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Organ Donation Essays (Examples)

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Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness
Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19235360
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Further, the review of literature in this study will identify the method most effective in assessing the effectiveness of instruction ultimately resulting in the design and development of a study to be implemented in the community of Quincy, Massachusetts. This study will be one in which nursing professional provide information awareness to members of the community and then following make an assessment of the effectiveness of the instruction provided by the nursing professional to the community of Quincy, Massachusetts.

DATA COLLECTION & ANALYSIS

The proposed study is one will qualitatively conduct a literature review of both an extensive and thorough nature in regards to methodology and research design specifically as related to the provision of community information awareness. Secondly, this study will determine the most effective method for assessing the outcome of learning for individuals in the Quincy, Massachusetts community through identification of the same in the review of literature,…

Bibliography

Role of the Registered Professional Nurse in Organ and Tissue Donation (2008) New York State Nurses Association. Position Statement. Online available at  http://www.nysna.org/practice/positions/position10_04.htm 

Organ and Tissue Donation Research Proposal

Tissue Donation
Words: 2438 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43055673
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Tissue Donation

Donated body organs like hearts and kidneys contribute to the saving of hundreds of lives each year. The fact is that bequeathed tissues like skin, bone and heart valves could remarkably enhance the value of life for the persons receiving them. A patient who is dead following a cardiac arrest i.e. whose heartbeat has stopped permanently cannot be an organ donor but can be a tissue donor. Though in case of tissue donation the urgency of restoring a life by donation of liver or heart is absent, yet it is no way less critical to bring back vision by the help of a donated cornea, avert the severing of a leg using a bone donated by somebody or brighten the odds of survival of a patient having sustained burn injuries by skin donation.

Transplanted tissues offer advantages like it helps in alleviating trauma, assisting individuals to see again,…

Bibliography

Chabot-Long, Lynn. A Gift of Life: A Page from the Life of a Living Organ Donor,

Je-Lynn Publications, 1996

LaTour, Stephen A; Manrai, Ajay K. Interactive Impact of Informational and Normative influence on Donations. Journal of Marketing Research. Volume: 26; No: 3;

August, 1989, pp: 327-335.

Barriers to Corneal Donation
Words: 1244 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89881049
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Corneal Donation within Hospitals and Medical Communities: Issues Surrounding Post Mortem Donations of Tissue

Qualitative Study

The purpose of this study is to identify barriers to corneal donation within hospitals and medical communities. A large body of research has focused on issues surrounding the post mortem donations of tissue. This research will take a different approach, examining what barriers exist within hospital and medical communities in an attempt to determine how these barriers may be overcome.

The number of potential corneal donors far surpasses the number of people available for traditional organ donations and in some states consent of the medical examiner alone is enough to allow use of corneal donations (family consent not required) (Lewin, 2000).

Traditionally the most significant barrier to organ donation and transplantation has been acquisition of organs and tissues (Murray et. al, 2002). The need for cornea tissue is rising. The average wait time for…

References

Gortmaker SL, Beasley CL, Brigham LE, Franz HG, Garrison RN, Lucas BA, Patterson RH, Sobol AM, Grenvik NA, Evanisko MJ. Organ donor potential and performance: size and nature of the organ donor shortfall. Crit Care Med 1996; 24(3):432-9.

Halloran, P.F. (2003). "Transmission of Donor Melanoma to Multiple Organ Transplant Recipients." American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 4 Issue

Hawkins, B.R. (1993). "The HLA System and Transplantation Matching in the 1990s." Journal of the Hong Kong Medical Association, 45 (2): 77-86

Jensen, T.R. (2000). "Organ Procurement: Various Systems and Their Effectiveness." Houston Journal of International Law, Vol. 22, Issue 3.

Legalizing Sale of Organs
Words: 3127 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19049372
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Organ Sales

When it comes to the sale of organs from one party to another, there are usually two "camps" that people fall within. Those camps are inclusive of people that rae entirely against the practice in any form and then there are those that feel that some level of person-to-person sales should be allowed for so long as the parties involved face certain rules. Even with the concerns about organs going to the highest bidder, there are diametrically opposed concerns and assertions including the right of an owner of a kidney being able to sell to who he or she wants and the fact that the proceeds from such a transaction can be life-changing in nature. While it may be controversial and problematic to some, there is a middle ground to be had between allowing organ sales between people with no limitation and never doing so under any circumstances.…

Public Information on Kidney Donation
Words: 1145 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 80584463
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This study underscores the presumption that where public health information campaigns are concerned, information is often accessed but forgotten or ignored. By connecting this information to certain compensatory incentives, those who make up a likely donor population may be more likely to retain and return to the information provided. Though controversial, this does present a realistic view on the motives that might incline one toward an act with significant personal and health-related implications.

It is important for public health facilities to consider the courtship of donations in this way, primarily because a failure to do so is increasingly stimulating an extra-curricular market for the sale of kidneys. In other words, by neglecting to consider the option of connecting kidney donation courtship to such compensatory incentives, the medical community is not protecting against the ethical concerns correlated thereto. They are simply forcing would-be recipients to look outside of the field for…

Works Cited:

Aghanwa, H.S.; Akinsola, A.; Akinola, D.O. & Makanjuola, R.O.A. (2003). Attitudes Toward Kidney Donation. J Natl Med Assoc., 95(8), 725-731.

Kranenburg, L.; Schram, A.; Zuidema, W.; Weimar, W.; Hilhorst, M.; Hessing, J. & Busschbach, J. (2008). Public Survey of Financial Incentives for Kidney Donation. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 23(3), 1039-1042.

Medical News Today (MNT). (2008). Kidney Donation Websites Raise Ethical Concerns - Public Solicitation For Organs May Favor White, Educated And Wealthy Recipients. Wiley Blackwell Publishing. Online at  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/125649.php

Buy and Sell Organs for Transplants The
Words: 728 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81248945
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Buy and Sell Organs for Transplants:

The consideration of the possible negative socio-ethical repercussions of allowing people to buy and sell their non-vital body organs for transplant fortifies the argument of all opponents to the proposition. As stated in the U.S. Constitution, human beings are created equal and given the un-separable rights to life, freedom, and the pursuit of happiness. While in the pursuit of these rights, the American society has learnt that the end does not always justify the means and as such, necessary legislation has been instituted to help protect minorities from majorities, the poor from the wealthy, and the weak from the strong. A society in which people could buy and sell organs for transplant would further ruin the pursuit for equality and frustrate the liberty of generosity needed for living a happy life.

Opposing the proposition does not mean that one believes society bears no duty…

References:

Andre, C. & Velasquez, M. (n.d.). Kidneys for Sale. Retrieved from Santa Clara University -- The Jesuit University in Silicon Valley website:  http://www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/iie/v1n2/kidneys.html 

Mayes, G. (2003.) Buying and Selling Organs for Transplantation in the U.S.: National Organ Transplant Act of 1984 (NOTA) Bans Buying and Selling. Medscape Education, 4(2). Retrieved from  http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/465200_2 

"Statistics." (n.d.). Donate Life America. Retrieved January 31, 2012, from  http://donatelife.net/understanding-donation/statistics/

Kidney Donation and Renal Availability
Words: 775 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 33044616
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Mayor, S. (2009). "UK sees rise in people donating a kidney to unknown recipients." British medical journal 338(7710), pp. 1521.

In this brief yet highly relevant article, the author describes a recently observed trend of increasing live-donor kidney donations for unknown recipients. hough living donors for family members with a need for transplant have been relatively common for sometime, the idea of donating a kidney while still living for a person unknown to the donor is a very recent development in kidney translation and availability. hough the reasons for this increase are not yet clear, as no research has been undertaken to determine the causal effect of this observed trend, initial results suggest that simple awareness of the need for renal donation and the normalcy of life following the donation of a kidney is a major factor.

Nakamura, Y.; Konno, O.; Matsuno, N.; Yokoyama, ., et al. (2008). "How can…

Though various methods and schema for renal transplantation exist, this study points out the benefits of living donor donation in the combating of end-stage renal failure, in Japan specifically. Citing a decreased need for recipient medication and an increased likelihood of successful transplantation when kidneys used in transplantation come from living donors, the authors of this study examine various methods for increasing rates of living donorship. A new surgical procedure developed by the authors limits the invasiveness and the blood loss in an elective living donor surgery, and combined with higher donorship rates could greatly increase the successful treatment of renal disease.

Testa, G.; Angelos, P.; Crowley-Matoka, M. & Siegler, M. (2009). "Elective surgical patients as living donors: A clinical and ethical innovation." American journal of transplantation 9(10), pp. 2400-5.

An innovative new schema for encouraging organ donation is put forth in this article. Specifically, the authors suggest that patients slated for laporoscopic cholecystectomy be given the opportunity to undergo a more invasive surgical correction and donate a kidney as a living donor at the same time. This would eliminate (or greatly reduce) the need for living donors to become surgical candidates with no health benefit to them; the same surgery and level of invasiveness would both correct the patients' problem and allow for donorship. This is the reverse of the current living donor schema, in which donors become surgical candidates specifically for donor purposes, raising ethical and medical concerns.

Carer and Donation Mean in
Words: 2965 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56093196
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His most famous work is his Utopia, a book in which he created his version of a perfect society and gave his name to such conceptions ever after as "utopias." The word is of Greek origin, a play on the Greek word eutopos, meaning "good place." In the book, More describes a pagan and communist city-state in which the institutions and policies are governed entirely by reason. The order and dignity of the state in this book contrasted sharply with the reality of statecraft in Christian Europe at the time, a region divided by self-interest and greed for power and riches. The book was also an expression of More's form of Humanism (Maynard 41). The term can also have broader application as a reference to any plans of government or schemes for social improvement which present the possibilities of a good society.

The society depicted in Never Let Me Go…

Works Cited

Ishiguro, Kazuo. Never Let Me Go. New York: Vintage Books, 2005.

Maynard, Theodore. Humanist as Hero: The Life of Sir Thomas More. New York: Macmillan, 1947.

Health Care and Ethics
Words: 2007 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19718322
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ethics regarding organ donation by brain-damaged people. The writer explores how a brain-damaged person is defined, and whether or not the donation of organs from that person is ethical. There were 15 sources used to complete this paper.

The field of medicine has advanced mankind to arenas never before thought possible. Today doctors can take entire organ systems out of one person and place them in another and the recipient can live for many years with transplanted organs. Hearts, lungs, kidneys, livers, eyes and many combinations of them are just a few of the organs that are transplanted worldwide today. As the medical community continues to advance age and quality of life the need for more organs has reached the critical stage. One of the most argued and passionate debates in the medical community today is whether or not it is ethical to remove organs in the case of a…

References

BROOKER Michelle, The gift of life after death., The Press (Canterbury, New Zealand), 08-10-2002, pp 3.

CAROL ANN CAMPBELL, Staff Writer, TV SHOW ANGERS ORGAN DONOR GROUPS., The Record (Bergen County, NJ), 11-13-1996, pp a09.

Author not available, [Thoughts of The Times] An Explanation of Brain Death., The Korea Times (Seoul, S. Korea), 02-09-2000.

Author not available, Pre-transplant brain-death test done on man in his 20s., Kyodo World News Service, 06-13-1999.

Health Care How Would You
Words: 1302 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 29469983
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Futile medical care is the ongoing provision of medical treatment or care to a patient who does not show any hope of recovery. It is either that his condition is not curable and therefore the treatment that he is receiving is of no benefit. The common examples of these are that a surgeon is performing a surgery on a patient with terminal cancer. Patients who have terminal cancer have gotten the cancer spread all throughout their body. It is only until time that their organs will go into failure and they will pass away. Another example is of keeping brain dead people on life support for other reasons. As it would be expected, this is quite a sensitive area and it would involve arguments with the patient's relatives and friends.

It is understandable that the loved ones do want to do anything they can to keep the patient in front…

References

Appel, J. (2009). What's So Wrong with "Death Panels"?. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jacob-m-appel/whats-so-wrong-with-death_b_366804.html  [Accessed: 26 Jul 2013].

Doyle, D. (2010). WebmedCentral.com:: Baby K. A Landmark Case In Futile Medical Care. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.webmedcentral.com/article_view/969  [Accessed: 26 Jul 2013].

Gardent, P. And Reeves, S. (2009). Ethics Conflicts in Rural Communities: Allocation of Scarce Resources. [e-book] Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England.  http://geiselmed.dartmouth.edu/cfm/resources/ethics/chapter-09.pdf  [Accessed: 26th July, 2013].

Pomerance, J., Morrison, A., Williams, R. And Schifrin, B. (1989). Anencephalic infants: life expectancy and organ donation.. Journal of perinatology, 9 (1), pp. 33-37.

Orthodox Jew
Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28968605
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Orthodox Judaism

There is great variation in the ways orthodox Jews practice their religion, and in what they believe. Many of the variations depend on cultural factors, as Jews are scattered all over the world. However, the basic tenets of the religion are all rooted in monotheism (belief in only one supreme God). The principles of the religion also include a firm belief in the Torah (Hebrew Bible) as being the word of God. This means interpreting the Torah in a manner that impacts daily life choices and lifestyle, including the observance of Kosher dietary habits and the Sabbath day. The practice of Orthodox Judaism emphasizes ritual and tradition, family and community life.

Life is sacred, but there are no hard rules about when life begins. egarding abortion, "even among Orthodox Jews it may be construed as 'a personal matter," ("What do Orthodox Jews think about abortion and why?" 2000).…

References

Baeke, G., Wils, J.P. & Broeckaert, B. (2011). There is a time to be born and a time to die. Journal of Religious Health 50(4): 778-795.

Donin, H.H. (1991). To Be a Jew. Basic.

Moss, A. (n.d.). Organ donation. Chabad. Retrieved online:  http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/635401/jewish/Organ-Donation.htm 

Rich, T.R. (2011). Olam Ha-Ba: The Afterlife. Retrieved online:  http://www.jewfaq.org/olamhaba.htm

Transforming Scheduled Death Into Renewed Life One
Words: 4525 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 66878778
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Transforming Scheduled Death Into Renewed Life

One of the harsh realities of living in an otherwise-free society is the fact that the United States incarcerates far more of its citizens than other leading industrialized nations, and it one of the few countries in the world that retains the death penalty on its books. hen capital offenders are executed, there exists the opportunity to turn this scheduled death into renewed through organ donations. At present, while an individual has the right to say whether their organs should be donated, death-row inmates are considered wards of the state and it is the position of this study that the state should have the corresponding right to harvest their organs as a means of execution in order to save and improve the quality of the lives of others. To determine whether the potential exists for such an approach, this study examines the relevant peer-reviewed…

Works Cited

"Abolish the death penalty." (2011). Amnesty International. [Online]. Available: http://www.

amnesty.org/en/death-penalty.

Beard, T. Randolph, David L. Kaserman and Richard P. Saba. (2006). "Inefficiency in cadaveric organ procurement." Southern Economic Journal, 73(1): 13-14.

Ben-David, Orit F. Organ Donation and Transplantation: Body Organs as an Exchangeable

International Management Ethics & Values
Words: 727 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 85262135
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As many forms of live donation do not cause harm to others, and as we allow the donation of blood for payment, we violate the categorical imperative by banning the sale of human organs.

It has been argued by some that banning organ donation is within the bounds of Kantian ethics because we have collectively agreed to the conviction that "such a practice would diminish human dignity and our sense of solidarity" (Cohen, 2002). Yet, we do not prohibit the donation of blood or of bone marrow. Indeed, most among us would agree that such donations are necessary and beneficial. Lives are saved. There is nothing morally wrong about saving lives -- indeed live donations today are conducted voluntarily and without any moral consequence.

Allowing live organ donations is ethically consistent with our established principles regarding blood donation and voluntary, unpaid live organ donation. It will increase the supply of…

Works Cited:

Holcberg, David. (2008). Allow the Sale of Human Organs. Chicago Sun-Times. April 18, 2008.

Cohen, Cynthia B. (2002). Public Policy and the Sale of Human Organs. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal. Vol. 12, No. 1, March 2002, pp. 47-64.

Mullen, Shannon. (2009). Sale of Human Organs in New Jersey a Worldwide Scandal. Asbury Park Press. Retrieved August 3, 2009 from  http://www.app.com/article/20090726/NEWS/907260350/1004/NEWS01 

MacDonald, Nikki. (2005). Live Donors the Key to Organ Shortage. Give Life NZ. Retrieved August 3, 2009 from  http://www.givelife.org.nz/latest_news_and_press_cuttings/live_donors_the_key_to_organ_shortage.cfm

Hospital Ethics to Do or
Words: 5897 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 97807504
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The clinical trial team includes doctors, nurses, social workers, data entry technicians and other health care professionals (NWHRC 2005). They review a participant's health history and current medical intakes before the trial begins. They impart adequate information and instructions about the clinical trial, monitor each participant in the conduct of the trial and may contact the participant after the conduct of the trial.

Clinical trials or researches may also be open-label, placebo-controlled, double-blinded or randomized. They consist of four phases. Phase I establishes the maximum safe dosage; Phase II, its effectiveness; Phase III, its use on a broad population; and Phase IV, post-FDA insights on the effects of its long-term use (NWHRC).

From 1999 to 2000 alone, the Food and Drug Administration approved 73 new medications (NWHRC 2005). These included drugs for HIV, cancer, heart attack and Alzheimer's disease. As of 2000, Medicare covers many of the costs involved in…

Bibliography

Billings, P.R. (2002). Should reproductive cloning be made available to people who want their own biologic chidren - pro and con. 2 pages. International Medical News Group: Gale Group

Deneen, S. (2001). Designer people. 9 pages. E: the Environmental Magazine: Earth Action Network, Inc.

Frankel, S., et al. (2000). The limits to demand for health care. 10 pages. British Medical Journal: British Medical Association

Hollander, D. (2005). Abortion support slipping. 2 pages. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health: the Allen Guttmacher Institute

Semi-Structured Interviewing Method Developed by
Words: 1802 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 5780820
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Neuman, W.L. (2003). Social research methods: Qualitative and quantitative approaches, 5th ed. New York: Allyn & acon.

In this popular text, the author provides a comprehensive overview of both qualitative as well as quantitative research methodologies, including techniques to improve the reliability and validity of social research approaches that involve questionnaire and interviews.

Statz, S.E. (2006). Finding the winning combination: How blending organ procurement systems used internationally can reduce the organ shortage. Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law, 39(5), 1677-1678.

Author presents a useful background and overview of organ donation practices used in the West with those used in Iran and Pakistan and provides a pragmatic analysis of how paid organ donations may represent a viable alternative to current Western practices if certain ethical issues are taken into account and steps taken to ensure that donors are not coerced by family members or others whose economic motivations and incentives outweigh the…

Bibliography

Brown, J.B., Karley, M.L., Boudville, N., Bullas, N., Garg, A.M. & Muirhead, N. (2008). The experience of living kidney donors. Health and Social Work, 33(2), 93-94.

This recent study of kidney donations in provided the general framework for the proposed study as well as the initial semi-structured interview questions that would be used to identify additional themes, common metaphors and key words in subsequent interviews. The interview guide at Appendix A will be used to probe further in follow-up questioning.

Neuman, W.L. (2003). Social research methods: Qualitative and quantitative approaches, 5th ed. New York: Allyn & Bacon.

In this popular text, the author provides a comprehensive overview of both qualitative as well as quantitative research methodologies, including techniques to improve the reliability and validity of social research approaches that involve questionnaire and interviews.

Beneficence the Field of Nursing Is Shaped
Words: 1580 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 57082843
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Beneficence

The field of nursing is shaped by a range of ethical principles; while all of these concepts are important, one could argue that perhaps the most crucial ethical principle is that of beneficence. "Beneficence is the obligation to do good and avoid harm. Nurses help others to gain what is beneficial to them, which promotes well-being and reduces the risk of harm" (Young et al., 2009, p. 75). Having a clear understanding of beneficence is important as nurses are often presented with a range of complex ethical situations and dilemmas and they need strong principles to help guide their actions and nursing practice. As Young and colleagues explain, avoiding the harm that comes to a patient involves balancing this against the perceived amount of benefit. Other theorists see this concept in a slightly different perspective: "Beneficence is the principle of promoting the legitimate and important aims and interests of…

References

Addington-Hall, J.M., Bruera, E., Higginson, I.J., & Payne, S. (2007). Research methods in palliative care. Oxford: Oxford Publishing.

Cedar, S.H. (2006). Stem cell and related therapies. Nursing Ethics, 13(292),

Hitchcock, J.E., Schubert, P.E., & Thomas, S.A. (2003).Community health nursing: Caring in action. Clifton Park: Delmar.

Randall, F.M. (1999). Ethical issues in palliative care. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand, 43(9), 954-6.

Distributive Justice Should Todd Krampitz
Words: 916 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93880967
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While no one ought to begrudge Mickey Mantle (or anyone) a much-needed liver transplant, it remains hard to believe, given the speed at which Mickey Mantle received a liver and an operation that he was indeed placed on a list and then waited his turn like everyone else.

Further, according to Koch (March 1996)Normative and prescriptive criteria: The efficacy of organ transplantation allocation protocols (March 1996):

well publicized cases have raised questions in North America about the efficacy of [donated organ] allocation procedures. An analysis of those cases, and the relevant technical literature, suggest consistent structural deficits exist in the organ allocation process as it is applied by many individual transplantation centres. These irregularities are based upon both the failure of rank waiting as a method to guarantee just treatment and a general failure to recognize the extent to which prescriptive criteria -- social values -- are commonly used to…

References

Koch, T. (March 1996). Normative and prescriptive criteria: The efficacy of organ transplantation allocation protocols. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics

Historical Archive),17(1). SpringerLink. 75-93. Retrieved July 31, 2005, at http://www.springerlink.com/app/home/contribution.asp?wasp=d059577 aa86c4a37b56a37e250fa9bdf&referrer=parent&backto=issue,7,8;journal,4,55;linkingpublicationresults,1:403004,1.html.

Man gets liver after using billboards, Net. (August 13, 2004). MSNBC.com.

Retrieved July 31, 2005, at  http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5685485/html .

Hospital Case Study if the First Requirement
Words: 2934 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56781691
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Hospital Case Study

If the first requirement of any successful case study is a detailed and analytical examination of the situation, the emotional component of so called "high stakes" issues can make this requirement difficult, indeed. The simple fact, however, is in order to find good solutions and policies regarding the problem presented in the case study, one must apply the three main questions of "situation," "remedy/s," and "method/s." Although this may seem difficult in some situations, the emotional component must not be considered.

A good example of this fact occurs in the examination of an unfortunate case involving the botched heart/lung transplant of a 16-year-old girl, much like the recent incident at Duke Hospital. In this case, a young girl died as a result of receiving miss-matched organs. Unfortunately, in this case, all of the supposed safeguards of the system, imposed to assure that proper blood typing of both…

Bibliography

Chibbaro, Lou. (2004) Victory Claimed in HIV Suits. Washington Blade. Web site. Retrieved on August 8, 2004, at  http://www.washblade.com/print.cfm?content_id=2771 

Colorado State University Writing Center. "Case Studies." Retrieved from Web site on August 2, 2004  http://writing.colostate.edu/references/research/casestudy/com2a1.cfm 

CTDN. California Donors Network. (2004) Facts about organ and tissue donation. Web site. Retrieved on August 8, 2004, at http://www.ctdn.org/resources/faqs.php?id=3&NoHeader=1

Duke University. (2004). UNOS and DUH Safeguards for Organ Transplant Safety. Duke Medical News. Retrieved on August 7, 2004, at http://dukemednews.org/filebank/2003/06/28/UNOS%20and%20DUH%20Safeguards%20for%20Organ%20Transplant%20Safety.doc

Healthcare -- Legal Issues Medical
Words: 2029 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 70244625
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1993). Within medical settings in particular, physicians and supervisors are often too over-burdened with their myriad formal responsibilities to take note of minor irregularities in protocols and procedures. Because coworkers are often in the best possible situation to notice inadequacies, it is important for all levels of employees to be equally involved in the overall CQI process.

Optimal implementation of an effective CQI process also requires a culture of openness to suggestion and confidentiality with respect to reporting more serious issues such as those that result from negligence or willful misconduct on the part of co-workers.

11. The textbook states that "an organization's most vital component in costly resource is its staff." With this being the case, the human resource function plays a very important role. Should the human resource function be part of the senior management team?

In terms of policy implementation and organizational philosophy, the human resources function…

References

Horine, P.D., Pohiala, E.D., Luecke, R.W. (1993) Healthcare Financial Managers and CQI: Implementing Continuous Quality Improvement; Healthcare Financial Management.

Humphry, D. (1991) Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying. Secaucus: Carol Publishing

Russell-Walling, E. (2005) Fifty Management Ideas You Really Need to Know. London: Quercus

Government Policies and Market Issues
Words: 4350 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86218355
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Few hospitals offered both the expertise and the necessary facilities.

Location of the donor and the recipient also impacted availability. Human organs cool and degenerate quickly when removed from the donor. Transportation in the 50s, 60s, and 70s was in the early stages of rapid jet aircraft travel and was too slow for the transportation of organs. The donor needed to be in close proximity to the recipient which was possible with living family members and donors. Research during this time focused on immunosuppressant drugs and on methods to maintain a viable organ outside the host.

In his discussion of justice in respect to the allocation of scarce goods, Jon Elster (1992) identified three levels of scarcity: natural, quasi-natural and artificial. The availability of twins with one needing a kidney transplant and one willing to donate a kidney generates a natural scarcity similar to the availability of natural black pearls.…

Poor Socio-Economic Background and Conditions
Words: 3403 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17295052
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Above all it has followed the delibeate maketing of health cae (in association with touism) as medical cae has gadually moved away fom the public secto to the pivate secto, ensuing that a gowing majoity of people, especially in the ichest counties, and paticulaly in the United States, must pay -- often consideably -- fo health cae. Finally, gowing inteest in cosmetic sugey, involving such elective pocedues as hinoplasty, liposuction, beast enhancement o eduction, LASIK eye sugey and so on, o moe simply the emoval of tattoos, have ceated new demands. Vaious foms of dental sugey, especially cosmetic dental sugey, ae not coveed by insuance in counties like the UK and Austalia; hence dental touism has become paticulaly common. In Asia these tends ae 'the unlikely child of new global ealities: the fallout of teoism, the Asian economic downtun, intenet access to pice infomation, and the globalisation of health sevices'…

references because the family vetoes it, in part because they were never made known. For a grieving and bereft family, a request for organ donation is difficult to agree to because they can only guess at the wishes of the deceased and if there were any doubt at all, would not the natural answer be a rejection? If relatives had severe objections, they should be taken into account for to do otherwise raises the spectre of the swastika, but the point remains that by changing the default position of organ donation it is a veto clearly against the deceased's wishes, which would be rather more unlikely to take place than the current veto due to a simple lack of information. It is not that the PC system is ethically unsound (Hatfield and Walker 1998).

It can be argued that presumed consent is superior to the opt-in system because it truly ensures autonomy by giving effect to choices each person makes. It gives legal effect to individual autonomy and it ensures truly informed consent when accompanied by public education and information, instead of intuitive responses to organ donation. But one has to question how comfortable the deceased family will be when they come to realise that their relatives' kidney is being placed into someone who is HIV positive. This is likely to be an ethical and morale matter rather than a discriminatory one (Williams, 1999).

Nonetheless, some problems with presumed consent have been pointed out. Patient autonomy lies at the very heart of modern medicine and medical research. This is partly a reaction against medical paternalism and an increasing awareness of the integrity of the individual. It may be argued that a presumed consent (PC) system is paternalistic - but it concomitantly reinforces individual autonomy and preserves the dignity and integrity of the individual especially in comparison to, for example, an organs market. (Brooks).

McLean points out that underpinning the system of organ donation is the fundamental view that organ transplantation should be a gift relationship and should not be based on the type of disease a person has. This underlines that HIV sufferers are just as entitled to a kidney transplant as those who are looking for a heart transplant. John Morris doubts that proposals to change legislation to allow presumed consent to be introduced are likely to be publicly accepted. However, why is presumed consent any less a gift? It does not mean widespread harvesting of major organs. It means greater public awareness and individual choice that is made concrete.

In today's modern, the reality is that HIV / AIDS is at a crossroads where the economic and political niches of the contemporary modern condition provide both the possibility to raise scientific research in order to create a means of effective pandemic or the new religion of globalize capital may only serve as to extend HIV / AIDS to become the biggest social issue of all history. There is a huge issue with regards to donor transplantation and especially kidney transplantation. Unfortunately, some patients with Human Immunodeficiency Disease are denied equal access to kidney transplantation and the same priorities of other people who are suffering from other serious diseases. Therefore, in this research, evidence will be provided to proof HIV patients have the same rights as others to get a kidney transplant regardless if they appear completely diseased.

Interdisciplinary Issues in Healthcare Increasingly
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Using a philosophical approach, there is typically no one single "right" answer given, but rather a process with which to think about, and analyze, a given set of problems. For instance, is euthanasia "always" right; certainly not, but under the right set of circumstances, it might be the kindest option available in a moral sense, but still not acceptable legally.

Create common ground- Common ground is created in medical ethics by finding a process to utilize disparate data and find a more appropriate solution.

Construct a more comprehensive understanding- No "system" or organization is capable of judgment, so it is up to the human professional to decide what is in the best interest of the client. To find a comprehensive understanding, one must pull from the templates and definitions of medical ethics: autonomy, justice, fidelity, beneficence, veracity, non-maleficence, and paternalism (ICN, 2006).

eflect and test the understanding -- Let us…

REFERENCES

Research to Promote Healthy and Safe Employment in Health Care. Public Health Reports. 119 (1): 60- 73. Retrieved from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih

ICN. (2006). "The International Code of Ethics for Nurses." International Council of Nurses. Retrieved from:  http://www.icn.ch/icncode.pdf 

Kozier, B., Erb, G. & Blais, K. (1997), Professional nursing practice (3rd edition),

Addison-Wesley.

Health Care & Faith Diversity it Is
Words: 1406 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31369841
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Health Care & Faith Diversity

It is quite obvious how different religions hold different philosophical views on various aspects and even when it comes to healing. Each religion highly upholds their spiritual values hence the need for health practitioners to be cautious while handling varied clientele whether they hold the same religious sentiments or not. In this research we will major on the views held by the Sikh, Buddhist and Judaist religions in comparison to the Christian belief on healing.

Sikh religion

The Sikh hold the belief that when one is sick it is the will of God and that He is merciful to heal; however one has to consider medical treatment in order to get well. During illness: Sikh patients engage in prayers to seek God for help, seek to obtain peace by remembering Gods name, recite sacred hymns (Gurbani) which are words from the holy scriptures (Guru Granth…

References:

Dharma Haven, (2005).Tools for Healing Relaxing and Awakening. Retrieved March 30,

2012 from  http://www.dharma-haven.org/tibetan/healing.htm 

Manitoba, (2006). Core Competencies for Spiritual health care Practitioners. Retrieved March 30, 2012 from http://ahpcc.org.uk/pdf/compaudittool.pdf

Marinell & James (2009). Jewish Views of Illness and Healing. Retrieved March 30, 2012

An Ad a Poem a Short Story and a Song
Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73780451
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Ad located: http://Www.topdesignmag.com/Awesome-Collection-of-Print-Ads/
The France ADOT advertisement for organ donation has an intended audience of all healthy people, who are in the position of registering for being official organ donors. The means of persuasion is emotional, as the image is of a hospital bed and a man hugging a transparent, ghost-like image of an elder. The suggestion is that the elder has passed on, and that the organs of that person are keeping alive the young man in the bed. A strong story is being told, given that the organ donor is of a different ethnic background from the recipient. The suggestion is that organ donation can help save the life of a total stranger. The method of persuasion is emotional and explicit, showing that it will help others to register as an organ donor, because once a person is dead, those organs can either be used to save the…

References

Ad located:  http://www.topdesignmag.com/awesome-collection-of-print-ads/ 

Chopin, K. "Story of an Hour."

Journey "Don't Stop Believin." [Song]

Percy, M. "Belly Good."

Barbas M P Expanding Knowledge From
Words: 1596 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 68455636
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More than 98% of respondents had heard of the term "brain death," but only one-third (33.7%) believed that someone who was "brain dead" was legally dead. Using a utilitarian approach, organ donation does provide good for others; and, when managed appropriated, can provide a greater good for society at large. However, utilizing a population for organ harvesting, or changing the model so that organ donation is seen as a profit-center as opposed to a humanitarian endeavor, certainly muddies the waters a bit.

EFEENCES

Barbas, M.P. Expanding Knowledge: From the Classroom to Hyperspace. Educational Media International. 43 (1): 65-73, 2006. etrieved from: tp://www.eric.ed.gov/EICWebPortal / search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&EICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ729235&EICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ729235.

Guo, G., et.al. The VNT 2-eteap in MAOA and Delinquient Behavior in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Associations. European Journal of Human Genetics. 16 (5): 626-34. etrieved from: http://www.unc.edu/~gguo/papers/08%20MAOA %202%20aggression%20EJHG.pdf

Kurth, J. eligion and Globalization. The eview of Faith and International Affairs. 7(2): 15-21, 2009.

Nilsen, D.,…

REFERENCES

Barbas, M.P. Expanding Knowledge: From the Classroom to Hyperspace. Educational Media International. 43 (1): 65-73, 2006. Retrieved from: tp://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal / search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ729235&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ729235.

Guo, G., et.al. The VNTR 2-Reteap in MAOA and Delinquient Behavior in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Associations. European Journal of Human Genetics. 16 (5): 626-34. Retrieved from:  http://www.unc.edu/~gguo/papers/08%20MAOA  %202R%20aggression%20EJHG.pdf

Kurth, J. Religion and Globalization. The Review of Faith and International Affairs. 7(2): 15-21, 2009.

Nilsen, D., Kowske, B., Anthony, K. Managing a Diverse, Global Environment is Critical. HR Magazine Review. 50 (8): 41-9. Retrieved from:  http://www.shrm.org/Publications  / hrmagazine/EditorialContent/Pages/0805tools.aspx

Applying Watson's Nursing Theory to Assess Patient
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Applying atson's Nursing Theory to Assess Patient Perceptions of Being Cared for in a Multicultural Environment" describes the validness and authentication of the nursing theory of care by Jean atson. She was of the view that the best which a nurse can give to the patient is care as humans are naturally gifted with it and it is irrespective of ethnical, racial, cultural or social basis. The article describes the implications of this theory in such environment where the nurses and their patients have ethnical and cultural difference and they do not even understand each other's language. It is a case study designed to explore Saudi patient's perceptions of important caring behaviors by staff nurses. It was concluded by the data obtained that the patients rated overall caring behaviors as most important irrespective of their cultural differences with the caregiver. Hence atson's theory was proved in a multicultural environment, but…

Works cited

Nicely, Bruce. (2011). Virginia Henderson's principles and practice of nursing applied to organ donation after brain death. Progress in Transplantation, Vol 21, No. 1, March 2011.

Wakifa et.al. (2009). Applying Watson's Nursing Theory to Assess Patient Perceptions of Being Cared for in a Multicultural Environment. Joumal of Nursing Research, VOL 17, NO 4, DECEMBER 2009.

Walling, Allan. (2006). Therapeutic modulation of the psycho-neuroimmune system by medical acupuncture creates enhanced feelings of well being. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners; Apr 2006; 18, 4; ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source pg. 135

Nursing and Religion Practice Religion and Nursing
Words: 2267 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 452423
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Nursing and eligion Practice

ELIGION AND NUSING PACTICE

Nursing success depends on the ability to put the patient in a state of rest and comfort as much as it is about administering the prescriptions of the doctor. To secure the rest of the patient, nurses need to understand their needs and show respect to their beliefs and values. This requires courteous and open communication with the patient and adopting a patient-centric orientation. Along with other factors, the religious background of the patient makes a lot of difference to their values and expectations. eligious doctrines and practices may differ across religions and denominations such as Jehovah's Witnesses, Muslims, Seventh Day Adventists and Scientologists and may impose restrictions on certain kinds of interaction between nurse and patient or on certain forms of treatment. Moreover, people with a different religious background are not usually aware of such differences. Therefore, it is necessary for…

References

Banja, J.D. (2010). Overriding the Jehovah's Witness patient's refusal of blood: A reply to Cahana, Weibel, and Hurst. Pain Medicine, 10(5), 878-882. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2009.00648.x.

Charles, C.E., & Daroszewski, E.B. (2012). Culturally competent nursing care of the Muslim patient, Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 33(1), 61-63. doi: 10.3109/01612840.2011.596613.

Cort, M., & Cort, D. (2008). Willingness to participate in organ donation among Black Seventh-Day Adventist college students. Journal of American College Health, 56(6), p. 691-697. Retrieved from EBSCO Academic Search Primer.

Effa-Heap, G. (2009). Blood transfusion: Implications of treating a Jehovah's Witness patient. British journal of nursing, 18(3), 174-177.

Speech on the Benefits of
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Since the war in Iraq, thousands of American soldiers have been injured, and some of them paralyzed by explosions that shattered their spinal columns.

Traumatic paralysis is often irreversible because the network of nerves in the human spinal cord cannot repair themselves when they are badly damaged.

Applications of cloning technology will allow us to grow new nerve tissue for implantation into damaged spinal cords to restore their functions (Sagan, 1997).

Seventh Point - Cloned Human Organs Can Save Thousands of Lives Every Year:

Medical applications of cloning technology already allows doctors to grow human skin for burn victims.

The exact same technology will allow us to make human organs by actually cloning the cells from the same person to make replacement organs (Soares, 2002).

This means an end to long waiting lists for donor organs and will make the difference between life and death for thousands of people every…

References

Krock, L. (2001) on Human Cloning: Three Views. (NOVA/PBSonline)

Accessed November 1, 2007 at www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/baby/cloning.html

Sagan, C. (1997) Billions and Billions: Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millennium. Random House: New York

Soares, C. Why Human Clones Won't Work Yet. Discover (Jan/02)

The Problems With Surrogacy
Words: 600 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20058065
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yes, I do see a parallel between being paid to be a surrogate and the prohibition against being paid to donate one's organs. The prohibition is clearly designed at least in part to prevent people who are financially desperate being exploited by wealthier individuals. We cannot have a caste system in our nation where the bodies of the poor can be bought by the wealthy. Yet surrogacy does that very same thing, in effect paying less financially well-off women to carry the babies of wealthier women. A not atypical scenario for a surrogacy is a poorer young women being paid by an older, more educated dual income couple that has postponed childbirth so they have time to develop their careers. In almost all instances, the couple is more educated and financially well-off than the surrogate, effectively create a power relationship that is highly asymmetrical.

Pregnancy, like organ donation, is not…

Political Influence Over Stem Cell
Words: 2905 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 14376102
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Going back further, the same religious principals also inspired opposition to organ transplants and blood transfusions; before that, the Catholic Church strictly forbade any forensic scientific research, necessitating the need to dissect cadavers for medical education entirely in secret (Levine, 2008).

Just as the news media are partially at fault today for their failure to distinguish legitimate concerns from ludicrous fears in connection with the ongoing political debate over American healthcare, they are equally responsible for allowing unfounded fears of "human cloning" in connection with the beneficial uses of stem cell science. Specifically, the main source of secular opposition to stem cell research is attributable to unnecessary fears of rampant misuse of human cloning technology to clone human beings. While human cloning is hypothetically possible, no responsible scientific researcher would ever misuse current biomedical technology in that fashion. The complexities of cloning entire organisms have been well documented in animal…

References

Dershowitz, a. (2002). Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. Boston: Little

Brown & Co.

Friedrich, M. "Researchers Make the Case for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research"

The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 292(7); August 18, 2004:

Ethics Reproductive Technologies - There
Words: 768 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62174015
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The next objection of IVF separating the procreation and marital aspects of marriage and in the end damaging the marital relationship was totally untrue in this case. This couple had a very strong relationship and going through the process of gestational surrogacy strengthen their martial relationship as opposed to damaging it. The last objection of adoption is a better answer to the trouble of childlessness may very well be true for a lot of people. One cannot argue the fact that there are a lot of children out there that need to have good homes and there are many couples that could benefit tremendously from this avenue. But in the case of the couple in this article the idea of having a biological child was something that was very strong from them, thus making the path that they took the best one for them.

IVF, just like many other things…

References

Kuczynski, Alex. 2008. "Her Body, My Baby." Web. 5 July 2011. <

 http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/30/magazine/30Surrogate-t.html?_r=2&pagewanted=1 >

Singer, Peter. IVF: The Simple Case. Biomedical Ethics. By Degrazia, David, Mappes,

Thomas A. And Brand-Ballard, Jeffrey. 2010. 7th ed. Columbus: McGraw-Hill. 2010.

Aging and Death but With
Words: 4093 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 78859146
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Typically a Japanese funeral follows the sequence: when someone dies, they are placed to rest in their homes. The corpse was placed with the head pointing the North, copying the deathbed of Gautama, and the head of the bed is well decorated. Then the previously mentioned encoffinment process. The first night after one's death is called the Tsuya; and it is for close family and friends to remember their beloved. In the morning, a cleansing meal is served called Okiyome. The funeral is thereafter carried out where the Jukai rite also known as receipt of commandments gives the dead an opportunity to receive the Buddhist commandments, automatically making the dead a disciple of the Buddha, and the dead person is accepted into Buddha hood.

After all this, the deceased embarks on the journey to the other world as the coffin is carried out of the house and burnt in a…

References

Kimura, R (1996).Death and dying in Japan. "Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal," Vol. 6, No.

4,The Johns Hopkins University Press, pp. 374-378.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2007).The Definition of Death

 http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/death-definition/

Spirit Catches You and You
Words: 1206 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42671162
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Within this clash of cultures, the Lee family did not know how to cope with the medical system in place to help Lia and her epilepsy. When they refused to give her the medications, Lia was removed from the home and placed in foster care. When the foster care parents gave her the prescribed medication, her condition worsened in several important ways. The foster parents believe that Lia's parents realized that, and that this is why they did not give her the medication, but did not have the cultural and language skills to communicate this to the medical staff.

Fadiman points out through example after example that the medical staff looked at Lia only as her illness, not as an individual, and certainly not as an individual part of a strongly developed culture that was markedly different than the hospital culture within which the doctors worked. Through a translator, a…

Market a Health Care Good
Words: 774 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72629816
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The less stable the identities of the individual on the outside, the more impact the routines of life on the 'inside.' The deprivations of the prison culture (as described by Sykes) intensify the effects of immersion. These losses include the "loss or deprivation of liberty, the loss or deprivation of goods and services, the loss or deprivation of heterosexual relationships, the loss or deprivation of autonomy, and the loss or deprivation of security."

Conclusion: The possibility of redemption for the redeemable; redeeming the incorrigibles -- and managing the unredeemable

Prisons have three main goals: to redeem the redeemables; to manage the incorrigibles (the unredeemable, such as those serving life terms) and convert at least some incorrigibles into being redeemable (through rehabilitation). To aid in the process of redeeming those who are redeemable, many prisons today have half-way houses and offer opportunities for prisoners to learn meaningful trades, so when they…

References

Clemmer, D. (1940). The prison community. Boston: The Christopher Publishing House.

Goffman, E. (1960). Asylums: Essays on the social situation of mental patients and other inmates. New York: Anchor.

Sykes, G.M. (1958). The society of captives. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

1996 the Federal Government Passed
Words: 1257 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 76880400
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"

ritten Policies

Covered entities must develop and implement written privacy policies that are consistent with the Privacy Rule (OCR, 2003). This policy must address several components. One is that there must be a privacy official. The privacy official is responsible for developing and implementing privacy policies. There must also be a contact person responsible for the receipt of complaints (Ibid.).

The written policy must also cover other key areas. These included workforce training, which should also include any employee under the direct control of the covered entity, even if they are under contract and not an employee of the entity. There must be data safeguards as well, so the written policy needs to include specific procedures for verification of identity, release of information and disposal of PHI.

There must also be a policy with respect to the handling of complaints. This procedure must be outlined in the notice that…

Works Cited:

Office for Civil Rights: Health Information Privacy. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from  http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/index.html 

No author. (2003). What is HIPAA? HIPAAps.com. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from http://www.hipaaps.com/main/background.html

Francis, Theo (2006). Spread of Records Stirs Fear of Privacy Erosion. Wall Street Journal. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from  http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06362/749444-114.stm 

Office for Civil Rights: HIPAA Privacy Rule FAQ. Retrieved April 2, 2009 from  http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/familyhealthhistoryfaqs.pdf

Cultural Differences That Surface When
Words: 2655 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 50518383
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These, then, eventually die leaving the transfer of oxygen in your blood being absolutely limited and far below the point at which the flow of oxygen needs to be in a human body. The flow of blood and transfer of oxygen eventually slows down tremendously and can cause terrible pain as well as make the immune system to be vulnerable to a variety of different diseases. There are many medical procedures that can allow the individual to find a relief (Lozoff et al., 2003).

In our case study, we will mainly highlight how the mother's approach was tentative and skeptical and how the four points that have been mentioned initially (communication, social organization, spatial dynamics and locus of control) are impacted through her approach. The first important thing to note about the attitude of the mother is that she does seem very forthcoming to find out as much as she…

References

Black R. (2003) Micronutrient deficiency -- an underlying cause of morbidity and mortality. Bulletin of World Health Organization, 81:79.

Dr Izumi, S., (2008) Japanese Patients' Descriptions of 'The Good Nurse', accessed on February 28, 2009.

Kino*****a, J., & Palevsky, N. (1992) Gateway to Japan (Rev. ed.). Tokyo: Kodansha International.

Lozoff B, De Andraca I, Castillo M, Smith JB, Walter T, Pino P. (2003) Behavioral and developmental effects of preventing iron-deficiency anemia in healthy full-term infants. Pediatrics.112:846-854.

Japanese Cultural Interview and Assessment
Words: 1466 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86258852
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Japanese: Cultural Interview and Nursing Assessment

Presentation of client and scenario

This interview was conducted with a Ms. X, a Japanese national visiting friends in another country. She was, over the course of the interview, asked about a number of personal and culturally sensitive factors about her native culture that might affect a nursing intervention.

It is important for a nursing practitioner to keep this in mind as, in the 2000 census, 796,700 residents of the U.S. identified their "race" as Japanese,

Thus it is useful for all nursing practitioners, particularly those residing on the est Coast to keep abreast of Japanese cultural traditions. (Tanabo, 2001) Also, even when residing in Japan, Japanese first-generation immigrants have traditionally seemed less eager than other immigrant groups to assimilate into the hegemonic culture. One measure of this is that compared to other Americans of Asian background, a lower percentage of Japanese elders speak…

Work Cited

Tanabo, Marianne. (2001) "Health and Health Care: Japanese." Stanford Ethnography e-Books. Retrieved 10 Mar 2005 at  http://www.stanford.edu/group/ethnoger/ebooks/japanese_american.pdf

Post Mortem Care
Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Literature Review Paper #: 65300644
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hospitals with regard to postmortem care. In particular, the procedures used in postmortem care involve methods for appropriate care of the body after death, sensitive and appropriate notification of death to the significant other and family, as well as notification to the coroner. The various departments within hospitals have different criteria regarding policies and procedures pertaining to postmortem care. The following outlines the procedures generally followed as well as policies followed with regard to postmortem care within different departments of the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.

Following the death of a patient, a final nursing assessment is generally performed including documentation regarding several details pertaining to the patient's death. These details include: the name of the patient, time that the physician was contacted, and the pronunciation of death; individuals present at the time of death, including family, friends, and healthcare workers; the time of the assessment; general appearance of…

References

Lousiana State University Health Sciences Center -- Shreveport. (2011). Post-mortem care. Hospital Policy Manual. Retrieved 10 March 2012 from http://www.sh.lsuhsc.edu/policies/policy_manuals_via_ms_word/hospital_policy/h_5.40.0.pdf.

American Society of Registered Nurses (2008). Postmortem care. Nursing Today. Retrieved 10 March 2012 from http://www.asrn.org/journal-nursing-today/310-postmortem-care.html.

Needle Stick Injuries
Words: 4119 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 98811208
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Patient Identifiers

The Importance of Patient Identifiers

Adverse events as a consequence of medical treatment are now recognized to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality around the world (World Health Organization [WHO], 2005). Somewhere between 3 and 5% of all hospital admissions in the United States result in an adverse event, and in 1999 it was estimated that the majority of the 44,000 to 98,000 deaths caused annually by medical mistakes could have been prevented (reviewed by Leape, 2000, and WHO, 2005).

The sources of adverse events can be divided into clinical practice, defective or poorly maintained products, improper procedures, or an organizational system. The World Health Organization (2005) concluded that systemic failures are the primary source of adverse events, and can be attributed to a particular organization's patient care strategy, culture, attitudes toward managing quality of care and risk prevention, and the ability to learn from mistakes.…

Resources. When taught in-house, hospital PHI guidelines will be included as course material. A formal 2-hour lecture will be presented, followed by a specified period for home study of the course material. A 1-hour supervised exam will then be administered to test the student's comprehension of the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules, and the significance of PSQIA.

Notes

Association of Surgical Technologists. (2006). Recommended Standards of Practice for Patient Identification. Retrieved March 16, 2011 from  http://www.ast.org/pdf/Standards_of_Practice/RSOP_Patient_Identification.pdf 

Brady, Anne-Marie, Malone, Anne-Marie, and Fleming, Sandra. (2009). A literature review of the individual and systems factors that contribute to medication errors in nursing practice. Journal of Nursing Management, 17, 679-697.

Brady, Anne-Marie, Redmond, Richard, Curtis, Elizabeth, Fleming, Sandra, Keenan, Paul, Malone, Anne-Marie et al. (2009). Adverse events in health care: a literature review. Journal of Nursing Management, 17, 155-164.

Analyzing Elder Care Professionals
Words: 6936 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 15648392
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Hawaiian elde cae pofessionals impove patient eldecae sevices to Japanese nationals, taking into consideation Japanese cultual noms and expectations

Caegiving fo eldely paents in Japan

Japan has witnessed a significant gowth in its elde population. In the yea 1950, 4.9% of the Japanese population was aged 65 yeas and above. This figue inceased to 14.8% (1995). By 2025, it is estimated to gow to 25.8% (Yamamoto & Wallhagen, 1997). Japan's 'vey old' population goup (aged 85 and above) is swiftly inceasing in numbe. It has been pojected that by 2025, the nation's 'vey old' population will account fo 4.3% of its total population -- a five-fold ise in thee decades. Futhemoe, it was pojected that as many as 2.62 million Japanese would be suffeing fom senile dementia by the yea 2015; the 1990 estimate fo senile dementia was about one million individuals (11WSA 1996).

Change in the pecentage of Japan's…

references, and Arrangement of End-of-life Care and Decision-Making among Japanese-American Older Adults, ProQuest LLC.

National Asian Pacific Center on Aging. (1998). Growing APA elderly population adds urgency to improving health services. Asian Pacific Affairs, 6 (Dr. 2-3.

SALDOV, M., KAKAI, H., McLAUGHLIN, L. & THOMAS, A. (1998). Cultural barriers in oncology: Issues in obtaining medical informed consent from Japanese-American elders in Hawaii, Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 13: 265-279.

Sato, S. (2015). THE IMPACT OF GENDER AND CULTURAL FACTORS ON THE PATTERNS OF ELDER CARE SERVICE UTILIZATION AMONG FAMILY CAREGIVERS OF JAPANESE ANCESTRY IN THE STATE OF HAWAII, ProQuest LLC

SOROCCO, K.H. (1998). BECOMING A HEALTH ACTIVE OLDER ADULT: THE EFFECTS OF A WORKSHOP FOR JAPANESE-American OLDER ADULTS. ProQuest Information and Learning

Ethics Project
Words: 4363 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 61479708
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Life and Death: The Life Support Dilemma by Kenneth E. Schemmer M.D

Kenneth Schemmer in his thorough, thought provoking book brings to life the controversial subject of the life support issue. For years, many all over the country have pondered, "What if a person were in some kind of an accident and the physicians told them that they were not going to make it?" And all that he or she could do is just lie there in extreme pain waiting for their life to the end. Or even worse case scenario what if they happened to end up completely brain dead? These debated questions are taken on by Dr. Schemmer in making his point that life support decisions may not necessarily be the decision of the family, the doctor or the patient but by a higher being that gives life and takes life. Schemmer uses these controversial questions in his…

References:

Court backs right to die | terminally ill have right to refuse medical life support. (1984, Dec 28). The San Diego Union, pp. A.1-1.

Ackerman, T. (2005, Mar 27). Life support battle shifts / A decade ago, patients families had to press for 'right to die. Houston Chronicle, pp. 1-B.1.

Allen, P. (2000, Oct 07). Right to die upheld despite new euro law, doctors can end life support rules judge. Daily Mail, pp. 33-33.

Dolan, M. (2001, Aug 10). Justices deal setback to right-to-die movement; health: State court bans removal of life support from conscious patients whose wishes are not clear. Los Angeles Times, pp. A.1-A.1.

Health Care Market in Discussing the Market
Words: 818 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14654930
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Health Care Market

In discussing the market for a health care good or service, one must first understand that in speaking of "health care," one is actually speaking of the entire health care industry, along with each of the goods and services that are produced and exchanged within this market. From organ transplant operations and blood donation to therapeutic massages and nursing home activity programs, the span of health care goods and services is both vast and varied. Further, in viewing today's uncertain economy, the market for health care goods and services is one that brings with it many different questions that must be addressed in order for a stakeholder to fully comprehend what decisions need to made in order to turn a profit.

Scarcity of esources

Scarcity of resources within this market significantly influences the decisions that stakeholders are forced to make. With scarcity of resources comes limited action…

References

Case, K. And Fair, R. (2007). Principles of economics. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson

Education, Inc.

Fullerton, D. (2008). How economists see the environment. Nature, 385(6701), p. 433.

Retrieved from: LexisNexis Database.

Nursing Kidney Nursing Perceptions and
Words: 2121 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 89660948
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(2008). The study measures public opinion concerning two scenarios: one in which the kidney donor is given a fixed financial compensation; and one in which the donor is provided with health insurance coverage for life. According to the findings of the study, "although almost half of the respondents (46%) were reluctant towards introducing a system with fixed compensation to increase the number of living kidney donors, still 25% of the general public reacted positively." (Kranenburg, 1039) This study would conduct a similar comparative discussion, but would expand the number of available options discussed and would use a different sample population, as discussed in the subsequent section.

Subjects and Sampling Technique:

The subjects will be drawn from amongst nursing professionals working in randomly selected renal specialty facilities and wards. Initial contact will be made by phone with a Director of Nursing at selected facilities requesting participation. Those that agree will receive…

Works Cited:

Conesa, C.; Rios, a.; Ramirez, P.; Sanchez, J.; Sanchez, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Martinez, L.; Ramos, F. & Parrilla, P. (2009). Attitude of Primary Care Nurses Toward Living Kidney Donation. Transplantation Proceedings, 37(9), 3626-3630.

Kranenburg, L.; Schram, a.; Zuidema, W.; Weimar, W.; Hilhorst, M.; Hessing, J. & Busschbach, J. (2008). Public Survey of Financial Incentives for Kidney Donation. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 23(3), 1039-1042.

Neyhart, C. & Colaneri, J. (2004). Living Anonymous kidney donation: A solution to the organ donor shortage? Nephrology Nursing Journal. Online at  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ICF/is_3_31/ai_n17207253/ 

Watson, J. (2007). Theory of Human Caring: Theory Evolution. University of Colorado at Denver. Online at  http://www.nursing.ucdenver.edu/faculty/jw_evolution.htm

Hela Tissue
Words: 1336 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75497757
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Henrietta Lacks born August 1, 1920, was an African-American female tobacco farmer who resided in Dundalk, Maryland. She was wife to her first cousin and mother of five children. At the age of 31, Lacks died from cervical cancer. Before she died, a doctor took a sample of her cervical cells. These cells, named HeLa cells, became the immortal cell line that provided a Polio vaccine, aided in cloning, among other scientific breakthroughs. "Henrietta's cells were the first immortal human cells ever grown in culture. They were essential to developing the polio vaccine" (Zielinski, 2010).

HeLa cells have become a benchmark in the study of cellular processes. However, here in lies the controversy. HeLa cells have benefitted many except for the family of the person the sample was derived from. Henrietta Lacks' children, for decades, lived in poverty, with one son homeless. Was it right for a doctor to, without…

References

Siminoff, L.A., & Traino, H.M. (2013). Consenting to donation: an examination of current practices in informed consent for tissue donation in the U.S Cell and Tissue Banking, 14(1), 85-95.

Skloot, R. (2010). The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks. New York: Crown Publishers.

Truog, R.D., Kesselheim, A.S., & Joffe, S. (2012). Paying Patients for Their Tissue: The Legacy of Henrietta Lacks. Science, 337(6090), 37-38.

Zielinski, S. (2010, January 22). History, Travel, Arts, Science, People, Places | Smithsonian. History, Travel, Arts, Science, People, Places | Smithsonian. Retrieved March 21, 2014, from  http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/henrietta-lacks-immortal-cells-6421299/

Scarce Resources Access to Healthcare
Words: 869 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26229370
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Boylan is a firm supporter of universal healthcare, stating without adequate healthcare the nation will soon realize a rapid decline in health, as evidenced by the increase of health status reported when healthcare was more readily available to community members in the past.

Creative Solution or Innovation

Guercia et al. (2005) provided a novel solution to the current healthcare crisis by suggesting hospitals and other healthcare agencies receive nonprofit status to encourage more charitable donations and grants of money to these organizations so they can provide charitable care. Individuals who qualify for charity care are more likely to seek healthcare when they need it most.

Derrington & Shapiro (2004) provide some evidence that early intervention may help prevent major healthcare crisis before they happen. This model is perhaps the best model to use to present a new and innovative solution to the current crisis in healthcare. ather than focusing on…

References

Boylan, M. (2001). A universal right to healthcare. Journal of Politics and Ethics. 1(3):

Derrington, T.M., Shapiro, B.J. (2004). Equity and disparity in access to services: An outcomes-based evaluation of early intervention child find in Hawaii. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 24(4): 199.

Giffords, E.D., Guercia, R., Kass, D., Weiss, D. & Wenze, L. (2005). Increasing access to healthcare: Examination of hospital community benefits and free care programs. Health and Social Work, 20(3): 213.

Liska, D., Brennan, N., & Bruen, B. (1998). State-level data book in healthcare access and financing (3rd ed). Washington, DC: Urban Institute.

Military Retirees Are Entitled to
Words: 12717 Length: 46 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 18599361
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First of all only a scant few of these Veterans groups will acknowledge the "promise" of free health care; for the most part these groups will tout the benefits already promised by the Veterans Administration and assert that cuts in these benefits are the same a broken promise-or contractual breach in legal terms. The idea of the United States military making a "promise" or forging a legally binding agreement between individual veterans or groups of veterans is barred by the United States Constitution. As will be demonstrated in the Literature eview, specific Constitutional language from Article I give Congress and only Congress the express authority to make laws and regulations pertaining to the armed forces. Therefore, the idea the military breached a contract with service members is, ultimately, inherently inaccurate. Combining the lack of specific language within the materials provided by any governmental agency with the clear language of the…

References

.... (n.d.). The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. The RETIRED MILITARY ADVOCATE. Retrieved November 29, 2010, from  http://mrgrg-ms.org/ 

Best, R. (2003, August 7). Military Medical Care Services: Questions and Answers. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-17.

Birkey, a. (2010, July 21). Fraudulent vets charity raised big money in Minnesota. The Minnesota Independent, p. 3.

Burrelli, D. (2008, August 12). Military Health Care: The Issue of Promised Benefits. Congressional Research Service, 1, 1-14.

Foundationally Promising Research Discoveries of
Words: 5874 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 95138553
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For some the issue then arises when the pluripotent cells are removed from the blastocyst, as this very act negates the ability for the cell group to develop into a human being. "Note that the process of changing from totipotent to pluripotent to multipotent cells is not reversible -- that is, pluripotent stem cells do not produce totipotent stem cells, and multipotent stem cells do not produce pluripotent stem cells."

Borror, O'Rourke and Skirboll 54) Additionally, the proponents of stem cell work cite the pluripotent as incapable of producing a human being therefore not a destruction of life, hence leading to the Bush decision to ban the creation of new lines of stem cells, as it would require the destruction of further human totipotent cells.

Multipotent. The pluripotent stem cells undergo further specialization into multipotent stem cells, which are committed to giving rise to cells that have a particular function.…

Works Cited

 

Direct to Consumer Advertising History of Drug
Words: 16271 Length: 59 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71118969
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Direct to Consumer Advertising

HISTRY F DRUG ADVERTISING

THE DTC ADVERTISING PHENMENN

CREATING DEMAND

DECEPTIVE ADVERTISING - A WLF IN SHEEP'S CLTHING

CAUSE F DEATH

PRFIT

UTILIZATIN, PRICING, AND DEMGRAPHICS

LEGISLATIN, PLITICS AND PATENTS

LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES REGARDING DTC

RECALLED and/or DEADLY DRUGS

In order to provide the most efficient method of evaluation, the study will utilize existing stores of qualitative and quantitative data from reliable sources, such as U.S. Government statistical references, University studies, and the studies and publications of non-profit and consumer oriented organizations. Every attempt will be made to avoid sources of information sponsored by or directly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry.

Existing data regarding the history, levels, content and growth of direct-to-consumer advertising will be examined. In addition, the industry's composition prior to and after the proliferation of direct-to-consumer advertising will be examined, with regard to market share, type of substances sold, benefits of substances sold, and…

On January 9, 2002, Dr. Darlene Jody, Vice President of Medical Marketing for Bristol-Myers Squibb, issued a manufacturer's "Important Drug Warning Including Black Box Information." The Important Drug Warning advises healthcare practitioners that "cases of life-threatening hepatic failure have been reported in patients treated with SERZONE." The manufacturer's Warning indicates that numerous persons have or will suffer liver failure, death or transplantation. The manufacturer's Warning also indicates that the current estimate of the rate of liver failure associated with Serzone use is "about 3-4 times the estimated background rate of liver failure." A new Warning is being added to the Serzone prescribing information, advising that "patients should be advised to be alert for signs and symptoms of liver dysfunction (jaundice, anorexia, gastrointestinal complaints, malaise, etc.) and to report them to their doctor immediately if they occur." According to Warnings, Serzone should be promptly discontinued if signs or symptoms suggest liver failure.

Vioxx belongs to a class of drugs known as COX-2 inhibitors. When the drugs were introduced a few years ago, COX-2 inhibitors were thought to be safer and more effective than other drugs such as Aspirin and Ibuprofen. However, several studies have questioned the cardiovascular safety of Vioxx. Studies indicate that people taking Vioxx have four times the risk of a heart attack.

In May 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Talk Paper about new label warnings for the popular arthritis and pain drug know as Vioxx (rofecoxib). The new label warnings are based on the results of the Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcomes Research (VIGOR). According to the FDA, recent studies demonstrate that Vioxx is associated with a higher rate of serious cardiovascular thromboembolic adverse events (such as heart attacks, angina pectoris, and peripheral vascular events). Based on the recent study, the FDA agreed with the Arthritis Advisory Committee recommendations February 8, 2001 that the label for Vioxx include gastrointestinal and cardiovascular warning information. Serious side effects attributed to Vioxx are heart attacks, seizures, strokes, or liver/kidney problems.  http://www.recalleddrugs.com