Mental Illness Essays (Examples)

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Differentiating Between Schizophrenia Dissociative Identity and Bipolar Disorder

Words: 917 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72656746

Differences between The Mental Illnesses
The challenge of near-similar presentation of symptoms between schizophrenia, dissociative identity, and bipolar disorder has led to many cases of misdiagnosis. This warrants the need to differentiate the three illnesses as a way of limiting the recurrence of misdiagnosis challenge. Bipolar disorder is a common mental infirmity characterized by alternating mood depressions and mania for several months or even weeks. Maniacs exhibit high levels of energy and hyperactivity associated with restlessness (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Such individuals have an irrational belief of accomplishing huge workloads in a short time. Moreover, the commit themselves to different projects although none can be accomplished. Those around the patients will notice that they are always on the move and have many things to say. Lastly, they do not sleep much because of the depressive and manic mood that leaves them feeling sad.
Contrastingly, schizophrenia is a mental illness where…… [Read More]

References
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
Corbiere, M., Samson, E., Villotti, P., & Pelletier, J. F. (2012). Strategies to fight stigma toward people with mental disorders: perspectives from different stakeholders. The Scientific World Journal, 2012. From  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3475300/ 
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Mental Retardation This Work Examines

Words: 6188 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58210378

Jones relates that statement of Corrigan: "Our work suggests that the biggest factor changing stigma is contact between people with mental illness and the rest of the population. The public needs to understand that many people with mental illness are functioning, fully contributing members of society." (Jones, 2006) Jones states that "the social cost of stigma associated with mental illness is high because it translates into huge numbers of people with treatable mental illness not getting help." Jones relates the fact that the National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) is a group of advocates that works toward fighting the "inaccurate, hurtful representations of mental illness" that are found in the media. Jang (2002) states that the National Health Law Program has a priority to access of healthcare. In fact, the Executive Order (EO 13166) was focused toward the implementation of guidelines in overcoming the language barriers. Jang states that LEP…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, S.K. & Middleton, V.A.

Explorations in privilege, oppression and DiversityBrooks Cole 2005. ISBN0-534-51742-0

Barber, J.G. (1995). Politically progressive casework. Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 76(1), 30-37.

Children Who Can't Pay Attention/ADHD (2004) Facts for Families. Academy of child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Online available at http://www.aacap.org/page.ww?section=Facts+for+Families&name=Children+Who+Can%27t+Pay+Attention%2FADHD
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Mental Health Nearly 40 of

Words: 2015 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30551883

New findings show that the spouses of veterans also experience mental health disorders, and the prevalence increases with the length of deployment (Mansfield, Kaufman, Marshall, Gaynes, Morrissey & Engel, 2010). When spouses are considered to be clients of health services, the need for improved and more robust resources becomes apparent. Moreover, spouses with mental health disorders present unique issues and questions for treatment. eturning soldiers may find that they have supportive partners who can lead to a mutually beneficial treatment relationship, via couples or family therapy. On the other hand, the mental health problems of the spouse can exacerbate those of the soldier, and vice-versa. Thus, a family systems approach can be extremely helpful when addressing the multifaceted mental health concerns among veterans.

Veteran health services are at a critical juncture. The need for targeted mental health interventions, ranging from screenings and assessments to therapies and treatments, has been proven…… [Read More]

References

Britt, T.W., Greene-Shortridge, T.M. & Castro, C.A. (2007). The Stigma of Mental Health Problems in the Military. Military Medicine 172(2), February 2007, pp. 157-161(5)

Bliese, P.D., Wright, K.M., Adler, a.B., Thomas, J.L. & Hoge, C.W. (2007). Timing of postcombat mental health assessments. Psychological Services 4(3), Aug 2007, 141-148.

Hoge, C.W., Auchterlonie, J.L. & Milliken, C.S. (2006). Mental Health Problems, Use of Mental Health Services, and Attrition From Military Service After Returning From Deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. JAMA. 2006;295(9):1023-1032. doi:10.1001/jama.295.9.1023.

Hoge, C.W., Castro, C.A., Messer, S.C., McGurk, D., Cotting, D.I. & Koffman, R.L. (2004). Combat Duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, Mental Health Problems, and Barriers to Care. N Engl J. Med 2004; 351:13-22July 1, 2004 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa040603
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Mental Health Counseling and Research

Words: 3990 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65935118

However, more empirical studies have been published in recent years which have both reported outcomes but also have acknowledged the complexity of the interaction of the number of variables involved in predicting outcome effects on children whose parents are substance abusers (Dworkin & Hirsch, 2004). This literature is particularly important because of the large number of children affected by substance abuse of various kinds and the social policy directed toward substance abuse offenders including parents.

Although the empirical research base is growing on the relationship of parental disability to child outcome effects (Emerick & Zirpoli, 2000) there continues to be a need for research that methodologically addresses specific critical parental disability factors.

Implementing Culturally Sensitive Crisis

In conclusion, when faced with an individual who is recognizably from a culture different from the crisis worker, some modification in approach will be considered. However, there is sufficient cultural diversity present in our…… [Read More]

References

Colangelo, N. (2007). Counseling gifted students: Issues and practices. In N. Colangelo and G.A. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of Gifted Education (2nd ed.), (pp. 353-381). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Colangelo, N., & Assouline, a. (1993). Families of gifted children. A research agenda. Quest, 4, 1-4.

Dworkin, M., & Hirsch, G. (2004). Responding to managed care: A roadmap for the therapist. Psychotherapy in Private Practice, 13, 1-21.

Emerick, L., & Zirpoli, T. (2000). Different concerns, different needs? Perceptions of gifted children and parents of children with disabilities. Paper presented at the conference of the American Association of Gifted and Talented, Little Rock, AR.
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Mental Status Examination Involves an

Words: 680 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73004742

Additionally, the questioner should know that some mood disorders can present themselves somatically: someone who is anxious may have a racing pulse, and someone who is depressed may have difficulty sleeping, eating, or engaging in basic self-care.

Perception

Aspects of the client's presentation to consider when evaluating his or her perception may include orientation (knowing where he or she is), alertness, coherence and ability to concentrate. ecall can be tested by asking questions about the date, who is president, etcetera; concentration can be tested by using a Digit Span test -- asking the client to count backwards from 100 to 50 by 7s or 3s (Niolin 2000). Noting the presence of delusions or hallucinations, gaining a rough estimate of the client's intellectual ability, thought processes, and judgment (ability to understand why he or she is being assessed), and assessing his or her ability to engage in abstraction (such as understanding…… [Read More]

Reference

Niolin. (2000). The mental status examination. Psych Page. Retrieved January 20, 2010 at  http://www.psychpage.com/learning/library/assess/mse.htm
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Mental Health Illness the Ability

Words: 1546 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28829089

This creates a nerve with the client that their private information is going to be unprotected and confidentiality is going to be broken . There is no safe way to keep all information private. However, all mental health professionals must take all necessary precautions to keep client information private .

Conclusion

As you look around the mall, classroom, church, family history, friend's family, or place of employment, you're sure to know someone with a mental illness, or someone who might of attempted suicide . Assessing and treating these disorders is essential in the mental health field, more trained mental health professionals are needed, more agencies, and more funding . Otherwise if society keeps assuming that the mind and brain are separate and that mental disorders are " different" or " bad" misunderstanding, mistreatment, and stigma will persist in this society . We need to stop seeing individuals with mental health…… [Read More]

Reference

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (Revised 4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

American Association of Suicidology. ( 2006, February), U.S.A. suicide: 2003 official final data. Retrieved March 19, 2010, from http:/ / www.suiciodology.org.

Bonner, L. ( 2001). Rethinking suicide prevention and manipulative behavior in corrections. Jail Suicide Mental Health Update, 10(4), 7-8.

Bonner, L. (2006) . Stressful segregation housing in psychosocial vulnerability in prison suicide. Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior, 36,250-254.
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Mental Health Problems Form a Larger Percentage

Words: 1554 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95566064

Mental health problems form a larger percentage of disability in developed countries more than other group of illnesses. Mental illness is exhibited by sustained and alterations in normal thinking, mood or behavior that is dominated with distress and impaired functioning CDC., 2012.

Care for mentally ill adults in communities is one of the biggest challenges in mental healthcare. Subsequently, the challenges are further compounded by the nature of intervention measures that are customized to manage, treat, and rehabilitate the condition of the mentally ill adults. It has been established that community care intervention programs have the potential of offering a wide array of services to mentally ill patients around the clock and this has led to the reduction in the number of patients being hospitalized. This paper discusses mental health problems in adult population and further proposes intervention measures for the group in a community setting.

Description of the Population…… [Read More]

References

Cattan, M., & Tilford, S. (2009). Mental Health Promotion: A lifespan approach. New York: McGraw-Hill International.

CDC. (2012). Mental Illness Surveillance Among Adults in the United States, from http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6003a1.html

Creek, J., & Lougher, L. (2011). Occupational Therapy and Mental Health. London: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Harkness, J., Newman, S.J., & Salkever, D. (2004). The Cost-Effectiveness of Independent Housing for the Chronically Mentally Ill: . Do Housing and Neighborhood Features Matter Health Services Research 39 (35), 1341-1360.
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Mental Health Counseling Discuss the Role in

Words: 1923 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96482523

Mental Health Counseling

Discuss the role in relationship to the prescription and monitoring of pharmacological treatments for mental health issues.

Unique advances have been achieved in the treatment offered to clients suffering from mental illness. Mental health care providers must understand the original causes of mental health disorders in order to provide treatment to clients with these disorders. Therefore, mental healthcare providers are able to treat disorders associated with mental health. This is being done with much success as physical disorders (Madden, 2008).

The profession of mental health provision has categorized strategies of treating mental health problems as either psychotherapeutic or somatic. Somatic methods of treating mental disorders include therapies such as electroconvulsive therapy, which have the potential of stimulating the brain. Psychotherapeutic method includes behavioral therapy strategies, hypnotherapy, and psychotherapy. esearchers have established that most mental health disorders require treatment strategies that involve both psychotherapy and drugs. This is…… [Read More]

References

Madden, R.G. (2008). Legal issues in social work, counseling, and mental health: Guidelines for clinical practice in psychotherapy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Palmo, A.J., Weikel, W.J., & Borsos, D.P. (2011). Foundations of mental health counseling.

Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.

World Health Organization (2009). Mental health aspects of women's reproductive health: A
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Mental Health Prisoners Usa I've Included Outline

Words: 1860 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83733055

mental health prisoners usa. I've included outline main idea, I apply ideas questions. contact clarifications. I. Introduce define global health issue connection nursing. For, .

Mental Health in the American Prison System

There has always been much controversy regarding prisoners and their mental health, but as civilization has experienced much progress throughout this century people have become more and more concerned about making sure that prisons are able to differentiate between individuals who are mentally ill and persons who are not. Even with the fact that prisons were never design to accommodate the mentally ill, conditions are critical today as a great deal of men and women who are unable to get mental health treatment in the communities they live in are incarcerated consequent to committing an illegality. There are a great deal of people suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or depression in U.S., thus meaning that society needs to…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Austin, W. And Boyd, M.A. (2010). Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing for Canadian Practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Cornwell, D.J. (2009). The Penal Crisis and the Clapham Omnibus: Questions and Answers in Restorative Justice. Waterside Press.

Finkel, M.L. (2010). Public Health in the 21st Century: [Three Volumes]. ABC-CLIO.

Videbeck, S.L. (2010). Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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Mental Patients' Physical Health Who Use Antipsychotic Medication

Words: 13284 Length: 32 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44641264

Antipsychotic Medication and the Physical Health Problems of the Patient With Mental Illness

More and more attention is now being given to the mental disorders especially in U.S. And due to this increase in attention an increase has also been noticed in the treatment of these mental health issues (Zuvekas, 2005). About 30% of the total U.S. population that is between the ages of 18-52 is being affected by mental health issues which make up a large part of the public health problem (Kessler et al., 2005; Narrow et al., 2002). The risk of morbidity and smaller life expectancy is very high in the patients who suffer from the mental health issues (Millar, 2008; Skodol, 2008). It has been observed from numerous researches that the chances of suffering from various health issues such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and hypertension are a lot more for the patients suffering from schizophrenia (Millar,…… [Read More]

References

Robson, D. And Haddad, M. (2012). Mental health nurses' attitudes towards the physical health care of people with severe and enduring mental illness: The development of a measurement tool. International Journal of Nursing Studies 49; 72 -- 83

Rosenberg, S., Goodman, L.A., Osher, F.C., 2001. Prevalence of HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in people with sever mental illness. American Journal of Public Health 91, 31 -- 37.

Ruigomez, A., Rodriguez, L.A.G., Dev, V.J., Arellano, F., Raniwala, J., 2000. Are schizophrenia or antipsychotic drugs a risk factor for cataracts? Epidemiology 11, 620 -- 623.

Ryan, M.C., Thakore, J.H., 2001. Physical consequences of schizophrenia and its treatment: the metabolic syndrome. Life Sciences 71 (3), 239 -- 257.
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Mental-Health Care for Mexican-Americans With

Words: 2607 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98440360

Who lives with you in you household? Quien vive con usted en la casa?

B. Tell me about you family. Cuenteme aceca de su familia

C. What's a typical day like fo you? With you Family? With you fiends? Como pasa Usted el dia? Con su familia? Con sus amigos?

D. Tell me about you fiends Cuenteme sobe sus amigos

E. Who ae the people you can count on the most in time of need?

Quienes son las pesonas con las que puede conta cuando las necesita?

F. Do you belong to goups o oganizations that you feel you get suppot fom? Examples? What kind of suppot?

Petenece an algun gupo u oganizacion que le popociona apoyo?

Pongame algun ejemplo, que tipo de apoyo?

G. How does the family and fiends suppot you and you family?

Como le apoya la familiay/o amigos a usted y su familia?

Language

Idioma (About…… [Read More]

references for mental health treatment for relative's name)

Que tratamientos para la salud mental prefiere que reciba su familiar?

B. Before taking (relative's name) to the hospital, what did you think about mental health treatment?

Antes de traer a su familiar al hospital, que opinaba usted de los tratamientos de salud mental?

Were you familiar with mental health treatment?
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Mental Health Court Study the

Words: 2549 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1040849



Nonetheless, people who received some level of ACRP intervention had a lower rate of criminal recidivism than people who received no intervention at all.

System Flow

The study found that the case flow through the ACRP was a little slow. The amount of time between the Initial Opt-In Hearing and the Formal Opt-In Hearing averaged 74 days. While there are no hard and fast rules governing how long this process should take, the study found that that "the ACRP is performing rather well on the front-end of the admissions process (up to the initial opt-in stage) but that more could be done to work on the back end (time between the Initial Opt-In Hearing and the Formal Opt-In Hearing)."

Status Hearings

The study found that the incentives and sanctions used by ACRP judges to promote compliance at status hearings, though standardized, were not tailored to correspond to participant progress.

Also,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Outcomes from the Last Frontier: An Evaluation of the Anchorage Mental Health Court (Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, Ferguson-Hornby-Zeller, 2008).

Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses: The Essential Elements of a Mental Health Court (Thompson, Osher, Tomasini-Joshi, 2008).

Mental Health Courts: Decriminalizing the Mentally Ill. (Irwin Law, Schneider-Hyman-Bloom, 2007).

Mental Health Courts. (Wiley Encyclopedia of Forensic Science, Schneider, 2009).
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Mental Health and Poor Mental Health Explain

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32821915

mental health and poor mental health. Explain two ways your own culture influences your definitions of mental health. Then explain how your definition of mental health might differ from that of your selected culture. Finally, describe a behavior that is considered normal in your culture but would be considered abnormal in the culture you selected.

Defining mental health: Japan vs. The United States

Even within a culture, the definition of what constitutes 'sanity' or 'insanity' can be extremely controversial. Where to draw the line between eccentricity and quirkiness vs. full-blown mental illness? In Western culture, definitions of mental illness have changed over time. For example, during the 19th century, a woman who did not want to get married and have sex outside of marriage might be considered deranged. Today, being gay is not considered a mental illness, but less than 50 years ago homosexuality was officially classified as an abnormality.…… [Read More]

Given the subjective nature of mental illness, it is not surprising that every culture has a different definition of what constitutes deviancy. In Japan, for example, a new mental disorder has been identified called "hikikomori," meaning "pulling in" or "withdrawal" (Grisafe 2012) Hikikomori usually affects young men who "withdraw entirely from society and stay in their own homes for more than six months, with onset by the latter half of their twenties, and for whom other psychiatric disorders do not better explain the primary causes of this condition" (Grisafe 2012). Most of these young men are middle-class and come from households able to support them financially. The young men spend their days watching television, playing video games, and pursing other activities that do not require social interaction. While some have reported self-destructive behavior like 'cutting' or obsessive-compulsive cleaning, their most distinguishing feature is their complete social isolation.

One of the causes of hikikomori is thought to be the famously rigid Japanese social system. If a young person does not get into a good school and find a good job immediately upon graduation, few opportunities are available for him or for her. While women have the possibility of marriage, men have little else to look forward to, given that society regards them as a 'failure.' The condition was first identified during Japan's great recession in the 1990s, when the formerly stable, booming economy began to unravel.

Of course, the phenomenon of young people struggling to find work after graduation is not confined to Japan. In the wake of the recession of 2008, many young American graduates were forced to return home. "The number of young adults ages 20 to 34 who lived with their parents jumped from 17% in 1980 to 24% in 2007-09" (Nasser 2012). Young male returnees are also reported to have fewer domestic demands placed upon them by their parents, such as cooking and cleaning (Nasser 2012). However, the sense of complete emotional stasis and failure that afflicted the Japanese men is not characteristic of American graduates enough to be regarded as a mental illness. Although some graduates undeniably experience depression and frustration, the fact that society in America takes a more permissive view of taking time to 'find one's feet' after graduation likely has a more positive emotional impact upon graduates unable to be financially independent. Also, in contrast to Japan, American colleges tend to be prohibitively expensive, and the need to alleviate their debt burden forces many young graduates to take some kind of a job (and therefore, to leave the house), in contrast
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Mental health problems experienced by college'students

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19172867

American Healthcare
One of the key healthcare issues in America as well as globally is mental health. The news article by Rinker (2017) in Kaiser News Health delineates the mental health problems experienced by college students. Based on the article, when students begin their life in college, several of them come to experience anxieties, face a difficult time to adjust to life in college, and possibly plunge into austere depression or self-destructive feelings and points of view. Owing to this issue, the Chancellor of UCLA, Gene Block, proclaimed that the college is offering charitable mental health screenings to all students entering the school including transfer students and the freshmen students. In acknowledgement of the stress that income students face as they begin their college life, UCLA purposes to screen for depression to aid in ensuring that all students are mentally healthy. The institution will also screen for traits associated with…… [Read More]

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Mental Health and Addiction

Words: 2699 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64549580

ecovery can be a difficult journey for many. The reality of having to change old habits for new ones can take a lifetime. The recovery approach/model realizes the struggle of change and transformation and makes it so that way emphasis is not placed on the destination, but rather the journey. Although other approaches like the disease/medical model aim to treat one aspect of recovery from addiction, the recovery model encompasses all aspects making it one of the most advantageous models to adopt to fight addiction.

The recovery approach/model to addiction and/or mental disorder places a strong emphasis on a support for an individual's potential for recovery. ecovery means a person undergoing a personal journey instead of determining and setting an outcome. This personal journey involves the development of hope, a sense of self, a secure base, social inclusion, meaning, empowerment, and coping skills that will take that person past the…… [Read More]

References

Barker, P. & Buchanan-Barker, P. (2012). Tidal Model of Mental Health Nursing. Currentnursing.com. Retrieved 24 July 2016, from  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Tidal_Model.html 

Best, D. & Lubman, D. (2012). The recovery paradigm - a model of hope and change for alcohol and drug addiction. Aust Fam Physician., 41(8), 593.

Hall, W., Carter, A., & Forlini, C. (2015). The brain disease model of addiction: is it supported by the evidence and has it delivered on its promises?. The Lancet Psychiatry, 2(1), 105-110. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s2215-0366(14)00126-6

Hammer, R., Dingel, M., Ostergren, J., Partridge, B., McCormick, J., & Koenig, B. (2013). Addiction: Current Criticism of the Brain Disease Paradigm. AJOB Neuroscience, 4(3), 27-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21507740.2013.796328
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Community Mental Health Service Program

Words: 2418 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32797947

Mental Disorders

Mental health services for adults and children in Florida are commonly provided by community health facilities and agencies. The use of community health agencies and facilities is providing these services are fueled by the need for an intensive care level to address the increase and impact of mental disorders. Florida State has embraced a framework of directive principles of care as the foundation for providing mental health services to adults and children. However, this framework has been insufficient to effectively deal with mental disorders for children in Jacksonville, Florida. Based on recent statistics, over 20% of children and young people experience the signs and symptoms of these illnesses during the course of a year (Goldhagen, 2006). A comprehensive, integrated community mental health service program is a suitable community-based approach this problem in Jacksonville, Florida.

Description of the Population

Mental disorders have developed to become a major health problem…… [Read More]

References

Buchanan, D. (2007). Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care. Retrieved from University of Nebraska -- Medical Center website: http://webmedia.unmc.edu/Community/CityMatch/EMCH/062807/DCBHS%202007.ppt

Cohen et. al. (2011). Three Models of Community Mental Health Services in Low-income

Countries. International Journal of Mental Health Systems, 5(3), 1-10. Retrieved from http://www.ijmhs.com/content/pdf/1752-4458-5-3.pdf

Flannery, F., Adams, D. & O'Connor, N. (2011, February). A Community Mental Health Service
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Women and Mental Health in Early 1900's

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5710235

Mental Health

The health of women has been a subject of discussion for many years and it has been emphasized because the health of women is directly related to the health of the child and thus the health of the society (Jacobson, 1993). However, the unfortunate part is that when considering the health of the women, only her physical and reproductive health is given importance and there is no consideration of her mental health that is equally as important as her physical health. All around the world, efforts have increased to make the health conditions of the women better especially since the last decade. Women are now regularly screened for HIV and other diseases that have a vertical pattern of transmission so that the children can be saved from such diseases. Awareness has also increased over the years among the women and they realize that their health, both mental and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Belle, D. Poverty and Women's Mental Health.American Psychologist (1990) 45:385-389.

Jacobson, J. Women's Health: The Price of Poverty. In The Health of Women: A Global Perspective, edited by M. Koblinsky, J. Timyan, and J. Gay, pp. 3-32. Boulder, CO: Westview Press (1993).

Jayarajan, Nishanth; Chandra, Prabha.HIV and Mental Health: An Overview of Research from India. Indian Journal of Psychiatry, September 2010.

WHO.Mental Health Determinants and Populations.Geneva (2000) http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2000/who_msd_mdp_00.1.pdf.
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Discrimination and Mental Health

Words: 1100 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36650564

Mental Health and Stigma

1
Stigma influences the lives of people living with serious mental illnesses in many ways, including via the experience of self-stigma, whereby a person gives intense focus to what others might think about one’s own mental illness, internalizing their conception of the illness (Link, Wells, Phelan & Yang, 2015). Stigma can also come from society, from the workplace, from one’s own family or set of peers, and even from strangers. When an illness is stigmatized in the media, a person who suffers from that illness may feel taboo, ostracized from society, isolated from the “normal” group of people who have normal lives and can function without problem (Corrigan, Druss & Perlick, 2014).

Stigma influences the lives of people living with serious mental illnesses in other ways too. They become afraid to seek medical help because of the fear of being labeled as a person with a…… [Read More]

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Analyzing Mental Health Disorder

Words: 2533 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66967288

Mental Health Disorder

The following is a close examination of the psychosocial status of mental health disorder. There is going to be an examination of the symptoms along with a comprehensive diagnosis of the case.

Mental Health Disorder- Background

Childhood mental health disorder refers to all mental health conditions that affect a person in childhood. The disorder in children is described as critical changes that affect the way a child behaves, learns or even handles emotional situations. Some of the known childhood mental health disorders include (CDC - Child Development, Children's Mental Health -- NCBDDD, n.d):

Hyperactivity disorder/attention deficit disorder (ADHD) (http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/index.html)

Disorders related to behavior

Anxiety and mood disorders

Tourette syndrome

Substance use disorders

Mental health is essential in life. Mental health disorders can persist throughout a person's life (CDC - Child Development, Children's Mental Health -- NCBDDD, n.d). The problem needs to be diagnosed early. Otherwise, children continue…… [Read More]

References

(n.d.). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC - Child Development, Children's Mental Health - NCBDDD. Retrieved February 6, 2016, from http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/mentalhealth.html

Klauck, S. (2006). Genetics of autism spectrum disorder. European Journal of Human Genetics, 14, 714-720. Retrieved February 6, 2016 from http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v14/n6/full/5201610a.html

(n.d.). Medicine Net. Mental Health: Get the Facts on Common Disorders. Retrieved February 6, 2016, from http://www.medicinenet.com/mental_health_psychology/article.htm

(n.d.). MU School of Health Professions. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Case Study. Retrieved February 6, 2016, from  http://shp.missouri.edu/vhct/case4108/case_study.htm
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Mental Retardation Is Generally Understood

Words: 2000 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76150564

They very seldom become fully integrated into society or become independent. (Mental etardation: Free Health Encyclopedia)

6. Conclusion

The is little doubt that mental retardation has an effect on society in general and in terms of care and treatment of the affected person. However, it is also true that with the knowledge and expertise that has been accumulated about mental retardation it is also become more feasible to accommodate the mentally retarded person as a productive member of society.

My perception of the mentally retarded in society is that are less fortunate and that the mentally healthy members of society should help and assist these individuals wherever possible. The research for this paper has made me aware that we often categorize the mentally retarded in a general way without realizing that there are different categories and degrees of retardation. Cognizance should be taken of the fact that many people who…… [Read More]

References. Retrieved June 24, 2008, at http://www.cloudnet.com/~edrbsass/mrdefinitions2.htm

Goldstein, G. And Shapiro B. (2007) Mental Retardation. Retrieved June 24, 2008 at http://www.dana.org/news/brainhealth/detail.aspx?id=9836

Lustig D.C. (1996)

Family adaptation to a young adult with mental retardation. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0825" Journal of Rehabilitation, http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0825/is_n4_v62" Oct-Dec, 1996. Retrieved June 24, 2008 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0825/is_2_65/ai_54924773/pg_1?tag=artBody;col1

Mental Retardation. Retrieved June 24, 2008, at http://www.hmc.psu.edu/childrens/healthinfo/m/mentalretardation.htm
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Mental Rotation of Objects and

Words: 880 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58475510

However, the concept that the shapes depict actually occurs in three dimensions. In two dimensions, the smaller sphere spirals into the depression formed by the larger very quickly; in three dimensions, the planets fall toward one another without spiraling together except over billions of years (Feynman, 1995).

Even more astonishing than having visualized gravity independently, Einstein visualized traveling along on a beam of light in four dimensions that also included the dimension of time, which allowed Einstein to deduce fundamental properties of space, time, and their interaction for the first time in human history. Nearly a century later, what began as visual "thought experiments" in one man's mind continue to be monumentally important in modern science and human history and affairs on earth and beyond earth.

Applications of Three-Dimensional otation in Chemistry and Biology:

The ability to mentally visualize three-dimensional shapes and their movement is also applicable in chemistry and…… [Read More]

References:

Atkins, P. (1995). The Periodic Kingdom: A Journey into the land of the Chemical

Elements. New York: Basic Books.

Feynman, R. (1995). Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most

Brilliant Teacher. New York: Addison Wesley.
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Sickness in Frankenstein Is One

Words: 1583 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99089224

He had built a wall around him that was preventing his normal interaction with people. This was causing real suffering and sickness. "hat then became of me? I know not; I lost sensation, and chains and darkness were the only objects that pressed upon me." (p.168) He loses interest in life even more when his dear ones are killed: "I had formed in my own heart a resolution to pursue my destroyer to death; and this purpose quieted my agony, and provisionally reconciled me to life." (p.169)

Sickness is thus a multifaceted theme in the novel. It serves many purposes. On the one hand, we see it as a force fighting against the evil ambitions of Victor and on the other, it can also be seen as a compassionate force trying to restrain Victor. It is all a matter of perception. Had Frankenstein understood why he was falling ill so…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anne K. Mellor, " Making a "monster": an Introduction to Frankenstein," the Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley, ed. Esther Schor (Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2003)

The Mary Shelley Reader, eds. Betty T. Bennett and Charles E. Robinson (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990)
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Mental Health Ethics

Words: 2831 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98623571

Given this priest is able to coax and created situations where boys are with him alone is even worse. In short, the counselor in this situation has no choice but to step in and say/do something.

To make a final decision, it would normally be wise to do some information gathering and to truly find out for sure whether or not this man has offended or not. However, the only real way to do that is to prod the priest even more and/or to ask the children and/or parents what is going on, if anything, and that would probably not be the best idea, at least in the latter case. Any querying of children would have to be done with the full knowledge and consent of the parents, and this is true both ethically and legally, and even if such permission was not garnered it would get back to them…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, Francesca, and Mark R. Kebbell. "Policing Indecent Images of Children. What Are the Critical Issues Surrounding Police Risk Assessment?." Sexual Abuse in

Australia & New Zealand 5.1 (2013): 52-59. SocINDEX with Full Text. Web. 5

Apr. 2014.

DeYoung, Mary. "The World According to NAMBLA: Accounting for Deviance." Journal
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Metal Health Mental Issue 2226 Mental Health

Words: 3481 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10485560

Metal Health

Mental Issue 2226

Mental Health

esearches indicate that poverty and mental illness are correlated with each other in a broader spectrum. This research paper is commissioned on the basis of two exhaustively researched hypotheses: H1 Poverty can cause mental illness and H2 Mental illness is subjected to poverty. Throughout this research paper, these two hypotheses have been investigated from scholarly academic resources. At the end of the proposed research it has been concluded that those, who are financially deprived, as exposed to severe mental illness due to their inability of fulfilling their basic needs, including house, education, food and employment. Likewise, evidences have also been explored on the fact that metal illness can cause extreme levels of poverty to the suffering beings. This signifies that both the research hypotheses are accepted by the research in the projected domain.

Introduction

For affirming the undertaken pinching social reality, a statement…… [Read More]

References

Alegria, M., Canino, G., Rios, R., Vera, M., Calderon, J., Rusch, D. & Ortega, A. (2002).

Inequalities in Use of Specialty Mental Health Services among Latinos, African-Americans, and Non-Latino Whites. Psychiatric Services 53(12): 1547-1555.

Battle, K., Mendelson, M. & Torjman, S. (2009). Towards a new architecture for Canada's adult benefits. Caledon Institute of Social Policy, June.

Burstein, M. (2005). Combating the social exclusion of at-risk groups. Policy Research
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Welfare Mental Health Problems and

Words: 2491 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61805198

Consistent with this, other findings propose that women are more likely than men to take part in violence in the home whereas men are more likely than women to take part in violence in public places.

Even though there is some evidence that mental illness is associated with violence, it appears that the bigger contributing factor is that of outside influences. Substance abuse appears to be the greatest contributing factor, but it can be something as insignificant as one's living arrangements or even just their gender. Overall people with mental health problems do not appear to be at an increased risk of violence.

References

Appelbaum, P.S., Robbins, P.C., Monahan, J. (2000). Violence and delusions: data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157,

p. 566-572.

Cottle, C. (2004). The role of social context in the prediction and management of violence among persons with mental illness. Dissertation…… [Read More]