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Normative Theories Act Utilitarianism and Rule Utilitarianism

Words: 1554 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45083800

Utilitarianism and ule Utilitarianism

Normative Ethics

Normative ethics entails accessing the moral standards that relate to right and wrong conducts. Normative ethics provides the ideal for socially correct behaviors. Normative theories are founded on an individual's principles of determining and differentiating between right and wrong (achels & achels, 2009). Therefore, it is appreciable that normative theories are founded not only by the societies' expectation but also on the principles an individual rides on as far as right and wrong relate. This paper presents a comparison between Act utilitarianism and ule Utilitarianism.

On the overall, utilitarianism determines ways of determining the best action depending on the choices individuals face. The guiding principle of utilitarianism is basically the consequence of individual actions, policies and laws (achels & achels, 2009). The evaluation of ones actions in utilitarianism is thus dependent on the outcome of the action and whether the outcome satisfies the individual's…… [Read More]

References

Rachels, J., & Rachels, S. (2009). The Elements of Moral Philosophy 6th edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
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Theory When Studying Theory Keep

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47914082

Per the author, the user should not be blamed for when the design does not meet user needs. All theories by individual designers on how the world works are biased because they are based on individual assumptions. It is important for designers to pay attention to information which leads to predictable results. Major problem in theory and design is the lack of an explicit body of positive knowledge.

The Nature of Positive Theory for Environmental Design: Based on many design failures, it is apparent that design needs to focus on the diversity of people and how they actually experience a designed environment, and make this focus systematic. The designer's understanding of the environment and how it affects people's lives is positive theory in practice. In addition, hypotheses need to validate this understanding and a clear framework of the process needs to be put in place.

A Conceptual Model of Architectural…… [Read More]

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Educational Theories Guiding Educational Experience Description of

Words: 3172 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29439383

Educational Theories Guiding Educational Experience

Description of an education event experienced

I am a dentist, and I have started a course on teaching dentistry. My experience with education was never a particularly encouraging one as my teacher was always absent. When I was at school, the teachers went on strike, and that left us with no attention from them. We had to do much of the studying alone, and all required research lay squarely on our shoulders in the absence of teachers for as long as they were striking. Whenever the teachers came around school, they applied a work to rule strategy and that was extremely devastating. Lecturers were never available for any extra consultation, and we had to take our learning as individual responsibilities instead of waiting for support or guidance from lecturers. Any difficulties, which we may have faced during the study never, had a chance in the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Annand, D. (2011). Social presence within the community of inquiry framework. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 12(5), 40-56. Aristotle.

(2002). Aristotle nicomachean ethics. (J. Sachs, Trans.). Newburyport, MA: Focus

Publishing/R. Pullins Co.

Baker, C. (2010). The impact of instructor immediacy and presence for online student affective learning, cognition, and motivation. The Journal of Educators online, 7(1), 1-30.
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How Positive and Normative Economics Relates to the US Government

Words: 2078 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17995914

POSITIVE AND NOMATIVE ECONOMICS ELATES TO THE U.S. GOVENMENT

The objective to the success of a specific science is the capability to identify and delineate opinions on 'what is' from 'what ought to happen'. This includes providing a demarcation between positive statements and normative statements. Positive statements deal with 'what is, was or what will be' but the normative statements deals with 'what ought to be' and are based on value judgments regarding what is good or what is bad. The positive conclusions could be considered as those which are extensively applicable throughout the whole world and they are testable whereas the normative instructions are not testable but constitute the basis for formulation of positive statements. Positive statements are for example, when we ask economists to inform us regarding how the price system operates, we are asking them to travel us along the road of positive economics. The following statement…… [Read More]

References

"Americans on Globalization: A Study of U.S. Public Attitudes." (28 March, 2000) Retrieved from http://www.pipa.org/OnlineReports/Globalization/introduction.html Accessed on 14 May, 2005

Deardorff, Alan V; Stern, Robert M. "An Overview of the Modeling of the Choices and Consequences of U.S. Trade Policy." The University of Michigan. Discussion Paper No: 400. Retrieved from  http://www.fordschool.umich.edu/rsie/workingpapers/Papers376-400/r400.pdf  Accessed on 14 May, 2005

Economics 104B - Lecture Notes Part III (November 9, 2004) "The Demand Side: Keynesian Economics" Retrieved from  http://64.233.187.104/search?q=cache:1BoqrVQy0tgJ:economics.wustl.edu/~e104sf/lec-notes-III.doc  Accessed on 14 May, 2005

Higgs, Robert. "Book Review: The Future of U.S. Capitalism." New York: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://www. the.net/bookreviews/library/0554.shtml Accessed on 14 May, 2005
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Western Ethical Theories

Words: 1246 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 10008808

Western Ethical Theories

The objective of this work is to examine Western Ethical theories including teleological, deontological, natural law, and interest view and virtue ethics.

The work of Bennett-Woods (2005) states that while the words 'ethics' and 'morality' are "often used interchangeably, morality is more precisely used to refer to the customs, principles of conduct and moral codes of an individual, group or society." Ethics, is also stated to be termed "moral philosophy of the science of morals" and is the branch of philosophy that examines "morality through the critical examination of right and wrong in human action." (Bennett-Woods, 2005)

The study of ethics is generally characterized into three specific domains of study include those of: (1) metaethics which is related to the nature of right and wrong insofar as the where and how of the original of ethical judgments and what these judgments mean regarding the human nature and…… [Read More]

References

Virtue Ethics (2010) Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved from:  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-virtue/ 

Eric Wingrove-Haugland (1999) The Foundations of the Core Values in Western Ethical Theories. Retrieved from:  http://isme.tamu.edu/JSCOPE99/Wingrove99.html 

Lovin, R.W. (2004) Moral Theories. Blackwell Publishing Company. Retrieved from:  http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/content/BPL_Images/Content_store/Sample_chapter/0631216340/Schweiker_sample%20chapter_A%20companion%20to%20religious%20ehtics.pdf 

Bennett-Woods, D. (2005 ) Ethics at a Glance. 2005 Regis University. Retrieved from: http://rhchp.regis.edu/HCE/EthicsAtAGlance/EthicsAtAGlance.pdf
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Kings Ali as Artist Normative

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 60019768



The fight itself was beautifully orchestrated by Ali through the study of Foreman's technique, movement, strength, and weaknesses. hile preparing for the fight, Ali focused training on his weaknesses, and on Foreman's strengths as a fighter. Ali also took advantage of the public's support and encouragement and used it to build up his esteem, mentally and amongst the African peoples. Foreman, on the other hand, stayed out of the public eye and was reluctant to take part of the cheering for or against his opponent. Foreman was rather laconic during his stay, saying little and staying out of the spotlight. Ali took advantage of the publicity that the fight was receiving and was constantly in front of the camera, whether he was boasting his great skill, advocating his political views, or trying to psych Foreman out. Ali boasts include his great ability to be able to manipulate Foreman's actions stating,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

D'Silva, Roy. "History of Boxing." Buzzle.com. 2011. Web. 3 February 2011.

Gast, Leon. When We Were Kings. Gramercy Pictures, 1996. Film.

Graham, Gordon. Philosophy of the Arts: An Introduction to Aesthetics. New York:

Routledge, 2005. Print.
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Theory Help You to Make Sense of

Words: 3357 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34639519

Theory Help You to Make Sense of Your Own Organization and the Management Practices in Your Organization?

Too often, individuals get an idea stuck in their heads and they cannot dislodge it no matter how hard they try. In actuality though, most people who can only contrive a particular system for working, whether that be managing or running an organization, and there is no interest in change. I realize that falling back to a secure position is comforting, but it is also damaging from a growth standpoint. And, growth is the object in business; that is, aside from the fact that making money is probably the primary concern.

But making money has led to some troubling consequences in the world as businesses have grown greedy and managers have become overly authoritarian and sure of their stagnant methods. The reality is that "managing and organizing are not isolatable objects of study…… [Read More]

References

Akella, D., (2008). A reflection on critical management studies. Journal of Management and Organization, 14(1), 100-109.

Bourn, D. (2011). Global skills: From economic competitiveness to cultural understanding and critical pedagogy. Critical Literacy: Theory & Practice, 6(1), 3- 20.

Das, H., & Long, B.S., (2010). What makes management research interesting?: An exploratory study. Journal of Managerial Issues, 22(1), 127-140.

Delbecq, A.L., (1999). Rethinking management education. Administrative Science Quarterly, 44(2), 439-442.
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Normative Ethics

Words: 683 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78397314

Ethics

While all ethical theories appeal to me in some way, the one I relate to the most is utilitarianism. Utilitarianism suggests that the ethical decision should enhance as much happiness as possible. I appreciate this idea, which is why I believe I make more decisions using a utilitarian ethic than any other. With Kantian duty ethics, I struggle with the absolutism. I do not believe it is possible to have one principle govern every ethical decision that I make. For example, I do believe that sometimes it is acceptable to tell lies. I have told lies to make my parents or girlfriend feel good, and I do not think it hurt them. In fact, I believe that if they knew now which lies I told and when, they would not even be upset. I would never tell a lie that I could later not admit to, however, I relate…… [Read More]

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Theories Related to Organizational Change

Words: 2545 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Application Essay Paper #: 13579303

Organizational theory refers to the behavioral and social theories which help in the understanding of both informal and formal organizations. It makes references to a number of fields - anthropology, sociology, psychology, semiotics, economics, communications science, history and cybernetics (Sage Publications, n.d). The field has become popular with sociological researchers. Many of these researchers, drawn from such fields as medical sociology, social movements, political sociology and education, have realized the need to study this concept because of the role in empirical research that big organizations play. Scholars out of this field have always found discussions regarding organizational theory arcane. These scholars also hold the view that all that organizational theory concerns itself with is firms and so it is not applicable in other social situations. The formal or complex organization is the study object in organizational theory. Assumptions are made that there exists goals, rules, hierarchy and definitions of membership…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ascher, W. (2000). Applying classic organization theory to sustainable resource & environmental management. Retrieved from  http://law.duke.edu/news/papers/ascher.pdf 

Boundless. (2014). Why Study Organizational Theory?. Retrieved from https://www.boundless.com/management/textbooks/boundless-management-textbook/organizational-theory-3/why-study-organizational-theory-28/why-study-organizational-theory-163-7564/

Cohen, D, & Prusak, L. (2001). In Good Company. How social capital makes organizations work. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Conner, D. (1990). The changing nation: Strategies for citizen action (Handout materials). Atlanta: ODR, Inc.ent document.
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Theory According to Your View

Words: 2190 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 70258648

S. involvement in World War II.

Is it possible to have a general theory of war?

Perhaps the most well-known "theory" of war is articulated in Matthew 24:6: "You will hear of wars and rumors of wars. . . . Such things must happen" (New International Version 1984). Therefore, although it is possible to have a general theory of war, any such theory will be limited in its ability to explain the why's and how's of its occurrence. According to Gray (1999), in his seminal text, on War, Carl Philipp Gottfried von Clausewitz, set forth a modern general theory of war, but Sun Tzu's Art of War also addressed this issue. Clausewitz, though, is cited time and again in the relevant literature as having propounded a general theory of war. For instance, eid (2004) reports that, "In particular, he seeks to explain the methods to establish a general theory of…… [Read More]

References

Clausewitz, C.V. (1976) on War. Princeton, NJ.

Gray, C.S. (1999) Modern Strategy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

-. The 21st Century Security Environment and the Future of War. Parameters, 38(4): 14-9.

Lichbach, M.I. (1989) "An evaluation of 'does economic inequality breed political conflict?'
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Theory Being Posed in The Normal and the Pathological

Words: 962 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67343622

Theoretical Argument

Crime is a normative aspect of any social construct. That however does not in any way imply that a criminal is a set of or his psychological and biological endowments, if that may be called so. These are actually two very different queries on altogether different premises. The differentiation is better captured when sociological pursuits (fraud, slander, calumny, insults, etc.) are ingrained into the discussion about criminality. It also discount the fact that criminality should be looked down upon, though crimes are an accepted social construct. In ways similar to an individual avoiding pain, so does the society abhor crime. As an extension, similarly as pain cannot be wished away and does form a feature of life, so does criminality about a social structure. That is however not at all to defend crime. Such a posit would be against the moral obligations that has tangible outcomes and become…… [Read More]

References

Emile Durkheim, (2008). The normal and the pathological, Oxford University Press.
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Dahl's Theory of Democracy

Words: 1304 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 10978204

Dahl's Theory Of Democracy

The two articles have defined Dahl as the role model in democracy research and the most eminent figure in the field of modern science. The articles reveal that Dahl has adequate knowledge in democratic issues specializing in empirical and normative aspects. He has pioneered in arguments regarding democracy concerns. Aspects of the democratic theory induced by Dahl are based on an analytical approach comprising of three elements. The first component includes values that constitute the objectives of a democratic government. The second component comprises of individual premises while the third is the required institutions for the implementation of democratic values. Besides knowing that democracy goes line in line with individuals, most leaders tend to ignore the individuals they are leading and their reactions. From the articles, the author argues that we cannot analyze how to produce democracy by ignoring to observe individuals making up democratic governments.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dahl, Robert A. What is Democracy? In Dahl, Robert A. On Democracy. 1998. Newhaven: Yale University Press, 35-43

Dahl, Robert A. Where and How did Democracy Develop. In Dahl, Robert A. On Democracy. 1998. Newhaven: Yale University Press, 7-25

Pateman, Carole. Participation and Democratic Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2011. Print.
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Influential Theories Related to Deviance by Robert

Words: 3803 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29991827

influential theories related to deviance by Robert K. Merton. Firstly, the paper provides the historical context within which the theorist produced their ideas. Secondly, the paper provides a summary of their original theory. Thirdly, the paper provides a discussion of how the model has been critiqued and altered as new research has emerged. Lastly, the paper delves into the theory's current usage/popularity within criminology.

The historical context within which the theorist produced their ideas

There is huge contribution of influential theories related to deviance by Robert K. Merton. As a matter of fact, He is considered one of the most significant sociologists of modern times. Moreover, he has also made large number of contributions to the criminology field. Undoubtedly, Merton influenced various fields of science, humanities, law, political theories, economics and anthropology (Cole, 2004, p.37). Merton's introduced numerous concepts like anomie, deviant behavior, self-fulfilling prophecy, strain, middle range theory and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

American Sociological Review (2012). Retrieved January 29, 2014 from  http://garfield.library.upenn.edu/histcomp/index-merton.html 

Bernanke, Ben, S. (1995) 'The Macroeconomics of the Great Depression: A Comparative Approach', Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, 27 February.

Bivens, T. (2004). Robert K. Merton Draft. Florida State University Publications

Calhoun, C. (2003). Remembering Robert K. Merton. Papers in Honor of Robert K. Merton. 175-220. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
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International Relations Theory and United Nations Peace

Words: 2630 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23279245

International elations Theory and United Nations Peace:

International elations (I) field normally focuses on the study of how various state systems can be made to work more efficiently to improve the power of law, maintain order, manage interstate affairs peacefully, and lessen prospects of war. The word relation in this field is used to denote the inclusion of more than political affairs to aspects like conflict and peace. International relations field is closely linked administratively to political science departments (O'Connor, 2010). Actually, the field of international relations traces its origin from various subfields including international law, diplomatic history, and international economics. While it's still early to consider international relations as a sovereign field of study, it has broken from the analytical procedures of economics and law as well as the ongoing process of breaking from political science. Consequently, this field has become an important facet because of the conceptualizations of…… [Read More]

References:

Ahmed, S. Keating P. & Solinas, U (2007), 'Shaping the Future of UN Peace Operations: is there

A Doctrine In the House?' Cambridge Review of International Affairs, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 11-28, viewed 26 November 2011,

Cristol, J (n.d.), International Relations Theory, Oxford Bibliographies Online, viewed 26

November 2011,
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Ethical Theories the Three Basic Ethical Theories

Words: 2729 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8101894

Ethical Theories

The three basic ethical theories share a number of similarities, because they each attempt to describe and explicate the ethical decisions made by humans as well as the logic (or illogic) that is used to inform any particular behavior. Utilitarianism offers what is perhaps the most sound ethical theory due to the way it chooses for itself the goal of its efforts, but it is hampered by disagreement regarding the precise execution of the theory. A deontological theory of ethics may be useful for formulating general rules regarding proper behavior, and as such is popular is the workplace, but these rules are not universally applicable and in some cases can actually lead to unethical behavior if followed without fail. Finally, while virtues-based ethics purports to offer individuals instruction for the cultivation of ideal behavioral traits, by definition it cannot offer a universal ethical norm, as it is based…… [Read More]

References

Begley, A.M. (2005). Practising virtue: A challenge to the view that a virtue centred approach to ethics lacks practical content. Nursing Ethics, 12(6), 622-37.

Broad, C. (1930). Five types of ethical theory. New York: Routledge.

Darwall (Ed.). (2003). Virtue ethics. Malden: Blackwell Publishing.

DeConinck, J.B., & Lewis, W.F. (1997). The influence of deontological and teleological considerations and ethical climate on sales managers intentions to reward or punish sales force behavior. Journal of Business Ethics, 16(5), 497-506.
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HRM Organizational Behavior Theories Frameworks and the

Words: 4457 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44961156

HM Organizational Behavior, Theories, Frameworks and the Links Between Individual and Organizational Performance

This work in writing conducts a critical evaluation of HM Organizational Behavior Theories Frameworks that link performance.

Defining and measuring the effectiveness and performance of workers is a specific part of the HM manager's work. The question presenting is one that asks how the skills, behaviors and attitudes that are needed by workers to successfully and effectively perform their roles is defined. One way of measuring this is linking the performance of individuals to the organizational goals. This is generally accomplished through use of competencies which are described as "the integrated knowledge, skills, judgment, and attributes that people need to perform a job effectively. By having a defined set of competencies for each role in the business, it shows workers the kinds of behaviors the organizational values…" (MindTools, 2011) Lawrence (1998) reports that people are "multifaceted and…… [Read More]

References

Alderfer, C.P. (1972). Existence, relatedness, and growth. New York: Free Press.

Argyris, C. & Schon, DA (1996) Organizational Learning II Theory, Method, and Practice. Reading MA: Addison-Wesley.

Beer, M. (1980) Organization Change and Development: A Systems View. Santa Monica, CA, Goodyear.

Castellano, William G. (nd) A New Framework of Employee Engagement. Center for Human Resource Strategy Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
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Accounting Theories and Business Decisions The Business

Words: 1729 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16133016

Accounting Theories and usiness Decisions: The usiness World

Case Facts

Application of theories

Other cases of stakeholder theory application

Accounting theories and business decisions: The business world

There are many theories that explain the complexity of relationship between different groups of people directly and indirectly related to an organization. Two of the most comprehensive and most discussed theories are stakeholder theory and agency theory. oth the theories describe what the main purpose of each group is and how these groups ought to manage these relationships. In agency theory, it identified that agency relationship takes place when one or more than one principal, acting as owners, delegate their power to make decisions, to a person acting as their agent or steward. Thus, agency theory principally revolves around the relationship of principal and agent. While the principal delegates the authority or decision making power to agent (managers) to act in the best…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alessi, Chirstopher. 2013. "Understanding the LIBOR Scandal." Council on Foreign Relations, Feb 6. Accessed August 23, 2013.  http://www.cfr.org/united-kingdom/understanding-libor-scandal/p28729 

Dean, Cornelia. 2007. "Executive on a mission: saving the planet." New York Times, May 22. Accessed August 23, 2013.  http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/22/science/earth/22ander.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 

Jensen, Michael C. 2010. "Value maximization, stakeholder theory, and the corporate objective function." Journal of applied corporate finance 22: 32-42.

Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. 2011. How great companies think differently. Harvard Business Review, November. Accessed August 24, 2013.  http://hbr.org/2011/11/how-great-companies-think-differently/ar/2
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Christian Personal Christian Theory of

Words: 2458 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17212565



Anderson (2000) converses spiritual oppression and how Satan and his fallen angels are in the process of trying to overpower the believers will. He also provides the phases to independence, for example: fake vs. factual, dishonesty vs. truth, resentment vs. tolerance, revolt vs. obedience, arrogance vs. self-effacement, and oppression vs. lack of restrictions. Fake vs. real step show how we need to absorb to recognize God's certainty so we do not fall into Satan's trap. If fall for these tricks of deception then we automatically give up God's truth for what is considered a lie. Dishonesty vs. truth shows that we should battle Satan's trickery with God's reality. If we become deceived then we must do away with any misleading views for the truth that will bring us our liberation.

Bitterness vs. forgiveness is showing us that we do not need to harbor that illness in our hearts because Satan…… [Read More]

Works Cited

A., H.D. (1999). The Anxiety Cure: You Can Find Emotional Tranquility and Wholeness. Thomas Nelson, Inc. .

Adams, E.J. (1986). How to Help People Change: The Four- Step Biblical Process. Grand Rapids: Zondervan .

Anderson, T.N. (1990). The Bondage Breaker: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings and Habitual Sins. . Boston: House Publishers, Inc.

Backus, W.C. (1980). Telling Yourself the Truth: Find Your Way Out of Depression, Anxiety, Fear, Anger and Other Common Problems by Applying the Priciples of Misbelief Therapy . Grand Rapids: Bethany Publishing Group.
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Crime Theory in the World of Criminology

Words: 1589 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16714251

Crime Theory

In the world of criminology, several theories have been constructed to help legal professionals understand the nature of and motive behind criminal activity. Studying these more closely can help with the rehabilitation of criminals and curb criminal activity. Criminal theory, therefore, is constructed to determine ways in which to prevent crime and mitigate the crime being committed. Theories such as the social control theory, strain theory, differential association theory, and neutralization theory can therefore be used for the purposes mentioned above. Each theory has its strenghts and weaknesses; to determine the theory to use could be determined on a case by case basis, hence enhancing the strengths and minimizing the weaknesses of the theory in question.

According to Welch (1998), Hirschi wrote his Causes of Delinquency, in which he developed the social control theory, during the 1960s. This was a troubled time in social terms, and American society…… [Read More]

References

Ball, R.A. (2006, Mar 7). An Empirical Exploration of Neutralization Theory. Criminology, Vol 4, Iss 2. Retrieved from:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-9125.1966.tb00147.x/abstract 

Matsueda, R.L. (2000). Differential Association Theory. Retrieved from:  http://www.soc.washington.edu/users/matsueda/DA.pdf 

Nash, M. (2002, Nov. 15). General Strain Theory as an Explanation for Crime and Deviance. Retrieved from:  http://web.viu.ca/crim/student/nash.pdf 

Welch, K. (1998, Nov. 30). Two Major Theories of Travis Hirschi. Retrieved from: http://criminology.fsu.edu/crimtheory/hirschi.htm
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Dimensions of Policy Theory the

Words: 1808 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 50396475

" (Devine, 2007)

Summary and Conclusion

Policy evaluation enables educators to make determines as to the accountability of the system and the conditions needed to expand the capacity of the educational institution to provide high quality curriculum and instruction as well as in the formulation of assessment and toward the increase of learning of students. This brief study has demonstrated how the competing and opposing forces locally, statewide and federal serve to formulate policies and ultimately to test the soundness and effectiveness of those policies. Policy evaluation is critical for educational institutions and use of the four dimensions of policy making offers a framework that enables the comprehension of policymaking toward the enhancement of education and improvement of the educational institution.

ibliography

Cooper, .S, Fusarelli, L.D., & Randall, E.V. (2004). etter policies, better schools: Theories and applications. Pearson Education, Inc.

Cooper, ruce S., Fusarelli, Lance D, & Randall, E. Vance…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cooper, B.S, Fusarelli, L.D., & Randall, E.V. (2004). Better policies, better schools: Theories and applications. Pearson Education, Inc.

Cooper, Bruce S., Fusarelli, Lance D, & Randall, E. Vance (2003). Better policies, better schools: Theories and applications. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Devine, Jack (2007) Four Dimensions of Educational Policy Theory: Normative, Structural, Constituentive and Technical. Associated Content 31 Dec 2007. Online available at: http://216.241.164.182/article/500765/four_dimensions_of_educational_policy.htmlLuxemburg, Fred C. And Irby, Beverly J. (2006) the Principalship: Vision to Action. Political and Policy Context. Thomson -- Wadsworth. U.S. Online available at: https://classshares.student.usp.ac.fj/ED453/R12%20Political%20and%20Policy%20Context.pdf

Fullan (2001) in Luxemburg, Fred C. And Irby, Beverly J. (2006) the Principalship: Vision to Action. Political and Policy Context. Thomson -- Wadsworth. U.S. Online available at: https://classshares.student.usp.ac.fj/ED453/R12%20Political%20and%20Policy%20Context.pdf
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Psychology Erick Erikson's Theory of Socioemotional Development

Words: 575 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 1333724

Psychology

Erick Erikson's Theory of Socioemotional Development

Erik Erikson, American psychoanalyst, is known in the field of psychology for his contribution in studying the socioemotional aspect of development among humans. Called the theory of socioemotional development, Erikson posits in his theory that, "people grow and develop "socialized by and socialize others -- parents, siblings, peers, teachers... processes that involve changes in an individual's relationships with other people, changes in emotion, and changes in personality" (Santrock, 2001:338). Erikson identified different dichotomies that specifically delineate positive and negative aspects of socioemotional developments among individuals. These dichotomies are placed at various levels, where different socioemotional characteristics are manifested at each level of the individual's development.

Erikson's theory is an essential tool to understanding human behavior because it serves as a guideline for people to understand the different changes in socioemotional characteristics of people as they grow older. Of course, there are certain exceptions…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dundy, E. (1976). "Life is all ups and no downs on this carousel." New York Times Web site (NYTimes.com). Available at  http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/08/22/specials/erikson-carousel.html .

Santrock, J. (2001). Psychology. Singapore: McGraw-Hill Book Co.
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Management Concepts and Theory

Words: 828 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72808712

Management Theory vs. Organizational Functions

Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory is useful for raising awareness of the contribution between job challenge and responsibility in motivating employees toward higher productivity and employee retention. It has also been useful in identifying and assessing customer satisfaction characteristics. Fishbein's Reasoned Action Theory is useful for explaining why particular behaviors are happening and the underlying causes of the behavior. Both theories are useful for identifying problem areas and planning actions for improvement in organizational behaviors.

According to (Bolm, 2012), the Two-factor Theory claims individual perception of satisfaction or dissatisfaction relates to discrete intrinsic and extrinsic variables where a variable can uniquely influence satisfaction or dissatisfaction, but not both. Motivator (intrinsic) factors include achievement, recognition, and responsibility where hygiene (extrinsic) factors include policy, status, and security. Motivator factors, when present, increase job motivation and satisfaction, but, when not present, show no effect. Hygiene factors, when present, show no…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bolm, J. (2012). Two-factor theory-at the intersection of health care management and patient satisfaction. Clinicoecon Outcomes Res., vol 4, 277-285 Retrieved from http:/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3468274.

Dartey-Baah, K. & . (2011). Application of Frederick Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory in assessing and understanding employee motivation at work: A Ghanian Perspective. European Journal of Business and Management 3(9).

Peters, R.M. (2010). Theory of Planned Behavior, Self-Care Motivation, and Blood Pressure Self-Care. Res Theory Nurs Pract, 24(3), 172-186 Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm, nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3728772.

Sukato, N. & . (2009). A Model of Male Consumer Behavior in Buying Skin Care Products in Thailand. ABAC Journal, 29(1), 39-52 Retrieved from  http://www.abacjournal.au.edu/2009/jan09/article03_JanApr2009.pdf .
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Ethical Theory and Moral Practice

Words: 4260 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 80307899

Ethical Theory & Moral Practice

Debates about theory and practice are ancient. Each generation considers the dynamics that surround issues about the interdependency of theory and praxis to be uniquely challenging. Complexity is a variable closely linked with knowledge. As science has added layer upon layer of knowledge, decision-making dilemmas have been confounded by new and staggering concomitant factors. In concert, theoretical frameworks for social science disciplines have been adapted to accept newly identified moral imperatives and ethical considerations.

This paper offers a discussion about the nexus of epistemology, ethics / morality, and praxis. An examination of the historical development of the paradigm and the assumptions of post-positivism is presented as an introductory foundation for the discussion. Next, is a discussion about ethical theory, followed by an exploration of the increasing division between philosophical frameworks and evolving modern science. Particular note is made of the theory-practice gap in healthcare, which…… [Read More]

References

Beauchamp, T.L. (2007). Does Ethical Theory Have a Future in Bioethics? The Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. 32(2): 209-217.

"Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" (2008). Conference 2008. Retrieved online:  http://www.bezinningscentrum.nl/links  / special_links5/special_links5_conference.shtml

Fieser, J. (2009). Ethics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Retrieved online:  http://www.iep.utm.edu/ethics/#H3 

Gastmans, C. (1998). Nursing Considered as Moral Practice: A Philosophical-Ethical Interpretation of Nursing. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8(1): 43-69.
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Management Theories of Likert Blake

Words: 2432 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4086879

As in the model of Likert, progressively the concern for people increases as we move down the line from 'Exploitative authoritarian' to 'Benevolent authoritarian' to 'Consultative' to finally 'Participative', similarly in the Blake's Managerial Grid the mapping of high concern for people and low concern for production is seen as the score comes to be 1,9. On the other hand a close comparison of G2 stage of the Vroom-Yetton model and the Participative management of Likert model it is seen that both of them bear similarities. In G2 stage of Vroom-Yetton model, the leader shares the crisis and difficulties with the subordinates of his group and based on a consensus all the parties build and evaluate alternatives and try to arrive at a consensus on a solution.

oughly the same idea is conveyed in the Participative model of Likert wherein the management looks forward to build groups of employees who…… [Read More]

References

Conger, Jay a; Kanungo, Rabindra N. (1988) "Charismatic Leadership: The Elusive Factor in Organizational Effectiveness." Jossey-Bass Publishers. Retrieved at  http://www.coastwiseconsulting.com/Charismatic%20Leadership%20-%20OCRed.pdf . Accessed on 10 February, 2005 del Val, Manuela Pardo; Rodr'guez, Sonia Das'; "Participative management and organizational culture." Retrieved at  http://www.sses.com/public/events/euram/complete_tracks/managing_cultures_identities/pardo-del-val_perez_rodriguez.pdf . Accessed on 10 February, 2005

Inman, Mark Lee. (01 Jun 2000) "The relevance of traditional management theories to the 21st Century" Retrieved at  http://www.accaglobal.com/publications/studentaccountant/32495Accessed  on 10 February, 2005

Leadership Model and Theories" Retrieved at http://www.cda-acd.forces.gc.ca/CFLI/engraph/research/pdf/12.pdf. Accessed on 10 February, 2005

Likert's leadership styles" Retrieved at  http://changingminds.org/disciplines/leadership/styles/likert_style.htm . Accessed on 10 February, 2005
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Boudon 2001 Theories of Social

Words: 838 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 87823124

For example, Tocqueville was able to explain 18th century European aristocrat behavior by looking at social consequences. Like Tocqueville, Marx believed that they could explain individual actions by looking at subconscious class interests. Frey has demonstrated that people will accept individually negative outcomes, if they have positive group benefits.

Nietzsche believed that, while conscious of class interests, individual actions and beliefs should be viewed from an individual perspective, since they are motivated by the positive consequences to the individual actor. In discussing his theory of bounded rationality, Simon seemed to combine elements from the different theorist, by showing how social actions include cognitive dimensions.

3. How does the author distinguish human actions from other forms of human behavior?

Again, the author does not make it clear how he feels human actions and other forms of human behavior are different. Instead, he explains how various theorists have attempted to differentiate human…… [Read More]

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Prospect Theory The Phenomenon of

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 61416891

he vice-versa is true for losses because the function associating with the biased value and corresponding losses is steeper than the one for gains (McKeown, 2000). Consequently, the dissatisfaction associated with losses is usually greater than the pleasure associated with similar amounts of gain. Depending on whether the options or choices are framed on the basis of gains or losses, people respond differently. According to the theory, losses tend to have increased emotional impact than the same emotional impact of gains.

he two most common framing effects associated with the prospect theory are bi-directional and unidirectional effects. Bi-directional framing effects incorporate the preference reversal from mainly risk averse to mostly risk seeking or vice-versa because of the dichotic impact of the framing of the choice results. As a result, this effect is characterized by more risk-averse choices based on positive framing and more risk-seeking choices based on negative framing. On…… [Read More]

The two most common framing effects associated with the prospect theory are bi-directional and unidirectional effects. Bi-directional framing effects incorporate the preference reversal from mainly risk averse to mostly risk seeking or vice-versa because of the dichotic impact of the framing of the choice results. As a result, this effect is characterized by more risk-averse choices based on positive framing and more risk-seeking choices based on negative framing. On the contrary, the unidirectional effect involves no preference reversal like the bidirectional framing effects but rather incorporates the shift towards a more extreme risk preference. When the major preference is uni-directionally risk averse on both of the framing conditions, it's a more risk averse on the positive frame than a negative frame and vice versa.

In economics, the phenomenon of expected utility hypothesis is primarily a notion where the utility of a certain action is based on the overall 'betting' inclinations of the individuals involved especially when dealing where the probable result is either uncertain or risky. These inclinations are thus presented by a series of reimbursements (monetary or products/goods), the likelihood of repetition of incidence, the potential to evade further risks or uncertainties as well as the use of the same utility to people sharing different dynamics, capital as well as inclinations (Cynkar, 2007).

From a financial perspective, the prospect theory can be used to describe and explain some illogical financial behaviors. This is primarily because it explains the occurrence of the disposition effect, which is the predisposition for investors to hold on to losing stocks for a long period of time and sell winning stocks as soon as possible (Phung, 2012). The most reasonable course of action is to hold on to winning stocks for extra gains and sell the losing stocks to prevent rising losses. The sale of winning stocks prematurely can be understood through the consideration of Kahneman and Tversky's analysis in which individuals were willing to obtain a lower guaranteed gain of $500 rather than settling for a riskier choice that is likely to generate $1,000. The study explains reasons investors realize the gains of winning stocks
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Ethical Theories in Nursing

Words: 4777 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74406948

Nursing Ethical Theories

Ethical Theories in Nursing

Significance of Moral in Nursing

Deontology vs. Utilitarianism

Deontology

Utilitarianism

Justice Ethics vs. Care Ethics

Justice Ethics

Care Ethics

ights Ethics

Conflict of ights

Ethical Theories in Nursing

Moral philosophy has moved from addressing Plato's question of what makes the good person, to Kant's query as to the right thing to do, to Buber's concern with relationship. Whether referring to business ethics' interest in relationships between corporations and consumers; legal ethics' focus on relationships among the legal system, clients, and society; or nursing ethics' consideration of the relationship between patient and nurse; ethics and morality are conceptualized and actualized on the playing field of relationship.

The nature of nursing as a moral endeavor is an assumption embedded in any philosophical or theoretical consideration of the discipline and practice of nursing. An the goal of nursing is a moral one, namely, the good of…… [Read More]

References

Bandman, E.L., & Bandman, B.(1995). Nursing ethics through the lifespan (3rd ed.). Stamford, CT: Appleton & Lange

Buber, M.(1965). Between man and man (R.G. Smith & M.Friedman, Trans). New York: Macmillan. (Original work published 1947).

Carper, B. (1979). The ethics of caring. Advances in Nursing Science, 1(3), 11-19

Cooper, M.C. (1991). Principle-oriented ethics and the ethic of care: A creative tension. Advances in Nursing Science, 14(2), 22-31.
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Ethical Theories Ethical Theories Are

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79653165

For example, and employee might decide they will never be late for a meeting, which will appear to be a noble duty, but there might be a hidden reason towards this action. Maybe the employee prefers to sit in a particular place or sit. Another negative attribute of the deontology theory is the fact that it is mostly concerned with the individual's welfare and not others.

Utilitarianism theory

This theory deals with the individual's ability to foresee the consequences of their actions. A person will have to analyze the choice they make to ensure that they benefit more people Weymark, 2005.

Using this theory a person can compare similar past solutions, and develop a system that determines which choice will be most beneficial for a majority of people.

For a large corporation, this theory would be beneficial because employees will endeavor to perform their duties while analyzing the consequences of…… [Read More]

References

Ronzoni, M. (2010). Teleology, Deontology, and the Priority of the Right: On Some Unappreciated Distinctions. [Article]. Ethical Theory & Moral Practice, 13(4), 453-472. doi: 10.1007/s10677-009-9209-z

Weymark, J.A. (2005). Measurement theory and the foundations of utilitarianism. [Article]. Social Choice & Welfare, 25(2/3), 527-555. doi: 10.1007/s00355-005-0017-7
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Ethical Theories Ethics Is an

Words: 1982 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10100387

These are ethics that know no cultural bounds. hat is perceived as ethical in one society as well as any other is an example of a natural law. These are typically based on the human desire for equality as well as the desire to do good ("hat is Natural Law?"). Furthermore, natural rights evolve legally from natural laws often. They also often see an intertwining of religious beliefs, although they can also be expressed as more an intertwining of moral beliefs that are then supported by religion. The primary weakness of natural law theory is that it is sometimes difficult to determine if a belief is truly universal, or simply cultural.

Virtue Ethics:

Virtue ethics determines whether an action is right or wrong by the virtue of the action.

Virtue ethics is currently one of three major approaches in normative ethics. It may, initially, be identified as the one that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Kant's Moral Philosophy." Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. N.p., 23 Feb. 2004. Web. 9 Feb. 2011. .

MacKinnon, Barbara. Ethics: theory and contemporary issues. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth Pub. Co., 1995. Print.

"Virtue Ethics." Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. N.p., 18 July 2007. Web. 9 Feb. 2011. .

"What is Ethical Relativism?" Philosophy - AllAboutPhilosophy.org. N.p., 2011. Web. 9 Feb. 2011. .
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Ethical Theory and Moral Practice

Words: 597 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 43571515

Ethical Theory and Moral Practice developed as a cohesive field in the late twentieth century, with the establishment of the Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Journal, in 1998. The theory therefore represents a culmination of scholarly thought and analysis in the fields of philosophy, sociology, and psychology. As a cross-disciplinary theory, Ethical Theory and Moral Practice reveals the increasing hybridization of fields that relate to normative ethics.

Because Ethical Theory and Moral Practice is a relatively new field of scholastic inquiry, the field is currently "undergoing change," ("Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" 2008). Changes reflect shifting social, economic, and political realities. Without falling pray to the traps of ethical relativism, Ethical Theory and Moral Practice remains heterogeneous and diverse.

The roots of the theory are difficult to trace because of the "disciplinary cross-pollination" that has occurred ("Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" 2008).…… [Read More]

References

"Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: How do they relate?" (2008). Conference 2008. Retrieved online:  http://www.bezinningscentrum.nl/links /special_links5/special_links5_conference.shtml" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Organizing and Leadership Theories

Words: 1707 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46262213

Leadership Theories

Different Ways of Organizing in Supervision and Management

Organizing constitutes a crucial management function. It is essentially concerned with task allocation, division of labor, chain of command, lines of authority and communication, delegation, span of control, as well as supervision and coordination (Shafiee, Razminia & Zeymaran, 2016). The manner in which these processes are organized significantly influences organizational effectiveness and efficiency. It determines how quick or slow decisions are made and implemented. This is particularly important in a constantly evolving environment, in which agility is a crucial parameter of competitive advantage (Felin & Powell, 2016). Organizational structure also shapes relationships between superiors and subordinates (Shafiee, Razminia & Zeymaran, 2016).

There are different ways through which the organizing function may be executed. For instance, organizational structure may adopt either the centralized or decentralized form. The former entails concentrating decision-making authority in top organizational positions, while that latter involves distributing…… [Read More]

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Managerial Grid Theory in Today's Globally Competitive

Words: 1145 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86908837

Managerial Grid Theory

In today's globally competitive environment, an organization needs to pay far more attention to human resources management in order to be able to adapt quickly to a rapidly changing environment and remain profitable. Indeed, an organization has the greatest chance of being successful when all its employees work towards achieving its goals. However, the ability of an organization to motivate its employees into achieving organizational goals depends a great deal on the quality of leadership exhibited by its managers and supervisors (Allen, 1998, para 1). It is in the light of this context that obert Blake's "Managerial Grid" theory assumes significance. Developed initially with his colleague, Jane Mouton, the "Managerial Grid" is a model that measures and defines managerial or leadership styles.

Blake and Mouton first developed the "Managerial Grid" as a two-dimensional model of managerial style or leadership, based on the theory that managers are simultaneously…… [Read More]

References

Allen, G. (1998). Management: Supervision- Leading. Mountain View College.

Retrieved Oct. 15, 2004: http://ollie.dcccd.edu/mgmt1374/book_contents/4directing/leading/lead.htm

Flower, J. (1992, July-August). Human Change by Design: Excerpts from a Conversation with Robert R. Blake, Ph. D. Healthcare Forum Journal. Vol. 35:4. Retrieved Oct. 15, 2004:  http://www.well.com/user/bbear/blake.html 

Grid International, Inc. (2004). The Leadership Grid TM. Grid International Web site.
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Cultural Theories

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86249456

Cross Cultural Psychology

Cultural Theories

Comparing cross-cultural approaches to psychology:

An ecocultural vs. An integrated approach

The need to take into account different cultural perspectives when treating patients has become increasingly recognized within the profession of psychology. Cross-cultural psychology, in contrast to other branches of psychology, allows that the definition of what is psychologically 'normal' is often highly dependent upon one's cultural context. Two similar, but slightly different approaches to cross-cultural psychology include the ecocultural model and the integrative model.

The ecocultural model, posits "that the individual cannot be separated from his or her environmental context. People constantly exchange messages with the environment, thus transforming it and themselves" (Chapter 1 summary, n.d). Someone acculturated in a nation other than the U.S. will show different developmental features than someone acculturated in America. The United States' culture supports a particularly long adolescence, and leaving home and beginning a family is no longer…… [Read More]

References

Chapter 1 summary. (n.d). Retrieved:

http://www.ericshiraev.com/resources/Chapter+1+Summary.pdf

Trommsdorff, G. (2002). An eco-cultural and interpersonal relations approach to development over the life span. Online Readings in Psychology and Culture, 6 (2).1-15 Retrieved from  http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1057&context=orpc
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Devel Family Cycle Theory Successful Completion of Developmental

Words: 849 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6630771

Devel/Family Cycle Theory

Successful completion of developmental tasks enables a person to make a smooth transition to adulthood. According to family life cycle theory (FLC), a paradigm rooted in the ideas of Duvall and Hill, there are eight stages of development with normative age role expectations for the nuclear family (Hill, 1970; Hill & ogers, 1964; ice, 1994; all cited in Erickson, 1998). More recent work on FLC by McGoldrick and Carter offer a new set of stages that they believe describe the fundamental American middle-class family at the beginning of the 21st century (VanKatwyk). According to McGoldrick and Carter, the family life cycle refers to "the expansion, contraction, and realighnemt of the relationship system to support the entry, exit, and development of family members in a functional way" (2003, p. 384, cited in Erickson). Their six stage classification lists the following:

Leaving home: single young adults

The joining of…… [Read More]

References

Erickson, M.J. (1998). Revisioning the family life cycle theory and paradigm in marriage and Family. American Journal of Family Therapy 26(4), pp. 341-355.

Jordyn, M., & Byrd, M. (2003). The relationship between the living arrangements of university students and their identity development. Adolescence 38(150), pp. 267-278.

VanKatwyk, P.L. (n.d.). Family life cycle theory. Theories of Human Development. Retrieved from http://freedownload.is/pdf/family-life-cycle-theory-3553375.html
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Intervention & Addiction Therapy Theory

Words: 3133 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96162245

.

The two hypothetical systems working on an individual's brain during the experience of addiction are complementary within and between system changes. The first counteradaptation results in a decrease in the transmission of dopamine and serotonin release during withdrawal phases of the cycle (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively, dopamine and serotonin transmission is artificially increased beyond the normative range during drug use, then virtually stopped once the drug has left the body. This intensifies not only the "come down" feeling but also the preoccupation anxieties associated with substance abuse as well as the existing emotional, environmental, or social vulnerability which lead to the initial lapse. Sensitization is the component of addiction which compels an individual to continually seek greater quantities of the substance (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively once the brain has been exposed to a chemical which alters neural transmission, the body attempts to return to a homeostatic state.…… [Read More]

References

1. Nesse, R. (1994). An evolutionary perspective on substance abuse. Ethology and Sociobiology, 15, 339- 348.

2. Robinson, T, & Berridge, K. (2001). Mechanisms of action of addictive stimuli incentive- sensitization and addiction. Addiction, 96, 103- 114.

3. Koob, G., & Le Moal, M. (1997). Drug abuse: Hedonic homeostatic dysregulation. Science, 278, 52- 58.

4. Brown, J.M., & Miller, W.R. (1993). Impact of motivational interviewing on participation and outcome in residential alcoholism treatment. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors,7, 211-218.
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Social Psychological Concept Normative Social

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38975740

The reason for this is that the phenomenon generally occurs within groups. Individuals who function in a group often do so differently than when left upon their own. To conduct the study, one individual and one group of people should be observed in two separate rooms.

The individual will be able to observe the group by means of a one-way window. The group will be unaware of the individual. All the group members except one were told to clap their hands in unison when a piece of rhythmic music begins to play. The individual in the adjacent room will observe this behavior as well as be able to hear the music.

As soon as the music begins to play, it is hypothesized that the person without prior coaching will be initially surprised. The other group members will overtly or covertly stare at the person or encourage him or her to…… [Read More]

References

ChangingMinds.org. (2010). Normative Social Influence. Retrieved from  http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/normative_social_influence.htm 

Lord, Kenneth R., Myung-Soo Lee, Peggy Choong (2001), "DIFFERENCES in NORMATIVE and INFORMATIONAL SOCIAL INFLUENCE," in Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA: Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 280-285.

McLeod, S.A. (2007) Simply Psychology [Online] UK: Available: http://www.simplypsychology.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk / Accessed: March 15, 2010
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Maturation and Why Is Piaget's Theory a

Words: 1726 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14338054

maturation, and why is Piaget's theory a good example of a maturational theory of children's cognitive development?"

Maturation is the way an infant gets to learn to become a proper individual by various maneuvers all through the early stages in life. The term maturation has different connotations in the theory of development if viewed from different angles. There are many theories of development that have links or are a part of the theory of maturation. The theories that try to explain the cognitive development are the behavioral theory propounded by Skinner which says that learning is a result of the environment. By creating a better environment, learning can be directed and shaped. Children introduced to a better environment learn to give better responses and the behavior theory seem to work where special education is required. Freud and Eriksson believed that children came with drives that had to be channeled in…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, Patricia A; Winne, Philip H. (2006) "Handbook of educational psychology"

Routledge.

Anderson, Norman H. (1996) "A Functional Theory of Cognition." Lawrence Erlbaum

Associates: Mahwah, NJ.
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Application of Criminology Theories Sociology

Words: 1885 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23733167

theoretical concepts from parts XII and XIII to the events and actors at the Malheur Wildlife efuge occupation. Be sure to utilize the different sections in your application.

Environmental criminology often focuses on opportunity theory, which is linked with rational choice theory. Opportunity theory suggests that criminal behavior is motivated or prompted by available opportunities to commit the crime. Although the Malheur occupiers were not environmental criminals in the traditional sense of being motivated also by an environmentalist agenda with related ecological goals, the Malheur Wildlife efuge is a nature preserve. There are also compounding issues related to territoriality, the "extent to which a space conveys a sense of being 'owned' or 'private' and has having clearly designated purposes," (XII, p. 459). Territoriality has been a primary driving factor in the occupation. The occupiers, spearheaded by Ammon Bundy and the Hammond brothers "sought to turn the refuge into a symbol…… [Read More]

References

Bernton, Hal. "Birds -- and staff -- return to Malheur National Wildlife Refuge." Seattle Times. 27 March, 2016. Retrieved online:  http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/northwest/birds-and-staff-return-to-malheur-national-wildlife-refuge/ 

Carpenter, Zoe. "Inside the Bundy Brothers' Armed Occupation." The Nation. Jan 5, 2016. Retrieved online:  http://www.thenation.com/article/inside-the-malheur-wildlife-refuge-occupation/
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Weber Theory Discussion the Theory

Words: 1515 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7864297

Therefore the logical deliberation of the performer should not be the only factor paramount for the understanding of the need and circumstances, but it is the matter of approach which devise the future strategy, and that is based on the interpretation of the present. The interpretation also accounts for the irrational behavior of the individual, and not every action has to be justified on the basis of logic, in different situations the logic is contradicted, only because of the insight meaning that is embraced by the performer in or against the interest of the community. The ground realities are different for the performer and observer, and therefore it is difficult to expect that observer and performer are likely to share similar wisdom and vision, because it is only the understanding that makes the individual apprehend, comprehend, adapt and implement the condition. In this regard, the Weber's theory is supportive of…… [Read More]

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Analyzing Criminology Classical Theory

Words: 1111 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20824315

Criminology

Classical theory elucidates crime as a creation and outcome of beliefs that advantages of committing crimes are extremely greater than normative, socially acceptable behavior. The foundation of this school of thought on criminology is that crime is a rational choice and that many individuals have the capacity to resort to crime. In addition, individuals will commit crime subsequent to the comparison of prospective advantages and disadvantages of such actions. The positivist school of criminology tries to ascribe crime causation to understood, contemplative assertion of advantages that criminal activities carry. Next, sociological school of criminology asserts that crime comes about due to manifold factors that can be split into mental, biological, and social factors. Therefore, it implies that crime is a result of social factors and elements that influence the behavior of human beings.

eek 2 Discussion

Siegel delineates the three different ways crime is recorded in our country. The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Boston University Metropolitan College. Reintegrative Shaming & Restorative Justice, 2016. Web. Retrieved:  https://learn.bu.edu/bbcswebdav/pid-1942479-dt-content-rid-6162758_1/courses/14sprgmetcj602_ol/week06/metcj602_W06L01T04_Reintegrative.html 

Criminal Justice. Similarities and Differences Between Social Control Theories and Other Major Theories of Crime. Social Control Theory, 2016. Web. Retrieved  http://criminal-justice.iresearchnet.com/criminology/theories/social-control-theory/7/ 

Mongold, Jennifer L., and Bradley D. Edwards. "Reintegrative Shaming: Theory into Practice." Journal of Theoretical & Philosophical Criminology 6.3 (2014): 205.

Podgor, Ellen S. "The challenge of white collar sentencing." The Journal of criminal law and criminology (2007): 731-759.
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Ethical Theories

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18289006

Cruzan Case through a variety of medical ethical perspectives

The Consequentialist Paradigm

The ethical paradigm of consequentialism, as its name suggests, is the view that "normative properties," in other words, ethical actions in the world, should be judged upon and "depend only" upon their resultant consequences. (Sinnott-Armstrong, 2003) The Nancy Cruzan case is famous legal a 'right to die' case whereby, after Nancy Cruzan was almost killed in a car crash, "years later, Cruzan's parents wanted to withdraw the artificial hydration and nutrition that kept their daughter alive," whom was deemed 'brain dead' or in a permanent vegetative state, at the time (Healthcare ethics, 2004)

The general approach of consequentialist ethics could be applied in this case regarding the moral rightness of acts, holding that "whether an act is morally right depends only on the consequences of that act or of something related to that act (such as the motive…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gowans, Chris. "Moral Relativism." The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Spring 2004 Edition. Edward N. Zalta, Editor. URL = .

Healthcare ethics. (2004) "Cruzan, Nancy." Ascension healthcare website. Retrieved 10 November 2004 at URL= http://www.ascensionhealth.org/ethics/public/cases/case11.asp 

Hughes, James & Damien Kewon. "Buddhism and Medical Ethics." Journal of Buddhist Ethics. 1995. Retrieved 10 November 2004 at URL=

 http://www.changesurfer.com/Bud/BudBioEth.html
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The Analysis of Theories and Life and Charles Lindblom

Words: 1245 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68083528

Charles Lindblom

Charles Edward Lindblom was born in 1917 in the state of California. His education included Bachelors in economics and political science from Stanford University. He earned a PhD in economics and the dissertation for this course, titled Unions and Capitalism, which was published as a book in the year 1949. Between 1939 and 1946, Lindblom worked in the Economics faculty at the University of Minnesota. Thereafter, he shifted to Yale University where he served until his retirement in 1991. Presently, Lindblom is Sterling Professor Emeritus of Economics and Political Science at Yale. Charles Lindblom attained a great deal of experience being a practitioner when he temporarily served for the AND Corporation. He also served as chief economic adviser for the U.S. Agency for International Development mission to India. In addition, he has served as the president for economics and political science associations (Fry and aadschelders, 1989).

The aforementioned…… [Read More]

References

Fry, B. R., Raadschelders, J. C. N. (1989). Mastering public administration: From Max Weber to Dwight Waldo. Chatham, N.J.: Chatham House Publishers.
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Amalgamation of Counseling Theories

Words: 4501 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 18822730

Integrative Approach to Counseling

The theories that the author will compare and contrast within this document include gestalt theory, choice theory and its practical application, reality therapy, and psychoanalytic therapy. There are definite points of similarity and variance between these theories. The natural starting point for comparison and contrasting lies with an analysis of gestalt theory and choice theory/reality therapy. Gestalt theory was largely founded by Frederick Perls (Wagner-Moore, 2004, p. 180) and Miriam and Erwing Polster (Jacobs, 2010, p. 25), whereas Glasser is widely credited with launching the notion of reality theory (Bradley, 2014, p. 6). A critical point of similarity between these theories is that they are unequivocally focused on the present, or the proverbial 'here and now' of the patient and his or her cognitive, emotional, and physical states. Interestingly enough, these theories take different perspectives for addressing those present needs of the individuals counseled. The primary…… [Read More]

References

Bornstein, R.F. (2010). Psychoanalytic theory as a unifying framework for 21st century personality assessment. Psychoanalytic psychology. 27(2), 133-152.

Bradley, E.L. (2014). Choice theory and reality theory: An overview. International Journal of Choice Theory and Reality Theory. 34(1), 6-13.

European Association for Gestalt Therapy. (2006). Code of ethics and professional practice.  http://www.eagt.org  / Retrieved from
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Parson's Theories

Words: 670 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46774740

Talcott Parson's concept of the sick role involves complicity on the part of both patient and community. The patient, once labeled as "sick," is exempt from the roles and duties expected of a healthy person, enabling a form of socially sanctioned deviance. The deviance is socially sanctioned because the physician, who is in a position of power, authorizes the sick role. Parson's sick role theory is unique because it focuses on the sociology of illness, and includes both structural and functional factors.

Illness deviates from the norm practically by definition, because functional wellness is presumed to be normative. When a person becomes incapacitated in whatever way due to illness or injury, that person's behaviors, level of functioning, and usefulness to society deviate from the norm. Although Parsons evolved his sick role theory in the middle of the 20th century, it remains a potent guiding foundation for medical sociology. Sick role…… [Read More]

References

Varul, M.Z. (2010). Talcott Parsons, the sick role, and chronic illness. Body Society 16(2): 72-94.

Working Party of the Royal College of Physicians (2005). Doctors in society. Clinical Medicine 5(6).
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Theory and Methods in Clinical Psychology

Words: 1273 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58668587

Psychological test or assessment method. "The Substance Abuse Questionnaire -- Adult Probation III

Brief Description of the Test

The recent release of one of the youngest convicted child murders in our nation's history, Lionel Tate, now an adult, into the general population, has highlighted the difficulty of determining if a former prisoner should be eligible for parole. Psychologists have attempted to answer this difficult and subjective question by designing the objectively-assessed test known as "The Substance Abuse Questionnaire -- Adult Probation III" exam. (Risk & Needs Assessment, Inc., 1997) This test was originally designed in 1987 exclusively for adult prisoners eligible for probation to determine the risk of paroling them and assessing their risk to society and has since been updated, in 1997, to include inventories for truthfulness. (Spies, 2003)

The SAQ is 165-item questionnaire. It can be administered either in a paper and pencil format or on a computer.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Educational Research Association. (1999). Standards for educational and psychological testing. Washington, DC: American Educational Research Association.

SAQ -- The Substance Abuse Questionnaire -- Adult Probation III (1997). Risk & Needs Assessment, Inc.

Spies, Robert. (2003). [Review of the SAQ -- Adult Probation [Substance Abuse Questionnaire].]. Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.  http://www.unl.edu/buros/reviewsample.html .

Toneatto, T. (1995). [Review of the SAQ -- Adult Probation [Substance Abuse Questionnaire].] In J.C. Conoley & J.C. Impara (Eds.). The twelfth mental measurements yearbook (pp. 889-891). Lincoln, NE: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements.
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Nhs Corporate Social Responsibility Practice in a

Words: 2377 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46226002

NHS Corporate Social esponsibility Practice

In a contemporary business environment, organizations are struggling with the new roles to meet the needs of present generation without compromising the needs of future generation. Within a business environment, stakeholders are calling upon corporate organizations to implement operations that will meet the societal values and the natural environment. Organizations are also being called upon to apply principles of corpo-rate social responsibility (CS) in the business operations. Corpo-rate social responsibility (CS) is the process where corporate organizations demonstrate the inclusion of social responsibility and environmental concerns in their business activities. (D'Amato, Henderson, & Henderson, 2009). It is no longer acceptable for a firm to conduct business without demonstrating societal concern.

The objective of this report is to evaluate the current Corporate Social esponsibility practice of National Health Service (NHS). The report uses Carroll's pyramid models to demonstrate the effectiveness of NHS Corporate Social esponsibility practice,…… [Read More]

References

Bowie, N.E. (1999). Business Ethics and Normative Theories. Black well Publishing. UK.

Burton, B.K., Farh, J.L. & Hegarty, W.H. (2000). Comparison of a Cross-Cultural Corporate Social Responsibility Orientation: Hong Kong vs. United States Students. Teaching Business Ethics, 4(2):151-167.

Carroll, A.B. (1999). Evolution of a Definitional Construct of Corporate social responsibility Business and Society, 38(3): 268-295.

D'Amato, A. Henderson, S. & Henderson, S.(2009).Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Business. CCL Press. USA.
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Don't Have One

Words: 1172 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63089446

electoral participation of American citizens and it looks at some of the factors that determine their voting behavior or patterns, also mentioned is how campaigned strategies are employed by candidates shaped by this knowledge.

he second section looks at the powers of the presidents and how different presidents have exercised powers given to them by the electorate, this part also points out how limits have been placed on the powers and if at all they have been effective.

Normative theory vs. findings of empirical research

First of all it's important to note that the normative theory is vital on understanding the political behavior of the American public and when regarding citizenship norms to participation they refer to voting in elections, being active in politics, political associations and the selection of products for ethical, political or environmental reasons. he normative theory of the ideal citizen and the findings of empirical research…… [Read More]

The president's power has been developed overtime by the congress that has the ability to expand these powers for the purpose of managing the economy and protecting the country in times of war. The presidential powers can also be extended through legislative actions as well as through the concept of inherent powers that are inferred from the country's constitution

Limitations of presidential powers

Most notably in the 20th century the congress used the powers it had to limit those powers bestowed on the president and good example of this was the War power act of 1973, which saw the presidential powers being limited as he was now required to notify the congress before sending American troops to combat, further more he was also required to seek approval for continued deployment after a sixty days period had elapsed while the troops were still in combat. However this hasn't been effective as consecutive presidents have refused to adopt the war power resolution citing that it is against the powers constitutionally bestowed to the President and thus not binding.
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Media Favorite Form Media You Choose

Words: 1332 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27116073

media / favorite form media. You choose . Analysis

In my opinion, the most preferable form of mass media is the fairly conventional compact disc. CDs are an excellent sociological tool in learning about one's environment and the relevant issues that affect society today. Additionally, CD's allow for a highly limited form of intervention between the message that the music artist is attempting to convey and its reception by the listener. Conversely, I believe that one of the least preferable forms of media is the internet. Despite the fact that there are vast amounts of information accessible to users on it, there are a number of ways in which using the internet inherently impinges on the privacy of a particular user. Cookies and other sorts of intelligence metrics track the particular activity of people. Moreover, this capability of the internet, when combined with aspects of data governance, data stewardship, and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Godwin, Allotey. "Libertarian V. Social Responsibility." Allotey Godwin.  http://alloteygodwin.blogspot.com/2009/05/libertarian-v-social-responsibility.html 

No Author. "Introduction to Mass Communication." Zeepedia.com. No date. Web.  http://www.zeepedia.com/read.php?media_theories_libertarian_theory_social_responsibility_theory_introduction_to_mass_communication&b=78&c=39 

No author. "Theories of Communication." www.peoi.org. 2012. Web.  http://www.peoi.org/Courses/Coursesar/mass/mass2.html 

Naveed, Fakhar. "Normative Theories of Mass Communication." Ask For Mass. 2012. Web.  http://mastermasscommunication.blogspot.com/2012/02/normative-theories-of-mass.html
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Social Responsibility Two Prehistoric Men

Words: 1689 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58820063



A capitalistic society that provides open and free competition did not bring about Enron and similar debacles. It was the second part of Friedman's statement: "without deception or fraud" that led to such situations. It was the greed of several individuals who misreported their profits to get a larger part of the pot. Unfortunately, there will always be individuals like this -- it is human nature. That does not make the whole system corrupt. One can say that the competition inherent in the capitalistic enterprise encourages such behavior. Hoarding by one of the cave dwellers would never work. The hope is that lessons are learned from situations such as these -- that nothing works perfectly.

ichard E. Hattwick, professor at Western Illinois University and co-founder of the American National Business Hall of Fame concludes:

competitive market situations encourage the reasonably high standard of business ethics called the ethic of justice.…… [Read More]

References

Boatright, J.R. 1994. Fiduciary duties and the shareholder-management relation: or, what's so special about shareholders? Business Ethics Quarterly 4:393-407

Friedman, M. The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits. The New York Times Magazine. September 13, 1970. www.nobel.se/economics/laureates/1976/"  http://www.nobel.se/economics/laureates/1976// 

Hasnas, J. 1998 the normative theories of business ethics: a guide for the perplexed.

Business Ethics Quarterly. 8:19-42
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Viet Nam War and Its Comparison to

Words: 3472 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89847448

Viet Nam War and its comparison to several social theories. Using the war as a measuring stick theories are examined and held against the war to see how the war could be applied to each theory. The writer explains a short history of each theory and then examines how the war holds up using that particular theory.

The Viet Nam War was arguably the most controversial war that America has ever been involved in. It sparked social movements that had never before been seen. It pitted the young against the old, the conservative against the liberal and the rich against the poor in ways that threatened to tear the nation in pieces. Until Viet Nam, service personnel had been considered heroes, worthy of the nation's admiration. During the Viet Nam war those who served often came home to being spit on, and having things thrown at time. Until Viet Nam…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Rational Choice and Deterrence Theory

Sociology of Deviant Behavior

 http://www.umsl.edu/~rkeel/200/ratchoc.html 

The Theory of Hegemonic Stability
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Business Ethics How Important Is an Individual's

Words: 3263 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46623316

Business Ethics

How important is an individual's privacy in the workplace? Is an individual's privacy in the workplace the most important consideration to be taken into account? hat constitutes privacy in a workplace environment? Do the goals and the mission of the organization supersede an individual's desire to protect his or her privacy? Is it ethical for an employer to collect and disperse personal information from employees without their knowledge? How does the philosophy of utilitarianism play into this issue? This paper delves into those questions and provides supporting information for the resolution of this issue.

After careful review of the textbook for this course, after reviewing additional scholarly resources and taking into consideration a utilitarian approach to this issue -- and after researching the Australian laws regarding workplace privacy -- this paper takes the position that an individual's privacy is indeed vitally important (and must by law be protected)…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Doyle, Carolyn, and Bagaric, Mirko. (2005). Privacy Law in Australia. Annandale, AU:

Federation Press.

Fair Work Ombudsman. (2011). Best Practice Guide / Workplace Privacy. Retrieved September

25, 2012, from  http://www.fairwork.gov.au .
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Lead Ethics

Words: 1299 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16837597

Leadership Ethics

Sorry Sorry, You did a great job. The rewrite is for another job.In many ways Scott Summers (better known as Cyclops) -- the fictional leader of the team of mutant superheroes The X-Men -- is an example of a quintessential leader. He was initially deputized as team leader as a teenager and led the team well into his 20's. During that time he dealt with a variety of rotating team members and super-villains that tested the limits of his strategic prowess as a leader, and presented a number of ethical challenges germane to leadership in general. A closer analysis of the career of Summers provides poignant illustrations about many of the six principle ethical challenges that leaders face.

Virtually all leaders have to contend with ethical issues related to information management, and Summers was no different in this respect. When the team was in Scotland battling the shape-changer…… [Read More]

References

Claremont, C. (2000). The Essential X-Men 2. New York, NY: Marvel Comics.

Ivey, G.W., & Kline, T.B. (2010). "Transformational and active transactional leadership in the Canadian military." Leadership & Organization Development Journal. 31 (3): 246-262.

Johnson, C. (2011). Organizational Ethics, A Practical Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
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Legitimacy of International Institutions

Words: 3173 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65492874

Legitimacy of International Institutions

International institutions are based on the multilateral treaties or the agreements among multiple states. States generally enter in the treaties to promote their common aims, and law recognizes the existence of international institutions. Typically, international institutions are established based on the charters that bind the member states together. "International institutions are the set of rules means to govern international behaviours" (Simmons & Martin 2001 P. 194). This definition is very important because international institutions have established set of rules guiding the conduct of member states. Based on the definitions of international institutions, it is revealed that member states are subject to abide by the decision of international institutions. However, there are hot debates among scholars and political actors whether international institutions posses legitimacy on the member states. (D'Amato,2007, Zurn, & Stephen 2010).

The objective of this paper is to investigate the legitimacy of international institutions.

Legitimacy…… [Read More]

References

BBC News (2011).Libya: UN Security Council votes sanctions on Gaddafi. BBC News Africa.27 February 2011.

Bodansky, D. (2011). International Relations and Legitimacy in International Law.

Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law Arizona State University.

Buchanan, A & Keohane, R.O. (2006). The Legitimacy of Global Governance Institutions. Ethics & International Affairs, 20(4): 405-437.
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Role of Public Administration in

Words: 1805 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4987275

An understanding of the facts,

2. An understanding of the codes, roles and values at play,

3. A consideration of all alternatives,

4. A consideration of how you would feel if the plan/action was implemented,

5. A projection of consequences, and

6. A consideration of how you would justify your actions to the public.

arnard also develop a construct called, "moral basis for the solution of moral conflicts." In applying this construct to the police officer's situation, arnard suggests opening up to the co-workers/subordinates to tell them the rationale behind the decision and writing a letter to management perhaps discussing how your role is really an expanded version with duties to the subordinates along with duties and allegiance toward management.

Another potential conflict is within one's self and one's inner values. There might be conflicts between private goals and public goals or between objective and subjective responsibility. Tussman notes that…… [Read More]

Barnard also develop a construct called, "moral basis for the solution of moral conflicts." In applying this construct to the police officer's situation, Barnard suggests opening up to the co-workers/subordinates to tell them the rationale behind the decision and writing a letter to management perhaps discussing how your role is really an expanded version with duties to the subordinates along with duties and allegiance toward management.

Another potential conflict is within one's self and one's inner values. There might be conflicts between private goals and public goals or between objective and subjective responsibility. Tussman notes that in our society, individualism is a prominent value and the public administrator will inevitably struggle to not act in his/her own self-interest and the administrator will also struggle just to not appear as though he/she is acting upon individualist notions. In the modern era, this tendency to not be able to clearly support the public interest over the private interest has increased.

The law provides the moral minimum by which a conflict of interest arises. Indeed, there are other situations which are not strictly delineated by law wherein a conflict of interest may arise. Just because an act is legal, it does not mean it is necessarily ethical. There will also be times when we will challenge a law because it conflicts with our morals or ethics such as the Civil Rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. Bribery, influence peddling, and information peddling are three kinds of conflicts of interest to avoid in the public domain.
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Kant Camus Kant and Camus

Words: 1439 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95083014

If Kant's points are to be assimilated when adopting a moral stance which is consistent with man's dignity, such absolute terms are inevitably defined by dominant social structures, bringing us to the application of a normative theoretical structure. The inextricable relationship which theology and morality have shared throughout history tends to have a tangible impact on the way these hegemonic standards are defined.

And Kant, rejects any flexibility outright, however. Beyond its deviation from his established disposition toward moral absolutes, such variation violates Kant's maxim about man as an end rather than a means. Man is to be the motive for moral acts, with his dignity defining right and wrong. Indeed, as he pointedly phrases it, "the laws of morality are laws according to which everything ought to happen; they allow for conditions under which what ought to happen doesn't happen." (Kant, 1)

Counter-argument:

Like Kant, Camus asserts a clear…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Camus, a. (1942). The Myth of Sisyphus. Vintage.

Kant, Immanuel. 1785. Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. Jonathan Bennett.
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How Does Branding Affect Consumer Purchasing

Words: 5784 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 97987486

randing Affects the uying Decision

"How Does randing Affect Consumer Purchasing?." Using this research question, analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each research method (qualitative and quantitative) within the scope of the proposed dissertation topic. Identify which method you will select (or state whether you will use a mixed methodology) and explain the reasons for your choice.

DA Qs 1 Answer

The marketing guru Philip Kotler perceives branding as a "name, term, design, symbol, or any other feature that identifies one seller's good or service as distinct from those of other sellers." It has also been adopted by the American Marketing Association. Michael Dunn, President and CEO, of Prophet, a strategic professional services firm in San Francisco, states that branding is just a defensive tool against market competition; but acts as "insulation against deteriorating economic conditions."

The essence of a brand is the base upon which the prosperity of the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dash, M. a. (2010). Marketing Research An Applied Orientation.

Ormrod., P.D. (2010). Practical Research: Planning and Design, Eighth Edition. Pearson Prentice Hall.

Scroggins Westey A.'*, R.E. (2010). Research Challenges in Cross-cultural International Business: The Issue of Cross Cultural Construct Equivalency. Advances in Management .

SONIA WESCHE*, N.T. (2010). Challenges and Opportunities in Cross Cultural Geographic Inquiry. Journal of Geography in Higher Education, 59-75.
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International Law the Objective of This Work

Words: 1866 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86378846

International Law

The objective of this work in writing is to examine what it means to 'keep the peace' in the present age and the world facing challenges and threats of unprecedented scope, scale and complexity. The question addressed in this research is that which asks where in such endeavors are the existence of international institutions and legal doctrines likely to suffice and where are international institutions and legal doctrines likely to fall short?

The ole of International Law in the Modern World

In the National Strategy for Homeland Security it is stated that "virtually every community in America is connected to the global transportation network by the seaports, airports, highways pipelines, railroads, and waterways that move people and goods into, within, and out of the Nation. We must therefore promote the efficient and reliable flow of people, goods and services across borders, while preventing terrorists from using transportation conveyances…… [Read More]

References

Besson. S. And Tasioulas, J. (2010) The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press. 2010.

Cassels, A. (1996) Ideology and International Relations in the Modern World. London and New York. Retrieved from; http://m.friendfeed-media.com/16091f1cfb5c64ee8145abc0116d37a065575b7d

Coleman, Katharina P. (2007) International Organizations and Peace Enforcement Operations: The Politics of International Legitimacy. Cambridge University Press 2007. Retrieved from: http://www.au.af.mil/au/ssq/bookreviews/coleman.pdfBrunnee, Jutta (2005) Enforcement Mechanisms in International Law and International Environmental Law. Ulrich Beyerlin et al., eds. Ensuring Compliance with Multilateral Environmental Agreements: A Dialogue Between Practitioners and Academia (2005) Environmental Law Network International Review 3-14]. Retrieved from:  http://www.law.utoronto.ca/documents/brunnee/BrunneeEnforcementMechanismsInt_lLaw.pdf 

Hathaway, Oona A. (2005) Between Power and Principle: An Integrated Theory of International Law. Chicago Law Review 2005.
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Abbott Labs Stock Analysis Abbott

Words: 2418 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 2262490

The first component is as follows: Net Margin = Net Income/Sales. How much profit Abbott laboratories makes for very $1.00 it generates in revenue, and the higher a company's profit margin the better. The second component is as follows: Asset Turnover = Sales/Total Assets. The amount of sales generated for every dollar's worth of assets. This measures Abbott's efficiency at using assets, and again, the higher the number the better. The final factor of the Du Pont analysis is as follows: Leverage Factor = Total Assets/Shareholder's Equity. The higher the number, the more debt the company has. Abbott's Du Pont analysis is computed using the following equation:

In this case, for the end of 2006, Abbott Laboratories reported a net income of $717 million dollars, sales of $22,476 million, total assets for 2006 of $36, 178 million, and equity of $14,054 for 2006. Placing these figures into the equation above…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abbott. (2007). About the Company. Retrieved November 9, 2007 at  http://www.abbott.com .

Epsicom. (2007). Abbott Medical Device Company Intelligence Report. Retrieved November 9, 2007 at  http://www.piribo.com/publications/medical_devices/companies/abbott_medical_device_company_intelligence_report.html .

McKinnell, H. (2003). Performance Report. Bayer AG 2003 Annual Review: 1-30.

Rogers, M. (2003). Risk Management in Real Options-Based Pharmaceutical
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Mental Health Counseling and Research

Words: 3990 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 65935118

However, more empirical studies have been published in recent years which have both reported outcomes but also have acknowledged the complexity of the interaction of the number of variables involved in predicting outcome effects on children whose parents are substance abusers (Dworkin & Hirsch, 2004). This literature is particularly important because of the large number of children affected by substance abuse of various kinds and the social policy directed toward substance abuse offenders including parents.

Although the empirical research base is growing on the relationship of parental disability to child outcome effects (Emerick & Zirpoli, 2000) there continues to be a need for research that methodologically addresses specific critical parental disability factors.

Implementing Culturally Sensitive Crisis

In conclusion, when faced with an individual who is recognizably from a culture different from the crisis worker, some modification in approach will be considered. However, there is sufficient cultural diversity present in our…… [Read More]

References

Colangelo, N. (2007). Counseling gifted students: Issues and practices. In N. Colangelo and G.A. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of Gifted Education (2nd ed.), (pp. 353-381). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Colangelo, N., & Assouline, a. (1993). Families of gifted children. A research agenda. Quest, 4, 1-4.

Dworkin, M., & Hirsch, G. (2004). Responding to managed care: A roadmap for the therapist. Psychotherapy in Private Practice, 13, 1-21.

Emerick, L., & Zirpoli, T. (2000). Different concerns, different needs? Perceptions of gifted children and parents of children with disabilities. Paper presented at the conference of the American Association of Gifted and Talented, Little Rock, AR.