Multiple Personality Disorder Essays (Examples)

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Avoidant Personality Disorder

Words: 916 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25899608

adults become susceptible to avoidant personality disorder.

Avoidant Personality Disorder

Avoidant Personality Disorder results in social constraint, feeling of insecurity and susceptibility towards criticism. Even if one want to socialize with others he is most often scared to. Being embarrassed in front of others horrifies individuals suffering from Avoidant Personality Disorders. As a result they usually withdraw themselves from social gatherings to avoid any sort of discomfort. John G. Gunderson in his article Childhood Antecedents of Avoidant Personality Disorder: A etrospective Study outlines the risk factors and primordial exhibition of Avoidant Personality Disorders by investigating present perspective reports of social functioning and antagonistic childhood encountering.

Primitive social operative and pathological childhood experiences were investigated through a childhood experience questionnaire. It was shocking to find out that around 146 adults out of 376 patients suffered from Avoidant Personality Disorder.

Adults with AVPD reported poorer child and adolescent athletic performance, less involvement…… [Read More]

References

Gunderson J. Childhood Antecedents of Avoidant Personality Disorder: A Retrospective

Study. 1 Sept. 2003.
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Personality Assessment Instruments Millon Rorschach

Words: 2270 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32945520

This 14-year-old male is currently in the ninth grade. In the demographic portion of the test, he identifies "restless/bored" as the problem that is troubling him the most. A tendency toward avoiding self-disclosure is evident in this adolescent's response style. This nondisclosure may signify characterological evasiveness or an unwillingness to divulge matters of a personal nature, problematic or not. Also possible are broad deficits in introspectiveness and psychological-mindedness, owing to either emotional impoverishment or thought vagueness" (Millon 2005).

Comprehensiveness

As evidenced in the above, sample assessment, the Millon devices are all-encompassing, giving a diagnosis and analysis of a multitude of different factors relating to an individual's state of mental health. A statistical recording of all responses and how they correlate to different mental health conditions is included and incorporated into the assessment. The assessment can make judgments about an adolescent's developmental state, as for example the above 9th grader's lack…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dana, Richard Henry. (2005). Multicultural assessment. New York: Routledge.

Millon, Theodore, Carrie Millon, Roger Davis, & Seth Grossman. (2008). MACI:

Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory. Pearson Assessments. Retrieved 11 Nov 2008 at http://www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/maci.htm

Millon, Theodore, Carrie Millon, Roger Davis, & Seth Grossman. (2008). MCMI-III:
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Personality Type as a Predictor

Words: 3103 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8027733



All participants will be clinically diagnosed with an addiction problem to alcohol and/or another controlled substance. Those that are addicted to prescription medicine alone will be excluded from the study as they are suspected to represent a different underlying order. Subjects will be chosen for addiction to alcohol, meth, crack, opiates and other controlled substances, other than prescription drugs. Participants may have single or multiple substances of addiction.

In order to eliminate as many potential confounding variables as possible the subjects will be males between the ages of 25-40. They will be from a number of socioeconomic backgrounds and will not be eliminated for race or other cultural attributes. However, these attributes will be considered in the final analysis to eliminate potential sources of sample bias. Participation in this study will be voluntary and all participants will be asked to sign a consent form. Participants meeting the criteria will be…… [Read More]

References

Bowden-Jones, O., Iqbal, M., Tyrer, P., Sieverwright, N., Cooper, S., Judd, a., & Weaver, T.

2004). Prevalence of personality disorder in alcohol and drug services and associated comorbidity. Society for the Study of Addiction. 99: 1106-1314.

Bucholz, K., Hesselbrock, V., Heath, a., Kramer, J., & S***t, M. (2000). A latent class analysis of antisocial personality disorder symptom data from a multi-centre family study of alcoholism. Addiction. 95 (4): 553-567.

Craig, R., Verinis, J., & Wexler, S. (1985). Personality Characteristics of Drug Addicts and Alcoholics on the Millon Clinical Multiazial Inventory. Journal of Personality
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Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders the Chapter Opens

Words: 890 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76272291

Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders

The chapter opens with the story of a man who mysteriously becomes paralyzed after he cannot save his wife from drowning. Psychologists call this kind of problem a somatoform disorder -- physical problems not explainable in medical terms but caused by some kind of psychological dysfunction.

Hysterical Somataform Disorders: In hysterical somatoform disorders, the person shows a change in physical functioning. It can be difficult to diagnose because it isn't always possible to rule out all physical causes.

In conversion disorders, a conflict the person has gets converted into physical symptoms. The example of the man who was paralyzed after his wife drowned is an example of conversion disorder. The problem could be blindness or some other neurological symptom. They're more common in women and appear during great stress.

Sometimes the conversion disorder gets the person attention, such as claiming a wide range of symptoms that…… [Read More]

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Personality Theories Including Evolutionary and Dispositional

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74900828

Dispositional and Evolutionary Theories

What makes some people extraverted and others introverted? Why are some people mellow and calm, while others lose their tempers at the drop of a hat? Personality psychology tries to answer questions like these by performing a twofold role. The first role of personality psychology is to explain how clusters of traits work together to cause behavioral or cognitive effects, and the other role is to simply explain individual differences or classify people according to clusters of traits (American Psychological Association, 2015). There are several schools of personality psychology, including dispositional and evolutionary theories. Dispositional theory is quite common in popular psychology and has been a prevalent mode of thinking in the history of philosophies throughout different societies. According to dispositional theory, people have immutable traits and personality "types." Occasionally a person might act out of character, but generally people have strong, innate personalities that remain…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association (2015). Personality. Retrieved online: http://www.apa.org/topics/personality/

Cherry, K. (n.d.). The Big Five personality dimensions. About Education. Retrieved online: http://psychology.about.com/od/personalitydevelopment/a/bigfive.htm

"General Strengths and Limitations of Trait Perspectives," (n.d.). Retrieved online: https://www.boundless.com/psychology/textbooks/boundless-psychology-textbook/personality-16/trait-perspectives-on-personality-79/general-strengths-and-limitations-of-trait-perspectives-312-12847/

McAdams, D.P. & Pals, J.L. (2006). A new Big Five. American Psychologist 61(3): 204-217.
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Realm of Psychological Disorder Through the Use

Words: 2202 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14333578

realm of psychological disorder through the use of a character assessment. The character in question is fictional and the data used to evaluate the psychological profile derives from a movie. Melvin Udall, the main character in the movie "As Good as It Gets" serves as the character used in this assessment. Ultimately, I find and explore specific links to Melvin's condition in the movie to that of one suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

In order to discuss the relationships previously mentioned, I needed to perform several steps in order to logically conclude that Melvin represents someone suffering from OCD symptoms. In order to accomplish this task, I first watched the film and examined many of the traits that Melvin demonstrated. Next, I used a set of ten questions which provided a baseline assessment formula. These questions are each answered separately within the body of this essay. This character assessment…… [Read More]

References

Atkins, L. (2009). A radical treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. The Guardian, 14 Dec 2009. Retrieved from http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/dec/15/obsessive-complusive-disorder- gamma-knife

Brooks, J.L. (1998) As Good As It Gets. Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear. Tristar Pictures.

Bouchard, C. Rheaume, J. Landouceru, R. (1998). Responsibility and perfectionism in OCD. Behavior Research Therapy 37 (1999). 239-248. Retrieved from http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/Homepage/Class/Psy394Q/Research%20Design%20Clas s/Assigned%20Readings/Experimental%20Psychopathology/Bouchard99.pdf

Eddy, M.F., & Walbroehl, G.S. (1998, April 1). Recognition and treatment of obsessive- compulsive disorder. American Family Physician, p. 1623-1632.  http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1623.html
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD

Words: 6369 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74077030

Often is forgetful in daily activities

10. Often has difficulty maintaining alertness, orienting to requests, or executing directions

11. Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat

12. Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected

13. Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate

14. Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly

15. Often is "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor"

16. Often talks excessively

17. Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed

18. Often has difficulty awaiting turn

19. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations/games)

20. Often has difficulty sitting still, being quiet,... inhibiting impulses in...classroom or at home

21. Often loses temper

22. Often argues with adults

23. Often actively defies or refuses adult requests or rules

24.…… [Read More]

References

The Columbia World of Quotations. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996. Retrieved April 16, 2008, at http://www.bartleby.com/66/3/33503.html

Cloward, Janessa. "ADHD drugs pose heart risks, federal panel says," University Wire, February 15, 2006. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1118518952.html

DeMarle, Daniel J.;Denk, Larry;Ernsthausen, Catherine S.. "Working with the family of a child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.(Family Matters)," Pediatric Nursing, July 1, 2003. Retrieved April 16, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1107215868.html

Edwards, Jason H.. "Evidenced-based treatment for child ADHD: "real-world" practice implications." Journal of Mental Health Counseling, April 1, 2002. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-87015306.html
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Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Words: 3177 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56691092

Theoretical Perspective of the Biological Approach to Personality Psychology

Personality is defined as a person's exceptional deviation on the general evolutionary design for human temperament. A personality trait refers to a durable disposition to act in a certain manner in different situations. Personality traits represent some of the most significant sets of individual disparities in organizations. It is the comparatively set of psychological characteristics that differentiates one person from another. People should strive to comprehend fundamental personality attributes and the manner in which they influence a person's behavior (Griffin 2007).Most perspectives to personality presuppose that some traits are more fundamental compared to others. This concept underlie that a small number of basic personality traits determine other, more superficial traits. With respect to the biological approach to personality, personality traits are determined by human genetic inheritance, behavioral tendencies that develop from evolutionary history and human conduct that generate through intricate biological…… [Read More]

References

Andrewes, D. (2001). Neuropsychology: From theory to practice. New York: Psychology Press.

Ashton, Q. (2012). Advances in Nervous System Research and Application: 2011 Edition. New York: Scholarly Editions.

Carducci, B. (2009). The psychology of personality: Viewpoints, research and applications.

London: John Wiley & Sons.
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Sotos Syndrome Is a Disorder

Words: 2205 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6935295

For instance a patient suffering from hypotonia may receive physical therapy to assist them in gain more control over bodily movements. Likewise an individual with Sotos syndrome that has been diagnosed with ADD may be treated with behavioral counseling and medications. Behavioral therapies may also be needed to combat aggressiveness, develop social skills, combat tantrums and some personality disorders that may be present. The mental retardation that can occur as a result of Sotos may be treated with learning therapies and through special education. Also language delay may be treated with speech therapy.

Individuals that develop tumors and cancer as a result of the disorder may be treated with surgery, radiation or chemotherapy. Likewise those with heart defects or kidney problems may need surgery or dialysis. Medical treatments may also be necessary as it relates to any skeletal malformations that may persist into adulthood as some researchers have reported that…… [Read More]

References

Finegan, J.K.,Cole, Trevor R.P.;Kingwell, E.,Smith, M. Lou;Smith, M.,;Sitarenios, G. (November 1994) Language and behavior in children with Sotos syndrome. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Hglund, P., Kurotaki N., Kytl S., Miyake N., Somer M., Matsumoto N. (2003)

Familial Sotos syndrome is caused by a novel 1 bp deletion of the NSD1 gene. J Med Genet 2003; 40:51-54

NINDS Cephalic Disorders Information Page. Retrieved August 11, 2007 from;
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Relationship of Eating Disorders Self-Esteem

Words: 6071 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52017394

These suppositions allow the researcher to view the world from a certain perspective while ignoring other perspectives. The researcher in this study assumes that his subjects are logical human beings who have a rationale point-of-view. Their thinking is valid and reasonable and their approach is more or less along the lines of scientific thinking. In addition, we assume that commonsense thinking and scientific thinking are more or less identical in nature. With these assumptions in mind, we take a post-positivism philosophical foundation; as in line with Trochim (2000) post-positivism is the outright denial of positivism (which argues that the laws of the nature are perfunctory and therefore deductive reasoning can be the only suitable approach to comprehend nature) and presupposes that day-to-day human and scientific reasoning are more or less the same and in order to understand reality, researchers have to use not only deductive but also inductive reasoning (Trochim,…… [Read More]

References:

Bailer UF, Frank GK, Henry SE et al. (2005). Altered brain serotonin 5-HT1A receptor binding after recovery from anorexia nervosa measured by positron emission tomography. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62, 1032-1041.

Bloks H, Hoek HW, Callewaert I et al. (2004). Stability of personality traits in patients who received intensive treatment for a severe eating disorder. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 192, 129-138.

Bulik CM, Klump KL, Thornton L. et al. (2004). Alcohol use disorder comorbidity in eating disorders: a multicenter study. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 1000-1006.

Byrne, B. (2000) Relationships between Anxiety, Fear Self-Esteem, and Coping Strategies in Adolescence. Adolescence. 35. 137.
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Antisocial Behavior in Females With Comorbid Diagnoses of ADHD and Conduct Disorder

Words: 2635 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13071562

Antisocial ehavior in Females with Comorbid Diagnoses of ADHD

Detention centers and residential treatment facilities are replete with male and female youth that have been in and out of the juvenile justice system for many years. Although the majority of the populations in these facilities are male, the number of female juvenile offenders is continually increasing. Many of the children in these facilities have a history of behavioral difficulties that may or may not have been diagnosed during much of their childhood.

Antisocial behaviors are acts that violate social rules and the basic rights of others. They include conduct intended to injure people or damage property, illegal behavior, and defiance of generally accepted rules and authority, such as truancy from school. "These antisocial behaviors exist along a severity continuum (Clark, et al., 2002). When childhood antisocial behaviors exceed certain defined thresholds -- the diagnostic criteria specified in the Diagnostic and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Disgnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington DC APA.

Clark, Duncan. Vanyukov, Michael. Cornelius, Jack. (November, 2002). Childhood Antisocial Behavior and Adolescent Alcohol Use Disorders. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: 66, 136-138.

Crawford, Nicole. (February, 2003). ADHD: a women's issue. Monitor on Psychology, APA: Volume 34, No. 2, p. 28.

Hinshaw, S.P. (2003). Preadolescent girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: I. Background characteristics, comorbidity, cognitive and social functioning, and parenting practices. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.
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digestive disorders and homeopathy

Words: 473 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21949853

.....homeopathic remedies have been developed to treat stomach and bowel problems including indigestion, constipation, diarrhea, and hemorrhoids. The following are among the most common homeopathic remedies for digestive issues and their specific applications:

Indigestion

Because the symptoms of indigestion vary, there are different remedies to address specific symptoms. Remedies can be combined when multiple symptoms are present.

Calcarea carbonica: This remedy is indicated for individuals who suffer from heartburn with accompanying stomach cramps, and who also tend to be lactose intolerant (British Homeopathic Association, 2010). A person who experiences a bitter taste in the mouth after belching would also benefit from calcarea carbonica (British Homeopathic Association, 2010).

Carbo vegetabilis: This remedy is indicated for individuals who experience indigestion symptoms like gas and belching a short time after eating, and even after eating small portions.. Bloating may also be an issue, as is aversion to meat, milk, or fatty foods (National…… [Read More]

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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and

Words: 3764 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56744836

The right medication stimulates these under-operating chemicals to make added neurotransmitters, thereby enhancing the child's potential to concentrate, have a check on the impulses, and lessen hyperactivity. Medication required to attain this usually needs a number of doses in the course of the day, since a single dose of medication remains effective for a short interval up to 4 hours. but, slow or timed-release types of medication for instance, Concerta would let a child having ADHD to go on to take the advantage of medication in an extended stretch of period. (Identifying and Treating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A esource for School and Home)

Psycho-stimulant medications like MPH are considered to trigger auto-regulatory or control procedures, thus improving the basic restraint shortfall in children having ADHD. Documented experiments on stimulants have exhibited experimental favor for this hypothesis. For instance, the influences of MPH on reaction restraint employing the fundamental stop-signal…… [Read More]

References

Arcus, Doreen. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology. 2002. pp: 14-23

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. December 2001. Retrieved at http://www.reutershealth.com/wellconnected/doc30.html. Accessed on 8 December, 2004

Barabasz, Arreed; Barabasz, Marianne. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity, Disorder: Neurological Basis and Treatment Alternatives. Journal of Neurotherapy. Volume: 1; No: 1; p: 1. Retrieved at (http://www.snr-jnt.org/JournalNT/JNT (1-1)1.html. Accessed on 8 December, 2004

Bedard, Anne-Claude; Ickowicz, Abel; Logan, Gordon D; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Schachar, Russell; Tannock, Rosemary. Selective Inhibition in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Off and on Stimulant Medication. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. June, 2003. Volume: 12; No: 1; pp: 90-93
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Disorder of Emotional Behavioral

Words: 1935 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74349818

Persons with Emotional Behavior Disorder

Importance of assessment of emotional and behavioral disorders in schools

Identifying and assessing emotional and behavioral disorders in schools (EBD) helps identify and address a number of risky behaviors among youths in good time. Students suffering from EBD experience difficulties when learning, have challenging social relationships, experience depression and anxious moments as well as exhibit inappropriate behaviors. School, administrators usually know these students, as they need a lot of support and different resources to be able to survive in a school environment (Davis, Young, Hardman & Winters, 2011).

Early identification of these problem behaviors help school administrators provide the necessary support students need before the situation gets out of hand or becomes impossible to manage. Even though students at risk of EBD have less severe characteristics and frequency than those already diagnosed, early identification is crucial in improving educational outcomes (Davis, Young, Hardman & Winters,…… [Read More]

References

Angold, A., & Costello, E. (2000). A review of issues relevant to the creation of a measure of disability in children based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning and Disability (ICIDH-2). https://devepi.duhs.duke.edu/pubs/who.pdf.

BASC,.BASC-2 Summary - Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from http://basc-2.szapkiw.com/basc-summary/

Connecticut State Department of Education,. (2012). Guidelines for Identifying and Educating Students with Emotional Disturbance. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/publications/edguide/ed_guidelines.pdf

Davis, S., Young, E., Hardman, S., & Winters, R. (2011). Screening for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Nassp.org. Retrieved 2 March 2015, from http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=Screening_for_Emotional_and_Behavioral_Disorders
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Psychological Sequelae of Childhood Sexual

Words: 6079 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85748070

It is also interesting to note that the correlation between depression and childhood sexual abuse was found to be higher among females in many studies.

However, the issue of the relationship between depression and sexual abuse may not be as clear-cut as the above studies suggest. Recent research has begun to question this correlation and has produced findings that suggest that there are many other parameters and variables that should be considered. This is especially the case with regard to the view that childhood sexual abuse necessarily leads to depression in adulthood. As one report claims, "...there is accumulating evidence to contradict these claims" (Roosa,

Reinholtz, (Angelini, 1999). However the majority of studies indicate that there is a strong possibility that children who are sexually abused experience symptoms of depression that can extend into adulthood.

PTSD

3.1. What is PTSD?

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a disorder that has shown…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abused Children Face Depression Risk as Adults. Retrieved March 3, 2009 at http://www.healthyplace.com/abuse/abuse-and-depression/abused-children-face-depression-risk-as-adults/menu-id-52/

Association between Childhood Sexual Abuse History and Adverse

Psychosocial Outcomes in controlled studies. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at  http://www.leadershipcouncil.org/1/res/csa.html 

Barker J. Adult Sequelae of Child Sexual Abuse. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at http://www.medicineau.net.au/clinical/psychiatry/SexualAbuse.html
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Validating the Effectiveness of Participation in a

Words: 7348 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2865324

Validating the Effectiveness of Participation in a Time-Sensitive Closed Therapeutic Group for Preschool Aged Children Allegedly Sexually Abused

This paper will review existing research on allegedly sexually abused preschool aged children. The traumatic psychological effects of the abuse including low self-esteem, poor peer relationships, behavior problems, cognitive functioning and physical/mental health will also be evaluated.

The author notes the paucity of available material on sexually abused children. Very little therefore is known of the effectiveness of psychotherapy to assist in the treatment of the problems of this particular group of abused children - a population of 40 selected children with a mean age of 45, with their parents (either father or mother) and/or caregivers attending sessions in another session hall at the same time the children are undergoing therapy.

This proposed study will therefore focus on how mental health services are provided to preschool children with ages ranging between 4…… [Read More]

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Norman Bates Psychological Analysis of

Words: 1586 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59392149

He completely looses himself in the image of his mother. He is so dissociated that he does not even know he is the one conducting the action of murder. Norman is "horrified to discover that his mother (actually his sub-personality) has stabbed a woman to death in the shower," (Comer 2003:224). To him, it was his mother, whom he has no control over. When he slips into that state Norman Bates disappears; he dissociates himself from a potentially harmful situation and allows the dominant personality of his mother take over completely. In the end, after all the trauma, Norman completely recedes into himself; "You see, when the mind houses two personalities, there's always a conflict, a battle. In Norman's case, the battle is over…and the dominant personality has won," (Hitchcock 160). His mother, who serves as his safety net, completely takes over when his psychosis is discovered.

His story is…… [Read More]

References

Comer, Ronald J. (2003). Abnormal Psychology. 5th ed. Worth Publishers

Freud, Sigmund. (1989). Civilization and its Discontents W.W. Norton & Co.

Hitchcock, Alfred. (1960). Psycho. Shamley Productions.

LeDrew, Stephen. (2009). Freedom and determinism: the uncanny in Psychoanalysis and existentialism. Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. Retrieved November 7, 2009 at  http://www.psychoanalysis-and-therapy.com/articles/ledrew.html
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Clinical Psychology

Words: 60005 Length: 200 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12402637

Deam Content as a Theapeutic Appoach: Ego Gatification vs. Repessed Feelings

An Abstact of a Dissetation

This study sets out to detemine how deams can be used in a theapeutic envionment to discuss feelings fom a deam, and how the theapist should engage the patient to discuss them to eveal the elevance of those feelings, in thei pesent, waking life. It also discusses the meaning of epetitious deams, how medication affects the content of a deame's deams, and if theapists actually "guide" thei clients in what to say. This "guidance" might be the theapist "suggesting" to thei clients that they had suffeed some type of ealy childhood tauma, when in fact, thee wee no taumas in thei ealy childhoods. The oigin of psychiaty is not, as it would have people believe, medicine, theapy o any othe even faintly scientific endeavo. Its oiginal pupose was not even to cue mental affliction.…… [Read More]

references. This may be related to the large decrease in familiar settings in the post-medication dreams. Although Domhoff (1996) does not list a high percentage of elements from the past as an indicator of psychopathology, he does mention that people suffering post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a type of anxiety disorder, tend to have dreams in which distressing events are relived again and again. It may be that other anxiety disorders invoke a similar response in which the dreamer has a tendency to dwell on past events, which merits further research.

A final observation is that the results of this study provide support for Hartmann's (1984) biological model of the effects of drugs on dreams. An early study which focused mainly on long-term sleep patterns found little change in dream content associated with psychotropic drug administration (Hartmann & Cravens, 1974), but a later study conducted in Hartmann's laboratory indicated that increased levels of dopamine resulted in more vivid, nightmarish dreams (Hartmann, Russ, Oldfield, Falke, & Skoff, 1980). Based on his own research and the literature on drugs and nightmares, Hartmann (1984) proposed that drugs that increase the neurotransmitters dopamine or acetylcholine, or decrease norepinephrine or serotonin, produce nightmares and more vivid and bizarre dreams.

Drugs that have the opposite effects would decrease the incidence of disturbing dreams. The dreamer in this study was taking a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which served to increase the effects of serotonin. According to the biological model, with the onset of medication the dreamer should have experienced a decrease in nightmares, or, in Hall and Van de Castle's terms, lower aggression, negative emotions, and other unpleasant factors. This was, in fact, the case.

The emphasis on statistically significant differences without regard to effect sizes slowed progress in the study of dream content by creating unnecessary polarities and focusing energy on methodological arguments. The introduction of effect sizes into the study of dream content makes it possible to suggest that the controversy over home and laboratory collected dream reports never should have happened. The emphasis in dream content studies henceforth should be on effect sizes and large samples. Then future dream researchers could focus on testing new ideas using dream reports collected either at home or in the sleep laboratory.

Summary
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Cognitive Therapy

Words: 1275 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86397297

Evolution and Development of Cognitive Therapy

Psychology is a relatively young science. Though it has roots in philosophy and other humanities, it has only been an official science for a little over a century. Moreover, the different treatment modalities in psychology are also relatively new. However, in a short period of time, some treatments have grown to preeminence in the field, so much so that, even though they are relatively young, they are considered the standards by which other treatments are judged. These two approaches are psychoanalysis and behavior therapy, and they have been used, with some success for decades. However, in the 1960s, a new therapeutic approach emerged: cognitive therapy. Cognitive therapy focused on the role that thoughts played in behavior and disorders, with the premise that changing thoughts would result in behavior and symptom change.

Of course, like other areas of psychology, it is important to understand that…… [Read More]

References

Beck, A. (1993). Cognitive therapy: Past, present, and future. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 61(2), 194-198.

Gluhoski, V. (1994). Misconceptions of cognitive therapy. Psychotherapy, 31(4), 594-600.

Montgomery, R. (1993). The ancient origins of cognitive therapy: The reemergence of stoicism.

Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 7(1), 5-19.
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Sexually Abused Children Cause for a Problems in Adulthood

Words: 2708 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56302172

Difficulty in Adulthood in Individuals that were Sexually-Abused as Children

Introduction to Sexual Abuse in Children

Sexually-abused children commonly develop problems that persist into adulthood. Child sexual abuse has come to be regarded as a cause of mental health problems in adult life. The influences of child sexual abuse on interpersonal, social and sexual functioning in adult life has only recently attracted attention. esearch into child sexual abuse was initiated by the self-disclosures of adults who publicly admitted to their abuse as children. These victims, predominantly women, often attributed personal difficulties to their sexual abuse as children.

Early research into the effects of child sexual abuse frequently employed groups of adult psychiatric patients (Jones, 1974), which further reinforced the emergence of an adult-focused psychiatric discourse about child sexual abuse. The manner in which child sexual abuse has been brought to the public's eye and the nature of the advocacy movement…… [Read More]

References

Arias, I. (2004). The legacy of child maltreatment: long-term health consequences for women. J Womens Health (Larchmt), 13(5), 468-473.

Brodsky, B.S., Oquendo, M., Ellis, S.P., Haas, G.L., Malone, K.M., & Mann, J.J. (2001). The relationship of childhood abuse to impulsivity and suicidal behavior in adults with major depression. Am J. Psychiatry, 158(11), 1871-1877.

Coffey, P., Leitenberg, H., Henning, K., Turner, T., & Bennett, R.T. (1996). The relation between methods of coping during adulthood with a history of childhood sexual abuse and current psychological adjustment. J Consult Clin Psychol, 64(5), 1090-1093.

Cole, P.M., & Putnam, F.W. (1992). Effect of incest on self and social functioning: a developmental psychopathology perspective. J Consult Clin Psychol, 60(2), 174-184.
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Home Invasion and Crime Spree

Words: 1014 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26995817

Facts about the Cheshire Murders

The Cheshire murders were the Connecticut home invasion that occurred on July 23, 2007. Jennifer Hawke-Petit, wife of Dr. William Petit and her two daughters were brutally killed. Her daughter was raped and killed while Dr. William managed to escape, although, he was injured during the home invasion. (Daily Mail). Typically, the case was the most widely publicized case in the history of Connecticut because of the nature of the killings. The two daughters of the couple were Hayes aged 17 and Michael 11, were tied to the bed, suffocated and the house was set on fire. The Haye's confession proved that the two criminals had planned to rob the house in the dark. However, the police were able to arrest the penetrator named Steven J. Hayes and Joshua A. Komisarjevsky.

Sentence Defendants Receive

During the trial, the jury deliberated on the evidence against them.…… [Read More]

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Zodiac Speaking Into the Mind

Words: 1033 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96426849

Douglas states that one of the most complicated in which the geography of a series of murders seemed to play a part, was that of the Zodiac killer (Profiling and Geography). Furthermore, in a study of 300 serial killers, it was found that 2.3% had turned themselves in, one way or another. However, this does not include those who might have made mistakes as a subconscious way to reveal themselves, but only those who initiated police awareness of them. There are many interpretations of their intent, and even as to their actual guilt, but it's nevertheless an error to say they never do it (the Myth).

From the evidence in this paper, it is clear that if a child is left alone, or forced to live in isolation, their minds become the object of their company, which begins the daydreams and the fantasy world (Ressler, Douglas and Burgess, 1990). Isolation…… [Read More]

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Tony Oursler Has a Very

Words: 1330 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13586676

He is intimate with television sufficiently to be able to understand how complex the integration of television is into individuals' lives. He then takes this awareness of the television medium and attempts to incorporate it into various works that tell people more about their lives.

Not everyone is comfortable with Oursler's art, however, but this is not something that Oursler has generally allowed to bother him. He began his art work in 1978, and his style has not changed all that much throughout the years. One of the most significant changes that has occurred in his style, however, is the use of newer technology to revisit many of the themes that were seen in his artwork in the past. This is very significant in that it indicates that Oursler has not stopped thinking about the issues that concerned him in the past, and that the feelings that he had for…… [Read More]

Generally, Oursler sticks with faces, figures, and what are considered by some to be mobile human dolls. Even though he has experimented with other designs and other ideas in the past, this experimentation has generally yielded results that he was not entirely pleased with. He has often been called "the video doll maker." Most of the other media that he has used has been seen extensively in Japan and Europe, but some of it has made its way to the United States as well. Despite the fact that this other media has been utilized throughout the world, the dissatisfaction that Oursler often had with it remained with him and led him to believe that he could not create exactly what he wanted to create and express himself to the extent that he wished to with this other imagery.

Because of this, he went back to what he was familiar with and what he was renowned for and the work that he was doing as late as 2003 generally involved these mobile dolls and the video information that he needed to give them expressions, voices, and other disturbing imagery that would be seen by those that viewed his work. Some critics discuss Oursler's work as being low-budget and low-tech expressionistic theater, since much of what Oursler creates is considered to be very primitive and sometimes grotesque as well. There is a sensibility to the handmade pieces that Oursler often exhibits but there are also psychodramatic landscapes that force the reader to look at much of Oursler's work from a pop culture standpoint.

There is no reason to believe that this pop culture standpoint is in any way a problem for Oursler or for the people that view his work. Instead, the idea that much of his work applies to pop culture is only an observation that many critics note. Much of this comes from the abstractness of a lot of Oursler's work. Even though it is easy to see what the actual images are in the work, some of the work does not tie itself together very clearly and therefore it may be confusing to understand. Despite this, however, Oursler's work is very strong and very interesting to behold. It has a richness, an openness, and an honesty that many other artist's work does not possess for one reason or another, and one can tell that Oursler is working and creating to please himself, not to please the masses.
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Schizophrenia While All Mental Illnesses Continue to

Words: 2199 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67382161

Schizophrenia

While all mental illnesses continue to carry some sort of stigma, perhaps no mental illness is more widely misunderstood than schizophrenia. In fact, prior to the introduction of some of the more modern medications, it was virtually impossible to live a normal life if one had a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The complex interplay of symptoms experienced by most schizophrenics lent those patients the classic air of madness. Moreover, the combination of hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thought contributed to the air of dangerousness (see APA, 2000). While the mentally ill, as a whole, are no more dangerous to themselves or others than the general population, the reality is that an individual with schizophrenia could be much more dangerous than the population as a whole. Moreover, there was no standard treatment of the patient with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia crosses all races and cultures, so that a wide variety of cultural treatments contributed…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-

IV. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.; 2000.

Bentall RP. Prospects for a cognitive-developmental account of psychotic experiences. Br J. Clin

Psychol. 2007;46(Pt 2):155 -- 73.
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Metropolitan Development Affect Rates of

Words: 1924 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81802379



Contrary to what is often seen on the nightly news programs, there are still many people in this country and throughout the world who want to live in safe places and who would be interested in making their town better. Often, they do not know what they can do to improve the poorer parts of town, so they simply choose not to live or work there. This only leads to the decay of those areas and the rising crime rate. While unfortunate, it is not entirely unexpected. However, urban revitalization has begun in a lot of cities and towns, both big and small, in recent years. Although the economy has slowed some of that, there are still many areas where it is moving forward. This will, in time, lower the number of sexual assaults and other crimes in those revitalization areas. If more people would help to improve their neighborhoods,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chu, James A. (1990). Dissociative symptoms in relation to childhood physical and sexual abuse, Am. J. Psychiatry.

Coons, P.M. (1994). Confirmation of childhood abuse in childhood and adolescent cases of multiple personality disorder and dissociative disorders not otherwise specified. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 182, 461-464.

Finkelhor, D. (1990). Early and long-term effects of child sexual abuse: An update. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 21, 325-330.

Jarvis, T.J., & Copeland, J. (1997). Child sexual abuse as a predictor of psychiatric co-
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Innocence and Consequences of Abuse

Words: 1719 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43992991

However, it is implied that Stampler is a sociopath; research has concluded that crimes typically committed by those that have been diagnosed with sociopathy, or psychopathy, include serial murder, mass or spree murder, and/or serial rape.

Stampler's actions were motivated by countless instances of abuse at the hands of his father and documented sexual abuse by the archbishop, which the audience is led to be believe was a trusted member of Stampler's social circle. At the end of the film, it is not Stampler's innocence that is revealed, rather Vail's. Vail's belief system is shaken to the core as he realizes that there are people in the world that are inherently evil; Vail realizes that there are instances in which crimes are committed by bad people, such as Stampler's father, the archbishop, and lastly, by Stampler. Though he must continue to operate under the concept that people are innocent until…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arrigo, Bruce. Criminal Behavior: A Systems Approach. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey:

Pearson Education, 2006. Print.

Hoblit, Gregory, dir. Primal Fear. Paramount Pictures, 2006. Motion Picture.
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Person Identity

Words: 1053 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90262396

Person Identity

Weirob believes that she is only her body because her identity is uniquely tied to it. Her body is what has experienced (i.e., seen, smelt, tasted, felt, etc.) the world; it is that to which she has attachment. Her body is the only constant in all of the arguments of identity. She was unconvinced by appeals to theories of identity tied to souls (which are unknowable, she argues) or memory (which, she says, is fallacious and must be actual to even be relevant). She believes that she must be able to anticipate the feelings of a future self, that self must be intrinsically significant (i.e., her identity is not dependent on outside forces, such as the creation of two of her via God's will), and her memories must be real (and not fabricated or otherwise not directly related to the actual experiences that caused the memories in the…… [Read More]

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Psychologists Conventional Wisdom Holds That a Hostage

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49452222

Psychologists

Conventional wisdom holds that a hostage negotiation team should include a police psychologist but that the psychologist should not actually be the team member who conducts negotiations with the alleged hostage-taker. Two articles take opposing sides on this issue. Hatcher et al. (1998) upholds this conventional wisdom, and argues for the value of a psychologist on the negotiation team, provided the psychologist does not serve as the one who conducts the negotiation. Ebert (1986) takes the opposing view, and argues against the conventional wisdom that the psychologist should not conduct the negotations. On consideration of the arguments presented, it is fairly easy to see why the conventional wisdom was established, and to see that Ebert's case for an expanded role is relatively specious.

Ebert claims that "most arguments against using psychologists as negotiators appear absurd when the characteristics of good negotiators as outlined by experts are examined" claiming that…… [Read More]

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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Disorder

Words: 1743 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65719540

This may consist of arising and seating in chairs securely. Following the progressive characteristics of this illness, all people gradually lose their capability simply to move and will need to advance and use a wheelchair.

eferences

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, . (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. eceived: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.

Fabio, ., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2008). Gaze Control and Foot Kinematics During Stair Climbing: Characteristics Leading to Fall isk in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.…… [Read More]

References

Burbank, P.M. (2006). Vulnerable older adults: Health care needs and interventions. New York, NY: Springer Pub.

Donaldson, I.M., & Marsden, C.D. (2011). Marsden's book of movement disorders. Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press.

Egerton, T., Williams, D. & Iansek, R. (2009). Comparison of gait in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease and healthy older adults. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabio, R., Zampieri, C., Tuite, P. (2006). Gaze-shift strategies during functional activity in progressive supranuclear palsy. Received: 20 July 2006 / Accepted: 26 September 2006 / Published online: 8 November 2006. Springer-Verlag 2006.
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Depressive Disorder Is it Caused

Words: 1701 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52021775



orks Cited

Carney, Robert M.; Kenneth E .Freedland. (2009). Treatment-resistant depression and mortality after acute coronary syndrome. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166(4), 410-7.

Retrieved April 27, 2009, from ProQuest Medical Library database. (Document ID: 1671559601).

Major depressive episode. (2009). DSM IV. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at http://www.mental-health-today.com/dep/dsm.htm

Franklin, Donald. (2003). Major depression. Psychology Info. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at http://www.psychologyinfo.com/depression/major.htm

Khaled, Salma M.; Andrew Bulloch, Derek V. Exner, Scott B. Patten. (2009). Cigarette

smoking, stages of change, and major depression in the Canadian population. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 54(3), 204-8. Retrieved April 27, 2009, from ProQuest Medical

Library database. (Document ID: 1673587981).

Levinson, Douglas. (2005). The genetics of depression: a review. Biol Psychiatry.

Retrieved April 27, 2009 at http://depressiongenetics.med.upenn.edu/DLResearch/Levinson_GeneticsDepression.pdf

Marrie, A.; R. Horwitz, G. Cutter, T .Tyry, D. Campagnolo, & T. Vollmer. (2009). The burden of mental comorbidity in multiple sclerosis: frequent, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Multiple Sclerosis, 15(3), 385-92.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carney, Robert M.; Kenneth E .Freedland. (2009). Treatment-resistant depression and mortality after acute coronary syndrome. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 166(4), 410-7.

Retrieved April 27, 2009, from ProQuest Medical Library database. (Document ID: 1671559601).

Major depressive episode. (2009). DSM IV. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at  http://www.mental-health-today.com/dep/dsm.htm 

Franklin, Donald. (2003). Major depression. Psychology Info. Retrieved April 27, 2009 at  http://www.psychologyinfo.com/depression/major.htm
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Physical and Mental Disorders for

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61490952

Usually, diagnosis is symptom driven, then combined with testing, forms an opinion, sometimes verified by lab tests, of a specific diagnosis. For instance, someone may have symptoms of nausea, pain, depression, anxiety, and their skin has a yellowish hue. The physician runs blood tests and finds that the liver is malfunctioning and there is likely a diagnosis of hepatitis. In this case, there are both physical and mental symptoms, but it is the physical nature that is diagnosed first. For mental diagnosis, symptoms are also important, but are based more on the functioning of the individual in social systems, or by observing the patient's behavior (How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? 2012). Thus, both use symptoms as a guide, but mental diagnosis is more empirical and uses observation, while physical diagnosis uses quantitative measurements.

Etiology- Etiology is the study of basic causation. We now know that there are a number of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

American Psychiatric Association Practice Guidelines. (2006). PsychiatryOnline. Retrieved from: http://psychiatryonline.org/guidelines.aspx

How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? (2012). WebMD. Retrieved from:  http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/mental-health-making-diagnosis 

Curtis, a.J. et.al. (2000), Introduction to Health Psychology, New York: Routledge.

Dombeck, M. (2003). Blurring the Boundary Between Mental and Physical. Seven Counties Services, Inc. Retrieved from: http://www.sevencounties.org / poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=1855&cn=74
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Medication Compliance in Psychotic Disorders

Words: 914 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63130178

Medication Compliance in Psychotic isorders

Janssen, Birgit., Gaebel, Wolfgang., Haerter, Martin, Komaharadi, F., Lindel, Birgit., & Weinmann, Stefan. (2006 April). "Evaluation of factors influencing medication compliance in inpatient treatment of psychotic disorders. Psychopharmacology 187:229-236.

The authors and researchers examine short- and long-term compliance to prescribed antipsychotic drugs. Their objective is to evaluate patient-related and treatment-related factors associated with medication compliance in inpatients with the following diagnoses: schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and other psychotic disorders. The study is a "naturalistic study," based in seven hospitals with patients assessed weekly. The following characteristics were studied: social function, side-effects of medication, mental status, and compliance to medication requests. The researchers in this study attempted to determine whether medication is the basis for compliance or whether multiple factors including innate factors such as social influence and individual characteristics, environmental characteristics, genetic and personality characteristics were more likely to influence medication compliance in psychotic patients because…… [Read More]

Dolder, Christian R., Pharm.D., Jonathan P. Lacro, Pharm.D., Laura B. Dunn, M.D., and Dilip

V. Jeste., M.D (2002 Jan). Antipsychotic medication adherence: Is there a difference between typical and atypical agents? Am J. Psychiatry, 159:103-108.

The researchers and authors of this study had a primary objective of comparing medication adherence in outpatient veterans using typical vs. atypical antipsychotic agents. To accomplish this goal the researchers used pharmacy refill records; the patient selection criteria including patients using medications haloperidol, perphenazine, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine. Patients used medications for a 3-month period before using an atypical agent, and refill records were reviewed for a period of 12 months. The results of this study suggested that adherence rates were higher in patients receiving atypical agents, suggesting that medication compliance is more likely in patients receiving these agents compared to typical antipsychotic agents. Patient personality traits were not examined in this study, as in previous studies, so it is uncertain whether characteristics including aggression, addiction or other factors may have influenced compliance, as was the case in some previous studies. Patients were likely to miss medications seven times per month on typical antipsychotics vs. four times per month on atypical antipsychotics in this particular study. At the end of the study refill rates showed a four percent difference between typical and atypical agents, with approximately 54% of patients on atypical agents likely to refill their medications vs. roughly 50% of patients likely to comply with necessary refills on traditional or typical antipsychotics.
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Taxi Driver A Case Study Travis Bickle

Words: 1538 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31362595

Taxi Driver: A Case Study

Travis Bickle: An Introduction

The facts that are presented to the spectator about Travis Bickle in the most general sense do paint a portrait of a certain level of pathology. Travis Bickle is a decorated Vietnam veteran, and appears to suffer from PTSD. The spectator also quickly learns that Travis does not have many friends: he's socially very isolated and this appears in part to be connected to the fact that he has trouble starting and maintaining friendships.

The spectator learns very quickly that Travis Bickle is given to disturbances in his judgment and perception, as well as in his decision-making process. In fact, the very reason he takes a job driving a taxi, thus bestowing the film with its very title, is because he has trouble sleeping (suffering from insomnia, a common symptom of PTSD). Bickle claims that he got lonely just walking around…… [Read More]

References

Berry, K., Band, R., & Corcorran, R. (2007). Attachment styles, earlier interpersonal relationships and schizotypy in a non-clinical sample. Psychology & Psychotherapy:

Theory, Research & Practice.,80(4), 563-576.

Filmsite.org. (2013). Taxi Driver (1976). Retrieved from Filmsite.org:  http://www.filmsite.org/taxi3.html 

Hurst, R., Nelson-Gray, R., & Mitchell, J. (2007). The relationship of asperger's characteristics and schizotypal personality traits in a non-clinical adult sample. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 37(9), 1711-1720.
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Cit Can Increase Performance With

Words: 2326 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8267129

d., p. 3). Interestingly, lower-conflict incidents where mental illness is indicated in the presence of a weapon generates higher referral than without (Watson, Ottati, Morabito, Draine, Kerr & Angell, 2010, p.305), although the status of these events as less-serious implies the weapon was not used in resistance or the crime would be serious and result in arrest.

Other situational factors outside particular incidents also affect the rate of arrest for all officers. Officer workload itself pushes down on the rate of arrest, where busier districts report higher rates of 'no action' on minor crimes, and referral where mental health is a factor, which allows more officer time on the street pursuing serious crime and regular duties (Morabito, 2007, p. 1584). Finally, officer characteristics generate different responses in similar scenarios, where officer comfort with or stigma against mental illness affects rates of arrest or diversion to mental health intervention (Watson, Ottati,…… [Read More]

References

Colins, O., Vermeiren, R., Vahl, P., Markus, M., Broekaert, E. & Doreleijers, T. (2011).

Psychiatric disorder in detained male adolescents as risk factor for serious recidivism. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 56 (1):44 -- 50. Retrieved from findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_7486/is_20110101/ai_n56982687

Fisher, W.H., Banks, S.M., Roy-Bujnowski, K., Grudzinskas, Jr., A.J., Simon, L.J., & Wolff, N. (2010, October). Categorizing temporal patterns of arrest in a cohort of adults with serious mental illness. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 37(4), 477-490.

Hanafi, S., Bahora, M., Demir, B.N. & Compton, M.T. (2008). Incorporating crisis intervention team (CIT) knowledge and skills into the daily work of police officers: a focus group study. Community Mental Health Journal 44: 427 -- 432. doi 10.1007/s10597-008-9145-8
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Case Study of Narcissism

Words: 3487 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66346607

Narcissist Personality Disorder

Examining narcissistic personality disorder (NPD)

What is Narcissistic Personality Disorder?

Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is commonly termed as 'a continuous pattern of magnificence (fantasies and illusions), desire for praises and lacking compassion'. It is notably described by five key elements as mentioned below:

Illusions of self-importance

An obsession with illusions of huge success, fame, love, beauty and wealth

Faith in being unique / special

Desiring constant praise

Having a sense of entitlement

Being manipulative

Lacking compassion

Jealous of others

Increasingly arrogant / ego-maniac / having attitude problem (Skodol, Bender & Morey, 2014).

Features and symptoms of NPD

NPD (Narcissistic Personality Disorder) are typically indicative of susceptible self-esteem where attention seeking and desiring constant praises are a given, whilst having overt and covert illusions of grandeur. There are troubles in having an identity, intimacy, compassion, self-direction and lastly, certain maladaptive characteristics of antagonism (Skodol, Bender & Morey, 2014).…… [Read More]

References

Holtzman, N., Vazire, S., & Mehl, M. (2010). Sounds like a narcissist: Behavioral manifestations of narcissism in everyday life. Journal of Research in Personality, 44(4), 478-484. doi:10.1016/j.jrp.2010.06.001

Levy, K. (2012).Subtypes, Dimensions, Levels, and Mental States in Narcissism and Narcissistic Personality Disorder. J. Clin. Psychol., 68(8), 886-897. doi:10.1002/jclp.21893

Links, P.S., & Stockwell, M. (2002).The Role of Couple Therapy in the Treatment of Narcissistic Personality Disorder. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 56(4), 522.

Matusiewicz, A., Hopwood, C., Banducci, A., & Lejuez, C. (2010).The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Personality Disorders. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 33(3), 657-685. doi:10.1016/j.psc.2010.04.007
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Contingency Management Alcohol & Marijuana

Words: 11354 Length: 41 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27822679

" (1995)

The authors state: "The amphetamines occasioned dose-related increases in d- amphetamine-appropriate responding, whereas hydromorphone did not. Amphetamines also occasioned dose-related increases in reports of the drug being most like "speed," whereas hydromorphone did not. However, both amphetamines and hydromorphone occasioned dose-related increases in reports of drug liking and in three scales of the ARCI. Thus, some self-report measures were well correlated with responding on the drug-appropriate lever and some were not. Lamb and Henningfield (1994) suggest that self-reports are complexly controlled by both the private event and the subject's history of experience with the drug. Some of the self-reports they observed (e.g., feels like speed) are probably occasioned by a relatively narrow range of stimuli because in the subject's experience with drug administration, these reports have been more selectively reinforced by the verbal community relative to other reports (e.g., drug liking). They also suggest that these results imply…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Budney, Alan J. et al. (2006) Clinical Trial of Abstinence-Based Vouchers and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Cannabis Dependence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 2006. Vol.. 74 No. 2. 2006 American Psychological Association.

McRae, a.; Budney, a.; & Brady, K. (2002) Treatment of Marijuana Dependence: A Review of the Literature. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 24 (2003)

Pathways of Addiction: Opportunities in Drug Abuse Research (1996) Institute of Medicine (IOM)

Kamon, J; Budney, a. & Stanger, C. (2005)a Contingency Management Intervention for Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Conduct Problems. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. 44(6):513-521, June 2005.
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Coping Mediates the Relationship Between

Words: 4919 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3377734

" (Giovacchini, 1996, pg. 2)

According to Giovachinni research into the psychodynamics of individuals in their experience of current adjustments and symptom formation is "much more interesting and fulfilling than monitoring surface behavior. processes are innately fascinating and their study creates dimensions and viewpoints that expand our appreciation of the versatility of the psyche as our in-depth understanding is increased, in itself, an aesthetic experience." (Giovacchini, 1996, pg. 2) Unconscious motivation is the "essence of the intrapsychic focus..." which serves to transform patients into "interesting human beings rather than the passive recipients of pharmacological ministrations. How the treatment procedures fits into the therapeutic relationship is taken into account, enabling patients to pursue autonomy and mastery of their emotions." (Giovacchini, 1996, pg. 2)

The work of Halil entitled: "Personality and Coping: A Multidimensional Research on Situation and Dispositional Coping" (2004) states that coping is defined "as a constantly changing cognitive and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Intrapsychic (2008) Definition - Biology Online available at  http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Intrapsychic 

Intrapsychic (2008) Definition - the Free Library. Online available at  http://www.thefreedictionary.com/intrapsychic 

Giovachinni, Peter L. (1996) Intrapsychic Focus Can Have Lasting Benefits for Patients. 1996, December 1, Psychiatric Times, Vol. 13, No. 12. Online available at http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/display/article/10168/49006?pageNumber=2

Halil, EKSI (2004) Personality and Coping: A Multidimensional Research on Situational and Dispositional Coping. 2004 Egitim Danishmanligi ve Arastirmalari Iletisim Hizmetleri Tic. Ltd. Sti. (EDAM)
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Case Presentation and Verbatim

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34126104

Susan Marx is a 31-year-old, right-handed, Caucasian woman who has completed 12 years of education. She was referred for complaints of depressed mood for the past month. hen asked why she referred herself she responded, "I am very depressed and cannot motivate myself to do anything." She also reports experiencing feelings of extreme sadness, hopelessness, lack of appetite, difficulty sleeping at night, decreased energy, some suicidal thoughts, and feeling as if everything she does is of no consequence.

Presenting Problem

Marx reported that her depression began following being terminated from her position as a secretary for an attorney. She reported that she had a "romantic" affair with her employer, who decided to end the relationship and then terminated her. Since then she is quite depressed and does not have the energy to clean her apartment which is becoming quite messy. She sits on the couch and watches television all day…… [Read More]

We must also not think of Ms. Marx as simply a victim, but her pathology also is also one of manipulation. Often individuals with personality disorders maintain pathogenic belief systems are complicated and characterized by conflict and are seemingly inconsistent (McWilliams, 1999). In the case of the borderline patient it is often assumed that the core underlying belief system is one of being abandoned or unsupported. While this is often a central core belief of borderline patients, an often overlooked and competing belief is one of manipulation or "I can manipulate people into being there for me." These beliefs of being able to manipulate others are often, like the core fear of abandonment, not explicit beliefs, like " The world is round" but more implicit beliefs that a manifest in intrapersonal behavior. Thus, the borderline patient is often known for their tendency to play people against one another in order to get them to take sides. The motivation for this is always to get someone, usually an easy target, to side with them and buy into their pathology. In Ms. Marx case she appears to try to get men attached to her by using sex and this can be a powerful tool in keeping them close to her. These core conflicting beliefs, that one can manipulate others into siding with them and at the same time believing that others are unconcerned about them, must both be addressed in order for treatment to be successful.

Ms. Marx demonstrates the tendency of many borderline patients to experience a dilemma based on the aforementioned core beliefs, when they get close to a person they will often become very anxious and panic because of fears of control or being engulfed by another; however, when they feel separated from others they experience anxiety and panic because of fears of abandonment. This often leads to a series of brief and intense relationships wherein Ms. Marx does not feel comfortable being close or apart.

Another issue with borderline patients is often with identity integration; borderline patients are
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Iceman Confessions A Social History

Words: 2060 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36325584

His convictions are believed to represent only a small portion of his actual crimes; he is believed to have committed upwards of 100 murders.

Mental Status and Behavior Observation (must have subheading):

Appearance, Attitude, and Activity

Kuklinski was a tall, physically imposing man. He was over 6 feet tall and over 300 pounds. He seemed physically fit, despite his immense size. He had several tattoos on his body at the time of his prison interviews. He had a beard and was balding. Otherwise, he presented a clean-cut disposition. His attitude was very soft-spoken, even when discussing horrific events. However, he did make it clear to the interviewer that, despite being incarcerated at the time of the interview, he still posed a threat to the interviewer.

Thought Process, Thought Content, and Perception

His thought process seemed coherent, with no obvious defects in cognition or reasoning. While he was relating horrific events…… [Read More]

References

Musto, M. (2001). The Iceman: Confessions of a Mafia Hitman 2 of 2. Retrieved July 10, 2012

from website: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=007UO2aOm-U&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PLCEBD010BB8CF9B63

Musto, M. (2001). The Iceman: Confessions of a Mafia Hitman 1 of 2. Retrieved July 10, 2012

from YouTube website: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv4c3flhSau
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Dually Diagnosed African-American and Latino

Words: 13893 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27469635

(1999) which are:

1) Those with serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder with major depression and who use alcohol and drugs to self-mediate to cope with the symptoms; and 2) Those with borderline personality and anti-social personality disorders including anxiety disorder that is complicated by use of alcohol and illicit drugs. (Mather et al. 1999)

Presenting further difficulty is the establishment of problems with alcohol and illicit drug use for adolescents entering service programs outside of the AOD system. (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2005) In an analysis of data taken form a sample group of youth in five San Diego county sectors of AOD treatment, mental health, juvenile justice, child welfare and public school-based services for severely emotionally disturbed [SED] youth gives indication that "there are relatively high rates of substance use disorders among adolescents in these systems, as determined in diagnostic interview with DSM-IV…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Amaro, Hortensia, et al. (2005) Racial/Ethnic Differences in Social Vulnerability Among Women with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Disorders: Implications for Treatment Services - Journal of Community Psychology. Vol. 33 Issue 4.

An Overview of the Effectiveness of Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Models (2001) Thousand Oaks, December 2001. Online available at  http://web.utk.edu/~dap/SA2003/EffectadolescentSATx.html 

Blane, H.T. (1993) Recent Development in Alcoholism: Ethnicity: Recent Development in Alcoholism, 11, 109-122.

Bridging the Gap: What We Know and Don't Know About Dual Diagnosis (1998) Healing Hands Journal. Vol.2, No.4 July 1998.
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Beck Depression Inventory-Ii Bdi-Ii Is a 21-Item

Words: 4152 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83941983

Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a 21-item clinician administered and scored scale that is designed to measure a person's mood and symptoms related to depression. The BDI-II was designed to conform to the DSM-IV depression diagnostic criteria and represents a substantial improvement over its predecessor, the original Beck Depression Inventory. The BDI-II has been used both as a research measure (its primary intended use) and to assist with the clinical diagnosis of depression. The BDI-II has been subject to numerous empirical studies designed to measure its internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, criterion validity, and construct validity and the test demonstrates acceptable psychometric qualities, but there have been some concerns with its use. This paper reviews the development of the BDI-II, its psychometric properties, uses, strengths, and weaknesses. Advantages and disadvantages of using the BDI-II and recommendations for future research regarding its use are also discussed.

Title of paper

The…… [Read More]

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Housing for the Mentally Ill

Words: 5997 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23006035

" (Finnerty, 2008) It is reported that those who suffer from co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse problems are also likely to be homeless. According to the Health Care for the Homeless Clinicians' Network (2000) "Co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse makes it more likely that people will be chronically homeless." (cited in Finnerty, 2008) Factors that are known to contribute to homelessness in those with co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse include factors such as: (1) Financial problems; (2) Loss of family support; (3) Severity of symptoms; and (4) Time spent in institutions such as jails or hospitals. (runette, Mueser and Drake, 2004 in: Finnerty, 2008) Padgett and Struening (1991) state that substance abuse and mental disorders "…increase the health care needs of homeless persons, whose primary source of care is often the emergency room.

The work of Padgett et al. (2006) reports having interviewed a group of women…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Brunette, Mary F., Kim T. Mueser, and Robert E. Drake. 2004. "A Review of Research on Residential Programs for People With Severe Mental Illness and Co-occurring Substance Abuse Disorders." Drug and Alcohol Review 23:471-81.

2. Creating Homes Initiative. (2010). TN Department of Mental Health and Developmental

Disabilities. Retrieved on June 23, 2010 from http://www.tennessee.gov/mental/recovery/CHIpage.html

3. Finnerty, Jacqueline (2008) Homelessness and Mental Illness Literature Review. 30 Apr 2008. Sociological Analysis. Online available at: http://www.unh.edu/sociology/media/pdfs-journal2008/Finnerty2EDITED.pdf
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Andrea M Is a 21-Year-Old Female in

Words: 2539 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99310236

Andrea M. is a 21-year-old female in her fourth year of college with aspirations to become a civil rights attorney. She was first recommended to seek treatment when she experienced her first panic attack three years ago. At the time, a friend advised her to seek counseling. However, Andrea never did seek counseling at that time. Andrea has since been avoiding certain types of social situations, has gravitated towards jobs with as little social contact as possible, and fears that her anxiety may be impacting her performance in school and her ability to find viable work as an intern this summer. She loves "diving into my work" and becoming absorbed in her academics, but when it comes to attending classes, Andrea feels stressed and has been missing more classes than she has ever before. After not showing up to classes for two weeks, and an incident involving alcohol poisoning during…… [Read More]

References

Amir, N. & Bomyea, J. (2010). Cognitive biases in social anxiety disorder. In Hoffman, S.G. & DiBartolo, P.M. (2010). Social Anxiety. 2nd Edition.

Andersson, G., et al. (2012). Therapeutic alliance in guided internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment of depression, generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder. Behavior Research and Therapy 50(9), 554-550.

Anxiety and Depression Association of America (2014). Social anxiety disorder. Retrieved online:  http://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/social-anxiety-disorder 

Bogels, S.M., Alden, L. et al. (2010). Social anxiety disorder. Depression and Anxiety 27, 169-189.
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Adolescent Substance Use Screening Instruments 10-Year Critical

Words: 14685 Length: 53 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28105173

Adolescent Substance Use Screening Instruments: 10-Year Critical eview of the esearch Literature

Over ten million teenagers in the United States admit in a national survey that they drink alcohol, although it is illegal under the age of 21 in all states. In some studies, nearly one-quarter of school-age children both smoked cigarettes and drank alcohol. Over four thousand adolescents every day try marijuana for the first time. The dangers of use, abuse and dependency on each of these substances have been established. When we also consider that these three substances are considered gateway drugs, that is, drugs whose use is likely to lead to experimentation with "hard" drugs, the potential problem of such widespread use is even more severe. Additionally, use of these substances is known to co-occur with a number of other psychiatric conditions as well as health issues such as the incidence of sexually-transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies and…… [Read More]

References

Aarons, Gregory A.; Brown, Sandra A.; Hough, Richard L.; Garland, Ann F.; Wood, Patricia A. Prevalence of Adolescent Substance Use Disorders Across Five Sectors of Care (Statistical Data Included). Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, April 2001 v40 i4 p419

Adger, Hoover Jr.; Werner, Mark J. The pediatrician (role in treatment of alcohol-related disorders). Alcohol Health and Research World, Spring 1994 v18 n2 p121 (6)

Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Symptoms of Adolescents. National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence of the San Fernando Valley, Inc. [Online]. Retrieved January 20, 2003 from http:/ / www.ncadd-sfv.org/symptoms/teen_symptoms.html

Alcohol use and abuse: a pediatric concern (American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Abuse). Pediatrics, March 1995 v95 n3 p439 (4)
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Schizophrenia on the Mind and Body an

Words: 2006 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36727452

Schizophrenia on the Mind and Body

An Analysis of the Etiology of Schizophrenia and Its Impact on the Mind and Body

Perhaps no other human condition has received so much publicity, but remains so misunderstood by the general public as schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is widely believed to be associated with multiple personalities and other acute symptoms that would make sufferers readily apparent; however, the reality of the condition is that people can have schizophrenia and never know it. However, while much has been learned about the disease and its etiology over the last hundred years, much remains unclear about who is at risk and precisely how the disease progresses. Nevertheless, a number of efficacious treatments have been identified, and today, some schizophrenics recover completely or sufficiently enough to lead normal and productive lives. This paper provides an overview of schizophrenia and its incidence, the etiology of the disease and its symptoms,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alanen, Yrjo O. And Sirkka-Liisa Leinonen. Schizophrenia: Its Origins and Need-Adapted

Treatment. London: Karnac Books, 1997.

Beebe, Lora Humphrey. (2003). Theory-Based Research in Schizophrenia. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 39(2):67.

Bigelow, Llewellyn B. et al. Schizophrenia and Manic-Depressive Disorder: The Biological
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Violent Crimes Analysis From the

Words: 1310 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18249175



The term signature aspect is used to refer to unique behavior that is exhibited by the criminal that is peculiar to that particular criminal though may not be necessary in committing the crime. One of the most common signature aspects is the calling card, or tattooing of the dead bodies, use of excessive force, leaving notes behind and many more. These are not necessary in killing of victims but are a sign of claiming the crime (John E. Douglas, 2011).

The components of crime classification that I learnt about and are central in the crime classification are finding out the defining characteristics of the crimes and the crime scenes, this will be instrumental in telling the motive behind the crime and in the case of multiple motives, the most outstanding will guide the profiling. The other component is victimology which is the complete history of the victim which will help…… [Read More]

References

Anthony Lantosca, (2006) IAFEI: The truth about Deception Detection. Retrieved February 11, 2012 from  http://www.iafei.com/deception-detection/ 

Encyclopedia of mental Disorders, (2012). Hare Psychopathy Checklist. Retrieved February 11,

2012 from  http://www.minddisorders.com/Flu-Inv/Hare-Psychopathy-Checklist.html 

Hwakins, (2012). The Baseline Killer. Retrieved February 11, 2012 from http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/predators/baseline-killer/1.html
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Fisher King Was a 1991 Movie That

Words: 2596 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83124991

Fisher King was a 1991 movie that starred Robin illiams and Jeff Bridges and was directed by Terry Gilliam. The movie provided a unique insight into the world of abnormal psychology. It depicted accurate per trails of a few psychological disorders and psychosis that were brought on by a single stressor for both of the leading roles as well as a plethora of disorders by lesser characters brought on by life. Neither illiams nor Bridges earned grandiose Hollywood awards for their roles and the movie itself did not rake in billions, but it does serve as a very good example of just how delicate human nature is and what can happen to each and every one of us without a moment's notice. At the time of the stressor in this movie, Bridge's character was on top of his game in the world of radio and was about to 'add a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

About.com. "Depression." 2009. Retrieved on November 18, 2009, from http://depression.about.com/cs/brainchem101/a/brainchemistry.htm.

Quicksilver. "The Fisher King: starring Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges." Dir. Terry Gilliam. 1991. Retrieved on November 18, 2009, from http://ipb.quicksilverscreen.com/lofiversion/index.php/t100510.html.

Schizophrenia.com. "Schizophrenia." 2009. Retrieved on November 18, 2009, from  http://www.schizophrenia.com/disease.htm .
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Psycho 1960 Film Movie Analysis

Words: 617 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23661421

Movie Analysis: Psycho (1960 film)

The movie's most relevant cast for this discussion includes Norman, Norman's mother (Mrs. Bates), and Marion. After the death of his dad, Norman becomes entirely dependent on the love, attention, and support of his mother. It is for this reason that when she (Norman's mother) takes in a lover, Norman feels as if he is no longer a priority in his mother's life -- he feels as if he has been replaced. Apparently, he can't stand sharing her and as a result of his intense jealousy, he ends up killing not only his mother's lover but also his mother, through poisoning. However, he elects to preserve the corpse instead of having it buried -- in what could be seen as an attempt to perpetuate the illusion that his mother is not dead but is, instead, still alive. As a consequence, he begins to not only…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hickey, Erick W. Serial Murderers and their Victims. 6th ed. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning, 2013. Print.

Jenkins, Philip. Using Murder: The Social Construction of Serial Homicide. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2009. Print.
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Understanding Violence

Words: 1916 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86996299

Psychosocial Assessment

Identifying Information / Setting

The purpose of this study is to examine Jackson. This client is in his early 40's and works as a professional police officer in a men's correctional facility. Jackson is a veteran and is married to a minority wife. They have a twins, a boy and girl aged 10. This study is based on therapy that is being conducted online.

eason for eferral

Jackson was referred to me due to issues at his job. The client was involved in a physical dispute with his wife that resulted from an argument over gambling. It is evident that Jackson's wife has serious gambling problem. Jackson's wife called the police during the dispute and this resulted in his police department's standard operating procedure to provide mandatory counseling for 13 weeks. Another result of the dispute, required Jackson to surrender his firearms. In order for client to get…… [Read More]

References

Babcock, J.C., Green, C.E., & Robie, C. (2004). Does batterers' treatment work? A meta- analytic review of domestic violence treatment. Clinical psychology review, 23(8), 1023- 1053.

Cross, C.L., & Ashley, L. (2004). Police trauma and addiction: Coping with the dangers of the job. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 73(10), 24-32.

Diagnostic and statistical manual-text revision (DSM-IV-TRim, 2000). American Psychiatric Association, 2000.

Gersons, B.P. (1989). Patterns of PTSD among police officers following shooting incidents: A two-dimensional model and treatment implications. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2(3), 247-257.
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Canadian Public Policy Education Learning Disability D

Words: 2563 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23922217

Canada Public Policy: ADHD and Education

Canadian Public Policy, Education Learning disability A.D.H.D

Struggle by Human ights Groups and Parents

Public Policy Canada: An Overview

Policy Implications

It has been estimated that almost five percent of School aged children out of population of 2.1 Million in Ontario are suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Contrasting other disabilities like autism or learning disabilities the ADHD was not in the special education previously. The students with ADHD were not included in the special education policy and thus the students and parents were suffering as they could not get the necessary interventions at School suggested by the doctor. (Andrea Golden, 2012)

ecently Education Minister of Ontario has announced to accommodate the students with ADHD and thus relaxed the parents as previously parents were spending from their pockets on theirs children with ADHD. A memorandum has been posted on the Ministry of Education…… [Read More]

References

Andrea Golden. (2012) Students with ADHD have legal right to supports in school Accessed online at http://www.thestar.com/living/article/1112930 -- students-with-adhd-have-legal-right-to-supports-in-school?bn=1

Castellanos, X.F. And Tannock, R. (2002). Neuroscience of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: The search for endophenotypes. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 3, 617-628.

Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The Constitution Act, 1982, being Schedule B. To the Canada Act 1982 (U.K.), 1982, c. 11. Ottawa, ON. Government of Canada.

Dryer, R., Kiernan, M.J., and Tyson, G.A. (2006). Implicit theories of the characteristics and causes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder held by parents and professionals in the psychological, educational, medical and allied health fields. Australian Journal of Psychology, 58, 79-92
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Single Case Study of an Individual

Words: 2750 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12755281

Client Description.

The client is a 19-year-old single male who was referred for treatment by his parents who are concerned that his use of alcohol is interfering with his grades in college. The client reportedly had all A grades in high school and had been placed in a program for gifted students. However, he has reportedly flunked out of college in his first year. Following this he was also recently arrested for his second DUI offense, the first offense occurring when he was a senior in high school.

According to his parents, the client was born at full term with no complications occurring in the pregnancy and delivery of the baby. He met all of his developmental milestones ahead of expectation and has experienced no major health issues although his last physical examination was several years ago. He excelled in school and was placed in a program for gifted and…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.-text revision). Washington, DC: Author.

Beck, A.T., Epstein, N., Brown, G., & Steer, R.A. (1988). An inventory for measuring clinical anxiety: psychometric properties. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 56(6), 893-903.

Covin, R., Ouimet, A.J., Seeds, P.M., & Dozois, D.J. (2008). A meta-analysis of CBT for pathological worry among clients with GAD. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 22(1), 108-116.

Dutra, L., Stathopoulou, G., Basden, S.L., Leyro, T.M., Powers, M.B., & Otto, M.W. (2008). A meta-analytic review of psychosocial interventions for substance use disorders. American Journal Psychiatry, 165 (2) 179-187.
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Hypochondriasis An Overview Description of

Words: 1386 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12214467

2).

The availability of the Internet, many beleaguered doctors fear, will make it easier for hypochondriac patients to find new and rare illnesses to diagnose themselves with -- however, even doctors acknowledge the value of the Internet in their own work, when cases baffle them. "eb-based search engines such as Google are becoming the latest tools in clinical medicine, and doctors in training need to become proficient in their use....Using clusters of symptom-related words, they [the doctors] searched Google for a correct diagnosis and compared the internet diagnosis with those in the journals....Google searches found the correct diagnosis in 15 - or 58 per cent - of cases proving, say the authors, that the engine is a useful aid, particularly if the condition has 'unique' symptoms...But patients doing a Google search may be less likely to reach the correct diagnosis" ("GPs should Google diagnosis: study," Nine MSNBC, 2007). Again, one…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Austen, Jane. Emma. Full e-text available 18 Apr 2008 at  http://www.austen.com/emma/ 

GPs should Google diagnosis: study." Nine MSNBC. 18 Nov 2007. 10 Apr 2008. http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=160924

Hypochondriasis." The Cleveland Clinic Department of Patient Education and Health

Information. 17 Apr 2008. http://www.clevelandclinic.org/health/health-info/docs/3700/3783.asp?index=9886
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Alcohol Drinking Among Young Jews

Words: 23454 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67540801

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Clinical Psychology

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study was to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26 yeas, the elationship between academic achievement and the alcohol use fequency of male Jewish…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Alcohol Drinking Among Young Jews

Words: 23424 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99740327

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Clinical Psychology

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study was to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26 yeas, the elationship between academic achievement and the alcohol use fequency of male Jewish…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Drinking With Younger Jews

Words: 24280 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42632920

Paenting Style Influence on Excess Alcohol Intake Among Jewish Youth

Ross

Maste of Science, Mental Health Counseling, College, Januay, 2008

Clinical Psychology

Anticipated; Decembe, 2016

The health hazads that ae associated with adolescent alcohol use ae well documented, and thee is gowing ecognition among policymakes and clinicians alike that moe needs to be done to addess this public health theat. The pupose of this study will be to examine the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish college students in the United States. The study daws on attachment theoy, social leaning theoy, and a paenting style model as the main theoetical famewoks to evaluate the effects of diffeent paenting styles on alcohol consumption levels among Jewish adolescents to develop infomed answes to the study's thee guiding eseach questions concening the elationship between peceived paenting style and excess alcohol use of male, Jewish, college students aged 18-26…… [Read More]

references to gender.

Scoring: The PAQ is scored easily by summing the individual items to comprise the subscale scores. Scores on each subscale range from 10 to 50.

Author: Dr. John R. Buri, Department of Psychology, University of St. Thomas, 2115

Summit Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55105.

Source: Buri, J.R. (1991). Parental Authority Questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Assessment, 57, 110-119
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Psychology Testing Psychometric Emotional Intelligence

Words: 12427 Length: 45 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79715879



As emotionally intelligent employees are reportedly more content, conscientious and committed in the workplace, businesses and organizations are repeatedly advised to recruit and retain these individuals. Abraham (2006), nevertheless, reports that the strongest findings emerging from her study was.".. The effect of job control on emotional intelligence." She contends that emotionally intelligent employees will not just naturally thrive in their workplace; that the work environment needs to provide independence in decision making for employees to succeed.

Aims and Objectives

Aim

To explore concepts encapsulated in and related to EQ testing, through intensive research and appropriate assessment of collected data.

esearch for this project proposes to increase understanding of EQ testing, as well as, complementary components.

Each objective presented in this proposal reflects an area of interest which will be expounded upon. As Objective 5, however, mirrors a primary consideration, plans are to include numerous samplings of related studies.

1.2 Objective…… [Read More]

References

Abraham, Rebecca. "The Role of Job Control as a Moderator of Emotional Dissonance and Emotional Intelligence -- Outcome Relationships.(Statistical Data Included)," the Journal of Psychology, March 1, 2000.

Bar-on, Reuven Ph.D (2005). "The World's First Scientific Measure of Emotional Intelligence."(2006). PEN Psychodiagnostics [26 September 2006]. http://www.eqiq.nl/eqivol.htm.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5008598359

Before You Start Your Fruit and Fibre Diet You Should Speak to This Man. (2005, February 9). Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), p. 12.
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Application of a Pedagogic Model to the Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Words: 60754 Length: 230 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60817292

Pedagogic Model to the Teaching of Technology to Special Education Students

Almost thirty years ago, the American federal government passed an act mandating the availability of a free and appropriate public education for all handicapped children. In 1990, this act was updated and reformed as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which itself was reformed in 1997. At each step, the goal was to make education more equitable and more accessible to those with special educational needs. During the last presidential term, the "No Child Left Behind" Act attempted to assure that individuals with disabilities were increasingly mainstreamed and assured of high educational results. All of these legislative mandates were aimed at insuring that children with disabilities were not defrauded of the public education which has become the birthright of all American children. The latest reforms to IDEA, for example, provided sweeping reforms which not only expanded the classification of…… [Read More]

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Parenting Program for Women and

Words: 41621 Length: 150 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12171638

There are many of these individuals, and it is time that this is changed.

Parents often look away from these kinds of problems, or they spend their time in denial of the issue because they feel that their child will not be harmed by parental involvement with drugs or alcohol. Some parents have parents that were/are addicts themselves, and some are so busy with their lives that they do not actually realize that their child has any kind of problem with the lifestyle of the parent until it becomes so severe that it cannot be overlooked, or until it is brought to their attention by police, the school, or someone else that has seen it first hand. Parents are not the only ones that overlook this issue, though.

Sometimes siblings and friends also see problems that they ignore, do not understand, or do not talk to anyone about, and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aleman-Padilla, L. 2002. Babies First gets last word on infant care Hundreds recognize groups contribution at fourth annual event. The Fresno Bee.

Anderson, D. 2004. Funding cuts impact health services. Precinct Reporter.

Anderson, S.A. (2000). How parental involvement makes a difference in reading achievement. Reading Improvement.

Baker, P.L. (2000). I didn't know: discoveries and identity transformation of women addicts in treatment. Journal of Drug Issues, 30, 863-881.