailed in billing literature as well as the appropriate methods for using them.

Coding professionals provide an invaluable service to physician practices and hospitals as they are truly the front line defense as far as ensuring reimbursements are near or even at maximum for their patients. The medical team works very hard for the patients they serve, and they should be reimbursed for it appropriately. Correct and appropriate medical codes will allow the office to recoup as much as possible from the services they provide.

Current…… [Read More]

References

Torrey, T. (2011) What Are CPT Codes?  http://patients.about.com/od/costsconsumerism/a/cptcodes.htm . Last accessed January 18, 2011.
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Schneck Medical Center Provide a Description of

Words: 3208 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 70543822

Schneck Medical Center

Provide a description of the company, its mission, and values

SMC (Schneck Medical Center) is a nonprofit healthcare organization that provides specialized and primary care services. The center was established in 1911 with a donation of five thousand dollars and a land from Mary Schneck (Jcr, 2007). It was established in memory of the founder's Husband to provide healthcare requirements to people of Jackson County. Initially, the center had a seventeen-bed capacity but it has now developed to ninety five-bed capacity. SMC celebrated its 100th centenary in 2011. This medical center is located in Jackson Country where it provides medical services to people of this area and the surrounding communities. Schneck Medical Center provides a full continuum of primary care services (Jcr, 2007). Particularly the medical center focuses on the health of women, noninvasive cardiac care, bariatric surgery, cancer care and joint replacement. Schneck Medical Center provides…… [Read More]

References

Biller, J. (2008). The interface of neurology & internal medicine. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins.

Cribb, A. (2005). Health and the good society: Setting healthcare ethics in social context. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Rahman, N., & de Feis, G.L. (2009). Strategic decision-making: models and methods in the face of complexity and time pressure. Journal Of General Management, 35(2), 43-59.

Johnson, K., Uecke, R., & Austin, R.(2006). The essentials of project management. New York: Harvard Business Press.
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Improving Computer-User Interface in Medical Care the

Words: 1618 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28090900

Improving Computer-User Interface in Medical care

The use of computer information systems in the field of medicine has revolutionized the way patients receive medical care. Computer information systems have assisted medical practitioners to capture and transfer information quickly saving the time taken to treat patients. Storage of information has also been automated such that the medical personnel do not have to manually input and store the data. The management of medical organizations has been able to improve on the time take to diagnose an ailment and the accuracy of diagnosis. The presence of electronic health records in an organization improves the way the organization collects patient's information. The collection of debt is thus automated and accurate thus the medical organization can collect all its debts.

Computer user interface refers to the method used the organization to connect o the computer information system. This interface needs to be improved to ensure…… [Read More]

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Selling Medical Supplies in Mozambique

Words: 2421 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65113683

(Illicit Drugs or Nutritional Supplements?) It is more likely that some illegal gratification was sought and not received and that led to this action. Since this was also a case for medicines, one should also be careful of the problems that may come up.

odule-9

1. Staffing

What has been stated earlier is that it would be better to leave the enterprise to operations by South Africans and in that case, they will determine most of the staffing. It is not advisable clearly that many ozambicans be depended on for operations at least due to their ability. An example of this has just been stated.

2. Training and Development

When we are talking about a business and a possible collaboration with an existing business owner, they would have completed the training in an operating business. This would be helpful as the culture of South Africa and ozambique would be similar.…… [Read More]

Mozambique- people and society. Retrieved at  http://www.oxfam.org.uk/coolplanet/kidsweb/world/mozambique/mozpeop.htm . Accessed 11 October, 2005

Mozambique-South Africa - Investment climate generally favorable, new report. 2 June 2004.

Retrieved at  http://www.irinnews.org/report.asp?ReportID=41385 . Accessed 11 October, 2005
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Security of Health Care Records

Words: 620 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15432259

" (Harman, Flite, and ond, 2012) the key to the preservation of confidentiality is "making sure that only authorized individuals have access to that information. The process of controlling access -- limiting who can see what -- begins with authorizing users." (Harman, Flite, and ond, 2012) Employers are held accountable under the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules for their employee's actions. The federal agency that holds responsibility for the development of information security guidelines is the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). NIST further defines information security as "the preservation of data confidentiality, integrity, availability" stated to be commonly referred to as "the CIA triad." (Harman, Flite, and ond, 2012)

III. Risk Reduction Strategies

Strategies for addressing barriers and overcoming these barriers are inclusive of keeping clear communication at all organizational levels throughout the process and acknowledging the impact of the organization's culture as well as capitalizing on all…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Harman, LB, Flite, CA, and Bond, K. (2012) Electronic Health Records: Privacy, Confidentiality, and Security. State of the Art and Science. Virtual Mentor. Sept. 2012, Vol. 14 No. 9. Retrieved from: http://virtualmentor.ama-assn.org/2012/09/stas1-1209.html

Kopala, B. And Mitchell, ME (2011) Use of Digital health Records Raises Ethical Concerns. JONA's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation. Jul/Sep 2011. Lippincott's Nursing Center. Retrieved from:  http://www.nursingcenter.com/lnc/cearticle?tid=1238212#P77  P85 P86 P87
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Improving Customer Service on a Medical Surgical

Words: 4407 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 84030109

Improving Customer Service on a Medical Surgical Nursing Unit

Quality Improvment Project-Customer service on the nursing unit

The hospital medical-surgical nursing unit is usually referred to as the "catch-all" department for different types of patients. This is because it includes renal patients, cancer patients, cardiac and surgical patient. It also includes other patients who do not particularly fall into any of these specialized units. The medical-surgical nursing unit is a conglomeration of all kinds of adults with all sorts of health problems and thus the nurses in this unit need to be dynamic, quick to respond and are almost on their toes at all times. Patients in the medical-surgical nursing unit are likely to develop changes in their condition quite rapidly and therefore they become more unstable even though they may have been admitted in a stable condition. This is because most patients in the medical-surgical nursing unit have unpredictable…… [Read More]

References

Amba-Rao, S.C. (1994). Human Resource Management Practices in India: An Exploratory Study. Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, 30(2), 190-202.

Dirks, K.T., & Ferrin, D.L. (2002). Trust in leadership: Meta-analytic findings and implications for research and practice. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(1), 611-628.

Glickman, S.W., Baggett, K.A., Krubert, C.G., Peterson, E.D., & Schulman, K.A. (2007). Promoting quality: the health-care organization from a management perspective. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 19(6), 341-348. doi: 10.1093/intqhc/mzm047

Judge, T.A., & Piccolo, R.F. (2004). Transformational and transactional leadership: A meta-analytic test of their relative validity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 89(1), 755-768.
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The Role of Medical Assistants in Claiming Reimbursement

Words: 2555 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75132176

All Medical Assistants

The importance of customer service in a tertiary healthcare setting

As you all know, the healthcare industry has been transformed in substantive ways as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the growing need for timely recordation of services rendered in order to attain appropriate reimbursement of physician services and overall expense reimbursement for the medical facility. This memorandum explains how and why customer service is the one thing that sets their organization apart from their competitors.

Importance of Customer Service from Medical Assistants' Perspective

Please know that our organization appreciates your unwavering efforts to provide the best possible medical care to our valued patients. Medical assistants are on the forefront of the provision of this care, and we need your support to ensure that your services are compensated appropriately. This is in everyone's best interests because unplanned turnover can cost this organization…… [Read More]

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Diagnostic Medical Sonography What Do

Words: 308 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 25869489

They have a great deal of responsibility for selecting the images during the scan that provide the most comprehensive picture for diagnostic purposes, as well as recording their own preliminary findings.

Why did you apply to this health program?

I have worked three years as a 401K plan analyst. I enjoy making the complex financial services industry comprehensible to clients, but I am seeking a job that is more meaningful and hands-on that still makes use of detail-oriented personality. The field of medical sonography is fascinating and likely to be more and more important in the future because of its ability to quickly provide a portrait of a patient's state of well-being. Working in the field will allow me to be in close contact with patients and to give them meaningful comfort, advice, and care during diagnostic procedures.… [Read More]

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Terrible Roads Houston Medical Center Unfortunately Not

Words: 1254 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38416858

Terrible oads Houston Medical Center

Unfortunately, not all is well within the context of the Houston Medical Center. esidents and workers alike are being plagued with poor quality roads that are creating a situation where many are at a disadvantage in their own everyday lives. Potholes and poor roads throughout the Houston Medical Center facility are creating many residents and faculty alike to have to put up with poorly constructed roads, and thus potential damage to their own vehicles when driving on roads within the region. It is ridiculous in an era where public funds are being spent across the country for the residents of the Houston Medical Center region to have to continuously put up with such horrible road conditions. This can essentially create a situation where there is damage undertaken by vehicles driving on the premises. Vehicles of all types are being damaged while driving in the region.…… [Read More]

References

Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library. "The Interstate Highway System." 2006. Available at www.eisenhower .utexas.edu/highway.htm.

Kuemmel, D. (1994, April). Accident study validates benefits of preventive maintenance. American City & County, 109, 52.

Takle, E.S. (1990, August). Bridge and roadway frost: occurrence and prediction by use of an expert system. Journal of Applied Meteorology, 29, 727-734.

Schnormeir, Russell H. "Asphalt Analysis, Sulfur Mixes, and Seal Coats," Transportation Research Record #1096. Washington D.C.: Transportation Research Board -- National Research Council, 1986.
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Radiation Therapy Medical Dissymmetry My Program

Words: 329 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62516865

My education consists of a Bachelors degree in Radiological Science, I also maintain a high grade point average (gpa), and pride myself on the care given to my study and work history.

Although I already have a bachelors degree in the field of radiology, that is not enough. I wish to obtain a higher understanding of the subject matter, addition hands on experience, and the opportunity to use all the resources that will be afforded to me by continuing education to a higher level. I realize the need to continue in education if I want to work in the medical field working more extensively within the realm of radiology. Thank you in advance for the opportunity to express my desire in the field of radiology and what I hope to do upon being given the opportunity to continue at the graduate level.… [Read More]