Medical Science Essays (Examples)

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Medical Advances in Cancer

Words: 553 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44527155

Medical Advances in Cancer Treatment Research

This paper discusses the medical advances in cancer treatment research. The writer explores several treatment options and compares them to treatment options of the past. There were two sources used to complete this paper.

There was a time when a diagnosis of cancer meant a death sentence. The word still strikes a chord of fear among the millions each year who are told they have it, but in recent years there have been many advances in medical science that allow many who would have died from the disease to live long and full lives. There are more cancer survivors now than ever before and treatment options continue to be made available.

In the past there were only two options for the treatment of cancer. One could have surgery and one could be given a course of radiation treatments. The surgery was for the purpose…… [Read More]

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Medical Model and Learned Helplessness

Words: 1083 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78154146

Lobotomy is a popular medical procedure introduced in curing mentally ill individuals, which requires the removal of the prefrontal lobes of the cortex of the brain, the part of the brain wherein aggressive and violent behavior is triggered. However, in the movie, lobotomy is shown to have disastrous results: McMurphy's violent behavior is indeed abated, but as illustrated in the movie, the lobotomy had turned him into a 'vegetable' neither responding to his ward mates' call for attention nor displaying his usual rowdy, obnoxious, McMurphy self.

This instance in the movie is considered as patterned after the medical model of abnormal psychology, wherein "mental disorders are described as medical diseases with a biological origin" (450). ecause this is the prevalent thinking in medical science during the time the movie (and novel) was made, Nurse Ratched decided, in order to "treat" McMurphy, to let him undergo lobotomy. Subsistence to the medical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Santorck, J. (2001). Psychology. NY: McGraw-Hill Book Co.
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Medical Home Model and Health Disparity Nursing

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51153740

Medical Home Model and Health Disparity

Nursing esearch Proposal

The Impact of the Medical Home Model on Health Disparities

The Impact of the Medical Home Model on Healthcare Disparity

Medical homes are primary care practices where a physician or NP establishes a long-term care relationship with patients and provide patient/family-centered, coordinated, and culturally-sensitive care (AANP, n.d.; Strickland, Jones, Ghandour, Kogan, & Newacheck, 2011). The benefits include improved healthcare access, quality, and safety. A number of states have enacted statutes supporting the medical home model after research findings revealed health disparities for racial and ethnic minorities were reduced (NCSL, 2013).

As a nurse practitioner I am interested in how effective a medical home model would be in reducing healthcare disparities, especially for racial and ethnic minority children residing in underserved communities. Nurse practitioners have traditionally practiced in underserved communities and will continue to do so; therefore, any strategy that could improve…… [Read More]

References

AANP (American Association of Nurse Practitioners). (n.d.). Medicare legislation: Fact sheet: The medical home -- What is it? How do nurse practitioners fit in? Retrieved from: http://www.aanp.org/legislation-regulation/federal-legislation/medicare/68-articles/349-the-medical-home.

Abrams, M., Nuzum, R., Mika, S., & Lawlor, G. (2011). Realizing health reform's potential: How the Affordable Care Act will strengthen primary care and benefit patients, providers, and payers. The Commonwealth Fund. Retrieved from:  http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/Files/Publications/Issue%20Brief/2011/Jan/1466_Abrams_how_ACA_will_strengthen_primary_care_reform_brief_v3.pdf .

NCSL. (2013). Health disparities: State laws. Retrieved from: http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/health-disparities-laws.aspx.

Strickland, B.B., Jones, J.R., Ghandour, R.M., Kogan, M.D., & Newacheck, P.W. (2011). The medical home: Health care access and impact for children and youth in the United States. Pediatrics, 127(4), 604-11.
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Science and Pseudoscience Would You

Words: 657 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39039801

This begins by asking a question. In that case, the question would be: Does Sensa cause weight loss without dieting? Background research would then need to be done. This would include any literature and other research information that could be found on Sensa from reputable sources. Information from InStyle and Good Housekeeping would not be considered for this type of research, because these are not reputable magazines from a scientific standpoint. A hypothesis would be constructed from the background research, which would be that Sensa causes weight loss without dieting. From that point, it would be necessary to conduct an experiment to prove or disprove that hypothesis.

An experiment to prove or disprove this hypothesis would need to include a control group, and that group would need to eat the same food and the same quantity of food as those using the Sensa. This is difficult, because everyone metabolizes food…… [Read More]

References

Braithwaite, J., & Jackson, J. (2006). What is pseudoscience?

Weight loss discovery making national headlines. (2012). How life works. Retrieved from http://www.howlifeworks.com/a/a/?cid=7425aa&AG_ID=520
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Science and Technology The Knowledge

Words: 1650 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86138785

Many of the results of scientific advancement have become part of the fabric of our humanity. But many of the advancements have also done grave damage to our planet, our traditions, and our social interactions.

In the end, whether scientific progress appears to be a good or an evil depends on what kind of world we want for ourselves, and what sort of control we want to maintain over that world. As long as our objectives are clear to ourselves, as long as the pace and direction of our endeavors remain within our control, and as long as we maintain a sense of awe and mystery in at least some aspect of our lives, science and technology will, as Bishop argues, lead us to a full unfolding of our potential as a species. But if we proceed with murky goals, if we allow the pace and direction of our endeavors…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bishop, J. Michael. "Enemies of Promise." The Presence of Others: Voices and Images that Call for Response. Eds. Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszciewitz. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2008. Print.

Chorost, Michael. "My Bionic Quest for Bolero." The Presence of Others: Voices and Images that Call for Response. Eds. Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszciewitz. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2008. Print.

Grady, Denise. "Struggling Back from War's Once-Deadly Wounds." The Presence of Others: Voices and Images that Call for Response. Eds. Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszciewitz. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2008. Print.

Shelley, Mary. "Excerpt from Frankenstein." The Presence of Others: Voices and Images that Call for Response. Eds. Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszciewitz. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2008. Print.
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Science Appealed to Me as Early as

Words: 880 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8206632

Science appealed to me as early as I can remember in my academic career, specifically, solving problems through experimentation. Biology, in particular, captured my interest because it seemed to combine science with the goal of providing healthcare and comfort to patients suffering from medical disease. Since then, I have learned that the other scientific disciplines contribute equally toward improving modern health care, but the biological sciences have always captured my greatest interest.

My recent volunteer duties at the (Name of nursing home) nursing home confirmed to me the profound satisfaction inherent in providing patient care. The experience of being able to improve the lives and outlook of elderly patients (some of whom suffer more from depression and loneliness than any organic disease) remains one of the most rewarding endeavors that I have ever undertaken.

The satisfaction of helping others is one element that has been missing from my professional life,…… [Read More]

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Science Definitions Science Is a

Words: 2077 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17935881

In the last fifteen or so years the concerns about vaccinations, and particularly the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccination (MMR) have come to the forefront of societies debates from a limited connection to autism that is most likely associated to the correlation between onset of symptoms of autism and autism spectrum disorders and standard immunization practices. The fear created a general public that was afraid to allow their children to get the life saving MMR and in turn many parents have denied their children vaccinations at all. Parents' fears of some connection between the vaccination and/or its ingredient makeup cause or trigger autism and an accompanying serious bowel disease is related to a single, very limited research study conducted in the UK (n 12). There has been a substantial increase in incidents of autism over the last 20 or so years and the extreme social, physical, emotional, financial and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Matson Ronald R. PhD, Scientific Laws and Theories May 1, 2008  http://science.kennesaw.edu/~rmatson/Biol%203380/3380theory.html .

Purcell, Edward a. The Crisis of Democratic Theory: Scientific Naturalism & the Problem of Value. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1973.

Sawin, Enoch I. "The Scientific Method and Other Bases for Evaluation Procedures." ETC.: A Review of General Semantics 62.4 (2005): 386.

Steuernagel, T. Increases in Identified Cases of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Policy Implications. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 16(3), 2005, 138.
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Medical Nursing

Words: 1796 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6008465

Medical Nursing

Medical l Nursing

The United States has the largest number of professional nurses in the world totalled 3 millions approximately. Despite the available large number of professional nurses, there is still imbalance between the supply and demand for nurses in the United States. Demand for the professional nurses has outnumbered the supply. Typically, critical nursing shortage has become a serious issue in the United States, and the production capacity is lagging based on the estimated future needs. The concept of nursing shortage refers to the situation where the demand for nurses outnumbers the supply. The worsening nursing shortage in the United States has created the demand for more nurses to fill the gap. Many private and public sectors healthcare leaders have advocated for the serious solution to boost the supply of nurses. One of the solutions advocated is that the U.S. should facilitate the migration of foreign graduate…… [Read More]

References

Aiken, L.H. (2007). U.S. Nurse Labor Market Dynamics Are Key to Global Nurse

Sufficiency. Health Service Research.42(3):1299-1320.

Brush, B.L. Sochalski, J. & Berger, A.M. (2004). Imported Care: Recruiting Foreign Nurses

to U.S. Health Care Facilities. Health Affairs. 23(3):78.87.
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Medical Robotics in Spite of Research Gaps

Words: 472 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53091203

Medical Robotics

In spite of research gaps, medical robotics is a growing trend in the United States.

Advances in Medical Robotics (Diana, 2011)

Hybrid Assistive Limb 5 (HAL5) is an artificially powered ecoskeleton that helps double the amount of weight someone can carry unaided.

DaVinci Si HD Surgical System performs minimally invasive surgery through superior visualization and greater precision, with incisions of one to two centimeters causing less pain and speedier recovery. It reduces the hospital stay to one half and costs one third less.

Sofie incorporates force feedback allowing a surgeon to feel the pressure they apply making sutures and pushing tissue aside. Sofie is expected to develop in five years.

Cyberknife Robotic Radiosurgery System is a non-invasive alternative to surgery for treatment of cancerous and non-cancerous tumors.

Nursebot is designed to specifically help elderly deal with daily activities allowing them to live at home.

RIA is designed to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Davies, B. (2006). Essay: Medical robotics -- a bright future. The Lancet, vol 368, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69929-7, S53-S54.

Diana, a. (2011, Jan 29). 12 Advances in Medical Robotics. Retrieved from InformationWeek Healthcare: http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/patient/12-advances-in-medical-robotics/229100383

Huang, G.P. (2006). Robotics and clinical research: Collaborating to epand the evidence-based for rehabilitation. JRRD, 43(5), xiii-xvi.

Seaman, a. (2013, Jan 4). Racial gaps in access to robotic prostrate surgery. Retrieved from Yahoo Health: http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/nm/racial-gaps-in-access-to-robotic-prostrate-surgery
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Science and Morality After the

Words: 1361 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57790064



That is not to say that theory and application cannot be separated into ethical categories. They can be, but those categorizations are always going to be somewhat skewed by the researcher, because no human being is capable of perfect neutrality. To assume that one can research for the sake of purse science really does involve imaging that scientists are not human beings with their own personal motivations. Moreover, this is not an issue that developed in the post-atomic world. Even before the use of the atomic bomb, scientists were motivated by personal motivations that kept them from being completely neutral. Therefore, it might be better to consider the ethics of scientific discovery from a viewpoint that includes the inherent morality of a discovery. For example, chemotherapy could be used as a weapon with very disastrous results, because its side-effects are devastating and can even be fatal. However, chemotherapies are developed…… [Read More]

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Medical Nursing Education

Words: 3350 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49965165

Medical/Nursing Education

Nurses are required to make many immediate decisions in their assigned duties. Unfortunately, in recent years, patient care has often been compromised as a nursing shortage crisis has escalated to epic proportions. Increased patient loads have resulted in often hasty nursing decisions as responsibilities and hours worked have increased. Although precious time must be spread thin to accommodate higher numbers of patients, nurses must exercise their morals through consistency in ethical behaviors. According to Peggy Chinn (1), "Many ethical issues, such as end-of-life decision making, have increased in complexity. Other issues, such as advocacy and choice, have changed in certain respects but are more clearly centrally situated within nursing's ethical domain."

As a result, nurses are held accountable for a variety of decisions in nursing practice and in many instances, a patient's life depends on such decisions to survive. Gastmans (496) states that "Generally, the goal of nursing…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. (2001). Nursing and ethics: the maturing of a discipline. Advances in Nursing Science

Erlen, J. (2001). Moral distress: a persuasive problem. Orthopaedic Nursing 20(2): 76-80.

Erlen, J. (2001). The nursing shortage, patient care, and ethics. Orthopaedic Nursing 20(6):

Gastmans, C. (2002). A fundamental ethical approach to nursing: some proposals for ethics education. Nursing Ethics 9(5): 494-507.
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Medical Admissions Fortunately or Not

Words: 335 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56470243

My predilection for working under stress prepares me psychologically for the unique and demanding profession. The college professor who advised that my disposition and talents lend themselves to a career in osteopathy told me that osteopaths need to be creative as well as analytical: to assess situations and make decisions that synthesize years of prior knowledge and experience. I believe I possess the qualities that would prepare me for a successful and rewarding career as an osteopathic physician.

As I seek entry into your esteemed medical school program with a focus in osteopathy, I can assure you of my capacity to meet challenges with poise and calm. My business experience has prepared me for the demands of medical school: owning a business while attending school full-time has not deterred nor tired me physically. I look forward to participating in your program; I assure you that I will represent your school…… [Read More]

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Medical Skills Needed to Be

Words: 2203 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74711001



According to the work of Fulford (1994) in an Oxford Practice Skills Project eport "Three elements of practice (ethics, law and communication skills) are approached in an integrated teaching programme which aims to address everyday clinical practice. The role of a central value of patient-centered health care in guiding the teaching is described. Although the final aim of the teaching is to improve the actual practice, we have found three 'sub-aims' helpful in the development of the programme. These sub-aims are: increasing students' awareness of ethical issues; enhancing their analytical thinking skills, and teaching specific knowledge. (Hope, 1994)

In the work of Miles, et al. (1989) entitled "Medical Ethics Education: Coming of Age it is stated that "medical ethics education is instruction that endeavors to teach the examination of the role of values in the doctor's relationship with patients, colleagues and society. It is one form of a broad curricular…… [Read More]

References

Fryer-Edwards, PhD (2005) Tough Talk: Helping Doctors Approach Difficult Conversations - Resources for Teaching- Domains for Small Group Teaching Prelude 3 Department of Medical History and Ethics University of Washington School of Medicine.

Siegler, Mark MD (2001) Lessons from 30 Years of Teaching Clinical Ethics AMA Journal 2001 October.

St. Onge, Joye (1997) Medical Education Must Make Room for Student-Specific Ethical Dilemmas" Canadian Medical Association Journal 15 Apr 1987, 156(8).

Hicks, L. et al. (2001) Understanding the Clinical Dilemmas that Shape Medical Students' Ethical Development: Questionnaire Survey and Focus Group study. BMJ Journal 2001;322-709-71- 24 march 2001.
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Science Intuition Cliff Bannaker Hero

Words: 996 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22435474

Their lack of foresight was really their downfall, and the crux at the heart of this story. If they did it, how many other labs do it too, and how much research is suspect?

Ultimately, Cliff's story and the controversy surrounding it is a study in ethics, and that's the real issue for us here at the Globe. Sandy and Marion knew the results were preliminary, but they chose to release them to Nature anyway. That was unethical and unprofessional. Marion fought against it, but Sandy won out with his attitude they had to release to get a lock on the research. He tells Marion, "We can't afford to wait six months for the review. In the meantime, everyone and his brother is going to try this" (Goodman 71). It is Sandy's need for attention and publicity that helps fuel the situation, and he should be held accountable for the…… [Read More]

References

Goodman, a. (2006). Intuition. New York: The Dial Press.
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Medical Theory Ever Since the

Words: 3095 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24024442

As mentioned earlier, the desired outcome of nursing care is comfort and there are many articles in which the researchers have talked about the needs of the patients and the things that alter the comfort of the patients. Kolcaba suggested that the cancer patients who are terminally ill can benefit from comfort care as it pays attention to the perspective and needs of the patients. Through such kind of care, the patient is not only provided with pain relief, but the depression of the patient is also addressed adequately. As she said that patients who are not in pain but are depressed seek comfort in the transcendental sense as well as in the psycho-spiritual sense (Kolcaba, 1992 p 4). In some of her works, she has explained the use of the instruments and their application by the nurses. Kolcaba reckons that the instruments presented by her to evaluate the comfort…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Kolcaba K. (1994). A theory of holistic comfort for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19(10): 1178-1184.

Kolkaba, K. (1992). Holistic comfort: Operationalizing the construct as a nurse-sensitive outcome..Advances in Nursing Science, 15 (1), pp. 1-10.

Kolkaba, K. (1997). The primary holisms in nursing..Journal of Advanced Nursing, 25 pp. 290-296.

Kolkaba, K. And Fisher, E. (1996). A holistic perspective on comfort care as an advance directive..Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, 18 pp. 66-76.
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Sci Fi Art Analysis & Examples

Words: 1557 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55702756

Sci-Fi Art Analysis

The class text makes two passing references to Star Trek. ith that in mind, the author of this report will focus on the show Star Trek: The Next Generation. Although rather dated, much of the material and imagery used in the show is very good even by today's standards. The show ran from 1987 to 1994, seven seasons in total. The show was a brilliant piece of art both in terms of the subject matter they covered as well as the manner in which it was presented in terms of color, presentation, concepts and ideas. The show is rated a very high 8.7 on the International Movie Database (IMDb) website (IMDb). This brief report shall cover some aspects of the show, what made the show so good and the adeptness in which they blended the script, the imagery and the characters into a cohesive storyline. hile Star…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Claremont. "The Politics of Star Trek." Claremont.org. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

IMDb. "Star Trek: The Next Generation (TV Series 1987-1994)." IMDb. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

IMDb. "The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)." IMDb. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

Schneider, Bernd. "Ex Astris Scientia - Space Art in Star Trek: The Next Generation." Ex-astris-scientia.org. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
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Religion and Science & Religion

Words: 1911 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36140675

There are exceptions, where legal ramifications are employed and individuals are held to account for their inaction. For most people, including myself the idea that faith is the only solution to medical concerns, and especially emergent ones is unfathomable. Medical care is congruent with faith, as even for the most ardent believer in God if God had not meant for children to be cured of preventable a treatable disease he would not have developed treatments to do so. For the broader population this is a reasonable tenet and most people report taking themselves and their children to a doctor or hospital when they feel it is necessary. It is also clear that modern people are even more involved in their own wellness and may even be able to treat some injuries and illnesses at home, without medical intervention. Furthermore most know when they need to seek care for themselves and…… [Read More]

References

Barnes L.L. & Sered, S.S. (2005). Religion and Healing in America. New York: Oxford University Press

Hamer, D. (2004).The God Gene: How Faith is Hardwired Into our Genes.

Koenig, H.G. (2005). Medicine, Religion, and Health: Where Science and Spirituality Meet. West Conshohocken, PA: Templeton Foundation Press.

Nord, W.A. (1999). Science, Religion and Education. Phi Delta Kappan, 81(1), 28.
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Sociology -- Medical Dominance on the Profession

Words: 1671 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93462251

Sociology -- Medical Dominance on the Profession of Nursing and How is the Profession of Nursing Challenging Medical Dominance in Australia

In the context of medical practice, the contemporary medical society is representing a change in the increasing issues of domination between medical professions. The focus of each practice's attention is on exploring its goals in providing integral contributions and impact to the framework of health care services. Each dimension of medical interest, specifically the doctors and nurses, are developing their respective paradigm and uniqueness to establish skills and authority in the field of health service.

This paper aims to do an informative research on medical dominance over the profession of nursing in Australia. As the industry of medicine progresses, the issue of domination among medical doctors and nurses in health care institutions are associated with competencies and authority over the other. The power and privileges of the profession is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Andrews, I., Hale, A. (2000). The Division of Labour in Health Care Delivery.

Retrieved Sept 23, 2003, from Faculty of Health Sciences. The University of Sydney.

Web site: http://www2.fhs.usyd.edu.au/bach/1107/topic9.htm

Duffy, E. Evolving Role and Practice Issues: Nurse Practitioners in Australia.
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American Medical Association The Writer

Words: 803 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66952427

ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

Some of the principles of ethics that physicians are expected to abide by include:

dedication providing competent medical care, with compassion and respect for human dignity and rights (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

Upholding the standards of professionalism, be honest in all professional interactions, and strive to report physicians deficient in character or competence, or engaging in fraud or deception, to appropriate entities (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

especting the law and also recognize a responsibility to seek changes in those requirements which are contrary to the best interests of the patient (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

especting the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals, and shall safeguard patient confidences and privacy within the constraints of the law (Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)."

In addition physicians are expected to maintain regular educational hours to remain on top of the latest breakthroughs in medical science so that they…… [Read More]

References

Principles of medical ethics http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2512.html)
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How to Evaluate Performance in the Medical World

Words: 4923 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14023760

Performance Measures for (50,000 call per year) EMS

EMS ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

That the organization implements additional clinical performance measures, including those to evaluate the quality of the EMS.

That the organization uses survey data to evaluate and analyze customer and employee satisfaction and that a proper feedback and control mechanism is in place to use this data to implement required changes.

This report starts from the premise that Emergency Medical Services will be treated as any other service. As a consequence, this type of service reflects the relationship between the service recipient (in this case the patients) and the service provider (in this case the medium-sized organization being analyzed in this report).

This means that this report will use many of the existing research and business literature and apply business principles such as customer and employee satisfaction in presenting and analyzing a comprehensive set of recommended performance measures for…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Balridge National Quality Program (2002). Criteria for performance excellence. Gaithesburg: National Institute for Standards and Technology

2. The Customer Communicator (TCC) (2005). Alexander Communications Group, 28 (1) 2.

3. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (2009). Emergency Medical Services: Performance Measures, Recommended Attributes and Indicators for System and Service performance.

4. Bruce, J. (2004). Application of EMS Customer Satisfaction Survey Data to Improve Service Delivery at Rialto Fire Department.
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Ayurveda and Western Science Compare

Words: 1946 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27267966

The largest difference exists in the basis of the Western holistic treatment and the basis of Ayurveda. Western holistic treatments are based on TCM or 'Traditional Chinese Medicine'. The key components of TCM are as follows:

Qi (pronounced like "chee") - this is the vital energy necessary for life (blood, body fluid)

Zang-Fu - the internal organs; and Jing-Luo: - this governs the meridian and collateral systems of the body. (rown, 2001)

Practitioners of TCM also used a system referred to as "The Eight Principles" which are used to categorize illness or disease. These eight principles are comprised of "four pairs of polarities, including:

interior/exterior;

hot/cold;

deficiency/excess; and Yin/Yang." (rown, 2001)

These principles are stated to determine:

1) Disease location;

2) the nature of imbalance;

3) the presence of a pathological (disease) factors; and 4) the strength of the body's own energies. (rown, 2001)

Summary and Conclusion

Ayurvedic medicine is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brown, Liz (2001) East Meets West and Western Medicine Takes a Back Seat: Why Ayurvedic and Chinese Medicines are at the Core of All That's Right with Holistic Healing Today. Better Nutrition Journal. December 2001. Online available at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FKA/is_12_63/ai_83076770/print.

Cooper, Edwin L. (2004) 12th International Congress of Oriental Medicine. Oriental Medicine and Biotechnology in the Post-Genomic Era - WHO's Traditional Medicine Strategy 2002 Date: November 6-9, 2003. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Journal. 2004 1(1):103-106 Oxford University Press.

Healing Choices (2007) Guide to Complementary and Alternative Healthcare. Online available at  http://www.healingchoicesonline.com/ .

Herlihy, John a. (2003) the Mystery and the Miracle Ayurveda. 13 April 2003. AuthorsDen.com. Online available at http://www.authorsden.com/visit/viewShortStory.asp?AuthorID=1363&id=7866.
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Human Stem Cell Medical -

Words: 4660 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11610140

This bill was sent to the U.S. Senate and set for vote mirroring a bill previously passed by the House during the Summer of 2003 which failed to pass the Senate because of vehement disagreement that was even "within the parties over the prohibition of therapeutic cloning.(National Legislation Concerning Human and Reproductive Cloning, 2004; paraphrased) As of the date of the report on legislation eight U.S. states had passed laws that explicitly prohibited reproductive cloning using human embryos and another five U.S. states have placed a prohibition on cloning for any purpose whatsoever with 22 other U.S. states introducing bills outlawing the reproductive cloning of humans. (Ibid; paraphrased) Patenting laws for genetics allow inventors to patent genetics but only specific genetic factors may be patented and inventors are required to:

1) Identify novel genetic sequences;

2) Specify the sequence's product, 3) Specify how the product functions in nature --i.e. its…… [Read More]

Bibliography

O'Connor, Sean M. (nd) Intellectual Property Rights and Stem Cell Research: Who Owns the Medical Breakthroughs?

Kadereit, Suzanne & Hines, Pamela J. (nd) Overview of Stem Cell Research New England Law Journal 2005 Mar 28. Online available at http://www.nesl.edu/lawrev/vol39/3/13%20Kadereit%20Final.pdf.

Chadwick, Ruth et al. (2004)HUGO Ethics Committee Statement of Stem Cells (2004) November

Legal Protection of Digital Information (2006) Chapter 5: Software-Based Inventions Online available at:.  http://digital-law-online.info/lpdi1.0/treatise63.html
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Medical Records System Definition of

Words: 3005 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30994463

The master patient index (MPI) value was mainly liked by the personnel in the medical record section.

The Golden 90s

Equipped with MPI and record-keeping growth, software designers sustained to generate and progress with a new emphasis on individual hospital sections. Auxiliary department purposes, for example radiology and laboratory showed to be fairly adaptive to software that is fresh and innovative, and computer healthcare applications start to show on the market. Patient test outcomes that instigated in the laboratory and radiology department now too were obtainable via computers nonetheless again with limit as the outcomes were separate and were not linked to one another, or to any other software for instance that being done with the patient registration. A lot of these applications had basically been marked as "source" governments, and they were not courteous to assembly athwart the healthcare aptitude. This is the state that mechanization in healthcare found…… [Read More]

References:

Holden, R.J. (2011). Cognitive performance-altering effects of electronic medical records: An application of the human factors paradigm for patient safety. Cognition, Technology & Work, 13(1), 11-29.

Kaliyadan, F., Venkitakrishnan, S., Manoj, J., & Dharmaratnam, a. (2009). Electronic medical records in dermatology: Practical implications. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, 75(2), 157-61.

Kochevar, J., Gitlin, M., Mutell, R., Sarnowski, J., & Mayne, T. (2011). Electronic medical records: A survey of use and satisfaction in small dialysis organizations. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 38(3), 273-81.

Kurbasic, I., Pandza, H., Masic, I., Huseinagic, S., Tandir, S., Alicajic, F., & Toromanovic, S. (2008). The advantages and limitations of international classification of diseases, injuries and causes of death from aspect of existing health care system of B&H. Acta Informatica Medica, 16(3), 159.
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Science Daily Called Pepper Component

Words: 762 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47336082



he introduction of Capsaicin to mice that have prostrate cancer will cause many of the cancer cells to die."

According to a team of researchers from the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, in collaboration with colleagues from UCLA, the pepper component caused human prostate cancer cells to undergo programmed cell death or apoptosis (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060319150754.htm)."

When the Capsaicin was introduced to mice that had prostrate cancer growing it killed approximately 80% of the cancer cells.

his was done by leading the capsaicin to follow molecular pathways that lead to the apoptosis of those cells.

Prostate cancer tumors treated with capsaicin were about one-fifth the size of tumors in non-treated mice. Capsaicin had a profound anti-proliferative effect on human prostate cancer cells in culture," said Sren Lehmann, M.D., Ph.D., visiting scientist at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the UCLA School of Medicine. "It also dramatically slowed the development…… [Read More]

The article provides a clear overview of the experiment and results and allows the reader to understand the significance of the consequences without creating a bias about those results.

REFERENCE (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/03/060319150754.htm)

Pepper Component Hot Enough to Trigger Suicide in Prostate Cancer Cells. Science Daily.
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Science Making Us More Ignorant

Words: 720 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80034152

In other words, scientific realism says that science can find the truth about everything (Erickson, 2005, 58-60).

Conversely, if there is realism, there must follow anti-realism which, in science, means that there are certain unobservable, and therefore only speculative, claims about the universe. These speculations are not detectable within the construct of human understanding, ability to observe, or even to adequately define other than theoretically. For example, we can observe the function of quantum space, but not the reality (if there is such). We can observe the characteristics of the DNA molecule, but not the actual mechnism by which DNA actually works. By the very nature of our construct, then, even our instrumentation is biased to measure what we expect, not necessarily what is (Braver, 2007). Irrealism takes both these theories nd asks if the objects we study really exist -- or if it is the nature of the study…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Braver, L. (2007). A Think of This World: A History of Continental Anti-Realism.

Chicago, IL.: Northwestern University Press.

Dacey, A. (2004, December). Is Science Making Us more Ignorant? Retrieved September

14, 2010, from Skeptical Inquirer:  http://www.csicop.org/si/show/is_science_making_us_more_ignorant
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Science Business Plan Entry Science

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12129535

Most recently he held the position of Vice President of Marketing and Product Management at Whopper Systems, a developer of PACS medical imaging and information management software. John defined the product portfolio and roadmap, managed strategic partnerships and was instrumental in the company's growth and eventual acquisition by Eastman Kodak Health Imaging. John holds a B.Sc in General Science (Physics) from Tel-Aviv University and is currently in his second year of studies at the McMaster Graduate School of Business.

Chief Medical Officer - Michelle Pfeiffer, M.D.

Michelle is a 5th year resident in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the McMaster University Medical Center. Michelle co-founded and is Vice President of Societal Resources, a company with diverse health care interests ranging from import/export of medical instruments to diabetes education in the United States and serving as a liaison between Medical Bandages and the Bosnian Ministry of Health. Michelle also helped design…… [Read More]

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Medical Disorders Face Recognition

Words: 1892 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81215349

Prosopagnosia

According to A.J. Larner's book, "A Dictionary of Neurological signs," prosopagnosia is a neurological condition, "a form of visual agnosia characterized by an inability to recognize previously known human faces or equivalent stimuli (hence a retrograde defect) and to learn new ones (anterograde defect)" (Larner, 2010). Larner further distinguishes between two forms of prosopagnosia: apperceptive and associative agnosia. This "category-specific recognition disorder," as G, Neil Martin calls it in his "Human Neuropsychology" is often, but not always, associated with other forms of visual agnosia such as alexia or achromatopsia.

Prosopagnosia can be congenital or developmental, or a consequence of brain damage, following a stroke, a brain injury, or caused by a degenerative disease (Kinai, 2013) . There are two types of prosopagnosia: apperceptive prosopagnosia and associative prosopagnosia. This form of visual impairment has various degrees of manifestation, from mild to severe and can or cannot be associated with other…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bowles, Devin C. McKone, Elinor. Dawel, Amy. Duchaine, Bradley. Palermo, Romina. Schmalzl, Laura. Rivolta. Davide. Wilson, Ellie. Yovel. Galit.

Cognitive Neuropsychology, "Diagnosing prosopagnosia: Effects of ageing, sex, and participant-stimulus ethnic match on the Cambridge Face Memory Test and Cambridge Face Perception Test." Available at:  http://www.faceblind.org/social_perception/papers/Bowles%2009%20CN.pdf 

Sperry, Roger Wolcott. Ed.Trevarthern, Colwyn B. 1990. Brain Circuits and Functions of the Mind: Essays in Honor of Roger Wolcott Sperry, Author. Cambridge University Press

Newman, Nancy J. Miller, Neil R. Biousse, Valerie. 2008. Walsh and Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-ophthalmology: The Essentials. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Medical Cannabis Research Study in

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57552341

10). In this particular study, the effects of smoked cannabis as compared wit the results of patients who received and smoked placebos was significant, and showed a 34% reduction in daily pain amongst those patients receiving the cannabis, versus 17% amongst those patients receiving the placebo.

The outcome of the studies conducted would suggest that medical use of marijuana for pain is recommended. The study concluded that there is an absence of pain relieving analgesics available to patients in the classifications studied. The findings as they relate to the efficacy of cannabis for the treatment of spasticity in MS indicate that medicinal marijuana for that purpose is an avenue of treatment for this very difficult to manage condition and the pain associated with the disease (p. 16).

The future of medicinal cannabis as a therapeutic approach to difficult to manage conditions like Parkinson's Disease, MS, and other conditions that have…… [Read More]

Reference List

Grant, I., Atkinson, J.H., Mattison, A., and Coates, T. Report to the Legislature and Governor of the State of California Presenting the Findings of Pursuant to SB847 Which Created the CMCR and Provided State Funding. University California, San Diego, Health Sciences, CMCR, February 11, 2010.
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Science Gender and Knowledge

Words: 706 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10678081

Brain, and Heart: A Feminist Epistemology for the Natural Sciences," Hilary Rose attempts to create a philosophy of science that is not contingent upon female scientists seeing the world 'like men,' or as male scientists do. In other words, Rose suggests that rather than suggesting that the scientific perspective is gender neutral and can be assumed by both male and female individuals, females in the scientific profession must create a different epistemology or way of understanding and learning about the world that transcends the binaries created by the men whom have dominated the scientific profession until now.

Rose states that the sciences have traditionally created a sharp division between what is done by the hand, the mind, and the heart -- or through craft, intellect, and emotion. Rose suggests that such a division has not simply traditionally and falsely been used to exclude women from excelling in the intellectual, objective…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Keller, Evelyn Fox. Reflections On Gender And Science.

Rose, Hilary. "Hand, Brain, and Heart: A Feminist Epistemology for the Natural Sciences." Signs (1983).
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Medical Testing on Animals

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27055506

against experimentation on animals, and some are more compelling than others. Some people suggest that the practice is immoral because choosing to experiment upon animals is directly analogous to racial or sexual discrimination; or more closely related to discrimination on the basis of mental capacity. Others contend that it is wrong because, by their estimations, no clear advances in medical research have been made through animal experimentation, and alternative modes of research are emerging. Doubtlessly, animal experimentation is a delicate moral issue, but asserting that animals should enjoy the same rights as humans within a society is a weak claim. Arguments have been formed differentiating animals from humans depending upon both their moral status and biological status. Yet, the most obvious line of reasoning is associated with the fact that granting animals the same rights as humans within society leads to many logical contradictions.

One question that needs to be…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

1. Dunbar, Daniel. "The Confinement and Use of Non-Human Animals in Scientific and Medical Experiments is Morally Unacceptable." Ithaca University, 2005. Available: http://www.ithaca.edu/faculty/cduncan/250/ddunbar.doc.

2. Mitchell, Graham. "Guarding the Middle Ground: the Ethics of Experiments on Animals." African Journal of Science, Issue 85, May 1989. Available:  http://www.garfield.library.upenn.edu/essays/v13p114y1990.pdf .
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Science vs The Bible

Words: 697 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46070555

Bible & Depression

Depression is something that a lot of people suffer with in modern times and there is very much a tug-of-war between "modern science" and the Bible in terms of depression, how it should be dealt with and what actually makes things worse. The same can be said of the broader medical field as some people rely on faith alone rather than the "poison" and such of modern medicine. As with most things, neither extreme is wise and a middle ground that recognizes both science and faith should emerge. While it is possible to read too much into certain clips and phrases in the Bible, there are certainly portions and passages where depression certainly was pointed to or that almost certainly existed with or without mention.

Analysis

The passages about Adam and Eve are a good starting point when it comes to depression and negative feelings. Indeed, Adam…… [Read More]

References

Mayo. (2015, January 8). Depression (major depressive disorder). Retrieved January 8,

2015, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/basics/definition/con-20032977

The Holy Bible: New international version, containing the Old Testament and the New

Testament. (1978). Grand Rapids: Zondervan Bible.
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Ruchi Tomar Advantages of Electronic Medical Records

Words: 3264 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74105747

The issue of misplaced or lost patient files is also gotten rid of. These advantages aid in producing a marked rise in the health connected security of patients and the welfare of patients (Ayers, 2009). Furthermore, electronic medical records and patient care are identical in that such systems effortlessly permit restrictions to be placed upon end users' admission to specific information of the patient. This personal security feature is likewise significant to meeting a patient's confidentiality anxieties.

Figure 4 Electronic medical records and their advantages with patients (Slaughter, 2000).

The Benefits of access that is easy to each patient's comprehensive medical information, and the ability for physicians to rapidly take part in medical records and organize patient care. Even though every department at SMG utilizes the EM, it is particularly valuable in the Urgent Care Center when rapid admission to a patient's material can make all the change in medical…… [Read More]

References:

Angst, C.M., Agarwal, R., Sambamurthy, V., & Kelley, K. (2010). Social contagion and information technology diffusion: The adoption of electronic medical records in U.S. hospitals. Management Science, 56(8), 1219-1241.

Ayers, D.J., Menachemi, N., Ramamonjiarivelo, Z., Matthews, M., & Brooks, R.G. (2009). Adoption of electronic medical records: The role of network effects. The Journal of Product and Brand Management, 18(2), 127-135.

Berner, E.S., Detmer, D.E., & Simborg, D. (2005). Will the wave finally break? A brief view of the adoption of electronic medical records in the United States. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 12(1), 3-7.

Brooks, R., & Grotz, C. (2010). Implementation of electronic medical records: How healthcare providers are managing the challenges of going digital. Journal of Business & Economics Research, 8(6), 73-84
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Organizational Performance Management Emergency Medical Services &

Words: 2154 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13153026

Organizational Performance Management

Emergency Medical Services & Pharmacies Long-Term Health Care Physicians' Offices Hospitals This paper written organizations. • Discuss influence regulatory accreditation standards performance-management systems.

Organizational performance management

The main purpose for the health care industry is to serve patients in the most effective, safe, and efficient manner. Each organization in this industry functions differently. However, there are some functions and regulations that the organizations will share. These regulations provide the organizations with a path that they are supposed to follow. egulatory requirements mandate the organization to compliance, and provide a standard performance level that creates the need for the organization to have specialized accreditation and monitoring in order to have quality improvements at various levels Sciences, 2006.

The key component for ensuring that an organization maintains its course in meeting the standards, compliance, maintaining the organization's mission and vision, and meeting regulatory requirements is communication. isk management will…… [Read More]

References

Briner, M., Kessler, O., Pfeiffer, Y., Wehner, T., & Manser, T. (2010). Assessing hospitals' clinical risk management: Development of a monitoring instrument. [Article]. BMC Health Services Research, 10, 337-347. doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-10-337

Bryan, K. (2009). Communication in Healthcare. New York, NY 10006: Peter Lang.

Carroll, R., & Management, A.S.H.R. (2010). Risk Management Handbook for Health Care Organizations: Student Edition. Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774: Wiley.

Coleman, L.A., Kottke, T.E., Rank, B., Reding, D.J., Selna, M., Isham, G.J., . . . Greenlee, R.T. (2008/12//). Partnering Care Delivery and Research to Optimize Health.
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History of Nursing Science Nursing Has Existed

Words: 1117 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30135288

History Of Nursing Science

Nursing has existed in some for as long as humans have roamed the earth. The modern era of nursing began with the emergence of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War in the 1850's. The daughter of affluent parents, Nightingale greatly accelerated the development of nursing and is widely acknowledged as the most important person in the history of nursing. Nursing science translates to the profession itself in the form of best practices that have been formulated, debated, reviewed and analyzed so as to verify the validity of nursing theories before they are put into practice.

Nightingale Emerges

As is the case with many nurses and others who dedicate their lives to the care of others, Nightingale was driven largely by her spirituality and religious convictions. Many people perceive there to be an inherent conflict between religion and science but Nightingale did not believe this to be…… [Read More]

References

George, J.B. (2011). Nursing theories, the base for professional nursing practice. (6 ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

McKenna, H. (1998). Nursing theories and models. Taylor & Francis.

Parker, M.E., & Smith, M.C. (2010). Nursing theories and nursing practice. (3 ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Co.

Walker, L.O., & Avant, K.C. (2011). Strategies for theory construction in nursing. (5 ed.). New York, NY: Prentice Hall.
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Montefiore Medical Center Reasons for Developing New

Words: 3035 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16657719

Montefiore Medical Center

easons for Developing New Strategy

Designing the new strategy involved several meetings by the Medical Center's employees to assist in the development of a balanced scorecard and initiating nation-level measures. In this regard, the firm developed a new strategy to represent the cause-and-effect linkages among the environment, strategy, and operating plan that could deliver the required financial results. The new system proposed by the strategy was initiated to ensure that financials made up a 10-percent of the measures on the balanced scoreboard. Montefiore additionally, developed the new strategy to measure patient satisfaction, the cost, health care quality as well as cycle times of clinical and administrative processes. It was realized by the institution that the strategic measures were essential in positioning Montefiore for future innovation while encouraging organizational growth. The GIP strategy was initiated by the medical provider to help in increasing market penetration while assisting in…… [Read More]

References

Barney, J.B. (1986). Organizational Culture: Can It be a Source of Sustained Competitive Advantage? Academy of Management Review, 11(3), 656-665.

Barney, J.B. (1991). Firm Resources and Sustained Competitive Advantage. Journal of Management, 17(1), 99-120.

Collis, D.J., & Montgomery, C.A. (1995). Competing on Resources: Strategy in the 1990s. Harvard Business Review.

Engestrom, Y., Miettinen, R., & Punamaki, R.-L. (1999). Perspectives on Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press.
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Scientific Medical Translation Personal Statement

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28591398

" here, I worked part-time as a translator and interpreter. It was indeed a magnificent experience to work with members of this demanding theatrical profession. Every day was a constant surprise and a constant challenge to my linguistic abilities. I had to put works of great emotion, the off-stage as well as the on-stage monologues, of these fine actors into comprehensible form, structure, and prose for the delight and edification of others and for audiences of all ages.

his constant, daily, living act of translation also highlighted for me the delicate balance between subjectivity and objectivity in the art of translating another's words and thoughts into another language and cultural system of ideas. Beyond decoding the meaning of the source text or voice, and recoding it into the language and meaning of another text and voice, I learned that in the immediacy of life there is always an element between…… [Read More]

This is even more important for someone in a specific field, as in medical and scientific translation, as often words have a different meaning in the technical lexicon of the profession or a discipline then they do in more colloquial usage. For much as I enjoyed my tenure with the theatrical company, for me, even more gratifying than making the arts understandable is the ability to make the often difficult and frightening world of medicine and science comprehensible. To see my knowledge of a language bring comprehension, the understanding of the 'yes, I see,' or the 'a-ha' in the eyes of another is as satisfying as landing a well-spiked volleyball over the net, another of my favorite leisure time pursuits, or of hearing applause while standing on the stage.

My knowledge of technical subjects and fluency in the language of scientific technology has been honed through my computer knowledge and my proficiency in technical languages. I am fluent in Windows98, Windows 2000, and Windows XP. Microsoft Applications such as Word, Excel, Access, Explorer, FrontPage, PowerPoint, Publisher, Photoshop, and I have a good knowledge of HTML programming and the languages involved in web design.

Translation, regardless of the language and the lexicon -- scientific, computer, medical, or artistic -- is about the conveyance of meaning as perfectly as possible into a language and a manner understandable to another person's language and lexicon. To be a translator is to be the human facilitator in the process of creating meaning and bridges between cultures. It is a skill I have performed in the past, and one that I hope to further sharpen and perfect, in school and in my professional life.
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How the Media Portrays Science to the Society

Words: 1909 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16900521

Media

A scientist is a person who engages in systematic activities in order to gain knowledge. A person who makes use of scientific methods is also a scientist. The person must be an expert in one scientific field. A scientist will study the world, perform experiments, develop theories and write all this in papers (Weingart, 2012). Any person who is interested in the sciences is a scientist. From amateurs to professionals, provided the individual is curious to find out what would happen when he performs an experiment, the person is a scientist. Some of the famous scientists are Charles Darwin, Aristotle, Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton, and Leonardo Da Vinci. These scientists have been widely covered and spoken of in the media. These individuals have excelled in their respective fields. They have experimented and made theory discoveries that are still in use to date. Most of their works have not been…… [Read More]

References

Brossard, D., & Scheufele, D.A. (2013). Science, new media, and the public. Science, 339(6115), 40-41.

Jarman, R., & McClune, B. (2010). Developing students' ability to engage critically with science in the news: identifying elements of the 'media awareness' dimension. The Curriculum Journal, 21(1), 47-64.

Weingart, P. (2012). The lure of the mass media and its repercussions on science The Sciences' Media Connection -- Public Communication and its Repercussions (pp. 17-32): Springer.
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Trends in the Provision of Health Sciences Information Resources

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52990908

Health Sciences Information esources

Ernst & Young (2001) describe the global health sciences marketplace as "a web created by pharmaceutical companies, biotech firms, eHealth companies, hospitals, physicians and other practitioners and medical device manufacturers" to name a few (p.1). This web or library of information is the wave of the future. Health sciences information libraries of the future will not just serve as global resources of health care information, but will rather serve as collaborative and interactive repositories where patients will be able to discover individualized treatment options and health care providers can collaborate on new biotechnological advances and discoveries.

The global health sciences marketplace and libraries are inexorably changing as technology is better enabling corporations, individuals and providers to provide services in new and faster ways. Trends developing within the industry that will affect health sciences libraries include providing health products and services that are delivered "Through integrated alliances"…… [Read More]

References:

Aday, L.A., Begley, C.E., Lairson, D.R. & Slater, C.H. (1993). Evaluating the medical care system: Effectiveness, efficiency, and equity. Ann Arbor: Health Administration Press.

Anton, P.S., Schneider, J. & Silberglitt, R. (2001). The global technology revolution:

Bio/Nano/Materials trends and their synergies with information technology. Santa Monica: Rand.

Brook, R.H., Damber, C. & Ker, E.A. (1998). Health information systems: Design issues and analytic applications. Santa Monica: Rand.
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Bipolar Student in Math and Science Class

Words: 2846 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22507836

ability of a bipolar student to learn concepts in the subjects of Math and Science in the general classroom setting

According to sources retrieved from the American Medical Journal, bipolar disorder refers to the psychiatric diagnosis for a mood disorder. Individuals who suffer from bipolar disorder undergo various symptoms such as experiencing episodes of a frenzied state whose medical term is mania (or hypomania). This medical condition typically alternates with episodes of depression. Doctor Annabel Hathaway, a senior psychologist at the University of Stanford, children suffering from bipolar disorders have high intelligence quotient and commendable talents. However, they may have difficulties in coordinating their reflexes and reaction time. They also experience difficulties making transitions, and they may as well have co-morbid syndromes that that render them anxious, inattentive, distractible, moody, argumentative, and withdrawn. Likewise, bipolar disorders may render such children acute and perfectionist.

Psychologists explain that children with bipolar disorders…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anglada, Tracy The Student with Bipolar Disorder: An Educator's Guide BP Children Organization <  http://www.bpchildren.org/files/Download/Educator.pdf >

Child & Adolescent Bipolar Foundation Educating the Child with Bipolar Disorder State: Arizona Department of Education

Grier, Elizabeth Chesno, Wilkins, Megan L. And Carolyn Ann Stirling Pender Bipolar Disorder: Educational Implications for Secondary Students Michigan: University of Michigan Press

The Balanced Mind Foundation An Educator's Guide to Pediatric Bipolar Disorder < http://www.thebalancedmind.org/learn/library/an-educators-guide-to-pediatric-bipolar-disorder>
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True Are Claims That the Medical Profession

Words: 2593 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58457062

True Are Claims that the Medical Profession Exercises Undue Dominance Over Health Professionals and Patients?

The objective of this study is to answer the question of how true the claims are that the Medical Profession exercises undue dominance over health professionals and patients? Toward this end, this study will conduct a review of literature in this area of inquiry. ) According to the work of Willis, et al. (2008) the rationale that doctors use for the maintenance of autonomy and control over their working conditions is derived in part from "the importance our society attributes to the relationship between the doctor and their patient. This is referred to as the patient-practitioner relationships." (Willis, et al., 2008) Stated to be an important part of the role of the doctor is the "obligation to provide the best available evidence-based care for patients." (Willis, et al., 2008) This has been termed as 'personalized…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bahnisch, M. (2012) Medical Dominance and the Continuing Robustness of Professional Cultures in Healthcare. CMEDRS/DME Research Rap. 7 Aug 2012. Retrieved from:  http://www.slideshare.net/mbahnisch/bahnisch-research-rap-070812 

Crinson (2008) Concepts of Health and Illness: Section 2: Sociological Conceptualization of Medical Knowledge and Power. Health Knowledge. Retrieved from:  http://www.healthknowledge.org.uk/public-health-textbook/medical-sociology-policy-economics/4a-concepts-health-illness/section2 

D. Armstrong, 'The Decline of the Medical Hegemony: A Review of Movement Reports During the NHS', Social Science, and Medicine, vol. 10, nos 3-4 (March-April 1976), pp. 157-63.

Henly and S. Harrison, 'Lines of Accountability', Health and Social Services Journal 22 April 1982), pp. 506-8.
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Popular Science An Understand of

Words: 1491 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71268415

The political implications of this article are enormous, including international relations to come up with worldwide emissions agreements, economic reform in regards to the businesses that continue to use carbon-emitting practices, and legislation that will limit the abilities of businesses. This article is written from the point-of-view, therefore, of someone who has been monitoring this situation for quite some time, and who is concerned about global warming's impact on earth. In addition, this person writes from the political point-of-view, having a great deal of knowledge about how the problem can be solved politically. The scientific conclusion that global warming is a time-sensitive problem is unique, but not valid, while the idea of 350 is based on a new study, so its accurateness cannot be confirmed. McKibben, however, does not suggest this. Instead, he relies on the number, 350, as solid fact, without admitting that it may not be correct. Thus,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Allen, Laura. (2008, December 19). The Other Big Meltdown. Retrieved December 20, 2008 at http://www.popsci.com/environment/article/2008-12/other-big-meltdown

Cyr, Christine. (2008, December 11). Flying High on Biofuels. Retrieved December, 20

2008, at http://www.popsci.com/military-aviation-amp-space/article/2008-12/flying-high-biofuels

McKIbben, Bill. (2008, November/December). The Most Important Number on Earth.
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University of Michigan Life Sciences

Words: 1305 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75922269



Tis is not to say owever, tat all classical music is sooting and terapeutic. In fact, te majority of traditional classical music are not terapeutic because tis is not te intent of te original masters. Concertos by Beetoven, Bac and Brams for example all focus on arousing strong emotion rater tan arnessing te power of strong terapy, terefore te pysical presence and rytmic are not necessarily terapeutic. Mozart's no. 23 owever, is an ideal example of terapeutic music. Tis is because te affects of entrainment is easily observed troug studies on te affect of tis music on oters. Wile listening to te music, people say tat it "relaxed and sooted," upon monitoring wit medical equipment it is observed tat te music lowered bot teir blood pressure and eart rates. Te reason is tat Mozart's concerto affects individuals in bot a psycological and pysical sense. Wile te classical music made people…… [Read More]

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/387632.stm.

Vanasco, Jennifer. American classical music: Exploring roots, reflections. Jan.

1998. Chicago Chronicle. 3 Feb. 2007  http://chronicle.uchicago.edu/980108/musymp.shtml .
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Obligations Science Has Towards Society

Words: 2136 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6661935

(the ole of Science and Technology in Society and Governance, 1998) the most important thing to do is to redefine the role of science for the society and governance.

Looking at the relationship

Science does change society as much as society influences science. In the last century there were tremendous progress in scientific invention and discoveries. The vast expansion both in terms of facilities and information has affected the society to a great extent. The unfortunate part of the advancement is that science benefits the affluent, the corporate and the powers that be. While the changes in the society like medical advancements were brought about by science, they are still available to the affluent, but even insurance is not available to the poor. (Crow, 2001, p. B20)

The role of science and scientists, the thinkers of today is to figure out how they can stream line their progress so as…… [Read More]

References

Crow, Michael M. 2001. Harnessing Science to Benefit Society. The Chronicle Review

B20.

Ross, Andrew. 1996. Science Wars. Duke University Press. Durham, NC.

Gruss, Peter. 2005. History of Science Particular Ethical and Moral Obligation. [Online] Available at http://www.mpg.de/english/illustrationsDocumentation/multimedia/mpResearch/2005/heft03/3_05MPR_66_67_pdf.pdf
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Nature of Science Even in

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97594194

Smith notes that it may be impossible to unequivocally prove something with one hundred percent accuracy; rather, scientists seek probability.

The term theory is often misconstrued: Smith states that "theories always explain facts." Moreover, there is no clear demarcation between a theory and a hypothesis. Theories are basically broad hypotheses. Laws, on the other hand, are more restrictive and are often derived from theories. The practice of science entails experimentation as well as presentation to the scientific community. When the research is presented to other scientists, it is usually done so through peer-reviewed journals. Often other scientists will critique and critically evaluate the scientific experiment and attempt to replicate it. When the experiment has been replicated the hypothesis may become part of the canon of established science and from there, common knowledge.

Because science can only deal with what is observable and measurable, it can not apply to philosophy, aesthetics,…… [Read More]

Reference

Smith, David. "The Nature of Science."
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Magic Johnson and HIV Science Knows That

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88093176

Magic Johnson and HIV

Science knows that although HIV can transition into AIDS, it does not automatically become AIDS. Magic Johnson, new president of the Los Angeles Dodgers and a member of the NBA Hall of Fame, was diagnosed with HIV several years ago. One of the immediate responses from Magic Johnson's body (with HIV) was the weakening of his immune system, which made him -- and makes all HIV-positive patients -- susceptible to the following infections and cancers:

Tuberculosis: an infectious disease "caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis" (Medical News Today).

Salmonellosis Enterocolitis: a very common kind of food poisoning that causes severe dehydration (NCBI)

Cytomegalovirus (CMV): this is a virus infection from a "member of the herpesvirus family" (Medline Plus).

Candidiasis: an infection of the mouth and tongue (Mayo Clinic).

Cryptococcal meningitis: this is an inflammation of those membranes and the fluid that is found around the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aidsinfonet.org. Fact Sheet 801: "Vitamins and Minerals." Retrieved June 23, 2012, from http://www.aidsinfonet.org/fact_sheets/view.801. 2012.

Cancer.org. "Kaposi Sarcoma: What is Kaposi Sarcoma?" Retrieved June 23, 2012, from http://www.cancer.org. 2009.

Mayo Clinic. "HIV / AIDS" Retrieved June 23, 2012, from http://www.mayoclinic.com. 2011.

Medical News Today. "What is Tuberculosis? What Causes Tuberculosis?" Retrieved June 24,
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Biological Science in Dr William

Words: 1574 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20995207

Often, bones have different shapes and/or sizes depending on whether they belonged to a male or female individual, and age also plays an important factor in the way bones look (Maples, 142). hereas doctors usually specialize in a certain branch of medicine, as in pediatrics or gerontology, forensic anthropologists must retain a broad range of knowledge because they might be called in to identify bones or other remains from any individual of any age or pathology. If they only knew a small portion of the type of details that could aid them in such identification, that particular forensic anthropologist's usefulness would be severely limited. Throughout his book, Dr. Maples demonstrates quite clearly how vital it is that observation, research, and learning continue throughout one's career as a forensic anthropologist, especially in the area of biology. As medical and biological knowledge grows, the forensic anthropologist must stay up-to-date or run the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Maples, William R. Dead Men Do Tell Tales. New York: Random House: 1994.
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Health Science

Words: 1690 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44181244

Health Sciences

hen I think about the challenges of the health profession in the 21st century, a very direct quote from former Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala and Linda Bolton, Head of Nursing at Cedars Mt. Sinai Medical Center comes to mind:

The image that people often have of nurses as acute care handmaidens…. Is so out of date and inaccurate that it may impede the nation's ability to harness the expertise and vision of these professionals in ways that can produce the needed improvements in the quality of health care…. The evidence is clear that we must shift our focus to the care that individuals and populations need to improve and protect their health, whether it means changing the way nurses are educated or addressing the interprofessional competition that results in resistance to the full utilization of nurses (Mason, et.al., 2011, 401).

This may seem a bit…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED & CONSULTED

Adams, L. (2007). Nursing academic administration: who will take on the challenge?

Journal of Professional Nursing. 23 (5): 309-15.

American Organization of Nurse Executives. (2005). AONE Nurse Executive Competencies. The Nurse Leader. 3 (2): 15-21

Ashcraft, A., et.al. (2007). Time requirements for implementation of the course facilitator role. Journal of Nursing Education. 46 (7): 334-8.
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Radiation Therapy Medical Dissymmetry My Program

Words: 329 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62516865

My education consists of a Bachelors degree in Radiological Science, I also maintain a high grade point average (gpa), and pride myself on the care given to my study and work history.

Although I already have a bachelors degree in the field of radiology, that is not enough. I wish to obtain a higher understanding of the subject matter, addition hands on experience, and the opportunity to use all the resources that will be afforded to me by continuing education to a higher level. I realize the need to continue in education if I want to work in the medical field working more extensively within the realm of radiology. Thank you in advance for the opportunity to express my desire in the field of radiology and what I hope to do upon being given the opportunity to continue at the graduate level.… [Read More]

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VA Medical Center Quality Improvement at the

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8797953

VA Medical Center

Quality Improvement at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center

The Philadelphia Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center is in the process of improving their quality of care for patients. The VA Medical Center provides care to veterans of the United States military and their families. The Philadelphia VA Medical Center has a list for quality improvements; of which one of the main objectives for improvement is customer service. In this paper I will discuss a plan for increasing customer service at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center.

ecent studies have shown that in the last five years there is an increase in the number of patients being treated by the VA Medical Centers in the U.S. (Ashish et. al., 2006). Clinicians are treating more patients with no additional help; this is could be contributing factor to the decrease in customer service. A higher level of customer service requires dedication from…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, E.W., Fornell, C. & Rust, R.T. (1997). Customer satisfaction, productivity, and profitability: differences between goods and services. Marketing Sciences. 16 (2) 129-145

Ashish et. al. (2006). Overall outpatient satisfaction and its components: perceived changes at the Huntington VA Medical Center over five years. Hospital Topics. 84 (4) 33-36.

Berta, D. (2003). Keeping employees happy pays off. Nation's Restaurant News. 37 (51) 25.

ISO. (2010). Iso 9001-what does it mean in the supply chain? Retrieved from http://www.iso.org/iso/9001supchain
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Live Without Science The Vast Improvements in

Words: 771 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20606578

Live Without Science?

The vast improvements in the quality of life modern humankind has been experiencing are due in large part to the developments and innovations in science. These are not only confined to one or two branches of science but all branches thereof have made significant contributions. Whether it is in the biological, physical, technological, medical or other science, each branch has provided breakthroughs that resulted in having a better life for each of us. For instance, "new technological advances lead to new scientific discoveries [such as] developing DNA copying and sequencing technologies [that] led to important breakthroughs (University of California Museum of Paleontology et al., 2011). Diseases that used to be dreaded in the past and caused several deaths are now curable because of our knowledge in DNA technology.

On the personal level, science has tremendously improved how I live my everyday life. Technology for that matter enabled…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Jessa, T. (2011, February 4). Importance of science. Universe Today. Retrieved June 3, 2011 from  http://www.universetoday.com/83736/importance-of-science/ 

University of California Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley, and the Regents of the University of California. (2011). Benefits of science. Retrieved June 3, 2011 from  http://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/0_0_0/howscienceworks_18 

Wagner, W. (2007). Vernacular science knowledge: its role in everyday life communication. Public Understanding of Science, 16 (1): 7-22. Retrieved June 3, 2011 from  http://www.brown.uk.com/brownlibrary/wagner.pdf
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Non-Science Class Having Known Most

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87039311

A Balinese gamelan ensemble from Los Angeles comprised of half Western and half Balinese musicians took my breath away but to analyze the show proved to be the most difficult class assignment the entire semester. For a student accustomed to listening to mainstream rock and pop, anything outside of a four/four meter sounded jarring. Trying to wrap my head around the complex rhythmic structure and near lack of melody made my brain feel like it was melting more than any biochemistry class came close to doing.

Western classical music concert piqued my interest in an art form I formerly felt was reserved mainly for seniors and snobs. Performing pieces by Beethoven, the orchestra included a grand piano and the deftness with which the pianist swept her fingers across the keys made me realize how all professions demand patience, careful repetition, and perfect practice. Even a creative art like music demands…… [Read More]

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Technology as Compared to Science

Words: 868 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38169119


Many things we take for granted in modern life are the result of the
Industrial Revolution. We no longer have to sew our own clothes, make
everything we eat from scratch, and we have access to a greater array of
cheap consumer goods. People no longer have to work from sundown to sunup,
farming for food, sewing, weaving, and fighting to stay alive. We now have
greater leisure time, but also the things we produce during our work life
are no longer our 'own,' in contrast to an agrarian societies where people
own the food they produce on their lands, and make only the clothing and
things they need to survive. We receive wages for the goods and services we
provide to strangers. Instead, what we do at work is often very different
than how we pursue in our private lives-one reason that the Industrial
Revolution is often said to…… [Read More]

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Nursing Science the Nursing Profession

Words: 2643 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30541149

As such, a nurse is primarily to recognize herself as an individual in the world, with certain responses to this world. When a patient enters the hospital, such a patient is also to be seen as a unique individual who responds to the world and his or her environment in a certain way.

Humanistic nursing is then primarily experiential rather than experimental. This means that new knowledge is gained with every new patient that arrives for treatment. In giving treatment, responses are observed and noted for future reference in similar situations. It is not however assumed that a treatment will work because it did in the past and in similar conditions. Instead, hypotheses are based upon experiences of the past. The recognition that hypotheses may prove incorrect helps the nurse to be open to new experiences. Each human being is then seen as a "world," as it were, with the…… [Read More]

Sources

Cody, William K. & Kenney, Janet W. (2006). Philosophical and Theoretical Perspectives for Advanced Nursing Practice. Jones & Bartlett.

Collaboration for Academic Education in Nursing. (2009). Foundational Perspectives. http://www.caen.ca/content/view/46/133/

Current Nursing (2009, March 16). Nursing Theories. http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/development_of_nursing_theories.htm

Kleinman, Susan (2009). Humanistic Nursing Theory.  http://www.humanistic-nursing.com/faq.htm
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Social Sciences There Are Many Fields of

Words: 742 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46729146

Social Sciences

There are many fields of study that fall under the umbrella of the social sciences. Sociology is usually the first thing that comes to mind when the term is mentioned, but there are several other fields of study under social sciences. A person studying in this field could also study such things as anthropology, history, archeology, and geography to name a few. Since studying in these fields generally does not command the large salaries as say a degree in computer programming or finance might, many wonder why someone would study in any field under the social sciences umbrella.

Even though studying in this field may not seem like a guarantee to a fast track career with a large paycheck, the social sciences offers a broad range of knowledge that can be used in almost any career field. A degree in the social sciences helps the student become a…… [Read More]

References

Gabbo, F. (2009). On metaphors, everyday diversity and intercultural education: Some further reflections. Intercultural Education, 20(4), 321-332.

Groeneveld, P.W., Heidenreich, P.A., Garber, A.M. (2005). Trends in implantable cardioverter-

defibrillator racial disparity. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 45(1), 72-

78.
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Art and Science of Nursing

Words: 997 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38883825

Art & Science of Nursing

Since its very inception, there has been a conflict within the nursing profession about its status as to whether it is a science or an art. This is due to the fact that the profession of nursing includes within its tradition both scientific and artistic aspects.

The opposition between science and art has existed from the beginning of modern nursing. Nightingale championed the view of nursing as a moral art, while Fenwick argued for registration and insisted that nursing was an independent profession allied with science and technology.

(Le Vasseur J. 1999)

On the one hand, nursing viewed as a science implies objectivity and distance while on the other hand it can be seen as an art form which implies subjectivity and detachment. There has been considerable debate about these two apparently opposing points-of-view, as well as attempts to find areas of consensus between the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Glazer, S. (2000, Summer). Postmodern Nursing. Public Interest,, 3. Retrieved February 13, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Johnstone, M. (Ed.). (1999). Bioethics: A Nursing Perspective. Sydney, N.S.W.: Harcourt Saunders.

Le Vasseur J. (1999) Toward an Understanding of Art in Nursing. Advances in Nursing Science; 6/1/1999

Raingruber, B. (2003). Nurture: The Fundamental Significance of Relationship as a Paradigm for Mental Health Nursing. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 39(3), 104+. Retrieved February 13, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.
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New Tech in the Imaging Health Profession

Words: 1161 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42101808

Medical Technology

Medical Imaging Technology in an information driven world

Technology and technology applications in the medical fields are proliferating faster than proverbial rabbits. The advances in digital transmission of data, together with application of MI technology and micro circuitry have created opportunities for the medical profession to gain more accurate information, analysis, and prognoses than ever before. MI machines produce images which are clearer, and virtually three dimensional for the medical staff to use to accumulate diagnostic information. In previous decades, developing the talents to read imaging devices was included in part of broader-based medical disciplines. But today, universities have advanced BS and MS degrees in medical imaging technology.

Like any new field, the perspective value and the actual value brought to the medical field can differ. Increasing technology is not solely a problem for medical community to solve, nor the salvation of the entire field. Technology is a…… [Read More]

Resources

Cassell, E. (1993) "The Sorcerer's Broom: Medicine's Rampant Technology," Hastings Center Report 23, no. 6 32-39. Adapted from The John and Roma Rouse Lecture for Human Values, The Mayo Clinic, 12 December 1990.

Crosby, O. New and emerging occupations: something old, something new, something better... perhaps something for you. Here's how new occupations develop.

(2002, Sept 22) Occupational Outlook Quarterly

Analytical and Diagnostic Sciences. (2003). College of Applied Sciences. Retrieved 16 Nov 2003. from University of Cincinatti web site: http://www.cahs.uc.edu/departments/AMIT.cfm