Overpopulation Essays (Examples)

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Can We Sacrifice a Few Lives to Save Millions

Words: 433 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36272959

Overpopulation is one of the biggest threats to the planet and to humanity. In poor nations where food rations are sparse, too many people can cause famines. Overpopulation contributes to environmental problems, health problems, and economical problems. However, overpopulation is a difficult crisis to deal with because the right to reproduce is ingrained in the human psyche. It would be unethical to invasively force sterilization on women or men. On the other hand, it is equally unethical to give up and do nothing. The recent discovery of the five-year birth control pill solves a slew of problems. First, it provides a contraceptive that is more reliable than condoms or the standard pill, for there is no room for human error. The pill is only taken once and the woman is protected for five years. Second, it offers a non-invasive method of contraception that can squelch the population growth on the planet. The risk that this pill causes cancer is relatively small, but that risk must still be made public. The primary issue in this case is the rightful disclosure of information: the findings should be publicized and the pill should be released with the appropriate disclaimers.

All pharmaceuticals carry risks…… [Read More]

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Philosophy -- the Tragedy of

Words: 1411 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19195662



More importantly, Sen argues that the collaborative approach would be a more successful route to reducing population growth. Among the ideas mentioned by Sen would be incorporating better public education to promote genuine understanding of problems and the reasons why changing certain behavior would be appropriate. In general, Sen expresses the confidence that Hardin lacks that many people could be taught long-range morality the same way many people already learn or absorb short-range morality. In that regard, it is simply not the case that most people behave appropriately toward others only because they fear the legal consequences of doing otherwise. Sen also implies that government could still play a role in encouraging the choice to have smaller families but in positive rather than negative ways. For example, federal and state agencies could provide monetary rewards for single-child families such as in the form of subsidized education, or childcare, or college funding, or tax credits to families who limit themselves to one or two children.

Critical Response to the Tragedy of the Commons Concept

The ideas advanced by Sen would include precisely the approach used by the U.S. federal government to encourage a nationwide highway speed limit. Specifically, the federal government…… [Read More]

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Child Han China's One Child

Words: 3495 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66771740



Ethnographic/Social Considerations

Hall (1987) examined the effects of the one child policy from a cultural/anthropological and ethnographic perspective. Her study revealed that such policies unwittingly result in a cultural change in attitudes, beliefs and even behaviors exhibited by children. For example, couples may lean toward the decision that having more than one child "cramps their economic style" and that may lead to the one child being spoiled and the 'babyhood' period being drawn out (Hall, 1987).

The author suggests that a country full of only children will result in children who grow into adults that will be self-centered and less likely to be concerned with the welfare of the country as a whole, and more likely to be concerned with their own personal satisfaction. This goes against the Chinese ideology that it is important to serve the country rather than oneself, and Hall suggests that "a citizenry made up of only children could spell trouble" (Hall, 1987:44).

There has been some push by the Chinese government and the Ministry of Civil Affairs in recent years to provide more funding for orphanages so they can provide better care and provisions for the children living in them (Banghan et. al, 1998). Also…… [Read More]

References

Banghan, H.; Johnson, K.; Liyao, W. 1998. "Infant Abandonment in China." Population and Development Review, 24(3):469

Greenhalgh, S. (2003). "Science, modernity and the making of China's one-child policy." Population and Development Review, 29(2):163

Hall, E. (1987). "China's only child: This strict policy is controlling China's population problem, but will only children make unwilling socialists." Psychology Today,

Johnson, D. Gale. 1994. "Effects of institutions and policies on rural population growth with application to China. Population and Development Review 20 (3): 503-531.
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California Dreams and Realities California

Words: 1769 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97016242

Hispanic parent work so hard at low paying job (maid; agricultural; day laborer, etc.) just to feed and shelter them, and parent don't have anymore time or energy for insisting about homeworks and graders. But this, I feel, will downfall California eventually if something to help their Hispanic education levels does not happen. Now Hispanic adults even are working in Disneyland and McDonald's but that person needed for doctor and engineer careers instead. Disneyland job will be fine for young kid, but after that, which Hispanic people will be able to work in computer jobs in Silicon Valley; maintain infrastructures; participate in state government, and in California industry and health, accounting, and legal professions? There are just too many Hispanics here for them not to enter these professions in much bigger groups! California must work hard with the children of all: rich poor and middle class people equally - now, not later. No more time is available to discriminate, or everyone paying very high price! Therefore, California must encourage more Hispanic scholars like Ruben Navarette ("Well I Guess they Need their Minority"). True, maybe Harvard needs Ruben for its minority quota, but California needs for all Hispanic youth being like…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Maasik, Sonia, and Jack Solomon. California Dreams and Realities: Readings

For Critical Thinkers and Writers. 3rd Ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's,
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Faith and Science Today

Words: 2014 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28790437

Anatomy/Christianity

The Breath of Life

Throughout scripture the concept of breath represents life. Genesis 2:7

It is evident that we need to breathe to live and that without our respiratory system, we would die. But why is this? Can we know why other than to say that this is how our Creator designed us to be? Perhaps an understanding of our own respiratory system can help us to better understand our Creator? I think so.

What do we find in our nose? A kind of filter that keeps out of our lungs harmful particles and spores that would otherwise pollute them. This can be a symbol of how we should filter our minds of impure thoughts so as to keep our souls clean. It can also be a symbol of how important God's grace is in our souls -- it is to our souls as oxygen is to our bodies. Without oxygen, we die. So to do our souls "die" if we cut them off from God's grace. But, just as our souls can be restored to life through the welcoming of grace into them, so to can our bodies be fortified, even when they have respiratory afflictions. For example,…… [Read More]

South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.

Sheen, F. (1951). Three to Get Married. Princeton, NJ: Scepter Publishers.

Holy Bible, New Living Translation. (2004). IL: Tyndale House Publishers.
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Tragedy of the Commons

Words: 1165 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90326041

Tragedy of the Commons

Few people would deny that overpopulation is a major problem. Even sparsely populated nations feel the brunt of the overpopulation problem because overpopulation affects the environment, politics, and the global market economy. The world currently holds six billion plus individual human beings, an unprecedented number. Rainforests are being cut down and soil depleted of their natural nutritive qualities in an attempt to please human appetites and keep the population happy. In his essay "The Tragedy of the Commons," author Garrett Hardin suggests that the only way to stop the overpopulation problem from getting worse is to stop unlimited human breeding. Unfortunately, the United Nations has taken a laissez faire stance that leaves the option to breed with each family. Hardin points out that this position is self-serving and outright stupid. So far, China has been one of the only nations in the world to institute some form of mandatory population control device, in limiting the number of children each family can have. Although China's model is not ideal and might not be the best ultimate application of population control, we do need, as Hardin proposes, to do something. That something must be a radical reworking of…… [Read More]

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United States Should Use Its

Words: 2975 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87619689

("USAID Family Planning Program Timeline: 1970s-1980s").

President Regan's successor, President George H.W. Bush, continued to adhere to the Mexico City Policy. In 1993, it was rescinded by President Clinton. President George W. Bush reinstated the policy in 2001 by establishing conditions in the grants awarded to USAID. In addition, President George W. Bush extended the policy to apply to any "voluntary population planning" assistance provided by the Department of State. (Obama).

Progress in family planning policy was made in other areas. The federal government recognized that special attention in providing family planning counseling should be paid to countries where overpopulation threatened biodiversity or endangered species. ("USAID Family Planning Program Timeline: 1990s-2009").

In addition, the federal government, especially USAID, worked to use family planning policy to promote the awareness of HIV disease and to promote health practices that would restrict the spread of such diseases. In 2003, USAID established new guidelines which included new information about how to integrate family planning into HIV-education programs and about how to integrate HIV counseling and services into family planning programs. ("USAID Family Planning Program Timeline: 1990s-2009").

In 2009, shortly after he was inaugurated, President Barack Obama rescinded the Mexico City Policy. He ordered the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clinton Hillary. Foreign Policy Address at the Council on Foreign Relations, May 5, 2009. U.S. Department of State. Web. May 24, 2010.

Griswold v. Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479 (1965).

Jones K.A. "New Complexities and Approaches to Global Health Diplomacy: View from the U.S. Department of State." PLoS Med 7(5). Web. May 24, 2010

Obama, Barack. "Memorandum to the Secretary of State: Mexico City Policy and Assistance for Voluntary Population Planning," January 23, 2009. Web. May 24, 2010.
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About Tragedy of the Commons

Words: 1239 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38359253

Tragedy of the Commons

In Garrett Hardin's essay "Tragedy of the Commons," the author presents a radical solution to the overpopulation problem. The title of the essay refers to a scenario presented by a mathematician in 1833. In the scenario, a communal pasture is enjoyed by several herdsmen in a given area. Everything is fine until "social stability" is achieved (2). When that happens, each herdsman feels entitled, even obliged, to "maximize his gain," (3). All the other herdsmen do the same thing and before long the pasture becomes overgrazed. Therefore, human self-serving instincts do not necessarily benefit the collective, and in many cases such as this, self-serving leads to collective destruction. Hardin calls this collective destruction the "tragedy of the commons." Hardin then applies the metaphor of the pasture to other tragedies of the commons, ultimately focusing on the overpopulation problem. According to Hardin, overpopulation can be stopped through public policy that limits breeding. Human beings and their societies enact a slew of laws that limit our personal freedoms. Because overpopulation is causing some undesirable and even disastrous effects such as starvation and pollution, laws should be enacted to enforce human population control. Although Hardin's position is radical and…… [Read More]

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Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Words: 3470 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19913828

Social Ecology of Health Promotion

Modern day examples of human modification of an ecosystem

Module 01 Question 01: Preservation of the existing ecosystems

Various measures have been put in order to modify and contain the natural state of the ecosystem. Preservation is one of the approaches that have been used to foster equitable management of the ecosystem. Through preservation, it has become evident that the ecosystem has taken a different understanding from the avenue of human perception. For instance, rules and regulations that help to protect the ecosystem have changed the entire perception of the ecosystem globally. Initially before the establishment of preservation approaches, the ecosystem was getting devastated gradually. Nonetheless, modification has come with the introduction of laws and regulations that work towards protection and preservation of the available avenues in the market.

Through the rules and regulations created, the ecosystem has achieved a new state of protection in the society. For instance, the living and non-living matter has been protected through the establishment of safer sites where they are able to thrive in their natural state. It is evident that most of the approaches and modifications in this field are aimed at protecting the existing species of the…… [Read More]

References

Callan, S., & Thomas, J.M. (2010). Environmental economics & management: Theory, policy, and applications. Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning.

Corwin, J. (2009). 100 heartbeats: The race to save earth's most endangered species. New York, NY: Rodale.

FAO/IRRI Workshop on Judicious and Efficient Use of Insecticides on Rice, International

Rice Research Institute. & Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
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Stratospheric Ozone Study Indicates More

Words: 1759 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75503188



A found this article particularly shocking for the immense figures suggested by the number of babies born daily. Such statistics opened my eyes to the core of the problem. Not only are we destroying the planet through our overindulgent, selfish and unsustainable habits, but also by the sheer number of us doing the same thing. No wonder studies such as the one in the first article found very little positive change in the environment around us. It is, as Connor says, time to raise our heads from the sand and face the core of our environmental problems. From the basis of sustainable population numbers, we can then create sustainable energy sources.… [Read More]

References

Business Wire. "Stratospheric Ozone Study Indicates: More is Needed for Full Recovery Report Released on the UN International Day to Protect the Ozone Layer." Sept. 15, 2003. Database: FindArticles.com. URL:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EIN/is_2003_Sept_15/ai_107753958

Connor, Steve. "Overpopulation is 'main threat to planet'." The Independent (London). Jan 7, 2006. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4158/is_20060107/ai_n15994712

Forliti, Amy. "Conservation efforts fuel school rivalries." The Associated Press. June 9, 2006.  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/09/AR2006060900417.html
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Globalization and National Differences in

Words: 3446 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87098019

But when the village is being rebuilt, consensus is not easy (Kurup)." This is a pointed criticism of using a U.S. model where the financial sector is doing well (the speculative economy) as opposed to the "real" economy on the street. Dr. Kurup feels that the infrastructural problems that have dogged India for years need to be solved as well so the recovery is even and across the board. He further remarked in the article that "You have to see the context. Just because we were not affected by the crisis, it does not imply we are safe. One has to look at what is the purpose behind the changes. There is a perception if you develop the bond market, infrastructure will develop. Infrastructure will not develop if the bond market alone is developed. In fact, no country in the world, except for partly the U.S., developed infrastructure through the bond market (ibid)." In other words, for there to be overall health in the Indian economy industrial growth and the strong infrastructure that it brings along with it is necessary for real, sustained economic growth that will benefit all Indians. In other words, he is looking across the border at…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Globalization in India." Economy Watch. Economy Watch.com, n.d. Web. 21 Nov 2010.

http://www.economywatch.com/economy-articles/globalization-in-india.html >.

Comparison Studies." I Watch. Wake Up Call for India, 2010. Web. 22 Nov 2010.

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Non Surgical Sterilization of the

Words: 1001 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5393951



Varied Perspectives on Non-Surgical Sterilization Methods:

There have been varied perspectives on the use of non-surgical sterilization of the dog since these products do not entirely solve the problem of the overpopulation of dogs and cats. Additionally, the varied perspectives and arguments on the use of these methods have also been due to the fact that some people don't care since they want to breed their animals. Given that there is no secure and effective non-surgical sterilization method of the dog that has been identified and announced, the varied perspectives have continued to increase. However, there have been various approaches to identify non-surgical products though none of the products have shown tremendous results to be widely adopted and implemented (Bowen, 2006).

One of the major perspectives has been against the non-surgical sterilization of the dog since the methods that have been explored have not only been ineffective but have also proven to have side-effects like the surgical methods. For instance, evaluation on the immunization against luteinizing hormone (LH) as a means of sterilization was only effective in some dogs. LH vaccines have however not been further pursued because the immunity obtained during the various evaluations were so variable. The effective…… [Read More]

References:

Bowen, R. (2006, April 25). Nonsurgical Sterilization of Dogs and Cats. Retrieved Colorado

State University website:  http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/reprod/petpop/nonsurg.html 

Singer, J. (2010, January 13). Non-Surgical Pet Population Control: A Godsend or Nightmare.

Retrieved November 16, 2010, from http://www.petside.com/petsideblog/2010/01/non-surgical-pet-population-co.php
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John Kelly's the Great Mortality

Words: 1378 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98504858

John Kellys "the great mortality"

The bacillus Yesinia Pestis made two continents pay intolerably high life prices both in human and animal lives. Along a few decades in the first half of the thirteenth century, it engulfed Eurasia and kept the world under its terror, making many think its end was near (The Great Mortality).

The Great Plague has carved in the history of humanity signs that will never fade with the passing of time because of its enormous toll on human lives. John Kelly's book "The great mortality" places the plague in a historic context and tackles the topic of Black Death from the perspective of the twentieth century. The word is not free from the deadly attack of infectious diseases, viruses are still threatening animals and human beings alike. John Kelly points out in the introduction to his book that in spite of the numerous victories reported by medicine in the fight against infectious diseases, like the small pox, for example, people are today almost as vulnerable and powerless when confronted with a new virus as they were during the thirteenth century.

By the end of the first half of the thirteenth century, the first wave of globalization…… [Read More]

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Environmental Crime Economic Globalization and

Words: 2261 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2165518

A company working on such a goal might claim that the intent is to use less pesticides, but really they just want to decrease the cost of production.

Another example of why a food organism might be modified is to make the final product more resilient to the means of distribution, such as what is seen with tomatoes being genetically modified to have more resilient skins, so they can be grown, harvested and distributed in mass. Many think of these types of modifications as positive, for the development of sustainable food growth, to feed a growing population, more efficiently and effectively. In many ways the positive aspects of this trend are good, and yet genetically modified plants and foods also create potential threats. Some examples of this are plants that if left on their own can overcome natural and indigenous plants, such as are seen with grain crops that have resilient single rather than traditional natural bush like growth. As these plants overtake the grasses that grow in clumps, the protection for the soil changes, even outside of the agricultural area, and fires spread more rapidly. ("Give a Weed an" c1) Another example would be the modifications of plants to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cook, Guy. Genetically Modified Language: The Discourse of Arguments for GM Crops and Food. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Gaudet, Mary. "Without a Trace: Controversy Buzzes around the Mysterious Disappearance of Bees on Prince Edward Island." Alternatives Journal July 2005: 32.

"Give a Weed an Inch, it'll Take a Smile." The Register-Guard (Eugene, or) 12 June 2005: c1.
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Philosophy - Economic Ethics the

Words: 1476 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58863265

Further Consideration of the Issues:

Actually, Singer's use of the term absolute affluence is not perfectly analogous (because the corresponding analog to the conditions of absolute poverty are those of extravagant wealth not working class wealth), but the idea itself is still valid just the same. The point is simply that once human society in part of the world reached the point where even most of those considered "poor" receive adequate nutrition, shelter, and the most basic emergency medical care (etc.), a moral duty arises whereby helping the less fortunate should be more important than self-centered concerns about increasing one's wealth relative to others in the manner that different levels of affluence are defined in wealthier nations.

It is important that Singer acknowledges the difference between ideals that people should uphold and ideals that people must uphold, because it is likely impossible to establish a logical justification for compelled charity, regardless of the moral imperative.

In fact, U.S. law also recognizes that distinction as well. To use Singer's first example of the rescue of the drowning child, there is absolutely no legal duty to conduct any such rescue, provided that the non-rescuer is not related to or in charge of…… [Read More]

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Large Mammal Extinction Ice Age

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64916309

However, there simply does not seem to be sufficient evidence for the disease hypothesis. First, there has been no evidence of disease found. Next, even extremely virulent diseases, like the plague or West Nile Virus, do not have the kill rates necessary to cause the extinction of an entire species. In addition, one has to realize that the extinction of large mammals coincided with the extinction of other animals, like birds, marsupials, placentals, testudines, and crocodilians. It is unlikely that a disease would be lethal in such a wide-variety of animal populations, especially when it did not destroy all species of certain animal genus.

The final theory is that a meteor killed the large mammals. There is evidence that meteor impacts caused earlier extinctions like the Permian-Triassic extinction and the extinction of the dinosaurs. Meteor impacts can interfere with food sources, because the resulting dust in the air interferes with photosynthesis. Meteors may also indirectly cause acid rain. In addition, there is the slim possibility that impacts could cause large-scale immediate disasters, like fires or tsunamis. Meteors are strongly linked to the extinction of the dinosaurs, but no evidence of a sufficiently-large meteor supports impact as a cause of the…… [Read More]

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Blue Hotel the Majority of

Words: 1422 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26297873

Humanity has worth only when they struggle for survival. Otherwise they can be seen as no more than over bred lice. In terms of my own views, I have a somewhat more positive outlook. While it is true that overpopulation and disease are problems created by the carelessness of humanity, there are also many cases of charity and caring that places many human beings above the harsh perception as mere conceited lice who have survived a storm or two. The technological, economic, and humanitarian developments over only the last century shows the great potential of the human heart. While it is therefore certainly not to be denied that humanity has inherent evils, there are also many contrasting cases of excellence that should not be overlooked. As a member of the human race, I prefer to concentrate on the excellence in others and myself. I find that this makes life far easier than a more negative view. I do believe that Crane is trying to be realistic in his outlook. However, realism is not always conducive to focused action.

The Swede demonstrates more humanity when he reaches the town and enters a bar. Apparently tired of isolation, the Swede attempts some…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Crane, Stephen. "The Blue Hotel." The Electronic Text Center, Virginia University. http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/CraBlue.html
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Spaying and Neutering Pets Spaying

Words: 1823 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53653292

Although some owners feel bad taking away the 'primal male instinct' of their male dogs through neutering, it is this sort of behavior that often causes animals to end up in shelters in the first place, as owners become afraid of aggressive animals, and eventually cannot contain them. (SPAY USA, 2005)

Additionally, aggressive strays spread rabies, disease, and are virtually impossible to find homes for. Even if one has money to burn in caring for an animal, remember that the capture, impoundment and eventual destruction of unwanted animals costs taxpayers and private humanitarian agencies over a billion dollars each year. As a potential source of rabies and other less serious diseases, these stray animals are, if nothing else a public health hazard. (the American Veterinary Medical Association, quoted on SPAY USA Website)

The fate of the animal population rests in responsible pet owner's hands. Dogs and cats cannot chose to exercise socially responsible lifestyles in a world that is human rather than animal created. Thus pet owners must do it for them. By spaying or neutering their animals, pet owners create better companions, healthier lifestyles for themselves, better pet and human relationships, better and safer communities, and fewer unwanted strays.… [Read More]

Works Cited

Articles available for print by clicking on links below)

Benefits of Spaying/Neutering." (2005) SPAY USA Official Website. Retrieved 14 Feb 2005 at http://www.spayusa.org/main_directory/02-facts_and_education/benefits_sn.html

Meenen, Kimberly (2001) "Facts about Spaying and Neutering Pets Outweigh Myths University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine Website. Retrieved 14 Feb 2005 at http://www.inkabijou.co.uk/spay.htm

Myths and Facts about Spaying and Neutering" Humane Society of America Official Website. Retrieved 14 Feb 2005 at http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/myths_and_facts_about_spaying_and_neutering.html
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Nietzsche and Nihilism Nihilism Was the Term

Words: 2070 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8952586

Nietzsche and Nihilism

"Nihilism" was the term used by Friederich Nietzsche to describe what he considered the devaluation of the highest values posited by the ascetic ideal. The age in which he lived was viewed by the German philosopher as one of passive nihilism, which he defined as the unawareness of the fact that the religious and philosophical absolutes had dissolved in the emergence of the 19th century Positivism. Since traditional morality collapsed, along with its metaphysical and theological foundations, the only thing that remained was a sense of meaningless and purposelessness.

The triumph of meaninglessness coincides with the triumph of nihilism, under the slogan "God is dead." Nietzsche believed that people would start seeking absoluteness in nationalism, just as they previously did it in philosophy and religion, a conception which later lead to catastrophically consequences.

Nihilism is most often associated with Nietzsche. The philosopher felt that there is no objective order or structure in the world except the subjective ones each person gives it. Consequently, the nihilist ends up discovering that all values are baseless and that reason is powerless. "Every belief, every considering something-true is necessarily false because there is simply no true world," Nietzsche writes in his…… [Read More]

Reference:

1. Elbe, S, European Nihilism and Annihilation in the Twentieth Century. Totalitarian Movements & Political Religions, Winter2000, Vol. 1 Issue 3, p43

2.Ramos, A., Triumph of the will. Review of Politics, Winter96, Vol. 58 Issue 1, p181

3. Berges, S. Plato's Defence of Justice:Socrates contra Nietzsche University of Leeds www.bilkent.edu.tr/~berges/phd.htm

4. Encyclopedia Briatannica 1997 edition -- Articles on Nietzsche
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How Fashion Affects the Way We Speak

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97178756

controversy regarding cats and dogs and their place in society at the moment, as there are animal lovers who go through great efforts to control their populations and make sure that they are not ignored and as there are individuals who feel that it is wrong to keep an animal as a pet because of the problems that it brings on. Society's attitudes toward dogs and cats vary on account of factors like cultural values and personal opinions. They range from individuals who would do everything in their power to protect these animals to persons who see nothing wrong with eating them.

The Western society largely perceives dogs and cats as animals that are an active part of this community and that need to be provided with a series of rights in order for the masses to gain a more complex understanding concerning the role these beings play. The bond between people and animals has come to be especially stronger during recent years as people acknowledged that pet are essential when considering the feelings that they induce in their owners and in others. While cats and dogs initially had the purpose of protecting the household from thieves and unwanted animals,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Anchel, Marjorie, "Overpopulation of Cats and Dogs: Causes, Effects, and Prevention: Proceedings of a Conference, New York City, September 11 & 12, 1987," (Fordham Univ Press, 1990)

Knight, Sara, and Herzog, Harold, "New Perspectives on Human-Animal Interactions: Theory, Policy and Research," (John Wiley & Sons, 01.09.2009)

"Hurricane Katrina Animal Rescue: IFAW Saves Dogs and Cats," Retrieved November 17, 2012, from the IFAW Website:  http://www.ifaw.org/united-states/our-work/animal-rescue/hurricane-katrina-animal-rescue-ifaw-saves-dogs-and-cats
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Prisoners Do Have Some Rights it Is

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60493154

prisoners do have some rights, it is worth noting that their rights are extremely circumscribed, particularly when contrasted with that of the average citizen who is not incarcerated. The most salient right that prisoners have is afforded by the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution, which strictly forbids cruel and unusual punishment (Dolovich, 2009, p. 881). As such, prisoners are entitled to a minimum standard of living. However, in several prisons it is extremely difficult to enforce this particular amendment, largely due to the fact that much of what takes place in a prison setting is well beyond the reach of the public's discernment.

Another highly important right that prisoners have is their right to due process, which is directly related to their ability to appeal decisions and to access less restrictive forms of punishment, such as parole. Due process means that prisoners are entitled to the same rights -- as pertaining to those two aforementioned things, parole and appeals, as other individuals. It is a valuable instance in which prisoners have the same rights as other citizens .

Other circumscribed rights that prisoners have pertain to practice religion and to practice free speech. Again, it is difficult to…… [Read More]

References

Dolovich, S. (2009). "Cruelty, prison conditions, and the eighth amendment." New York University Law Review. 84 (4): 881-979.

Liptak, A. (2011). "Justices, 5-4, tell California to cut prison population." The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/24/us/24scotus.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
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Pros and Cons Abortion

Words: 1260 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20744352

Abortion remains a political issue, in spite of the fact the Supreme Court decision in 1973 that ensured the rights of women to terminate an unwanted pregnancy. Roe v. Wade reflects core Constitutional principles, ranging from the right to privacy invoked by the Supreme Court justices in the decision, to the tradition of separating matters of Church and State in American politics.

When it comes to abortion, there are essentially no real pros and cons; the debate mainly centers on whether or not abortion should be legal or not. Abortion is not something that women look forward to, but it is a procedure that ensures that unwanted children are not brought into the world unnecessarily. Abortion rights are essentially the rights of an individual to not carry an unwanted child to term. No one is "pro" abortion, but someone may be "pro" choice.

An abortion is a procedure to terminate an unwanted pregnancy; on that basic level there should be no moral or ethical debate. Anti-abortion activists usually claim that abortion is a form of homicide based on the assumption that the fetus is a human being with rights. This claim is based on intuition, emotion, and religious doctrine, rather…… [Read More]

References

Ahman, E. & Shah, I. (2007). Unsafe abortion. WHO Document number 323036. Retrieved:  http://www.popline.org/node/563377 

Balkin, J.M. (2007). Abortion and original meaning. Constitutional Commentary 24(291).

Cockrill, K. & Weitz, T.A. (2010). Abortion patients' perceptions of abortion regulation. Women's Health Issues 20(1): 12-19.

Donohue, J. & Levitt, S.D. (2001). The impact of legal abortion on crime. Quarterly Journal of Economics CVXI (2).
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Death Penalty Costs

Words: 2265 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6087793

Enforce the Death Penalty for Murders Over a Life Sentence

Cover Letter

This paper addresses the question: Is it more cost effective to enforce the death penalty for murders over a life sentence? Several topics will be covered such as why it could be cost effective and why it has not been cost effective. Several articles point to the need for prisons to carry out death penalties in order for death penalty sentencing to be cost effective. The introduction will highlight why the death penalty has been regulated more so than enforced.

Other articles will also show how death penalty sentencing can be used a means of creating persuasive plea bargains as criminals do not want to experience death row. Another article states how expensive maintenance of death row inmates are vs. inmates who received life sentences. It also shows how many inmates were killed on death row vs. The ones that were not. Shockingly, very few executions occurred on death row in the state of California. In fact, most of the prisoners on death row died of old age or other circumstances before they were executed.

Introduction/Problem Statement

Many times people have pondered over whether or not it was…… [Read More]

References

Alarcon, A.L., & Mitchell, P.M. (2012). Costs of Capital Punishment in California: Will Voters Choose Reform This November. Loy L.A.L. Rev., 46, 221. Retrieved from http://heinonline.org/HOL/LandingPage?handle=hein.journals/lla46&div=9&id=&page=

Ehrhard-Dietzel, S. (2012). The Use of Life and Death as Tools in Plea Bargaining. Criminal Justice Review, 37(1), 89. Retrieved from http://cjr.sagepub.com/content/37/1/89.short

Liebman, J.S., & Clarke, P. (2011). Minority Practice, Majority's Burden: The Death Penalty Today. Ohio St. J. Crim. L, 9, 255. Retrieved from http://heinonline.org/HOL/LandingPage?handle=hein.journals/osjcl9&div=14&id=&page=

Nagin, D.S. (2013). Deterrence: A Review of the Evidence by a Criminologist for Economists.Annual Review of Economics, 5, 83. Retrieved from http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-economics-072412-131310
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The Globalization Phenomenon

Words: 1170 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34009438

The phenomenon of globalization is a very controversial one, as some people are against it despite the fact that they are aware that the process is unavoidable. From the early ages people have felt the need to socialize and civilizations have been absorbed into one another. The process of globalization has both advantages and disadvantages, but, people are dedicated to making it happen regardless to the consequences that their actions have.
The human race started building civilization several millennia ago, and, from there on, humans have become addicted to it. It is in the human nature to constantly seek for advancement and to interact with others. One of the main disadvantages that civilization poses, however, is that is provides better grounds for evil to develop. Crimes are taken to a whole new level in the modern world. Another disadvantage that globalization brings is the fact that vices are also advancing and people are enslaving themselves through the deviant acts that they perform.
Of course, one can observe the benefits that globalization has brought when looking at the technological and medical advancements that have been done. Education is a primary benefit brought by globalization. Thousands of years of interacting between numerous…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Hopkins, A.G. "Globalization in World History" .
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[1] Hopkins, A.G. "Globalization in World History" .
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History of the Future Strathern

Words: 3036 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34895497

This became an age in which visionary thinkers said, "see, we told you so," and were able to garner additional support from not only the activist type, but the regular citizen.

Talking Points

Malthusian dynamics (overpopulation and resource allocation) became a focus of futurists. Marshall McLuhan, for one, combined futuristic predictions with analysis of global media and advertising trends.

Noam Chomsky was revolutionizing the idea of linguistics as a way to view our innate cultural mechanisms.

Science fiction writers like Clarke, Asimov, and Lem pushed the boundaries of science as far as possible -- insisting that the reader ask very difficult questions about what it truly means to be human, what it truly means to have conservatorship of a planet, and whether or not we have the wisdom to maintain life on earth as we know it.

Chapter 6 -- Fast Forward

Arthur C. Clarke made an interesting remark about interaction with alien technology. He noted that "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." This rather defines a group of advanced futurists in the 1960s through the 1980s who, like Clarke, saw the future as one in which humans would move away from Mother Earth and begin to explore…… [Read More]

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Criminal Justice and Corrections Issues

Words: 570 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88116890



What are the differences between jails and prisons?

Generally, jails are maintained by local municipalities and by state authorities and they are mainly intended to house criminals charged with crimes pending trial (Schmalleger, 2009). Jails are also used to incarcerate inmates convicted of misdemeanors and any other crimes whose sentences are less than a year. Meanwhile, prisons are maintained by states and by the federal government and are generally used to incarcerate inmates convicted of more serious crimes (i.e. felonies) who are serving sentences longer than a year. Federal prisons house inmates convicted on federal charges (Schmalleger, 2009).

Is the current jail/prison system effective? Why or why not?

In many respects the current jail/prison system is not particularly effective. For one thing, many have argued that members of racial minorities and those from economically disadvantaged backgrounds are much more likely to serve criminal sentences than members of non-minority groups and those from better economic circumstances (Healey, 2009; Schmalleger, 2009). Another problem with the current corrections approach is that it often provides a breeding ground for criminals because they use the opportunity to collaborate with other more experienced criminals to perfect their criminal skills. There are also significant problems caused by…… [Read More]

References

Healey, J.F. (2009). Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class: The Sociology of Group

Conflict and Change. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge.

Schmalleger, F. (2009). Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st

Century. Hoboken, NJ: Prentice Hall.
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Setting in Jonathon Swift's a

Words: 858 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24650787

(2179)

Here we have another example of how Swift uses his setting as a perfect weapon for his argument. Not all people are respected and soome are treated badly. These statements are morbid but they are true and that is why this essay succeeds.

Swift's satire has a greter impact because he opens his argument up for debate. Any argument is allowable as long as it is "equally innocent, cheap, easy, and effectual" (2180). Furthermore, he writes to anyone that believes they have a better solution to the problems to:

ask the parents of these mortals, whether they would not at this day think it a great happiness to have been sold for food at a year old, in the manner I prescribe, and thereby have avoided such a perpetual scene of misfortunes, as they have since gone through, by the oppression of landlords, the impossibility of paying rent without money or trade, the want of common sustenance, with neither house nor clothes to cover them from the inclemencies of the weather, and the most inevitable prospect of intailing the like, or greater miseries, upon their breed for ever. (2180)

Here we see a unique blend of satire and compassion.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Swift, Jonathan. "Modest Proposal." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol. II. Abrams, H. H, etal, eds. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986.
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Origins of the 3rd World

Words: 1554 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28615426

This adds to the understanding of development of the Third World- which is shown in reality as a result of a combination of factors and not just climate changes or other 'natural' causes.

Central to the argument in the article by Davis is the view the British colonial empire in the 1800s, as the dominant economic power, influenced and affected other less-developed countries negatively and resulted ion the creation of the Third World. As the author states, the logic of Capitalism and the susceptibility of colonized nations led to the origins of the present division between the developed and less-developed countries. There is a certain moral criticism of these events in the Davis' article. "The route to this "new world order" is thus paved with the bodies of the poor" (Davis 29).

While there are of course many other aspects and answers to the question of the origins of the Third World, as well as many arguments that run counter to the central thesis of this paper, Davis does succeed in making a compelling and cogent case for his view of the modern beginnings of the separation of rich and poor countries in the world. As such, the article is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Davis M. Late Victorian Holocausts: El Nino Famines and the Making of the Third World. Verso: London and New York. 2001.
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Patronage System in Renaissance England

Words: 2669 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15643671

Yet, I suggest that while Anne Clifford succeeded in life -- she was at last able to join the fellowship at Penshurst and through long life and tenacity to reclaim her lands -- Aemilia Lanyer succeeds in an imaginative vision: out of marginality, out 'of absence, darkness..., things which are not,' indeed out of weakness, Lanyer creates in Salve Deus a remarkable community of strength, present more powerfully and enduringly in her fiction than in life itself. (Pebworth and Summers 46)

This fictionalization of such a "remarkable community" is one aspect of the rigors of life during this period in history that might escape a casual reader today, but the fact that Lanyer was able to craft such a work during such an otherwise bleak era suggests that she did in fact have some compelling reasons beyond money and fame that drove her work.

John Milton's masque "Comus." Because Europe was faced with a population boom, land was in short supply and food was scarce, chastity it would seem would be perceived as an increasingly valuable social trait. Likewise, it would be reasonable to posit that premarital sex was socially acceptable as long as no one knew, no issue resulted,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Briggs, Julia. This Stage-Play World: Texts and Contexts, 1580-1625. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Hall, Kim F. Things of Darkness: Economies of Race and Gender in Early Modern England. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1995.

Haselkorn, Anne M. And Betty S. Travitsky. The Renaissance Englishwoman in Print: Counterbalancing the Canon. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 1990.

Hunter, William B., Jr. Milton's Comus: Family Piece. Troy, NY: Whitston Publishing Company, 1983.
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Child Policy in China It

Words: 1923 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37028849

Advanced technology played a big role in infanticide as it allowed couples to check the gender of the child before it was born. Ultrasounds helped couples check the sex of their child and allow them to make a decision on abortion easier. Infanticide managed to unbalance the sex ratio in china as there were far too many males and not so many females. Women do not have a big role to play in determining the gender of their children as the husbands are the ones who make the decisions. There have been cases where a husband has beaten his wife to abort her child. Then are cases where the wife has to go into hiding so that people won't be able to know if she is pregnant. This helps a lot if they are expecting a girl and they need to abort it. There have been a lot of families who were unable to kill their daughters which resulted in them being sent to orphanages. Hundreds of thousands of girls have been adopted by people over the last 20 years. The social pressure of having one child has had a bad effect on parents and forced them to abandon their…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Greenhalgh, Susan. June 2003. "Science, Modernity, and the Making of China's One-Child Policy," Population and Development Review 29-Page.165

Hardee, Karen. (2004) Family Planning and Women's Lives in Rural China, International Family Planning Perspectives. Volume: 30 Issue

Johnson, Kay Ann. (2004)Wanting a Daughter, Needing a Son. Yeong and Yeong Book Company

Faison, Seth. (2004) South of the Clouds: exploring the hidden realms of China, St. Martin's Press
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Human Population in El Paso Population Explosion

Words: 1533 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10120818

Human Population in El Paso

Population Explosion in El Paso and Juarez

Globalization is well in full force. The increasing population explosions in El Paso and Juarez Mexico show that international business and economic developments are encouraging people from the interior of Mexico to flood into border towns and eventually into the United States. What has resulted, however, is chaos partly because the two towns do not have proper legislation or budgeting to deal collaboratively on this shared population problem.

The population of both towns is exceeding their capabilities. According to the research, "The Juarez-El Paso population of 2 million makes up the largest border community anywhere in the world, expanding more than 5% a year," (Padgett 2001 p 1). This growth is unmatched in other American and Mexican cities. The two cities together had a population of two million in 2000 (Casey 2006). That number is estimated to explode to a population of 6 million by 2025 (Casey 2006). Yet, the two cities are not equipped to handle such a population explosion, and need future direction in order to protect their citizens' health and businesses.

There are a wide variety of nonliving and living factors that contribute to or…… [Read More]

References

Associated Press. (2011). Cuidad Juarez residents flee Mexico's 'dying city.' Fox News. Web. http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/01/02/ciudad-juarez-residents-flee-mexicos-dying-city/

Casey, Maureen. (2006). Juarez / El Paso selected facts. Labor-Religion Coalition. Web. http://www.labor-religion.org/ip-elpaso-juarez-facts.htm

Cave, Damien. (2011). Bridging a gap between fear and peace. New York Times. Web. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/15/world/americas/15juarez.html

Padgett, Tim. (2001). Two countries, one city: El Paso and Juarez only seem separate. TIME Magazine. Web.
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Prison Overcrowding Empirical Analysis of

Words: 6511 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57249199



This view stresses a sociological approach to crime, suggesting that the behavior of criminals is more easily adapted and changed when law enforcement agents understand the circumstances and immediate environment an offender lives in that may contribute to offensive behaviors, and to one's behavioral characteristics.

Literature Review

The purpose of the preliminary literature presented is to provide an overview of the historical foundations leading to prison overcrowding, an exploration of the populations of people incarcerated and empirical evidence that provides an explanation for overcrowding. By examining this evidence the researcher will find support for the hypothesis presented, develop appropriate research questions and present insight into the significance and importance of the study topic selected for this research. The preliminary research review will include an overview of texts, primary and secondary research articles and studies that explore prison overcrowding, criminal behavior and law enforcement policies and procedures during the last three decades. Much of the research presented focuses on empirical evidenced gathered between the 1980s through the present. The results of this literature review will contribute to the meaning and impact of the primary research study proposed by the author.

History Incarceration and Prison Overcrowding

Alexander (1998) provides some history about…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, Elizabeth. A troubling response to overcrowded prisons. Civil Rights Journal,

Clark, R.V. & Homeal, R. "A revised classification of situational crime prevention techniques," in S.P. Lab (ed.), Crime Prevention at the Crossroads, Cincinnati: Anderson (1997): 17-27.

Gottfredson, Stephen D. & McConville, S. America's Correctional Crisis: Prison

Populations and Public Policy. New York: Greenwood Press, (1994).
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Overcrowding in Prisons

Words: 1976 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54169893

Prison Overcrowding

Arguably the most pressing issue facing the field of corrections today is the problem of prison overcrowding. Overcrowding negatively impacts nearly every aspect of running a corrections facility, and even exacerbates problems when inmates are eventually released (Specter, 2010). Overcrowded prisons increase the likelihood of violence against both inmates and corrections officers, and there is evidence tying overcrowding to higher rates of suicide and homicide (Davies, 2004, & Camp, Gaes, Langan, & Saylor, 2003). The problem has only gotten worse over the last few decades, and there is no evidence that policymakers or administrators have plans to do anything soon (Giertz & Nardulli, 1985, & Taggart, 1996). After examining the relevant literature concerning the history, scope, and reasons behind prison overcrowding, it becomes clear that the solution to overcrowding and its attendant costs must come in the form of administrative/institutional reform coupled with a serious reconsideration of the current legal and prison system, particularly in relation to the suitable treatment of non-violent offenders.

While overcrowding has likely afflicted prisons throughout history, the issue did not become a crisis until the 1980s, when a series of new laws, including many related to drug offenses, dramatically expanded the number of…… [Read More]

References

Camp, S.D., Gaes, G.G., Langan, N.P., & Saylor, W.G. (2003). The influence of prisons on inmate misconduct: A multilevel investigation*. Justice Quarterly: JQ, 20(3), 501-533.

Davies, R. (2004). Deaths in UK prisons are due to overcrowding, says report. The Lancet,

363(9406), 378-378.

Giertz, J.F., & Nardulli, P.F. (1985). Prison overcrowding. Public Choice (Pre-1986), 46(1),
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Tragedy of Commons and Clean

Words: 1848 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24574941



The solution that Hardin proposes is that of a coercive method; as always he gives a lucid example to support the point that he proposes. Hardin reminds the reader that society mutually agreed to make it illegal to rob banks, rather than appeal to the sense of responsibility to those who wish to rob banks as a means of deterring them. Bank robbers (real and potential) know that very immediate consequences await them, such as police chases which could end in injuries or fatalities, jail time and other comparable results. These consequences are real and immediate because they're reinforced by the state, the judicial system and by the police force. This form of coercion prevents more people from attempting to rob banks. Our natural resources of water need to be treated as though they're as valuable as banks filled with money. Dumping chemicals such as fertilizers, pharmaceuticals and personal care products into sources of water should be viewed as a felony by the state and judicial system and be enforced as such.

After the numerous Wall Street scandals caused major corporations to be instructed to stop the spread of greed and corruption within their organizations by praising and rewarding good…… [Read More]

References

Environmentalgraffitti, n.d. 7 Extinct Animals: Rare Photographs. [Online]

Available at: http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/featured/rare-photographs-

now-extinct-beasts/14727?image=2

Magnuson, M.L. et al., 2005. Responding to Water Contamination Threats. [Online]
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Peter Singer Explication of Peter Singer's Famine

Words: 936 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29548912

Peter Singer

Explication of Peter Singer's "Famine, Affluence, and Morality"

Peter Singer's objective in "Famine, Affluence, and Morality" is to raise activism in the general public with regard to ending famine and conditions of abject poverty. The focus of the article concerns the public's need to take greater action. His argument stems from his view that "At the individual level, people have, with very few exceptions, not responded to the situation in any significant way" (1). Thus, people have a moral obligation to assist those who are impoverished, and even those in remote locations should not be excluded from aid.

A main focus of Singer's article concerns moral utility, and exactly how much people are morally obligated to provide to those who are impoverished. Singer argues that there has traditionally been an overly severe distinction between duty and charity; people are quick to fulfill their duties, while charity is viewed as activities that are conducted at less frequent intervals and those that one is not required to perform. A person will go to work to perform their duty, but they will not donate even a paltry sum of money to refugees in Bengal. Singer notes that "The traditional distinction between…… [Read More]

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Dream City Oriented the Apparent Garbage Crisis

Words: 2515 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46508685

Dream City

Oriented

The apparent garbage crisis of overflowing landfills would help develop urban landscapes for the future city.

Establish an overlay district of employment to encourage high-income employment in strategic locations

I would like to see the city where health systems are integrated and sharing one regional headquarter.

The leaders must facilitate development programs that generate high-income jobs.

I must address my quest for an economically vital and people-friendly future city. The apparent garbage crisis of overflowing landfills would help develop urban landscapes for the future city. There are various ways in which trash could be transformed into treasure. Based on my understanding of the Clearwater's challenges and opportunities, coupled with the current economic conditions, I believe the below strategies will translate Clearwater into a new city of my desire.

Establish an overlay district of employment to encourage high-income employment in strategic locations: the future city will be a site for creating a regional employment center. There is always a heavy traffic of workers along the highway to south and north of the city. Similarly, it marks the entrance to the peninsula via Bay Boulevard Gulf. I would like to see the city where health systems are integrated and…… [Read More]

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Challenging the Beijing Consensus China Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Words: 24240 Length: 60 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17194104

Foreign Policy of China (Beijing consensus)

Structure of Chinese Foreign Policy

The "Chinese Model" of Investment

The "Beijing Consensus" as a Competing Framework

Operational Views

The U.S.-China (Beijing consensus) Trade Agreement and Beijing Consensus

Trading with the Enemy Act

Export Control Act.

Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act

Category B

Category C

The 1974 Trade Act.

The Operational Consequences of Chinese Foreign Policy

The World Views and China (Beijing consensus)

Expatriates

The Managerial Practices

Self Sufficiency of China (Beijing consensus)

China and western world: A comparison

The China (Beijing consensus)'s Policy of Trading Specialized Goods

Chapter 5

The versions of China (Beijing consensus)'s trade development

The China (Beijing consensus) Theory of Power Transition… [Read More]

References

Barnett, A.D. (1977). China (Beijing consensus) and the Major Powers in East Asia. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=34158088

Boorman, H.L., Eckstein, A., Mosely, P.E., & Schwartz, B. (1957). Moscow-Peking Axis: Strengths and Strains (1st ed.). New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=53424557

Sardesai, D.R. (1974). Chapter 6 India: A Balancer Power?. In Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power, Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.) (pp. 94-104). New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691923

Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.). (1974). Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power. New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691822
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Marihuana Should Be Legalized in the United States

Words: 961 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2113027

Legalize

Marijuana, also known as cannabis, is the most widely used illegal drug worldwide (Caulkins et al.). However, the legal status of marijuana is slowly changing. Uruguay recently became the first nation in the world to fully decriminalize and federally regulate marijuana. Several other countries in Western Europe have liberal laws related to marijuana that amount to practical decriminalization. The United States, which until fairly recently remained stuck to its "war on drugs" policy, has finally begun to understand that not only is marijuana safe, but it is also a valuable medical resource. Thus, several states in the union have started to allow for the prescription of cannabis for medical use. Given the fact that decriminalization also presents several net benefits to society including reducing prison overpopulation and reducing the stranglehold organized crime holds over some communities, a few states have begun to decriminalize the drug entirely. Colorado and Washington State became the first to decriminalize marijuana, and Alaska and Washington, D.C. followed soon thereafter. According to Becker, there are seven more states poised to legalize marijuana within their borders as well, including Massachusetts, California, Missouri, Hawaii, Maine, Nevada, and Arizona. The reasons why marijuana should be legalized at the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Becker, Sam. "7 States Ready to Legalize Marijuana." Politics Cheat Sheet. 28 Mar, 2015. Retrieved online: http://www.cheatsheet.com/politics/5-states-and-one-city-ready-to-legalize-marijuana.html/?a=viewall

Caulkins, Jonathan P., et al. Marijuana Legalization. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012.

Drug Policy Alliance. "Marijuana legalization and regulation." Retrieved online: http://www.drugpolicy.org/marijuana-legalization-and-regulation

Khatapoush, Shereen and Halifors, Denise. "Sending the Wrong Message.'" Journal of Drug Issues. Vol. 34, No. 4, pp. 751-770.
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Government Force Poor Women to

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97214889

(2, Watson)

Dr. Federoff has in the past been an advocate of widespread use of genetically modified foods, vehemently disagreeing with opponents on the issue: "We wouldn't think of going to our doctor and saying, 'Treat me the way doctors treated people in the 19th Century, and yet that's what we're demanding in food production."

Jonathon Porrit, one of Gordon Brown's leading green advisers, warned last year, "Population growth, plus economic growth, is putting the world under terrible pressure." He said that Britain has no choice but to drastically reduce its population so as to build a "sustainable" society. The trust of which Porritt is a part, Optimum Population Trust (OPT), released data last year suggesting UK population be cut to 30 million persons in favor of sustainability. The represents a fifty percent cut in the UK population. Whether or not an economic downturn has caused Porrit to rehash his ideas is unclear. (3, Leake) Other proponents of such programs cite the need for governments to supply unprepared parents with Food Stamps, Health Care, Child Care as a reason for limiting the amount of children poor people have.

Critics of such policies, however, cite lack of evidence for overpopulation, malpractice…… [Read More]

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Performance of the Middle East

Words: 8783 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76621532

(Jabal Omar Development Corporation 2010)

Kuwait

Since 2008, the real estate market in Kuwait has been continually declining. The reason why is because the economy was largely depending upon oil revenues. However, in 2010 the sector began witnessing an increase in prices. This is because of the Kuwaiti government was aggressively promoting the tourism industry. As developers are expecting a strong increase in foreign direct investment, due to the governments push to expand the sector. As a result, holiday and residential areas in Kuwait are continuing to boom. (Finkelstein)

In the housing industry, there are large numbers of shortages that are affecting prices. What has been happening is the residential sector has been facing restrictions over the last several years, surrounding building permits. As the government was slow to endorse them, which created a rush on new areas that were approved for development. At the same time, the government has placed various restrictions on property ownership. In this case, foreigners are prevented from owning any kind of property in the country. This is important because, it is showing how this restriction provides the ability to see substantial price increases. While simultaneously; making it challenging for investors to become involved in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alexandria Real Estate, 2010.

Egypt Property, 2010, Select Property. Available from: [19 Mar. 2011].

Egypt Real Estate Attracts Interest From Foreign Investors, 2010, New Investors. Available from: [19 Mar. 2011]

Jabal Omar Development Corporation, 2010