Medical School Essays (Examples)

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Medical Admissions Fortunately or Not

Words: 335 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56470243

My predilection for working under stress prepares me psychologically for the unique and demanding profession. The college professor who advised that my disposition and talents lend themselves to a career in osteopathy told me that osteopaths need to be creative as well as analytical: to assess situations and make decisions that synthesize years of prior knowledge and experience. I believe I possess the qualities that would prepare me for a successful and rewarding career as an osteopathic physician.

As I seek entry into your esteemed medical school program with a focus in osteopathy, I can assure you of my capacity to meet challenges with poise and calm. My business experience has prepared me for the demands of medical school: owning a business while attending school full-time has not deterred nor tired me physically. I look forward to participating in your program; I assure you that I will represent your school…… [Read More]

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Medical Nursing Medical L Nursing the United

Words: 1796 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6008465

Medical Nursing

Medical l Nursing

The United States has the largest number of professional nurses in the world totalled 3 millions approximately. Despite the available large number of professional nurses, there is still imbalance between the supply and demand for nurses in the United States. Demand for the professional nurses has outnumbered the supply. Typically, critical nursing shortage has become a serious issue in the United States, and the production capacity is lagging based on the estimated future needs. The concept of nursing shortage refers to the situation where the demand for nurses outnumbers the supply. The worsening nursing shortage in the United States has created the demand for more nurses to fill the gap. Many private and public sectors healthcare leaders have advocated for the serious solution to boost the supply of nurses. One of the solutions advocated is that the U.S. should facilitate the migration of foreign graduate…… [Read More]

References

Aiken, L.H. (2007). U.S. Nurse Labor Market Dynamics Are Key to Global Nurse

Sufficiency. Health Service Research.42(3):1299-1320.

Brush, B.L. Sochalski, J. & Berger, A.M. (2004). Imported Care: Recruiting Foreign Nurses

to U.S. Health Care Facilities. Health Affairs. 23(3):78.87.
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Medical Skills Needed to Be

Words: 2203 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74711001



According to the work of Fulford (1994) in an Oxford Practice Skills Project eport "Three elements of practice (ethics, law and communication skills) are approached in an integrated teaching programme which aims to address everyday clinical practice. The role of a central value of patient-centered health care in guiding the teaching is described. Although the final aim of the teaching is to improve the actual practice, we have found three 'sub-aims' helpful in the development of the programme. These sub-aims are: increasing students' awareness of ethical issues; enhancing their analytical thinking skills, and teaching specific knowledge. (Hope, 1994)

In the work of Miles, et al. (1989) entitled "Medical Ethics Education: Coming of Age it is stated that "medical ethics education is instruction that endeavors to teach the examination of the role of values in the doctor's relationship with patients, colleagues and society. It is one form of a broad curricular…… [Read More]

References

Fryer-Edwards, PhD (2005) Tough Talk: Helping Doctors Approach Difficult Conversations - Resources for Teaching- Domains for Small Group Teaching Prelude 3 Department of Medical History and Ethics University of Washington School of Medicine.

Siegler, Mark MD (2001) Lessons from 30 Years of Teaching Clinical Ethics AMA Journal 2001 October.

St. Onge, Joye (1997) Medical Education Must Make Room for Student-Specific Ethical Dilemmas" Canadian Medical Association Journal 15 Apr 1987, 156(8).

Hicks, L. et al. (2001) Understanding the Clinical Dilemmas that Shape Medical Students' Ethical Development: Questionnaire Survey and Focus Group study. BMJ Journal 2001;322-709-71- 24 march 2001.
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School Clinics Affects on Students

Words: 3382 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58532109

Utilization of the data and collection of the data should be one of the main aims of the policy makers. The data can be used by the policymakers in order to develop the policies and implement these in order to make sure that improvement can be ensured (Basch, 2011, p. 9).

3. One of the main roles that can be played by the policy makers includes reviewing the policies that have already been designed for the schools. How these previous policies have played roles in an improvement of academics of the children, their environments and their health are important parts of the review by the policymakers. It is important that funding is collected for the issues that affect health and academics of children.

4. The policymakers should make sure that the importance of school-based health clinics that can play roles in looking after the needs of the students.

Great levels…… [Read More]

References

Basch, C. (2011). Executive Summary: Healthier Students Are Better Learners. Journal of School Health 81, pp. 4-107.

Bruzzese, J., Sheares, B.J., Vincent, E.J., Du, Y., Sadeghi, H., Levison, M.J., Mellins, B.R., and Evans, D. (2011). Effects of a School-based Intervention for Urban Adolescents with Asthma: A Controlled Trial. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. April 15, 2011 183, pp. 998-1006.

Gall, G., Pagano, M.E., Desmond, S., Perrin, J.M., and Murphy, J.M. (2000). Utility of Psychosocial Screening at a School-based Health Center. Journal of School Health 70, pages 292 -- 298.

Geierstanger, P.S., Amaral, G., Mansour, M., and Walters, R.S. (2004). School-Based Health Centers and Academic Performance: Research, Challenges, and Recommendations. Journal of School Health 74, pages 347 -- 352.
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Medical Use of Marijuana Increasing Use of

Words: 814 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30556120

Medical Use of Marijuana

Increasing use of medical marijuana

Having looked at the various areas that medical marijuana has been brought into use and the various forms in which marijuana is administered, it is also important to take note of the various challenges that come with it. There have been various researches that have been conducted that covers the medical as well as the ethical side of the medicinal marijuana, and there have been a dilemma in the balance of the two sides on whether to institutionalize the drug or to stop it, and even on whether the medicinal use can be made to work without the proneness to abuse as is the case at the moment.

Medicinal marijuana has neither medical nor ethical standing within the contemporary society where drug abuse is one of the biggest worries of governments across the world and the alternative medicines that medical research…… [Read More]

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Medical Writing Boon and Bane'

Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36094312

These examples highlight that technology is always a tool, a way of enhancing human judgment -- we must not mistake it as a replacement for good nursing practice.

After all, the use of a computer is no substitute for a medical education. Anyone who works in a hospital can see this -- the increased accessibility of information through the Internet also means that patients often come in, convinced that they are suffering from a serious illness, allergy, or condition, based more upon a diagnosis Googled on WebMD, rather than upon the fact that they saw a doctor! If a computer alone was required to diagnose, everyone would have a degree!

Don't get me wrong -- I use technology every day in my life, and thank my lucky stars, and my patient's lucky stars, that it is so ubiquitous. When health care providers wish to communicate, the use of cell phones…… [Read More]

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Schools and Education Over the Last Several

Words: 4678 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36633796

Schools and Education

Over the last several years, the field of education has been facing tremendous challenges. This is because of shifts in how they address a host of issues and there are changing demographics of students. These are all signs of broader social implications which are having an effect on individual performance and their ability to adapt with a variety of situations. (Rury, 2013)

Evidence of this can be seen with observations from Rury (2013) who said, "e live in a time of considerable social and political turmoil, marked by economic uncertainty that has directly touched the lives of millions of Americans. Deep divisions and critical problems, as a range of issues are debated fervently, extending from economic policy, to poverty and inequality. If there is anything everyone seems to agree upon it the growing importance of education for the future. ithout expanding our present knowledge and abilities, it…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ballantine, Jeanne. 2012. Schools and Society. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Hendrix, L. (2013). Education and Society. (Educational Autobiography).

Morris, Edward. 2012. Learning the Hard Way. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Rury, John. 2013. Education and Social Change. New York: Routledge.
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School-Based Intervention Trials for the

Words: 14493 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7664904

, 1999). In many areas of the country this may be very accurate.

Another problem that comes into the picture where obesity in children is concerned is that many parents must work very long hours today to pay bills and have money for what their family needs (Mokdad, et al., 1999). ecause of this, many children are latchkey kids and are not watched as closely by their parents as they used to be (Mokdad, et al., 1999). Children used to come home from school and go and play with others, but many now live in neighborhoods where this is unsafe or where there are no children their age so they remain inside watching TV or playing video games and snacking on whatever is available (Mokdad, et al., 1999).

If there is healthy food in the house this is often not a problem, but many households are full of potato chips,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, J.G. (1987). Structural equation models in the social and behavioral sciences: Model building. Child Development, 58, 49-64.

Arlin, M. (1976). Causal priority of social desirability over self-concept: A cross-lagged correlation analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 33, 267-272.

Averill, P. (1987). The role of parents in the sport socialization of children. Unpublished senior thesis, University of Houston.

Bandura, a. (1969). A social-learning theory of identificatory processes. In D.A. Goslin (Ed.), Handbook of socialization theory and research (pp. 213-262). Chicago: Rand McNally.
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School Improvement Project Proposal Improving

Words: 4564 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29005100



Causative Analysis

There are several causes to why the students did not pass the state standardized test in mathematics and in language arts. It is strongly believe that the students were not adequately prepared for the test because they had not been completing the required assignments and attending the online classes offered by their teachers. Their lack of School Improvement 7 participation in the class, has lead them to a failing test score because if they had not completed the assignments in their learning management system, then there was no way for them to be adequately prepared for the materials on the tests. The course materials that are found in the learning management system are closely related to the state bench marks and are closely aligned with the state requirements.

There are several reasons that students may not complete work in their online classes. These reasons include lack of motivation,…… [Read More]

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School of Public Health Public Health Admissions

Words: 1046 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8491953

School of Public Health

Public Health Admissions Essay

The most logical next phase of my career would be the completion of a degree in Public Health Administration.

A currently hold a BS in Sociology and the diversity that this and my personal history have offered me will lend well to the challenges of a postgraduate degree program. I am goal driven and will succeed, regardless of the difficulty of the task. I have researched the program that is offered by your institution and I believe the curriculum and faculty afforded there will be exactly what I am looking for and exactly what my professional goals need to progress.

The impetuses for my professional goals are strongly rooted in my life history. I am an immigrant from Sierra Leone. The reality of meeting my education goals were at times in my life fortuitous accidents. As a child myself my parents and…… [Read More]

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Medical Fraud and Abuse --

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92526914



The facts that you have provided indicate extremely troubling circumstances that could seriously jeopardize the welfare of your organization. It is well-settled law that entities contracting for the services of subsidiaries are legally responsible for legal and ethical improprieties committed by those subsidiaries irrespective of whether or not the contracting organization had any specific involvement in or knowledge of those actions. Accordingly, we would strongly advise that you take immediate action to rectify the situations described in the manner outlined in our recommendations below.

ecommendations

To avoid the potentially serious criminal, civil, and financial consequences arising under MWHC's respondeat superior responsibility to prevent fraud and abuse in connection with its association with subsidiaries, it is hereby recommended that MWHC immediately:

1. Instruct the subsidiary to cease and desist from offering its contracted home health agency employees compensation of any kind in connection with client durable medical equipment (DME) orders from…… [Read More]

References

Reid, T. (2009). The Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care. New York: Penguin Group.

USDHHS. (2004). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-Office of Inspector

General-Statement of Organization, Functions -- and Delegations of Authority.

Federal Register. Vol. 69, No. 127; July 2, 2004. Retrieved November 14, 2010,
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Medical Nursing Graduate Study Challenges

Words: 823 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83110191



Bieber & Worley (2006) note that when students pay closer attention to their surroundings, and when teachers engage students in a more collaborative manner, students are more likely to set daily schedules that conform with their abilities and adapt to any limitations they may experience while juggling multiple responsibilities.

Anderson (1996) suggests that many Universities need to work with student's to accommodate their unique needs, as long as students are willing to engage in collaborative relationships with their peers (Austin, 2002) and families. One way to teach graduate students how to balance their education, career and any psychological or emotional blocks they may have to success is by teaching students to adopt self-efficient tools, such as creating daily task lists that limit the amount of time they spend on activities to ensure they fulfill all of their obligations (Bandura, 1982). Universities also have an obligation to effectively screen students (Brink,…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, M.S. (1996). Collaboration, the doctoral experience, and the departmental environment. The Review of Higher Education, 19, 305-326.

Austin, a. (2002). Preparing the next generation of faculty: Graduate school as socialization to the academic career. Journal of Higher Education, 73, 95-122.

Bandura, a. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanisms in human agency. American Psychologist, 37(2),

Bieber, J.P., & Worley, L.K. (2006). Conceptualizing the academic life: Graduate students perspectives. Journal of Higher Education 77, 1009.
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Medical-Nursing Patterns of Knowing and

Words: 844 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1012213

It is the dimension of knowing that connects with human experiences that are common but expressed and experienced uniquely in each instance. It is ultimately the processes of envisioning and rehearsing nurture artistic expression (Chinn, Kramer, & Chinn, 2008).

Empiric knowledge in nursing consists of knowledge development along with highlighting the role of conceptualizing and structuring ideas into knowledge expressions such as theories and formal descriptions. Theories and formal descriptions become shared as empiric knowledge in a discipline and serve to enable scientific competence in practice (Chinn, Kramer, & Chinn, 2008).

It is thought that if knowledge within any one pattern is not critically examined and integrated within the whole of knowing, that uncritical acceptance, narrow interpretation, distortions, and partial utilization of knowledge will occur. When the patterns are used in isolation from one another, the potential for synthesis of the whole is also lost. The formal expressions of knowledge…… [Read More]

References

Behm, Kathy, Comrie, Rhonda, Crane, Judy, Johnson, Charlotte, Popkess, Ann, Verbais, Chad,

Yancey, Val, Carstens, Belinda, Keene, Carol, Davis, Doris, and Durbin, Christine.(n.d.).

Knowledge Development: Patterns and Outcomes. Retrieved from Web site:

http://www.siue.edu/UGOV/FACULTY/BRIDGE%20final%20proposals%20Mar06/Dur bin.htm
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Impact of the Medical Education Programs in the Interdisciplinary Staff Practice

Words: 1141 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55108031

Medical Education on Interdisciplinary Staff Practice

The research question I am addressing is the impact of continuing medical education on interdisciplinary staff practice. Researchers of the past decade produced systematic reviews of continuing medical education (CME) and other strategies intended to improve patient outcomes. The subjects of the reviews included such concepts as audit and feedback, chart-based reminders, clinical practice guidelines, and formal lectures. Defined as interventions to change interdisciplinary staff practice, the effects of those strategies were inconsistent across practitioners, settings, and behaviors. As a result, in the midst of contemporary discussions about quality improvement and the effects of continuing education, there is no singularly effective method for improving interdisciplinary staff performance.

Research Methods/Literature Searches

The literature to be studied will come under the rubric of medical education. Medical education journals such as JAMA, Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, and nursing journals such as the Journal…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adams KM, Kohlmeier M, Powell M, Zeisel SH (2010) Nutrition in medicine: nutrition education for medical students and residents. Nutr Clin Pract. 25(5):471-80.

Haycock A, Burling D, Wylie P, Muckian J, Ilangovan R, Thomas-Gibson S. (2010) CT colonography training for radiographers -- a formal evaluation Clin Radiol. 65(12):997-1004.

Karam MD, Marsh JL. (2010) Does a trauma course improve resident performance on the trauma domain of the OITE? J. Bone Joint Surg Am. 92(13):e19

Mazmonian, P. & Davis, D. (2002) Continuing Medical Education and the Physician as Learner. JAMA, 9: 1057-1060.
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Physician a Written Report Preferred Profession Medical

Words: 1165 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92723102

Physician

A written report preferred profession, Medical doctor. The report 3-4 pages long (including Literature Cited) 1.5 line spacing. Please read carefully attach Instructions Professional eport file. Ask questions.

The road to becoming a physician

Overview of the profession

Physicians serve in many capacities, spanning from primary care physicians who see a wide variety of patients to specialists; from researchers to active practitioners in the field. However, one common, linking thread between all types of doctors is the care they must exhibit for the welfare of humanity and the arduous requirements for entry into the profession. The American Association of Medical Colleges notes that medical school itself (embarked upon after undergraduate school) is four years in duration (The road to becoming a doctor, 2013, AAMC: 3). Year one is devoted to normal structure of body tissue; year two to abnormal structure; year three and four are clinical years in which…… [Read More]

References

Collins, S. (2011). The high cost of medical education. Yale School of Medicine Journal.

Retrieved from: http://yalemedicine.yale.edu/spring2011/features/feature/109072

Martin, M. (2011). After earning MDs are doctors obligated to keep practicing medicine? NPR.

Retrieved: http://www.npr.org/2011/06/21/137319969/after-earning-mds-are-docs-obligated-to-keep-practicing-med
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Montefiore Medical Center Mmc A Case Study

Words: 3296 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42792132

Montefiore Medical Center (MMC): A Case Study

This study reviews a Harvard Business School case on Montefoire Care Centers. The Balanced Scorecard is chosen for the strategic management initiative at Montefoire and the reasons and results of such a choice is reviewed in this case study.

The objective of this study is to answer the question of what were the underlying reasons for the development of a new strategy at Montefiore Medical centre (MMC)? Secondly this study will answer as to how could the strategic direction chosen by MMC be described and what factors likely influenced the chosen direction? This study will compare and contrast the old and the new organizational structures. With reference to the notions of synergy and responsiveness, this study will analyze the advantages and disadvantages or each of these and will explain what is meant by the term causal ambiguity. This work will take the Heart…… [Read More]

References

Ambrosini, V. And Billsberry (2008) Value Congruence and Its Impact on Causal Ambiguity. 2nd Global e-Conference on Fit. 19th-21st November 2008. Retrieved from:  http://www.fitconference.com/2008/fri01.pdf 

Michael E. Porter -- The Value Chain (2013) Clint Burdett Strategic Consulting. Retrieved from:  http://www.clintburdett.com/process/05_research/research_05_4_valuechain.htm 

Montefiore Medical Center (2001) Harvard Business School. 9 Apr 2001.

Porter, ME and Kramer MR (2012) Creating Shared Value. Harvard Business Magazine. Retrieved from: http://hbr.org/2011/01/the-big-idea-creating-shared-value
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Non-Medical Expertise the Post-High School

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17305129

Medical personnel served patients and visitors deftly; they were professional, attentive and knowledgeable and operated in a no-nonsense manner that I respected and hope to emulate as a practicing physician. The occasionally present language barrier posed few problems in the doctor-patient relationship while my friend recuperated in hospital.

Cultural differences in the medical experience can become issues for medical practitioners anywhere but especially in multicultural America. Doctors who treat patients from different backgrounds sometimes fail to accommodate for large extended families for visiting hours, for example, or doctors may resist accommodating for outmoded misogynistic cultural norms such as addressing the husband directly about the wife's medical decisions. Linguistic barriers can also impede a doctor's ability to properly treat a patient or offer the patient all the options available for treatment.

While in Asia I witnessed the diverse ways patients and relatives interact with doctors, reflecting social structures that emphasize hierarchy.…… [Read More]

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Teachers Schools and Society Different

Words: 2362 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5693853

These standards set forth clear expectations for school districts, schools, teachers, and students for the core subjects of reading, science and math. Each state's standards and testing are different, but all have the same goal of providing consistent, quality education, as defined by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Beginning in 2014, students must not only be determined to be 'proficient' in these three core subjects, but schools must make Adequate Yearly Progress overall and for specific demographic subgroups (Murnane & Pappay, 2010).

Although there are benefits to the NCLB, including the accountability measures that have been established that have set clearer expectations, there are also drawbacks to these standards as well. There has been an increasing concern regarding the inordinate amount of time that teachers must spend preparing students for the standardized tests. Although this prep may improve students scores on these tests, teachers have reported that there…… [Read More]

References

Bakic-Miric, N. (Jun 2010). "Multiple intelligences theory: A milestone innovation in English language teaching at the University of NIS Medical School." Acta Medica Medianae, 49(2). p. 15-19.

Financing America's public schools. (No date). Retrieved November 29, 2010, from http://www.nga.org/cda/files/PUBLICSCHOOLS.pdf.

Flook, L. & Fuligni, a. (May/Jun 2008). "Family and school spillover in adolescents' daily lives." Child Development, 79(3). p. 776-787.

Koshy, V., Ernest, P., & Casey, R. (2009). "Mathematically gifted and talented learners: Theory and practice." International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science & Technology, 40(2). p. 213-228.
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Lack of Creativity in the Medical Profession

Words: 1345 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24606197

intended public audience for this opinion piece includes stakeholders in the healthcare industry, including educators, researchers, nurses, physicians, and hospital administrators. One of the goals of this opinion piece is to persuade members of the healthcare industry to embrace a new paradigm in which creative thought is welcomed and encouraged, rather than shunned and mistrusted as it currently is. Consumers who are willing to pressure their physicians to improve quality of care are also a primary target demographic, as all Americans will at some point in their lives avail themselves of medical services. All Americans are likely to have had, at some point or another, a negative experience using medical services. Therefore, my goal is to persuade the audience of consumers to demand a higher standard of care.

The popular television show House helped draw attention to the need for, and resistance to, creativity in the medical practice. A lack…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Medical Association. "E-2.072 Ethically Sound Innovation in Medical Practice." Retrieved online: https://www.ama-assn.org/ssl3/ecomm/PolicyFinderForm.pl?site=www.ama-assn.org&uri=/resources/html/PolicyFinder/policyfiles/HnE/E-2.072.htm

Jones, Orion. "Why Creativity is Essential to Practicing Medicine." Big Think. 2015. Retrieved online: http://bigthink.com/ideafeed/why-we-must-return-creativity-to-the-medical-practice

Morse, Gardiner. "Ten Innovations That Will Transform Medicine." Harvard Business Review. 8 March, 2010. Retrieved online: https://hbr.org/2010/03/health-care-of-the-future

Parkinson, Jay. "What Happens to Doctors Who Think Outside the Box?" Retrieved online: http://blog.jayparkinsonmd.com/post/4024600220/what-happens-to-doctors-who-think-outside-the-box
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Medical Model and Learned Helplessness

Words: 1083 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78154146

Lobotomy is a popular medical procedure introduced in curing mentally ill individuals, which requires the removal of the prefrontal lobes of the cortex of the brain, the part of the brain wherein aggressive and violent behavior is triggered. However, in the movie, lobotomy is shown to have disastrous results: McMurphy's violent behavior is indeed abated, but as illustrated in the movie, the lobotomy had turned him into a 'vegetable' neither responding to his ward mates' call for attention nor displaying his usual rowdy, obnoxious, McMurphy self.

This instance in the movie is considered as patterned after the medical model of abnormal psychology, wherein "mental disorders are described as medical diseases with a biological origin" (450). ecause this is the prevalent thinking in medical science during the time the movie (and novel) was made, Nurse Ratched decided, in order to "treat" McMurphy, to let him undergo lobotomy. Subsistence to the medical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Santorck, J. (2001). Psychology. NY: McGraw-Hill Book Co.
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School Couseling School Counseling Is

Words: 592 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14573853

The constant help I try to offer her represents an important emotional achievement. Despite the natural consequences such a diagnosis has on both the girl and me, I consider that her stay in a community that has offered her more than medical support is an essential element in her well being. From this perspective, I am convinced that school counseling can be a factor of real use for pupils and students alike. However, it cannot be done without a proper mental, emotional, and theoretical preparation. This is why I consider that the graduate program will help me in achieving all three states of readiness.

Aside from studies, experience is important in working with vulnerable children and young adults. However, my goal is to succeed in helping them find the answers to their questions or at least guiding them towards different reflection paths. Nonetheless, my experience as a case manager at…… [Read More]

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School-Based Mental Health Program on

Words: 8166 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67429057

This is discussed at length by Fusick and ordeau (2004) "...school-based counselors need to be aware of the disturbing inequities that exist in predominantly Afro-American urban school districts, where nearly 40% of Afro-American students attend school in the United States" (Fusick and ordeau, 2004) This again places emphasis on the need for mental health programs in these areas of concern. This is also related to findings from a study by McDavis et al. (1995) Counseling African-Americans, which refers to research that stresses the "...widening achievement gap between Afro-American and Euro-American students." (McDavis, et al. 1995)

An important study Laura a. Nabors, Evaluation of Outcomes for Adolescents Receiving School-ased Mental Health Services (2002) refers to the particular issue and problems experience at inner-city schools. The author states that, "School mental health (SMH) programs are an important setting for providing mental health services to adolescents, especially urban youth who typically face in-…… [Read More]

Bibliography.aspx www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308

Smith, P.B., Buzi, R.S., & Weinman, M.L. (2001). Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic. Adolescence, 36(142), 323. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622

Stern, S.B., Smith, C.A., & Jang, S.J. (1999). Urban Families and Adolescent Mental Health. Social Work Research, 23(1), 15. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228

Sternberg, R.J., & Dennis, M.J. (1997). Elaborating Cognitive Psychology through Linkages to Psychology as a Helping Profession. Teaching of Psychology, 24(3), 246-249. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383

Stock, M.R., Morse, E.V., Simon, P.M., Zeanah, P.D., Pratt, J.M., & Sterne, S. (1997). Barriers to School-Based Health Care Programs. Health and Social Work, 22(4), 274+. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383
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Medical Records

Words: 499 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63667855

EMR

Electronic Medical Records

Electronic Medical Record (EMR) keeping can definitely add efficiency into the modern healthcare system. However, this efficiency might be associated with some hidden costs. One example of such a cost will be due to the loss of privacy that is allowed by shared records. Not only will doctors be able to see your entire medical history, but other agencies that you might not want to share information with will have access as well. Therefore, there are both advantages and disadvantages associated with the move to a digital system.

"Imagine a world where everything important about a patient is known to the physician the first time that patient presents," says Andrew Rubin, vice president for NYU Medical Center Clinical Affairs and Affiliates in New York City (Mann, N.d.).

Doctors have full access to a patient's medical health history has the potential to reduce errors and improve patient…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Mann,, . D. (N.d.). Technology Plays Key Role in Health Care Reform. Retrieved from WebMD:  http://www.webmd.com/health-insurance/technology-plays-key-role-in-health-care-reform
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Medical Diagnosis vs Educational Diagnosis of Autism

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37766532

Autism

The differences between a medical diagnosis of Autism and an educational diagnosis of Autism often have implications for the individualized educational prospects of an autistic student in public schools. Often even when a child has a medical diagnosis of autism parents still go through the diagnostic process of the school to determine what, if any, educational adjustments can or should be made. Diagnosis is made more difficult by the fact Autistic symptoms vary widely in individuals and often tend to manifest themselves in many different combinations (Lenne, 2001, P. 71). Autistic impairment includes social, communicative, and behavioral development challenges. An autistic child may have trouble with nonverbal language, poor eye contact, and difficult making and retaining friends (Lenne, 2001, P. 71). n terms of communication, there may be delays in speaking difficulty using or imitating language and incorrect use of words (Lenne, 2001, P. 71). Repeated body movements and…… [Read More]

In 2000, a set of guidelines were formulated by the American Academy of Neurology. (Blackwell, 2001). The panel's guidelines are widely recommended and urge providers to carryout diagnosis in several stages. In the very first stage of investigation clinical practioners are urged to screen for any children who may display behavior or characteristics which may place the child at risk for any developmental delays (Blackwell, 2001). The second investigative step is to screen for those children who are specifically at risk for autism so that they can be differentiated from those children who have other developmental disorders (Blackwell, 2001). Blackwell, et. al argue that before the diagnosis of autism is attempted all primary care physicians should routinely, when necessary, use developmental screening tests on their patients. Unfortunately, less than 1/3 of "primary care providers have been shown to conduct a standardized developmental screening test in child office visits" (Blackwell, 2001, p. 534).

The AAN guidelines urge that when a child has delayed language development or motor skills, the primary care provider should immediately engage in audio logical assessment to rule out any ear or auditory issues, followed by using the CHAT, Autism Screening Questionnaire (Blackwell, 2001, p. 535). At this stage, one of two things must happen, either the child passes or fails the test; if the child passes, then the child still must undergo a formal diagnostic procedure including a neurological evaluation, if the child fails the doctors must communicate the need for early child-hood intervention with the school district in addition to the formal diagnostic evaluation (Blackwell, 2001, p. 535). Although Blackwell, et. al do not detail the specific diagnostic indicators of autism their overview of the AAN guidelines are important in order to demonstrate the relationship between the school and the medical provider.

Whereas the medical diagnosis focuses on the symptoms the educational diagnoses often focus on the relationship between the symptom and its impact on the child in the class room. An individualized education plan is dependent on significant impairment in the classroom which is more than just behavioral in nature. Often behavioral problems in school are seen as acting out rather than a symptom
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Schools We Have Today Would

Words: 1319 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14701740

Student isolation and teacher autonomy have been perpetuated, where there is a basic lack of collaboration in the learning process.

Although student collaboration in the teaching process is not necessarily a novel idea, integrating teachers in this process is. In all learning and teaching models, the role of the teacher has always been one of superiority in terms of knowledge. Students are regarded as subordinate, deferring to the teacher for their learning process. In Carroll's model, teachers truly become collaborators with students, working together to gain new knowledge, making an enriching experience for everyone involved. Central to this model is the sense of community.

On major challenge here is that Carroll's proposed model is so radically different from all education models developed thus far, that it is likely to meet significant resistance in educational circles. At the heart of this resistance is not necessarily only the pride of leaders and…… [Read More]

References

Caine, R.N. And Caine, G. Understanding why Education Must Change. New Horizons for Learning. Retrieved from: http://home.avvanta.com/~building/trans/caine_change.htm

Carroll, T.G. If we didn't have schools today, would we create the schools we have today?

Kokinos, P. (2010). Changing the Schools can Change the World. Retrieved from:  http://changetheschools.com/
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School Improvement Idea

Words: 2805 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6169883

Education being the act or process of imparting or acquiring knowledge, development of the art of reasoning and judgment to the environment, and widely the preparation of a person or others intellectually to live peacefully with each other. This process helps in the acquisition of particular knowledge or skills in a particular profession such as engineering, social sciences and doctors.

Education being an interactive affair calls for people's interaction. The society having banked so much on the skills from their members they then sort to improve this interaction. The society has thus resorted in researches that would see the betterment of the current educational system (Kerfoot, 2008).

School improvement then comes in to improve a school; there should be two forces that should be working in harmony. This force comes from the learners themselves and those who impart knowledge to them. Emphasis are then put on the type of curriculum…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aurora, C.O (2001). Leadership for School Improvement (rev. ed.)

Bruce, C, James, Lance, F (2008) Handbook of Education Politics and Policy. Routledge Barber, B.(1992). An Aristocracy of Everyone; The Politics of Education and the Future of America. New York: Ballantine Books.

Butts, R.F.(1988). The Morality of Democratic Citizenship: Goals for Civic Education in the Republic's Third Century. Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education.

Center for Civic Education (1991). Civitas: A Framework for Civic Education. Calabasas, CA: Center for Civic Education.
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School Nursing

Words: 762 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59386612

Politics/Healthcare

Attn: Senator

e: Bill 672, Public and Nonpublic schools -- Student Diabetes Management Program

Dear,

My name is ____ ____ and I am writing to ask that you vote in support of Bill 672, which would authorize the Student Diabetes Management Program in Maryland public and nonpublic schools. As a nurse, I have a lot of experience with diabetes patients, and pediatric patients. I have seen in my career a dramatic increase in recent years of pediatric diabetes patients, and this trend has reached alarming levels.

As you may be aware, childhood diabetes comes with a whole host of negative health outcomes. Type 1 diabetes, or juvenile insulin-dependent diabetes, in a genetic condition requiring constant care, which poses significant challenges to our educational system. Our educators are trained to educate, but must also play the role of safeguarding the health of our children, a role that is challenged by…… [Read More]

References

Mayo Clinic. (2015). Type 1 diabetes in children. Mayo Clinic Staff. Retrieved March 11, 2015 from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes-in-children/basics/definition/con-20029197

Berhan, Y., Eliasson, M., Mollsten, A., Waernbaum, I., Dahlquist, G.. (2015). Impact of parental socioeconomic status on excess mortality in a population-based cohort of subjects with childhood-onset Type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Care.

Lyons, S., Becker, D. & Helgeson, V. (2014). Transfer from pediatric to adult health care: Effects on diabetes outcomes. Pediatric Diabetes. Vol. 15 (1) 10-17.

Guttu, M., Engelke, M. & Swanson, M. (2004). Does the school nurse -- student ratio make a difference? Journal of School Health. . Vol. 74 (1) 6-9
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Medical Coding

Words: 688 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5515484

health information technology occupation and conduct a search of the Internet, consult professional

Thorough Job Details: Although there are not an abundance of qualifications that an individual must have to earn a position as a professional medical coder, there are several different avenues to pursue them. Candidates typically must have graduated high school or earned the equivalency of a high school diploma. Once they have completed this step, they can satisfy the general education requirements in a couple of different ways: either by earning an associate's degree or a postsecondary certification in health information technology or in a related field. Certificate programs typically last less than a year, whereas associate's degree programs are generally two years of full time study. The completion of these courses usually qualifies individuals to begin working within the field of medical records and health information technology as a medical coder. It is also permissible for…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014). Medical records and health information technicians. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Healthcare/Medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm 

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014). Medical and health services manager. www.bls.gov. Retrieved from  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm
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Paperwork for Medical Billing

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28869666

Medical and Billing Claims

I certainly do not agree with Tina's way of filling out an insurance claim. In fact, her method appears extremely suspect and potentially noxious to the company that both she and Tim are working for. The reason that I do not agree with Tina's way of filling out an insurance claim form is because she leaves far too much room for error. The fact that she would rather make an educated guess about the veracity of a claim based on unclear handwriting or terms she is ignorant about certainly does not bode well for her career -- or the degree of business that the company she is working for has. The billing and coding specialist position in the medical record field leaves little room for error.

There are a couple of rules or guidelines I would suggest Tina adhere to when attempting to fill out a…… [Read More]

References

Hobbes, T. (1651). Leviathan. www.Oregonstate.edu Retrieved from http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/texts/hobbes/leviathan-contents.html

Machiavelli, N. (2006). The Prince. Project Guttenberg. Retrieved from http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1232/1232-h/1232-h.htm
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Sunrise Medical Market Growth in Wheelchairs Is

Words: 2922 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14459745

Sunrise Medical

Market growth in wheelchairs is favorable for a few reasons. The growth in the industry is concentrated in higher-priced segments, with 12-15% each. This means that the relevance of the standard wheelchair is declining, despite that segment remaining the highest volume wheelchair at around 208,000 units or 61.3% by volume and 31.4% of dollar sales. Projecting current growth rates out five years, the industry will looks as follows:

1998 Wheelchair Market

1998 unit share

1998 $ share

Standard

Lightweight

Ultralight

Power

total

Standard wheelchairs are going to lose unit share and are going to decline significantly in dollar share as well. The other three categories are going to increase in importance, so it is important for firms to capture a share of these markets. ight now, the power market is not served by Sunrise, so the company is essentially competing for what will be 38-39% of the total…… [Read More]

References:

QuickMBA. (2010). Porter's five forces. QuickMBA. Retrieved February 22, 2012 from  http://www.quickmba.com/strategy/porter.shtml 

Blank, S. (2010). Here's why the first-mover advantage is extremely overrated. Business Insider. Retrieved February 22, 2012 from http://articles.businessinsider.com/2010-10-19/tech/30027432_1_market-bad-idea-failure-rate

McGahan, A. (1993). Sunrise Medical's wheelchair products. Harvard Business School 9-794-069

Nationmaster. (2012) Age distribution tables: United States. Retrieved February 22, 2012 from http://www.nationmaster.com/country/us/Age_distribution
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Scientific Medical Translation Personal Statement

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28591398

" here, I worked part-time as a translator and interpreter. It was indeed a magnificent experience to work with members of this demanding theatrical profession. Every day was a constant surprise and a constant challenge to my linguistic abilities. I had to put works of great emotion, the off-stage as well as the on-stage monologues, of these fine actors into comprehensible form, structure, and prose for the delight and edification of others and for audiences of all ages.

his constant, daily, living act of translation also highlighted for me the delicate balance between subjectivity and objectivity in the art of translating another's words and thoughts into another language and cultural system of ideas. Beyond decoding the meaning of the source text or voice, and recoding it into the language and meaning of another text and voice, I learned that in the immediacy of life there is always an element between…… [Read More]

This is even more important for someone in a specific field, as in medical and scientific translation, as often words have a different meaning in the technical lexicon of the profession or a discipline then they do in more colloquial usage. For much as I enjoyed my tenure with the theatrical company, for me, even more gratifying than making the arts understandable is the ability to make the often difficult and frightening world of medicine and science comprehensible. To see my knowledge of a language bring comprehension, the understanding of the 'yes, I see,' or the 'a-ha' in the eyes of another is as satisfying as landing a well-spiked volleyball over the net, another of my favorite leisure time pursuits, or of hearing applause while standing on the stage.

My knowledge of technical subjects and fluency in the language of scientific technology has been honed through my computer knowledge and my proficiency in technical languages. I am fluent in Windows98, Windows 2000, and Windows XP. Microsoft Applications such as Word, Excel, Access, Explorer, FrontPage, PowerPoint, Publisher, Photoshop, and I have a good knowledge of HTML programming and the languages involved in web design.

Translation, regardless of the language and the lexicon -- scientific, computer, medical, or artistic -- is about the conveyance of meaning as perfectly as possible into a language and a manner understandable to another person's language and lexicon. To be a translator is to be the human facilitator in the process of creating meaning and bridges between cultures. It is a skill I have performed in the past, and one that I hope to further sharpen and perfect, in school and in my professional life.
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For School of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery Foot Doctor

Words: 469 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56505337

School of Podiatric Medicine & Surgery

Admission Essay: Gelareh Noenifard

Thank you for the opportunity to submit a learning portfolio for you to consider my application to enroll for the Podiatry B.Sc. degree. I trust that the information provided will convince you of my passion for the medical profession. I believe that knowledge is power and it is my desire to explore every learning opportunity to broaden my education toward attaining this qualification. It is my goal to offer my services free of charge - while I am studying - to podiatry practices to gain work experience. I have attended a podiatry taster day and found it to be a rewarding and challenging career. My interest was sparked when I received medical attention for an injured ankle. I regularly visit the podiatric office to gather information about the profession, learn by observing the treatment procedures, and ask questions about podiatric…… [Read More]

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Prevention of Obesity in School

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85693052



One of the fundamental methods of combating obesity, as learned through the aforementioned studies, is to present an awareness of the habits, behaviours, and symptoms of its presence as early as possible, within the context of a comprehensive program which provides prudent action for the alleviation of such symptoms. Schools need to take specific actions to educate students as to the pitfalls and poor nutrition and the benefits of salutary eating habits, and reinforce such measures with copious exercise and other active means of reducing incidence of obesity that is conducive to a lower body mass index. Additionally, a key supplement to the measures undertaken in the school environment is the support and awareness of such anti-corpulent behaviour undertaken by parents of school aged children, within the home environment. By providing effective eating habits at home and fortifying them with a degree of education of such advantageous dietary measures at…… [Read More]

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Financial Management Criticisms of Medical

Words: 1240 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90608063

To demonize the concept of universal healthcare with the word 'rationing' "buys into the myth that we don't have rationing of medical services now. But we do. It takes many different forms. It is commonplace for health insurance companies and HMOs to deny patients beneficial treatment. They find a variety of excuses for doing so, and may not openly admit it, but we all know that it happens. Medicare rations drugs by requiring co-payments that many patients can't afford. Emergency rooms ration care by making people wait so long in line that some just give up and go away" (Singer 2011).

Question 3

The recent decimation of many retirement funds means that more and more members of the elderly are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. The elderly on fixed incomes often struggle to afford medications not currently covered within the provisions of Medicare because of the "doughnut hole" in…… [Read More]

References

Kane, Robert, Rosalie Kane, Neva Kaye, Robert Mollica, Trish Riley, Paul Saucier, Kimberly

Irvin Snow & Louise Starr. (1996). Managed care.

Retrieved August 12, 2011 at http://aspe.hhs.gov/Progsys/Forum/basics.htm

Leonard. Sean. (2011). How to fix Medicare. Salon. Retrieved August 12, 2011 at http://www.salon.com/technology/how_the_world_works/2011/05/25/the_long_march_to_healthcare_reform/index.html
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Can a Minor Consent to Medical Treatment

Words: 2354 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14963179

Minor Consent to Medical Treatment

In order to understand the issue of minors and medical practice, it is necessary to understand the position of minors in general law, and why the minor has been accorded special status and is handicapped in so far as consent is concerned. The original dictum in this regard comes from the common laws of England, which were then adopted and modified in each of the dominions. Thus there are specific rulings regarding minors that stem, not from the medical practice but from other laws such as the contract laws. In all countries the minor is not a person entitled to enter into contracts on his own. Now what implications these can have for a medical necessity? Basically the medial personnel also enter into a contract with the patient where there is a quid pro-quo for the services rendered. Even free services have a contractual assumption.…… [Read More]

References

Dugas, Melvin John. (1998) "Comment: The Contractual Capacity Of Minors: A Survey Of

The Prior Law And The New Articles" Tulane Law Review, 62 Tul. L. Rev. 745.

Grodin, Michael A; Glantz, Leonard H. (1994) "Children As Research Subjects: Science,

Ethics, and Law: Science, Ethics, and Law Program in Medical Ethics Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health" Oxford University Press.
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Electronic Medical Health Records Utilizing Electronic

Words: 5456 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39373512

However, because they make billing more efficient, the majority of large urban practice groups and hospitals have already made the switch to electronic records, according to Michael R. Costa, attorney and associate at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, in oston, Mass. However, he adds, most of these organizations maintain warehouses where they store paper records that have been transcribed to electronic form. "There is resistance from some about going to a completely electronic format because there are still some questions about privacy," Costa says. "There is definitely still a place for paper-based medical records, but the focus from now on will be on making sure that information can be adequately secured" (Fiske).

Frederick Geilfuss, partner in the health law department of Foley & Lardner, in Milwaukee, Wis. says that while many larger providers have already begun the shift, he has not encountered any institutions that have made a complete transition -- an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ball, Marion, Carla Smith and Richard Bakalar. "Personal Health Records: Empowering Consumers." Journal of Healthcare Information Management (2007): 76-83.

Brenner, Bill. "Secure Electronic Medical Records: Fact or Fiction?" 3 March 2009. The Standard. 10 April 2009 .

Bright, Beckey. "Benefits of Electronic Health Records." 29 November 2007. The Wall Street Journal. 10 April 2009 http://hfs.illinois.gov/assets/ilhie_112907.pdf

Byers, Jay. "Medical Records Scanning: Convert your paper-based patient records into electronic records." December 2008. EMR Services of Canada. 9 April 2009 .
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Attending the Lecom School of

Words: 344 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85548305

In addition, pharmacists often work with people who are very ill, which can be emotionally difficult work, and a professional pharmacist must be able to offer support and advice to patients during these difficult times, without becoming overwhelmed by sickness and death.

III. While working at a retail pharmacy, I had a dispute with a pharmacist regarding the pharmacist's interpretation of the doctor's orders on the prescription. I believed that the pharmacist read the dosing information incorrectly and wanted to call the prescribing doctor to verify. The pharmacist disagreed with me and filled the patient's prescription. Because incorrect medication dosages can kill people, I did not drop the issue. I called the doctor's office, ascertained that the dosing information was incorrect, and had the office email the correct dosing information to the prescribing pharmacist. While the pharmacist could have been upset, I could not allow my personal concerns about office…… [Read More]

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True Are Claims That the Medical Profession

Words: 2593 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58457062

True Are Claims that the Medical Profession Exercises Undue Dominance Over Health Professionals and Patients?

The objective of this study is to answer the question of how true the claims are that the Medical Profession exercises undue dominance over health professionals and patients? Toward this end, this study will conduct a review of literature in this area of inquiry. ) According to the work of Willis, et al. (2008) the rationale that doctors use for the maintenance of autonomy and control over their working conditions is derived in part from "the importance our society attributes to the relationship between the doctor and their patient. This is referred to as the patient-practitioner relationships." (Willis, et al., 2008) Stated to be an important part of the role of the doctor is the "obligation to provide the best available evidence-based care for patients." (Willis, et al., 2008) This has been termed as 'personalized…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bahnisch, M. (2012) Medical Dominance and the Continuing Robustness of Professional Cultures in Healthcare. CMEDRS/DME Research Rap. 7 Aug 2012. Retrieved from:   http://www.slideshare.net/mbahnisch/bahnisch-research-rap-070812  

Crinson (2008) Concepts of Health and Illness: Section 2: Sociological Conceptualization of Medical Knowledge and Power. Health Knowledge. Retrieved from:   http://www.healthknowledge.org.uk/public-health-textbook/medical-sociology-policy-economics/4a-concepts-health-illness/section2  

D. Armstrong, 'The Decline of the Medical Hegemony: A Review of Movement Reports During the NHS', Social Science, and Medicine, vol. 10, nos 3-4 (March-April 1976), pp. 157-63.

Henly and S. Harrison, 'Lines of Accountability', Health and Social Services Journal 22 April 1982), pp. 506-8.
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Sociology -- Medical Dominance on the Profession

Words: 1671 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93462251

Sociology -- Medical Dominance on the Profession of Nursing and How is the Profession of Nursing Challenging Medical Dominance in Australia

In the context of medical practice, the contemporary medical society is representing a change in the increasing issues of domination between medical professions. The focus of each practice's attention is on exploring its goals in providing integral contributions and impact to the framework of health care services. Each dimension of medical interest, specifically the doctors and nurses, are developing their respective paradigm and uniqueness to establish skills and authority in the field of health service.

This paper aims to do an informative research on medical dominance over the profession of nursing in Australia. As the industry of medicine progresses, the issue of domination among medical doctors and nurses in health care institutions are associated with competencies and authority over the other. The power and privileges of the profession is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Andrews, I., Hale, A. (2000). The Division of Labour in Health Care Delivery.

Retrieved Sept 23, 2003, from Faculty of Health Sciences. The University of Sydney.

Web site: http://www2.fhs.usyd.edu.au/bach/1107/topic9.htm

Duffy, E. Evolving Role and Practice Issues: Nurse Practitioners in Australia.
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Schneck Medical Center Provide a Description of

Words: 3208 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70543822

Schneck Medical Center

Provide a description of the company, its mission, and values

SMC (Schneck Medical Center) is a nonprofit healthcare organization that provides specialized and primary care services. The center was established in 1911 with a donation of five thousand dollars and a land from Mary Schneck (Jcr, 2007). It was established in memory of the founder's Husband to provide healthcare requirements to people of Jackson County. Initially, the center had a seventeen-bed capacity but it has now developed to ninety five-bed capacity. SMC celebrated its 100th centenary in 2011. This medical center is located in Jackson Country where it provides medical services to people of this area and the surrounding communities. Schneck Medical Center provides a full continuum of primary care services (Jcr, 2007). Particularly the medical center focuses on the health of women, noninvasive cardiac care, bariatric surgery, cancer care and joint replacement. Schneck Medical Center provides…… [Read More]

References

Biller, J. (2008). The interface of neurology & internal medicine. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins.

Cribb, A. (2005). Health and the good society: Setting healthcare ethics in social context. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Rahman, N., & de Feis, G.L. (2009). Strategic decision-making: models and methods in the face of complexity and time pressure. Journal Of General Management, 35(2), 43-59.

Johnson, K., Uecke, R., & Austin, R.(2006). The essentials of project management. New York: Harvard Business Press.
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Schneck Medical Center The Baldrige Award Schneck

Words: 3190 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64899259

Schneck Medical Center: The Baldrige Award

Schneck Medical Center: Overview

The Schneck Medical Center according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology -- NIST (2011) "is a 93-bed nonprofit hospital providing primary and specialized services to the residents of Jackson County, Ind., and surrounding communities." The facility as NIST (2011) further points out, offers a variety of primary care services including but not limited to cancer care, noninvasive cardiac care, and joint replacement.

Established in 1911, the facility was amongst four organizations selected by the President and the Commerce Secretary in 2011 to be awarded the Malcolm Baldrige Quality Award. This particular award in the words of NIST (2011) is "the nation's highest Presidential honor for performance excellence through innovation, improvement and visionary leadership." It is important to note that apart from the Baldrige Award, Schneck Medical Center has been a recipient of several other awards including the Outstanding…… [Read More]

References

Greene, A.H. (2012). HIPAA Compliance for Clinician Texting. Retrieved May 28, 2013, from:  http://library.ahima.org/xpedio/groups/public/documents/ahima/bok1_049460.hcsp?dDocName=bok1_049460 

Hester, D.M. & Schonfeld, T., (Eds.). (2012). Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Hernandez, S.R. & O'Connor, S.J. (2009). Strategic Human Resources Management in Health Services Organizations (3rd ed.). Clifton Park, NY: Cengage Learning.

Lyer, P.W., Levin, B.J. & Shea, M.A. (2006). Medical Legal Aspects of Medical Records. Tucson, AZ: Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company.
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Indian Education Boarding Schools Indian Boarding Schools Were

Words: 704 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83898286

Indian Education/Boarding Schools

Indian boarding schools were designed to assimilate Native American children into the greater American (white) culture. Students at the schools suffered from poor diet, illness and harsh discipline. As a result of these deficiencies, and the high cost of running the boarding schools, they began to disappear from the American landscape in the 1930s.

Indian education from the 1880s to the 1920s was designed to assimilate the American Indian population into the greater American society. This was accomplished by placing Native American Indian children into institutions where the traditional ways of Indian society were replaced by government-sanctioned behaviors and beliefs. Native American children were removed from their families, and enrolled in government-run boarding schools.

Boarding schools first became vogue prior to the American Civil ar. During this time, idealistic reformers put forth the idea that Indians could become "civilized" with the proper education and treatment. Prior to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Marr, Carolyn J. Assimilation Through Education: Indian Boarding Schools in the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Libraries. Digital Collections. 19 October 2002. http://content.lib.washington.edu/aipnw/marr/biblio.html

Kelley, Matt. The Associated Press. American Indian boarding schools: 'That hurt never goes away'. Wednesday, April 28, 1999. 19 October 2002. http://www.canoe.ca/CNEWSFeatures9904/28_indians.html
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Business School Admissions -- Appeal

Words: 797 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68157773

It is important that tomorrow's business leaders understand the good and bad science behind currently marketed drugs, and understand what constitutes ethical and unethical marketing practices.

Also, over the course of the past five months, while working in a research lab in genetics has given me invaluable knowledge, I have realized the importance of science to communicate in layperson's terms with the outside world. On an individual level, I often find it frustrating that my more scientifically oriented colleagues in my current place of employment exhibit so little interest in making their scientific work comprehensible, much less marketable to non-scientists and to industry. This contrast between their own orientation and my own desire to communicate effectively with a larger world confirms my decision to enter the business world.

In my own future, I seek to be a bridge between the worlds of science and industry. To better become such a…… [Read More]

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Record Medical Administration Service for File Rationale

Words: 773 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32324816

ecord

Medical Administration Service for File

ationale in Support of Selection of Heart Transplant ecipient

Because time was of the essence in formulating this decision, this memorandum for the record sets forth the decision-making process and that was used to select the most appropriate candidate for a heart transplantation procedure. It was my responsibility as lead surgeon to select the most appropriate heart transplant recipient from a pool of three candidates, each of whom had suffered from several health-related issues that adversely affected their suitability for the transplant procedure. Therefore, in order to formulate as subjective an analysis as possible in a timely fashion, a utilitarian ethical analytical approach was used to identify the candidate that held the most promise of using the gift of additional life from the heart donor to its maximum advantage. The utilitarian ethical analysis showed that of the three potential heart transplant candidates, the 12-year-old…… [Read More]

References

Andre, C. & Velasquez, M. (1989, Winter). Calculating consequences: The utilitarian approach to ethics. Issues in Ethics, 2(1), 37.

Hollingsworth, J.A., Hall, E.H. & Trinkaus, R.J. (1991). Utilitarianism: An ethical framework for compensation decision making. Review of Business, 13(3), 17-19.

Rosen, F. (2003). Classical utilitarianism from Hume to Mill. London: Routledge.
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Educational Psychology Schools Must Take

Words: 1822 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57685348



The results showed that 37% of those responding have had "some type of frequent involvement in bullying"; the data showed that 17.5% of those thirty-seven percent of the student population were victims, 11.7% were bullies, and 8.4% were both bullies and victims (bully/victim). Interestingly, and going back to the Handbook of Educational Psychology's view of bullying as acting out ethnocentrism, "minority youth were significantly more likely to be categorized as bully/victims and bullies, but significantly less likely to be categorized as victims than hite youth" (Bradshaw, p. 12).

Moreover, minority youth in the survey had "increased odds" of reporting that "rumors or lies had been spread about them," and that they had been "bullied with sexual comments or gestures" (Bradshaw, p. 12). No surprisingly, youth in the groups that were connected to bullying or being victims reported feeling "less safe and less connected to their school" than youth in the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berliner, David C., & Calfee, Robert C. (1996). Handbook of Educational Psychology.

New York: MacMillan Library Reference / Simon & Schuster MacMillan.

Bradshaw, Catherine P., O'Brennan, Lindsey M., & Sawyer, Anne L. (2008). Examining

Variation in Attitudes Toward Aggressive Retaliation and Perceptions of Safety
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Round School vs A Regular

Words: 10557 Length: 40 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76655571

Students in these kinds of schools do not attend school longer, but they do not have a summer break that is longer than any of the other breaks that they take during the school year.

esearch done by McMillen (2001) indicated that there were 106 schools in the state of North Carolina that operated on the year-round school calendar for third through eighth grades during the 1997-1998 school year. McMillen (2001) then conducted an analysis of the academic achievements of these students and compared them to the academic achievements of students in the same grades that attended schools where the traditional calendar was still used.

Data for the study came from a database of statewide testing in which 95% of the public schools in the state participate. In order to determine the academic achievements of the students, McMillen (2001) looked at achievement test scores and demographic information that was collected…… [Read More]

References. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at     http://www.ericdigests.org    

Painesville City School District. (2008). Year Round Education. Retrieved February 20, 2008, at http://www.painevillecityschools.org

Polite, V.C. (1999). Combating educational neglect in suburbia: African-American males and mathematics. In V.C. Polite & J.E. Davis (Eds.), African-American males in school and society: Practices and policies for effective education (pp. 97-107). New York: Teachers College Press.

Poplin, M., & Weeres, J. (1992). Voices from the inside: A report on schooling from inside the classroom. Claremont, CA: Claremont Graduate School, Institute for Education in Transformation.

Pothering, S.L. (1998). The decision-making processes of higher education undergraduate academic program development in a public liberal arts institution. (Doctoral Dissertation, University of South Caroline, 1998). UMI Dissertation Services.
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Rugby Training School in the

Words: 2765 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71748786

First of all, the marketing plan identifies the need for opening a rugby training school in the Denver Metro Area, given in this case by the fact that, however there exist several rugby clubs, they generally do not offer training services. Then, a second objective of the marketing plan is to identify the customers which would purchase the new product or services. In this case, it would be represented by all those who wish to practice rugby but have no place to learn it.

Another objective of the marketing plan is to help the management of the organization decide on numerous product related issues, such as the launching of the product or service, its placement onto the market, decisions related to the price of the service or the promotion strategies used to familiarize the customers with the new service. All these represent decisions which must be made prior to the…… [Read More]

References

Denver City Search, Sport Clubs and Gyms, 2008, http://denver.citysearch.com/yellowpages/results/Denver_CO/page15.html?gcats=200&cats=374,last accessed on February 15, 2008

Black Ice Women's Rugby, 2008, http://www.blackicerugby.com/intro.html, last accessed on February 15, 2008

Denver Barbarians RFC, 2008, http://www.denverbarbarians.comlast accessed on February 15, 2008

Denver Highlanders Rugby Football Club, 2008, http://www.denverhighlanders.org, last accessed on February 15, 2008
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Food Served in Public Schools

Words: 2618 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34033952

Food Served in Public Schools

he school nutrition environment, consisting of school meals and competitive meals, has actually properly gotten terrific attention due to the fact that kids eat, usually, one-third of their everyday calorie consumption at school (Briefel et al., 2009).

Improving the dietary consumption of our country's kids is of crucial value given that one-third of school-age kids are obese or overweight (Ogden et al., 2010).

Paper's Scope and significant areas:.

his research will clarify Kid Nutrition Reauthorization from FRAC. he research addresses school meal quality and gain access to (Hartline-Grafton, 2010). Moreover, the present research concentrates on competitive meals, which are extensively readily available in schools, mostly exempt from federal nutrition criteria, and have an unfavourable influence on the wellness and health of all pupils, particularly pupils from low-income households.

Research Methods:.

he semi-structured type of interview is utilized in the research in addition to the standardized…… [Read More]

Terry-McElrath, Y.M., O'Malley, P.M., Delva, J., & Johnston, L.D. (2009). The school food environment and student body mass index and food consumption: 2004 to 2007 national data. Journal of Adolescent Health, 45(3 Supplement), S45-S56.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and U.S. Department of Education. (2005). Making It Happen! School Nutrition Success Stories. FNS-374. Available at: http://www.fns.usda.gov/TN/Resources/makingithappen.html. Accessed April 20, 2013.

Wharton, C.M., Long, M., & Schwartz, M.B. (2008). Changing nutrition standards in schools: the emerging impact on school revenue. Journal of School Health, 78(5), 245-251.
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High Schools Wake Up by

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34816466

This only furthers the problems associated with insufficient sleep because of the body's natural physiological response to excessive sugar intake and leads to a constant repetitive cycle of sugar highs and corresponding crashes shortly afterwards.

Furthermore, the excessive caffeine consumption throughout the school day only makes it that much harder for students to wind down and go to sleep as early as they would need to receive adequate sleep. Finally, in that regard, the regular substitution of healthy breakfasts for non-nutritious fast food and vending machine substitutes contributes substantially to the epidemic of overweight and obese American teenagers.

According to Houston, delaying the start time of American high schools would help resolve most of these problems.

Houston's observations are very consistent with what one observes in high school.

Very often, students skip class to take naps and others simply sleep in their classes.

Other times, students take unauthorized days off…… [Read More]

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Vail AZ School District's Online

Words: 1659 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47989166

To do this, the teacher needs to adopt a diverse, personalized teaching style and curriculum.

To accomplish this, a teacher's learning style must show respect for the students' individual and different learning styles, be responsive to students' different learning styles by utilizing different levels of tasks and activities, utilize a range of teaching strategies, and teach thinking skills that stretch across the curriculum. One of the most significant challenges that a teacher using a learning style centered approach to teaching is the growing pressure to "teach to the test." Teaching to the test refers to the practice of utilizing standardized test to assess the learning of students. Since such things as funding and raises are often tied directly to how well a student performs on the standardized test, many teachers and schools have adopted a curriculum that essentially teaches to the test, or in away that ensures high rates of…… [Read More]

References:

Alaska Department of Education and Early Development: Mathematics and Science, http://www.eed.state.ak.us/tls/frameworks/mathsci/ms4inst.htm# mathematicsandscienceinstructionalpracticestoreachallstudents, Retrieved 12/01/2007

EDAS 7776: Curriculum Design Qualifying Exam Notebook. (2006) http://pirate.shu.edu/~sorrelri/Curriculum/Curriculum.pdf Retrieved 12/01/2007.

Madeus, G.F., & Stufflebeam, D.L. (1989). Educational Evaluation: the Works of Ralph Tyler. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Press.

Prideaux, D. (2005). Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. ABC of Learning and Teaching in Medicine: Curriculum Design, http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/326/7383/268. Retrieved 12/01/2007.
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Transition From One School Phase

Words: 1312 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47948283

Faculty to assist with pre-vocational skills training

6. Linkages to specific programs and services

7. General support for student and parents in all aspects of the student's progress

Of course, the tasks delineated above can double amongst faculty, meaning that there need not be a special and specific staff member set aside to deal with each specific duty. taff-members rather can and do multitask and whole programs may be set up that deal with addressing goal-setting and vocational needs where the different tasks may be delegated amongst the pool of counselors and personnel.

The following programs are available to all high-schools students, and, depending on need, I can introduce them to the special needs student too. These include:

Guidance counseling

Career center services

Work experience education

Academy programs

Career education / vocational courses.

Implementation of the IEP

The IEP starts with a meeting where all individuals connected with the student's…… [Read More]

Sources

IEP Transition Planning Summary Information Tools www.cde.state.co.us/cdesped/download/pdf/TK_TransMtg.pdf

Transition Planning for students with IEPs www.greatschools.org/.../873-transition-planning-for-students-with-ieps.gs

Writing the Transition Plan www.nhspecialed.org/documents/Writing%20the%20Transition%20Plan.pdf
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Public High School Graduate Audience and 5 Annotated

Words: 794 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40368758

Public/high School Gaduate Audience) And 5 Annotated Pofessional, Pee-Reviewed Souces (aimed at a Pofessional/academic/college Student/gaduate Student Audience)

Annotated Pofessional, Pee-eviewed Souces (aimed At A Pofessional/academic/college Student/gaduate Student Audience)

Jounal of Attachment & Human Development (http://www.tandf.co.uk/jounals/titles/14616734.asp)

Routledge. 6 issues a yea. Is child-development oiented. Focuses on child attachment theoy and eseach. Povides empiical pespective with cutting edge studies, eviews, and clinical case obsevations. Cosses ove the fields of psychiaty, psychology, nusing, social wok and elated fields whilst pesenting ideas, methods, and eseach on attachment theoy.

Jounal of Child & Family Behavio Theapy (http://www.tandf.co.uk/jounals/titles/07317107.asp)

Routledge. 4 issues a yea. Teating all aspects of the child and adolescent's life within a behavioal fomat, this issue shaes extensive case methods and pactical behavioal techniques fo anyone involved in the child / o adolescent's life (including paent, teache, and counselo). Thee ae extensive book eviews, case studies, and the latest behavioal techniques with step-by-step details…… [Read More]

references) related to that age are extant.

5. Parenting School Years Magazine

(http://www.magazines.com/product/parenting-school-years)

Part of Parenting magazine, this new edition discusses the challenges that educators, counselors, and parents may face with school-age children. Parenting School Years targets children age 6-11. Has 11 issues per year and in popular style targets a general audience. Articles include dealing with sibling rivalry, and helping kids adjust to parents' divorce and remarriage. In this way, it targets issues that exceed the school parameters and that anyone dealing with children, in whichever capacity, will encounter.
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Med School

Words: 489 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6933570

future of health care delivery in the country in which I intend to practice, America, is a shortage of physicians. he Association of American Medical Colleges (2013) projected that there will be a demand for approximately 100,000 doctors at the end of the decade, and for nearly 131,000 doctors by 2025 (AAMC). here are several factors that have impacted this shortage and which are placing increased demands on what doctors are available. Addressing this shortage is essential for American health care to survive in the coming decades.

Recent legislation pertaining to health care has exacerbated the demand for physicians and highlighted the fact that there may not be enough of them to attend to the country's impending health care needs. he Affordable Care Act has made it mandatory for virtually everyone in the country to obtain healthcare. Moreover, individuals who were previously denied health care because of pre-existing conditions or…… [Read More]

The shortage is also greatly attributed to an increasingly aging population. Advancements in science and technology have made it so that people are able to receive better care and live longer than was possible in other generations. Consequently, the considerable Baby Boomer generation is growing older and will require greater amounts of treatment that are commensurate to an aging population. These individuals will routinely require health care services that involve doctors, a fact which is complicated by the reality that "physician shortages will impact primary care more than other specialties" (Gordon, 2014). Although there are the same numbers of people requiring care, the aging Baby Boomer population contributes to the doctor shortage because they will need more of it. The additional care that this generation necessitates is another burden on doctors in the U.S.

The shortage is also attributed to the rising demand for physicians and a reduction in the benefits for this profession. While various aspects of the Affordable Care Act and the Baby Boomers' aging increase the number of patients and treatment frequency, there are a number of disincentives that are helping to keep the number of doctors relatively low. Several physicians have reported dissatisfaction with their income, the amount of hours they work, and their overall quality of life (Gordon, 2014). These negative perceptions of this profession are not helping to spur the numbers of people who wish to take up the challenge of being a doctor in such conditions.

In summary, the shortage of doctors is the most significant issue affecting the future of health care in the United States. It is largely engendered by greater numbers of patients, an aging population that requires more care, and rising demands and decreased benefits associated with this occupation.
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Business School Undergraduate Business --

Words: 334 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45252836



I believe that most successful people in the field of biotechnology are comfortable with the language of science as well as possess an economic understanding of the implications of science. Taking the actively discussion-based class Business 1 gave me my first taste of marketing and the sense of what it like to become part of a working environment and culture. Working with motivated and creative undergrad business students encouraged me to excel, to stretch myself as a learner, and also to bring my own unique experiences from science to the classroom.

My ultimate career goal is to secure a role in a biotechnical company in a managerial or marketing capacity, whereby I hope to deploy my skills managing and communicating with people to clarify complex scientific issues so that laypeople can understand such issues, and appreciate their significance to individuals and to the…… [Read More]

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Marijuana Use

Words: 1042 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1866288

Medical Marijuana Use and the National Drug Policy

It is clear that the marijuana plant covers numerous elements that may prove prized when it comes to treating a variety of symptoms illnesses or, leading numerous individuals to argue that it should be made legally obtainable for medical determinations. The states of Colorado and Washington in the United Sates have legalized marijuana for fun use. However, there is a quantity of other states which have legalized basic marijuana for "medical" utilization. esearch shows that even more states are passing laws that permitting individuals to start practicing medical marijuana. Therefore, if an individual lives in a state where medical marijuana is permitted and their physician trusts that it would benefit, they will get what is called a "marijuana card." With that said, this paper will discuss medical marijuana use and the national drug policy.

When it comes to national policy, twenty-three states…… [Read More]

References

Drug Policy: Marijuana. (2014, December 23). Retrieved from National Association of Drug Court Professionals: http://www.nadcp.org/drugpolicy

Marijuana Resource Center: State Laws Related to Marijuana. (2013, January 12). Retrieved from State of the Union: http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/state-laws-related-to-marijuana

Marijuana, M. (2015, Janurary 18). Have Medical Marijuana Laws Contributed to Greater General Marijuana Use by Adults? Retrieved from http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=000242

State Medical Marijuana Laws. (2014, Janurary 17). Retrieved from National Conference of State Legislatures: http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/state-medical-marijuana-laws.aspx
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Developing a Plan to Handle Diabetes in High School

Words: 1610 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18305291

Diabetes and Self-Care Ability of High School Diabetics

Diabetes has been one of the biggest challenges that the health sector has been facing in the recent decades. There have been a soaring number of fast foods across the nation and with them the subsequent rise in the number of diabetic population and in specific the high school students who hardly have aby time to cook or access healthy foods. The change in the feeding habits is significantly informed and shaped by the change in trends and lifestyle where eating in fast foods is seen as both a fashionable trend and convenient despite the outright health challenges that come with it like the predisposition to diabetes due to wrong diet. Ferguson, T., Tulloch-eis, M., Wilks, . (2010) note that the last 50 years have seen the highest number of Western fast foods mushroom across the world and with it the significant…… [Read More]

References

Alice P., (2015). Self-Care Deficit Theory. http://www.nursing-theory.org/theories-and-models/orem-self-care-deficit-theory.php

Ferguson, T., Tulloch-Reis, M., Wilks, R. (2010). The epidemiology of diabetes mellitus in Jamaica and the Caribbean: a historical review. West Indian Medical Journal, 59(3): 259-64.
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Vocational Courses in High School

Words: 7142 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6405426

(Stasz, and Bodilly, 2004)

In the press release by Mike Bowler and David Thomas (2005), High School Students Using Dual Enrollment Programs to Earn College Credits, New eports Say. According to this report, the federal budget proposes to increase access to "dual enrollment" programs for at-risk students. Out of the approximately 2,050 institutions with dual enrollment programs, almost 110 institutions, or 5% (about 2% of all institutions) offered dual enrollment programs specifically aimed toward high school students "at risk" for failing academically. Two new reports by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics also confirm that high school students currently take advantage of programs to earn college credits. The High School Initiative, designed to help prepare high school students to graduate with skills needed to succeed, permits states and districts to utilize funding for:

individual performance plans, dropout prevention efforts, demanding vocational and technical courses, college awareness…… [Read More]

References www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Ahola+Sakari%22Ahola, Sakari & www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Kivela+Suvi%22Kivela, Suvi. (2007). "Education Is Important, but..." Young People outside o Schooling and the Finnish Policy of "Education Guarantee." Routledge. Retrieved March 5, 2008, at http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&eric_viewStyle=listERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=high+school+vocational+courses&searchtype=basic & RICExtSearch_SearchType_0=kw&pageSize=10&eric_displayNtriever=false&eric_dis ayStartCount=11&_pageLabel=RecordDetails&objectId=0900019b801cf28f&accno=EJ 73348&_nfls=false

Bowler, Mike & Thomas. David. (2005). "High School Students Using Dual Enrollment Programs to Earn College Credits, New Reports Say." Retrieved March 5, 2008, at  http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2005/04/04062005a.html  www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Cavanagh+Sean%22Cavanagh, Sean. (2006). Perkins Bill is Approved by Congress; Editorial Projects in Education. RetrievedMarch 5, 2008, from: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&eric_viewStylelist&EICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=high+school+vocational+courses&searchtype=bas & ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=kw&pageSize=10&eric_displayNtriever=false&eric_ isplayStartCount=11&_pageLabel=RecordDetails&objectId=0900019b8015ea43&accn =EJ748517&_nfls=false www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020969480

Chang, E.S., Chen, C., Greenberger, E., Dooley, D., & Heckhausen, J. (2006). What Do They Want in Life?: The Life Goals of a Multi-Ethnic, Multi-Generational Sample of High School Seniors. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 35(3), 321+. Retrieved March 5, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020969480 www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5024401870

Christle, C.A., Jolivette, K., & Michael, N.C. (2007). School Characteristics Related to High School Dropout Rates. Remedial and Special Education, 28(6), 325+. Retrieved March 5, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5024401870 www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5023042611

Dymond, S.K., Renzaglia, a., & Chun, E. (2007). Elements of Effective High School Service Learning Programs That Include Students with and without Disabilities. Remedial and Special Education, 28(4), 227+. Retrieved March 5, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5023042611 www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Gentry+Marcia%22Gentry, Marcia; www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Peters+Scott+J.%22Peters, Scott J.; www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=ERICSearchResult&_urlType=action&newSearch=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=au&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=%22Mann+Rebecca+L.%22Mann, Rebecca L. (2007). Differences between General and Talented Students' Perceptions of Their Career and Technical Education Experiences Compared to Their Traditional High School Experiences. Prufrock Press Inc. Retrieved March 5, 2008, at http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?_nfpb=true&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=high+school+vocational+courses&searchtype=keyword&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=kw&_pageLabel=RecordDetails&objectId=0900019b801cbe46&accno=EJ773183&_nfls=false www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002014218
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Refusal of Medical Treatment Based

Words: 828 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75029595

From there, health care providers are becoming more assertive in denying services based on their religious beliefs (Friedman 2007). This debate has been going since a doctor refused medical treatment to a gay man. The dispute arose in 2000 after San Diego-area doctors Christine Brody and Douglas Fenton refused to artificially inseminate Benitez, a lesbian who lives with her partner, Joanne Clark, in Oceanside, north of San Diego (Parker 2007).

What distinguishes the case of Guadalupe Benitez is that the physicians involved refused to provide a medical procedure to one patient that they readily provide to others, says Jill Morrison, legal counsel to the National Women's Law Center, an advocacy group that works to protect women's rights in the workplace, schools, sports, and health care. "Usually, providers who object to certain services object to them for everyone: 'I won't provide contraception.' In this case, they don't object to the service,…… [Read More]

References

2007). Medical treatment & Religion. Retrieved November 5, 2007, from Website: the Stockholm School of Economics in Riga & Latvijas Mobilais Telefons Debate Club

http://sserdc.wordpress.com/2007/09/21/medical-treatment-religion/

Bridge, Caroline (1999). Religious Beliefs and Teenage Refusal of Medical Treatment. The Modern Law Review, Vol. 62, No. 4

2004). Child Welfare vs. Parental Autonomy: Medical Ethics, the Law, and Faith-Based Healing. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
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Parental Involvement in Urban School

Words: 11020 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27657969

Overall parental involvement has an effect on the child from the early stage to the secondary stage. Students need the parents for guidance, integrity and confidence to become successful in life because it is not the teachers job to make sure the students have these qualities. "In reality, parent involvement is a more diverse and complex concept than is generally acknowledged" (Dom & Verhoeven, 2006, p.570).

The study will help to determine the reason for the different challenges students may face due to the lack of parental involvement.

esearch Design and Methodology

The proposed study will use a quantitative research design that uses both secondary resources as well as primary data collected specifically for the purposes of this research. The research procedure will proceed in a step-wise fashion, beginning with an exploratory review of the literature to identify common themes and trends in the research concerning current patterns of parental…… [Read More]

References

McDermott, P. & Rothenberg, J. (2000). Why urban parents resist involvement in their

children's elementary education. The Qualitative Report. 5(3/4).

Blasi, M.J. (2001). Rethinking family-school relations: A critique of parental involvement in schooling. Childhood Education, 78(1), 54.

Ainscow, M. & West, M. (Eds.). (2006). Improving Urban Schools: Leadership and Collaboration. Maidenhead, England: Open University Press. Retrieved July 30, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=111655146
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Safety Net Hospitals Have Traditionally Provided Medical

Words: 1382 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72609761

Safety net hospitals have traditionally provided medical services vital to public health. Unfortunately, the recent economic recession has dealt a hard blow to safety net hospitals, even to the point of forcing hospital closures. Fortunately, Health Care Reform has already positively impacted U.S. health care and will even revolutionize American health care in some respects.

The Effect of the Closure of Safety Net Hospitals on Public Health

Safety net hospitals, such as Grady Memorial Hospital, serve the public health through providing vital treatment of uninsured, underinsured, Medicaid, and Medicare patients, along with some privately insured patients (Dewan & Sack, 2008). In addition, some safety net hospitals are also teaching hospitals that train medical professionals who contribute considerably to public health. Unfortunately, economic pressures are forcing the closure of some safety net hospitals, resulting in the severe reduction of medical care in certain communities for the "poor and underserved" (Altman, Shactman,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Altman, S.H., Shactman, D., & Efrat, E. (2006, Jan/Feb). Could U.S. hospitals go the way of U.S. airlines? Retrieved September 1, 2012 from Proquest.com Web site:  http://search.proquest.com/docview/204650663/138ED25BFA63A547161/5?accountid=28844 

Amalberti, R., Auroy, Y., Berwick, D., & Barach, P. (2005, May 3). Five system barriers to achieving ultrasafe health care. Retrieved September 1, 2012 from Proquest.com Web site:  http://search.proquest.com/docview/222267835/138ED3FE9A36E21E74A/6?accountid=28844 

Dewan, S., & Sack, K. (2008, January 8). A safety-net hospital falls into financial crisis. Retrieved September 1, 2012 from Nytimes.com Web site: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/08/us/08grady.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

Felland, L.E., Cunningham, P.J., Cohen, G.R., November, E.A., & Quinn, B.C. (2010, January). The economic recession: Early impacts on health care safety net providers. Retrieved September 1, 2012 from Rwjf.org Web site: http://www.rwjf.org/files/research/55109.pdf
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Bullying in Schools Across United

Words: 1638 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84070476

This would help a victim open up to the teacher and thus seek help. School is an important period in a child's life and should be free of stress. It is the responsibility of school authorities to ensure child' safety. In the schools, where bullying incidents are non-existent have some active form of intervention in place. Bullying is a more serious problem in public schools compared to private school mainly due to the quality of education, teacher training and level of accountability. Higher level of accountability can result in fewer cases of bullying in public schools too. Concerted effort is required to reduce prevalence of bullying in schools across the country.

eferences

Atlas, .S., & Pepler, D.J. (1998). Observations of bullying in the classroom. Journal of Educational esearch, 92(2), 86-99.

Espelage, D.L., Bosworth, K., & Simon, T.. (2000). Examining the social context of bullying behaviors in early adolescence. Journal of…… [Read More]

References

Atlas, R.S., & Pepler, D.J. (1998). Observations of bullying in the classroom. Journal of Educational Research, 92(2), 86-99.

Espelage, D.L., Bosworth, K., & Simon, T.R. (2000). Examining the social context of bullying behaviors in early adolescence. Journal of Counseling and Development, 78, 326-333.

Hoover, J.H., Oliver, R., & Hazier, R.J. (1992). Bullying: Perceptions of adolescent victims in the Midwestern USA. School Psychology International, 13, 5-16.

Horne, a.M., & Newman-Carlson, D. (2004). Bully Busters: A Psycho-educational Intervention for Reducing Bullying Behavior in Middle School Students. Journal of Counseling and Development. Volume: 82. Issue: 3.
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Voluntary in School Free Reading Programs Elementary Level

Words: 4220 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74042195

grain of sand, hold infinity in an hour, - lines I read in a book of poetry, lines that play at the back of my mind as I begin to lay the outlines if this thesis for a Master's degree.

I see the wonder in a child's eyes as he imagines a world unfolding in a grain of sand as I read a story to him; an hour reading in a class of children translates into infinity as the children in that class become readers themselves, changing the hours into infinity as they develop the habit of infinite reading.

Voluntary in-school free reading program - elementary level" is the subject of this thesis proposal, and the objective is to prove that voluntary in-school free reading programs result in positive effects on elementary students' attitudes toward reading.

Statement of the Problem

General Objective

To be able to identify the strengths and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Durrell, Donald. D. Durrell Analysis of Reading Difficulty (New Edition).

Kottmeyer, William. Evaluation Handbook: Levels in English. Webster.

Kottmeyer, William. Guide for Remedial Reading. Webster Strang, Ruth, et. al. The Improvement of Reading. New York: Mc GrawHill.

Steiger, Ralph. New Directions in Reading. New York: Bantam Books.
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Emergency Medical Services Act

Words: 585 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94660591

Emergency Medical Services System Act of 1973 helped to establish national standards for emergency medical systems, with broad implications for education and public health. The Act follows a series of seminal events that drew attention to weaknesses in emergency response, including the lack of proper, regulated, or consistent training for personnel. Moreover, the Act helped to ensure that healthcare infrastructure would be modernized to minimize instances and costs related to accidental injury and death. The Act includes provisions for training in emergency medical services, offering funding and support for training programs that conform to a set of federal standards. Interestingly, Nixon had initially vetoed the Emergency Medical Services System Act, and it was subsequently reworded to omit mandate for a Public Health Service Hospital system -- something Nixon believed was "unnecessary," (Shah, 2006, p. 1). Passing the EMS Systems Act of 1973 meant that the Department of Health, Education, and…… [Read More]

References

EMS Systems Act of 1973. Public Law 93-154

Shah, M.N. (2006). The formation of the Emergency Medical Services System. American Journal of Public Health 96(3): 414-423.
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Quiet Time Program in Hospitals Medical Professionals

Words: 591 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71556651

Quiet Time Program in Hospitals

Medical professionals and healthcare practitioners have practiced and committed their profession to one ultimate goal: to ensure that patients' health state would improve from worse to better. In the hospital setting, a myriad of factors operate and influence patients' perception of the quality of care they received during their confinement. There exists both physical and social factors -- external factors that result to either the worsening or continued improvement of the patient. The hospital staff and medical practitioners, and the kind of interaction between staff and patient make up for the social component of the hospital environment. Physical factors, meanwhile, include ambience, cleanliness and noise level of the hospital, which form part of the hospital's physical environment and inevitably, factors that lead to the determination of patients' improvement and perceived quality of care received in the hospital.

The role that physical environment, particularly noise level,…… [Read More]

References

Fontana, G. (2010). "Sleep deprivation among critical care patients." Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 1.

Gardner, G. (2009). "Creating a therapeutic environment: A non-randomised controlled trial of a quiet time intervention for patients in acute care." International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 46.

Robinson, S. (2005). "The Sh-h-h-h Project: Nonpharmacological interventions." Holistic Nursing Practice, Vol. 19(6).
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Market Model Changes the Medtech or Medical

Words: 865 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11539350

Market Model Changes

The medtech, or medical technology, industry is a large and intensely competitive industry that produces highly innovative medical devices for hospitals and other healthcare facilities in the effort to save lives and improve health for patients (Research, 2012). It is spread across different segments including, cardiology, oncology, neuro, orthopedic, and aesthetic devices. It relies largely on aging baby boomers, high unmet medical needs, and increased incidence of lifestyle diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

The industry is being challenged by pricing concerns, hospital admissions and procedural volume, uncertainty concerning healthcare reform, Medicare reimbursement issues as agencies are looking for cost reduction measures, and regulatory overhang. There is a rise in patients deferring treatment in elective procedures. "One factor aligning economic and clinical forces: in the U.S., the number of medical practices owned by hospitals grew from 25% in 2005 to 50% in 2008" (practice, 2011).…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Blog, I. (2012, Mar 12). MedTech Industry Stock Outlook. Retrieved from Financial Content: http://markets.financialcontent.com/stocks/news/read/20832505/MedTech-Industry-Stock-Outlook

practice, B.G. (2011, Feb 9). Creating a new commercial model for the changing medtech market. Retrieved from Bain & Company: http://www.bain.com/publicatgions/articles/creating-a-commercial-model-for-changing-medtech-market.aspx

Research, Z.E. (2012, June 15). MedTech Industry Stock Outlook-June 2012-Zacks Analyst Interviews. Retrieved from Nasdaq: http://community.nasdaq.com/News/2012-06/medtech-industry-stock-outlook-june-2012-zachs-analysts-interviews.aspx?
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Psychosocial Issues Affecting African-American Student in NYC Public Schools

Words: 6869 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75548572

PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES AFFECTING African-American STUDENTS

PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES AFFECTING

African-American STUDENTS

"They never want to hear what I have to say…it doesn't matter who started a fight, or what a teacher said to you that made you mad.

You might have something heavy going on at home but no one asks.

They're not interested. They just want you out of the school."

17-year-old 11th grade African-American female student, NYC

(Sullivan, 2007, p. iii).

In New York City, one of the two largest urban public school districts in the United States (U.S.), as well as throughout the U.S. An educational crisis exists; particularly relating to African-American students, that links to a number of factors. According to Sullivan (2007) in the published study, Deprived of Dignity. Degrading treatment and abusive discipline in New York City & Los Angeles public schools, 58% of African-American fourth grade students attending school in the U.S. during 2005…… [Read More]

References

Analysis finds dramatic spike in NYC suspensions: Black children and students with special needs most affected. (2011). New York Civil Liberties Union. Retrieved July 4, 2011 from http://www.nyclu.org/news/analysis-finds-dramatic-spike-nyc-suspensions-black children-and-students-with-special-needs-mo Berry, G.L. & Asamen, J.K. (1989). Black students: psychosocial issues and academic achievement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Booker, K.C. (2006). School belonging and the African-American adolescent: What do we know and where should we go? The High School Journal, Vol. 89, No. 4. Retrieved June 27, 2011 from  http://www.jstor.org/stable/40364222 

Brown, B.V. (2008). Key indicators of child and youth well-being: Completing the picture, New York, NY: CRC Press.

Bruce, A.M., Getch, Y.Q., & Ziomek-Daigle, J. (2009). Closing the gap: A group counselling approach to improve test performance of African-American students. Professional School Counseling, 12(6), 450+. Retrieved June 27, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5035345079
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Attendance Policy in an Alternative School

Words: 8552 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1590486

Program Attendance Policy Proposal and Analysis

As we are nearing the end of the third school year of the P.A.S.S. program it is beneficial to evaluate the standards and practices which have been set forth through the past three years and determine the efficacy of them. In accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for Elementary and secondary education school principals (January 2001), data driven assessment of the policies is due. The need for implementation of best practices, be they new or accepted older models is especially great given the proven success of the P.A.S.S. program which has resulted in the proposal for expansion of enrolment and services to meet a greater demand within the local district.

The establishment of best practices for the future is the goal of the current assessment. Since its inception the P.A.S.S. program has used a program completion option strategy with at-risk students attending classes at Howell…… [Read More]

References

ERIC Raising School Attendance. Education Digest, Feb2002, 67.6, pgs.54-57.

ERIC Urban Policies and Programs To Reduce Truancy. ERIC/CUE Digest 129.

ERIC Jay DeKalb Student Truancy. ERIC/CUE Digest 125.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management and Linn-Benton Education Service
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Preventing Dropouts Among Minority Middle School Students

Words: 4402 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40851999

Preventing Dropouts Among Minority Middle School Students

The dropout rate of minority middle school students is rising. This can be contributed to a number of factors that cultivate frustration and develop low self-esteem among minority adolescent students. Middle school students already struggle with self-image issues, but when the added pressure of factors such as low literacy skills, poverty within the home, early pregnancy and low regard for education are also introduced, these students become lost in the system and develop the desire to give up or dropout thus eliminating their opportunity to break the cycle of poverty by becoming educated and obtaining higher level paying employment.

Statement of Significance

The educational sector is under pressure to meet the new federally mandated guidelines of the "No Child Left Behind" legislation. Early childhood education has previously been the focus of the national goal that every child will read by the time they…… [Read More]

References

Adam, M. (2003). Fighting the latino dropout rate. Education Digest, 6, 23-28.

Banfield, K., Johnson, P, Thomas, P., Thieroff, A. (2002). Defying latino statistics. New York

Amsterdam News, 10, 18.

Benz, M.R., Lindstrom, L., & Yovanoff, P. (2000). "Improving graduation and employment outcomes of students with disabilities: Predictive factors and student perspectives. Exceptional Children, 66(4), 509-529.
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Community Assessment Applied After School

Words: 498 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42835411



Topic Area 2: Participation in Extracurricular Activities at School

National Data: 70% of students nationally participate in some amount of curricular activity, with almost half of these students (32% of the total population) participating only in an hour or two (per week, it is assumed). A substantial 21% of the total population participates in extracurricular activities six hours or more, with 8% at eleven hours or more of participation. Nearly a third (30%) of all students surveyed, however, do not participate in extracurricular activities at all.

Springfield Middle School Data: At Springfield Middle School, 57% of students participate in extra curricular activities, and of these students half participate in school sports. Band and chorus each involve around 30% each of participating students (29% and 31%, respectively), with 23% of participating students taking part in other clubs.

Interpretation: Again, the different measures make it difficult to compare these two data sets…… [Read More]