Mood Disorders Essays (Examples)

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Mood Disorders
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Mood Disorders
CONSIDER THE CORE DRUG KNOWLEDGE FOR Fluoxetine (Prozac®)

Why is Rita taking fluoxetine?

Rita is currently taking Fluoxetine in response to a psychological evaluation that demonstrates Major Depressive disorder and there is also some evidence of PMDD (Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder). Major depressive disorder as described by the multi-axial system includes the presence of a single episode of the mood disorder, Major Depressive Disorder on the Axis I table as the patient has not reported having such severe episodes prior to this time and the episode is not better explained by any other psychotic disorder nor does she exhibit signs of having mixed episodes including mania or any other psychiatric disorder. It is also clear that Rita's Major Depressive Disorder episode is linked with the melancholic features as a modifier. The criteria for this modifier, experienced by Rita include loss of pleasure in all or most activities coupled with several of the….

Mood Disorders
INTENSE, PERSISTENT, RECURRING

Definition of Mood Disorders

Causes

Risk Groups

Symptoms

Diagnosis and Treatment

Prevention

Proposed Dimensions for DSM5

In a single year, approximately 7% of Americans suffer from mood disorders, seen as depression or mania, likely to turn worse or cause death (Satcher, 2011). It is one of the top 10 causes of disability throughout the world. Mood disorder subjects spouses, children, parents, siblings and friends to frustration, guilt, anger, financial burden and even physical abuse in coping with the person who suffers from it. Depression has damaging effects on the economy in the form of decreased productivity and increased use of healthcare resources. Depression leads to absenteeism or reduces productivity. Depression accounts for the large part of healthcare expenditure. Depressed persons go through expensive diagnostic procedures in search for the cause of their pain. In many cases, they are treated for other complaints while the mood disorder escapes diagnosis and treatment (Satcher).

Mood Disorders

Mood disorders represent….

Mood Disorders
All people experience mood changes. We are happy or sad. We may be overjoyed or in despair, but our reactions are in proportion to the situations we face. In mood disorders, this balance is not present. Moods are extreme. Depression is a sad state where things seem hopeless. Mania is elation or extremely heightened energy. In both states the person's perception of the world is somewhat distorted. Many famous people have had these disorders including Winston Churchill and Eugene O'Neill.

Unipolar depression: is the most common mood disorder, and is more than just a short period of "the blues." Up to 15% of the population may be clinically depressed during any given year.

Symptoms: Emotionally, people with depression feel sad. They may describe themselves as feeling miserable or empty inside. They lose pleasure in thing they used to enjoy, and lose their sense of humor. Depression can also cause agitation, anxiety,….

3). This wide range should be accounted for, and ideally the participants should have similar treatment histories. Too many intervening variables would interfere with the outcome of the research. It would be preferable to select participants who did not represent a wide range of treatment histories. Moreover, the "children's mood disorder diagnoses and their illness severity...also spanned a wide spectrum," (p. 3). Wide spectrums interfere with the accuracy of the research.
Ethical problems also arise in the methods used in the research. Families were chosen because their parents opted to participate in the study, but it is unclear whether or not the children participated of their own accord or because their parents wanted them to. eferrals welcomed participating families who already had children diagnosed with mental disorders. Some of the families had not yet sought treatment but many already had. Therefore, the study limited its population sample to families already….

Depressive or mood disorder is a term that is used to refer to the underlying or longitudinal disorders. Mood disorders are classified into various categories including elevated mood, depressed mood, and moods that swing between mania and depression. The most common types of mood disorders that cycle between mania and depression are bipolar disorders, which were previously known as manic depression. Bipolar I Disorder and Bipolar II Disorder are two different types of mood disorders that are associated with manic episodes or depressive symptoms. These two kinds of mood disorders have several similarities and differences in addition to being relatively difficult to treat effectively.
Similarities and Differences between Bipolar I and Bipolar II

As previously indicated, bipolar I and bipolar II disorders are two kinds of mood disorders that have become common in the recent past. Each of these mood disorders is defined by pattern or manic or depressive episodes, length, and….

Melancholia in Film
Melancholia

Depicting Melancholia in Film: Melancholia

The film Melancholia (2011), directed by Lars von Trier, is a science fiction film about the end of the world viewed through the eyes of a melancholic. The melancholic is Justine, who is played by Kirsten Dunst, and the end of the world is caused by the planet Melancholia crashing into earth. One of the more important relationships in the movie is between Justine and her sister Claire. Throughout most of the film, Justine is in the midst of a depressive episode while Claire acts as a caretaker; however, at the very end of the film the roles of invalid and caretaker are reversed as Claire begins to panic and Justine manages both Claire's and Claire's son's fear in the face of imminent death.

Although there is a prologue that casts a sense of foreboding on the initially happy and joyful wedding reception that….

Background The client in the present scenario is an 8-year-old African American male who presents with signs of depression. Some of the reported symptoms include; feeling of sadness, occasional irritation, and decreased appetite. The score obtained upon the administration of the Children’s Depression Rating Scale indicates significant depression. This text concerns itself with three decisions relating to the medications prescribed for the 8-year-old.
Discussion
I. Zoloft
Decision Point 1: Begin Zoloft 25 mg orally daily
Studies conducted in the past have indicated that for children and adolescents suffering from depression, Zoloft (Sertraline) happens to be largely effective. According to Hritzak and Culhane (2004), “Sertraline (Zoloft) is effective and generally well tolerated for the short-term treatment of major depressive disorder in both children and adolescents” (17). In essence, Sertraline, which is essentially an SSRI, impacts unbalanced brain chemicals in persons suffering from anxiety disorders, panic disorders, as well as depression. Low serotonin levels are often responsible….

My Work1The course provided a thorough understanding of the basic mechanisms of neurotransmission, including the different types of neurotransmitters and their functions. The course also explained how psychotropic medications target specific neurotransmitter systems to treat various mental health conditions. For example, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSIs) are commonly prescribed for depression and anxiety disorders because they increase the availability of serotonin in the brain, a neurotransmitter associated with mood regulation (Hjorth et al., 2021).The course covered major categories of psychotropic drugs, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, and mood stabilizers. It explained the rationale for using these medications, their mechanisms of action, and common side effects associated with their use. For example, antipsychotics are used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder because they block dopamine receptors, a neurotransmitter that is overactive in these conditions. At the same time, these drugs can have negative side effects.The course additionally covered the use of complementary….

Disorder of the Hypothalamus
There is a tremendous amount of importance associated with the hypothalamus, which extends throughout various physical, emotional, and mental aspects of life. The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that creates hormones that are critical to a number of processes of the body including temperature, sex drive, mood, and others. It is also directly related to certain glands that secrete hormones. Therefore, it is very important that it functions properly because it plays a role in a number of vital processes that most people take for granted. Those with this condition have a reduced sense of smell (Houneida et al., 2013, p. 144).

Several different disorders exist that pertain to the hypothalamus. One that is fairly rare is termed Kallman syndrome, and is a genetic disorder that is related to bodily processes that typically develop during puberty for those with a normal functioning hypothalamus. The fact that….

BP Disorder
Bipolar disorder, originally called manic depressive disorder, is a severe mood disorder that vacillates between extreme "ups" (mania, hypomania) and "downs" (depression). The effects of having bipolar disorder can be observed across the patients social and occupational functioning. Often the patient is left isolated from work, friends, and family. Medications have become the first-line treatments for bipolar disorder; however, psychotherapy can offer additional benefits in the ongoing treatment of patients with bipolar disorder. This paper discusses the symptoms and treatment of bipolar disorder focusing on cognitive behavioral therapy and emotion focused therapy.

Bipolar Disorder

Description and differentiation

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders -- Fourth Edition -- Text evision (DSM-IV-T) one's mood is an all-encompassing and sustained feeling tone experienced internally by the person and influences the person's behavior and perception of the world. Affect is the external or outward expression of this inner state (American Psychiatric Association….

Bipolar I Disorder
PAGES 15 WORDS 4472

Bipolar I disorder is an axis 1 clinical disorder in the DSM-IV and is a serious mental illness that can lead to suicidal ideation or action. The history of bipolar disorder research is a long one, and understanding of the disease has deepened considerably over the last several generations. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder 1 is complicated by its resemblance to other mood disorders, mainly major depression but also psychotic disorders like schizophrenia. esearch is revealing new treatment interventions that are targeted to the biological needs of bipolar patients, as antidepressants are often or usually contraindicated. A Christian worldview suggests that individualized treatment plans take into account the family history and patient's lifestyle when recommending a treatment plan.
History

Bipolar I disorder is a serious mental illness that affects between 1 and 2.5% of the general population in the United States (Ghaznavi & Deckersbach, 2012). The more conservative estimate, 1%, is generally reserved….

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) is a childhood disorder characterized by chronic irritability that interferes with academic and social functioning. Frequent outbursts and temper tantrums, at a frequency of about three times per week, are the most obvious behavior externalizations of DMDD, but to be diagnosed with the disorder, the child must also exhibit poor mood or irritability in between outbursts, too (National Institute of Mental Health, 2018). To differentiate DMDD from pediatric bipolar disorder, it is also essential that the child does not exhibit sustained mood elevation or nonepisodic mania (Beweka, Mayes, Hameed, et al, 2016). Moreover, the symptoms of DMDD persist in spite of changes to the child’s environment, evident at home and also in school. Symptoms must also not be temporary, but in place for a year or more. While on the surface DMDD appears no different from any other psychiatric illness, it is in fact a nebulous….

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a mood disorder associated with specific periods of the calendar year. SAD is more commonly found in geographic locations with long winter seasons with shorter daylight hours, less sunlight, and longer nights. This lack of sunlight has been directly connected to mood changes in a variety of populations and is most common at latitudes that experience less light during the winter seasons. In addition, some mood changes have been associated with the summer months in specific geographic areas. This paper will explore the diagnosis and assessment of Seasonal Affective Disorder, including the differentiation of the physical and emotional causes for the mood changes that occur. The paper will also explore the common treatment methods, including behavioral, pharmacological, and biopsychological, attempting to identify the preferred methods of treatment and data regarding the efficacy of the methods (.
According to the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) DSM-IV, SAD is….

The first group will receive a placebo. The second group will receive a spiritual chakra treatment designed to correct electrochemical imbalances within the body. The third group will receive medication to treat psychosis. The specific medication does not matter and therefore will not be specified. The dose will be the same for each patient and therefore will be monitored to determine whether dosage is sufficient.
Therefore, the measurements will track each participant and determine which treatment is most effective given the parameters of the study. The placebo group is expected to see no difference, other than perhaps unrelated psychological improvement which will be tracked and recorded as standard error or standard margin of the error estimate. The second group will undergo a physical treatment of chakra adjustment to maximize the flow of energy throughout the body and remedy the physiological response. The treatment will be administered once per day over….

Bipolar psychiatric disorder (BD) -- which is characterized by "…cycles of depression and mania" -- is a "euphoric, high-energy state" that can produce remarkable bursts of creativity or, on the other hand, can produce erratic behavioral events that are risky and provocative (Gardner, 2011). About 2.4% of the world's population has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder (at one time or another in their lifetime) but the rate in the United States (4.4% of the population) is the highest of any nation (Gardner, p. 1). The lowest rate on record is in India, 0.1%. This paper reviews various aspects and ramifications of the effects of bipolar disorder through nine peer-reviewed research articles.
Bipolar disorder and cigarette smoking

In the journal Bipolar Disorders the authors point out that adults suffering from bipolar disorder are "…two to three times more likely" have begun a serious smoking habit, which is a "devastating addiction" and is very….

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2 Pages
Case Study

Psychology

Mood Disorders

Words: 580
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Case Study

Mood Disorders CONSIDER THE CORE DRUG KNOWLEDGE FOR Fluoxetine (Prozac®) Why is Rita taking fluoxetine? Rita is currently taking Fluoxetine in response to a psychological evaluation that demonstrates Major Depressive disorder and…

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4 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Mood Disorders Intense Persistent Recurring Definition of

Words: 1169
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Mood Disorders INTENSE, PERSISTENT, RECURRING Definition of Mood Disorders Causes Risk Groups Symptoms Diagnosis and Treatment Prevention Proposed Dimensions for DSM5 In a single year, approximately 7% of Americans suffer from mood disorders, seen as depression or mania,…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Psychology

Mood Disorders All People Experience Mood Changes

Words: 898
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Mood Disorders All people experience mood changes. We are happy or sad. We may be overjoyed or in despair, but our reactions are in proportion to the situations we face.…

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2 Pages
Article Critique

Psychology

Mood Disorders in Children the

Words: 631
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Article Critique

3). This wide range should be accounted for, and ideally the participants should have similar treatment histories. Too many intervening variables would interfere with the outcome of the…

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2 Pages
Essay

Psychology - Abnormal

Comparison of Mood Disorders

Words: 669
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Depressive or mood disorder is a term that is used to refer to the underlying or longitudinal disorders. Mood disorders are classified into various categories including elevated mood, depressed…

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2 Pages
A-Level Coursework

Film

Mood Disorders in the Movie Melancholia

Words: 700
Length: 2 Pages
Type: A-Level Coursework

Melancholia in Film Melancholia Depicting Melancholia in Film: Melancholia The film Melancholia (2011), directed by Lars von Trier, is a science fiction film about the end of the world viewed through…

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5 Pages
Essay

Nursing

Assessing and Treating Pediatric Clients with Mood Disorders

Words: 1587
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Background The client in the present scenario is an 8-year-old African American male who presents with signs of depression. Some of the reported symptoms include; feeling of sadness, occasional irritation,…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Nursing

Effect of SSRIs on Mood Disorders

Words: 641
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

My Work1The course provided a thorough understanding of the basic mechanisms of neurotransmission, including the different types of neurotransmitters and their functions. The course also explained how psychotropic medications…

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2 Pages
Essay

Children

Disorder of the Hypothalamus

Words: 486
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Disorder of the Hypothalamus There is a tremendous amount of importance associated with the hypothalamus, which extends throughout various physical, emotional, and mental aspects of life. The hypothalamus is a…

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20 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Processing Effects of Cognitive and Emotional Psychotherapy on Bipolar Disorder

Words: 6099
Length: 20 Pages
Type: Research Paper

BP Disorder Bipolar disorder, originally called manic depressive disorder, is a severe mood disorder that vacillates between extreme "ups" (mania, hypomania) and "downs" (depression). The effects of having bipolar disorder…

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15 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Bipolar I Disorder

Words: 4472
Length: 15 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Bipolar I disorder is an axis 1 clinical disorder in the DSM-IV and is a serious mental illness that can lead to suicidal ideation or action. The history of…

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4 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

Words: 1286
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) is a childhood disorder characterized by chronic irritability that interferes with academic and social functioning. Frequent outbursts and temper tantrums, at a frequency of about…

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image
4 Pages
Essay

Psychology

Seasonal Affective Disorder SAD

Words: 1066
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a mood disorder associated with specific periods of the calendar year. SAD is more commonly found in geographic locations with long winter seasons with…

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10 Pages
Research Paper

Psychology

Bi-Polar Bipolar Disorder Is a

Words: 2854
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Research Paper

The first group will receive a placebo. The second group will receive a spiritual chakra treatment designed to correct electrochemical imbalances within the body. The third group will…

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9 Pages
Research Paper

Sports - Drugs

Bipolar Psychiatric Disorder Bd -- Which Is

Words: 3047
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Research Paper

Bipolar psychiatric disorder (BD) -- which is characterized by "…cycles of depression and mania" -- is a "euphoric, high-energy state" that can produce remarkable bursts of creativity or, on…

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